ABC Nabs ‘Woman Up’ Comedy From Zoe Lister-Jones, Liz Meriwether & Jason Winer As Put Pilot

ABC has given a put pilot commitment to Woman Up, a single camera comedy from Life in Pieces star Zoe Lister-Jones, New Girl creator Liz Meriwether, Jason Winer (Life in Pieces, Singe Parents). Life In Pieces producer 20th Century Fox TV, where Lister-…

ABC has given a put pilot commitment to Woman Up, a single camera comedy from Life in Pieces star Zoe Lister-Jones, New Girl creator Liz Meriwether, Jason Winer (Life in Pieces, Singe Parents). Life In Pieces producer 20th Century Fox TV, where Lister-Jones, Meriwether and Winer are under an overall deals, is the studio. Written by Lister-Jones, Woman Up is about two former teen moms who have worked their asses off to see their daughters all the way through high school…

Zoe Lister-Jones Comedy Scores Put Pilot Commitment at ABC

ABC has given a put pilot commitment to a single-camera comedy project that hails from Zoe Lister-Jones. Lister-Jones is known for her acting work, but will serve as the writer and executive producer on the project. It is titled “Woman Up” …

ABC has given a put pilot commitment to a single-camera comedy project that hails from Zoe Lister-Jones. Lister-Jones is known for her acting work, but will serve as the writer and executive producer on the project. It is titled “Woman Up” and follows two former teen moms who have worked their asses off to see their […]

Zoe Lister-Jones Joins Funny or Die’s Creative Production Company Gifted Youth

Gifted Youth, the Los Angeles-based commercial division of Funny or Die, has added Zoe Lister-Jones to its growing roster. The division is meant to help create content for television, the web, and mobile devices while also helping rising talents learn to hone their skills behind the camera. Lister-Jones joins a team that includes Jake Szymanski,… Read more »

Gifted Youth, the Los Angeles-based commercial division of Funny or Die, has added Zoe Lister-Jones to its growing roster. The division is meant to help create content for television, the web, and mobile devices while also helping rising talents learn to hone their skills behind the camera. Lister-Jones joins a team that includes Jake Szymanski,... Read more »

‘Band Aid’ Review: Zoe Lister-Jones and Adam Pally Channel Marital Discord with Three Chords

The history of pop music is littered with couples whose eventual marital rifts made their way into the music. (Where would Fleetwood Mac have been with two happy marriages?) In her directorial debut “Band Aid,” Zoe Lister-Jones flips the script (she’s also the screenwriter, incidentally), looking at a miserable husband and wife who decide to channel their arguments into songs.

And if misery is the motor for their songwriting, Anna (Lister-Jones) and Ben (Adam Pally) have enough material for several double albums. She’s a frustrated writer working days as an Uber driver, while he has given up on the visual arts for a go-nowhere gig creating corporate logos.

The elephant in the room is their sadness over a miscarriage — what they talk about instead is who’s going to do the dishes, a spat that these two somehow steer into a discussion of the Holocaust. Anna and Ben seem headed toward divorce, but at a friend’s kid’s birthday party, they pick up toy instruments and start singing their disputes, and a band is born.

Watch Video: ‘Band Aid’ Director Zoe Lister-Jones on the ‘Joyous’ Experience of an All-Female Crew

With the help of oddball neighbor Dave (Fred Armisen) — the more we learn about this eccentric, the more fascinatingly strange he becomes — and his drumming skills, the couple start turning their dysfunctional marital lemons into strangely catchy lemonade. (Lister-Jones also wrote all the songs with Kyle Forester.) But this marriage will need more than a hook to solve its deep problems.

“Band Aid” might sound gimmicky, but Lister-Jones keeps the emotions firmly rooted and the characters believably contextualized: Both Anna and Ben are the sort of free-floating semi-bohemians who would believably have an old electric guitar and bass tucked away in their garage. Their career ruts, their marital disputes and their underlying mutual love all rings true, making what could have been merely a wacky high-concept premise into a relationship’s genuine and deeply felt cry for help.

READ MORE

See Zoe Lister-Jones’s latest POWER MOVE.

PowerRank:

9210

I am unfamiliar with Lister-Jones’s previous work (she is best known for the sitcom “Life in Pieces”), but she’s a compelling screen presence, on top of her achievements as a writer-director; her close-ups register glib resistance and genuine vulnerability, often in rapid succession. Paired with Pally — so hilarious in the canceled-too-soon TV classic “Happy Endings” — the two actors make this couple’s highs and lows equally resonant.

Lister-Jones is also generous enough an auteur to allow for memorable moments from others, whether it’s hilarious bits from the likes of Retta (as Anna and Ben’s unlucky marriage counselor), Brooklyn Decker, and Jamie Chung; the escalating weirdness of Armisen (who was, of course, a seasoned indie-band drummer before he turned to acting and comedy); or a knockout dramatic scene between Pally and the great comedian Susie Essman as Ben’s mother, who provides some invaluable advice.

Also Read: Fred Armisen Showed Up at the Emmys in a Hearse

“Band Aid” also manages to be a great-looking film for what was no doubt a fairly small budget; cinematographer Hillary Spera (“After Tiller”) shoots Los Angeles in an intuitive way that’s neither overly glossy nor distractingly stylized. One of the movie’s selling points is that it’s the first feature film to employ an all-female crew; that we had to wait until 2017 for this milestone fairly boggles the mind, but now that this ceiling has been shattered, long may this practice continue.

Don’t expect couples therapy classes to open up at your local School of Rock, but do enjoy this movie’s exploration of solving discord with three chords.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Wonder Woman’ Powers to $11 Million at Thursday Box Office

Gender Bias Goes Indie: Only 25 Percent of Films at Major Festivals Had Female Director, Study Finds

Bill Hader, Fred Armisen Reveal One Film They Won’t Mock on “Documentary Now”

‘Confirmation’s’ Zoe Lister-Jones Says Women Are Sexually Harassed ‘Regularly’

The history of pop music is littered with couples whose eventual marital rifts made their way into the music. (Where would Fleetwood Mac have been with two happy marriages?) In her directorial debut “Band Aid,” Zoe Lister-Jones flips the script (she’s also the screenwriter, incidentally), looking at a miserable husband and wife who decide to channel their arguments into songs.

And if misery is the motor for their songwriting, Anna (Lister-Jones) and Ben (Adam Pally) have enough material for several double albums. She’s a frustrated writer working days as an Uber driver, while he has given up on the visual arts for a go-nowhere gig creating corporate logos.

The elephant in the room is their sadness over a miscarriage — what they talk about instead is who’s going to do the dishes, a spat that these two somehow steer into a discussion of the Holocaust. Anna and Ben seem headed toward divorce, but at a friend’s kid’s birthday party, they pick up toy instruments and start singing their disputes, and a band is born.

With the help of oddball neighbor Dave (Fred Armisen) — the more we learn about this eccentric, the more fascinatingly strange he becomes — and his drumming skills, the couple start turning their dysfunctional marital lemons into strangely catchy lemonade. (Lister-Jones also wrote all the songs with Kyle Forester.) But this marriage will need more than a hook to solve its deep problems.

“Band Aid” might sound gimmicky, but Lister-Jones keeps the emotions firmly rooted and the characters believably contextualized: Both Anna and Ben are the sort of free-floating semi-bohemians who would believably have an old electric guitar and bass tucked away in their garage. Their career ruts, their marital disputes and their underlying mutual love all rings true, making what could have been merely a wacky high-concept premise into a relationship’s genuine and deeply felt cry for help.

READ MORE

See Zoe Lister-Jones's latest POWER MOVE.

PowerRank:

9210

I am unfamiliar with Lister-Jones’s previous work (she is best known for the sitcom “Life in Pieces”), but she’s a compelling screen presence, on top of her achievements as a writer-director; her close-ups register glib resistance and genuine vulnerability, often in rapid succession. Paired with Pally — so hilarious in the canceled-too-soon TV classic “Happy Endings” — the two actors make this couple’s highs and lows equally resonant.

Lister-Jones is also generous enough an auteur to allow for memorable moments from others, whether it’s hilarious bits from the likes of Retta (as Anna and Ben’s unlucky marriage counselor), Brooklyn Decker, and Jamie Chung; the escalating weirdness of Armisen (who was, of course, a seasoned indie-band drummer before he turned to acting and comedy); or a knockout dramatic scene between Pally and the great comedian Susie Essman as Ben’s mother, who provides some invaluable advice.

“Band Aid” also manages to be a great-looking film for what was no doubt a fairly small budget; cinematographer Hillary Spera (“After Tiller”) shoots Los Angeles in an intuitive way that’s neither overly glossy nor distractingly stylized. One of the movie’s selling points is that it’s the first feature film to employ an all-female crew; that we had to wait until 2017 for this milestone fairly boggles the mind, but now that this ceiling has been shattered, long may this practice continue.

Don’t expect couples therapy classes to open up at your local School of Rock, but do enjoy this movie’s exploration of solving discord with three chords.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Wonder Woman' Powers to $11 Million at Thursday Box Office

Gender Bias Goes Indie: Only 25 Percent of Films at Major Festivals Had Female Director, Study Finds

Bill Hader, Fred Armisen Reveal One Film They Won't Mock on "Documentary Now"

'Confirmation's' Zoe Lister-Jones Says Women Are Sexually Harassed 'Regularly'

Women Making Movies: ‘Band Aid’ Filmmaker Zoe Lister-Jones Explains How to Employ an All-Female Crew (And Why It Works)

For her directorial debut, the filmmaker tried something radical: employing an all-female crew for her fun and fresh feature.

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

Long-time actress, writer, and producer Zoe Lister-Jones had a big idea when she decided to move behind the camera to direct her first film: she wanted an all-female crew to assist her. On her directorial debut, “Band Aid,” Lister-Jones was joined on set by producer Natalia Anderson, director of photography Hilary Spera, and a team that included female art directors, camera operators, electricians, sound editors, and many more. It was a revolutionary idea that the filmmaker found essential to execute, if only to prove that such a move was indeed possible.

While the lack of female filmmakers working in the industry has become a firebrand topic over the past couple of years, diversity is also severely lacking in other areas of the crew. The Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University’s latest Celluloid Ceiling study reported that gender representation in professions like editing and sound design is still wildly skewed towards men. The 2016 study found that women comprised 17% of all editors working on the top 250 films of 2016 and just 5% of all cinematographers on those same films were women. Of that same sample, 3% of composers were women, along with 8% of supervising sound editors and 4% of sound designers.

READ MORE: ‘Band Aid’ Review: Zoe Lister-Jones And Adam Pally Rock Their Marriage Back To Life In a Sincere Music Comedy

But Lister-Jones didn’t require numbers, because she had already seen the under-representation of women firsthand during the course of her career. While she was heartened by the uptick in conversation around the topic, she was also eager to those ideas into action. “Nothing was changing,” she said in a recent interview. “It felt like, in order to effect change, I needed to sort of subvert the paradigm entirely.”

And that’s exactly what she did. Here’s how she did it (and why it worked so well).

1. Start Planning Early

The daughter of video artist Ardele Lister and photographer and media artist Bill Jones has been working in entertainment since she was kid — amusingly, her first on-screen credit is from when she was just three and starred in her mother’s short “Zoe’s Car” — and she’s always been serious about her craft, graduating with honors from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and studying at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London to boot. She committed to the idea of an all-female working environment early on.

“I was given this assignment to start a business in my elementary school, and the business that I came up with was an all-female construction company called Big Women. The tagline was ‘There’s No Job to Big for Big Women,'” Lister-Jones said with a laugh. That was just the spark of what would become a game-changing decision, decades later.

“I don’t really have a moment where I remember making that decision,” she said. “For some reason, it lived in me for a really long time, that this was something that I want to create in this world: A place where women, in a collective, get to do work that has otherwise been sort of difficult for them to break into.”

Lister-Jones was confident that her dream of an all-female crew could be reality, having already seen examples of boundary-busting on other projects. She pointed to her work on the TV movie “Confirmation,” a project that boasted a female cinematographer and a first assistant director, in addition to a number of other female crew members.

“Band Aid”

“There are so many misconceptions that continue to create roadblocks in terms of creating more opportunities for women on film and TV crews,” Lister-Jones said. “And I had seen so many examples of those misconceptions being turned on their heads, and so I just thought, ‘Yeah, let’s just go for it, whole hog!'”

2. Go After Every Possibility

In gathering her crew, Lister-Jones cast a wide net and allowed herself a few months to find the right people for the job at hand, chasing down every avenue in the process.

“I worked with my producer Natalia Anderson, just reaching out to friends and friends of friends in the industry, getting recommendations,” Lister-Jones said. “Once we started hiring our department heads, it was about their recommendations.”

Women began to recommend other women, a sentiment that was reflected when Lister-Jones pursued other employment options, too. The filmmaker also looked to female-centric industry resources, like Women Making Films (WMF) and the Film Fatales, a widespread collective of female filmmakers who have chapters around the world, who had a number of recommendations for her. She even went as grassroots as posting on Facebook when she was in need of a woman for a specific job.

“There is a growing community of women who prove to be very helpful resources in hiring female crews,” she said.

3. Embrace the Good Vibes

“Band Aid” follows a long-time couple (Lister-Jones and Adam Pally) who decide to work out their issues by forming a rock band in their garage dedicated to literally singing out their problems. It’s a fun, fresh idea, but it’s also one that is rife with dramatic possibilities and major revelations. It’s also an emotional film, and Lister-Jones found that having an all-female crew allowed them to tap into those spaces with a different kind of ease.

“There was definitely a large sense of intimacy on set, and I think that our crew definitely lent to that energy,” she said. “It was a very supportive and nurturing and patient vibe.”

Lister-Jones pointed to the film’s sex scenes as a barometer for the energy on set, one she had never experienced before.

“The sex scenes were really clear indicators of how different the energy was on set,” she said. “As an actress, I think even when you’re not in a sex scene, just as a woman, you’re very aware of your objectification on a day-to-day basis. I think that’s obviously magnified when you’re naked and simulating sex in front of a group of men. To be surrounded by women [while doing it], it was just like night and day.”

She’s clear, however, that her desire to have an all-female crew isn’t reflective of bad experiences she’s had with male-dominated ones, however. It was about finding — and embracing — the right crew and vibe for the project.

“It has nothing to do with the intentions of the people watching,” she said. “I’m not saying that male crew members are predatory in those instances, but I think it’s just the nature of what we as women are raised feeling and continue to feel. That male gaze is very powerful. It just was so freeing to feel that protected.”

The gamble paid off: the film premiered at Sundance in January, where it was quickly snapped up by IFC Films and Sony Pictures Worldwide for a summer release.

4. Enlist Male Allies

There were, of course, a handful of men directly involved in the film’s creation — including Lister-Jones’ own husband, executive producer Daryl Wein, with whom she has frequently worked — and QC Entertainment partners and producers Edward H. Hamm Jr., Raymond Mansfield, Shaun Redick, and Sean McKittrick, none of whom balked at the filmmaker’s request. And that wasn’t even the half of it.

“One of the earliest conversations we had was that they wouldn’t be allowed on set,” Lister-Jones said. “Because I wanted to be really clear about boundaries, in terms of creating an environment where women were calling every shot. I think even with the most wonderful and caring and sensitive executive producers at the monitor, it would inevitably shift the dynamic. They were so respectful and so excited about this idea, it was really refreshing.”

“Band Aid”

Co-star Pally also benefitted immensely from the all-female crew. Lister-Jones fondly remembered shooting a particularly emotionally raw scene with the actor, an experience that was bolstered by a crew that fell totally silent during filming, allowing the actor the space and safety to dive deeply into the material. “It was this incredible reverence to what they understood Adam had to do in that moment,” she said.

5. Keep Pushing Forward

Lister-Jones is pragmatic about the future of all-female crews or even female-dominated crews, though she’s continuing to push forward on her own end. She recently filmed a music video for a song from the film’s band, The Dirty Dishes, and she again employed an all-female crew for the gig, including some returning members and some new faces.

READ MORE: IFC Films and Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquire Sundance Comedy ‘Band Aid’

“I think what’s exciting to see is that it just keeps getting easier to do,” she said. “Now, it just feels like the norm for a lot of us.”

She’s also hopeful that what she was able to accomplish on “Band Aid” will inspire others to try something similar, or at least to try something different than their usual stuff.

“The reality is still very bleak, but I hope more people are inspired to do so and inspired to sort of step outside their comfort zones in terms of their hiring practices and the patterns that can so easily fall into in terms of hiring people that they know,” Lister-Jones said. “I think all of those things need to be challenged a little more vigilantly, so that more change can be effected.”

“Band Aid” opens in theaters on June 2 and on VOD on June 9. Check out the trailer below.

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Zoe Lister-Jones’ Sundance Pic ‘Band Aid’ Acquired By IFC Films & Sony Worldwide

IFC Films has acquired North American rights to Band Aid, the debut feature from Zoe Lister-Jones that just played in competition at the Sundance Film Festival. Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions meanwhile snagged rights outside of North America as part of the pickup.
Jones wrote, helmed and stars with Adam Pally in the film, about a feuding married couple whose shared love of music makes for unconventional therapy, transforming their fights into song and ultimately a…

IFC Films has acquired North American rights to Band Aid, the debut feature from Zoe Lister-Jones that just played in competition at the Sundance Film Festival. Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions meanwhile snagged rights outside of North America as part of the pickup. Jones wrote, helmed and stars with Adam Pally in the film, about a feuding married couple whose shared love of music makes for unconventional therapy, transforming their fights into song and ultimately a…

Zoe Lister-Jones Comedy ‘Band Aid’ Picked Up by IFC Films

Zoe Lister-Jones’ comedy “Band Aid” has been acquired by IFC Films following its premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, it was announced Friday.

Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions picked up the rights to the film outside of North America. “Band Aid” marks the directorial debut of the “New Girl” and “Life in Pieces” star. It had its world premiere in the U.S. Dramatic Competition section at Sundance.

“Band Aid” stars Lister-Jones and Adam Pally as a feuding married couple, whose shared love for music acts as a form of unconventional therapy. Fred Armisen also stars.

See Video: ‘Band Aid’ Director Zoe Lister-Jones on the ‘Joyous’ Experience of an All-Female Crew

“I am extremely proud of this film,” said Lister-Jones. “IFC Films & SPWA’s enthusiasm and passion for the project is beyond exciting, and I am delighted to work with them to bring ‘Band Aid’ to a wider audience.”

The film was produced by Lister-Jones under her production banner Mister Lister Films, with producer Natalia Anderson and executive producer Daryl Wein. It was financed by QC Entertainment with QC’s Ted Hamm, Sean McKittrick, Ray Mansfield, and Shaun Redick serving as executive producers.

Also Read: Sundance Hit ‘Beach Rats’ Has a #BuryYourGays Problem – But It’s Not Backing Down

“Everyone at IFC Films is thrilled to be working again with the immensely talented Zoe Lister-Jones after our first collaboration on ‘Breaking Upwards,’” said Jonathan Sehring and Lisa Schwartz, co-presidents of Sundance Selects/IFC Films. “‘Band Aid’ is an incredibly impressive directorial debut feature — it is not only funny but also incredibly smart and inventive, proving Zoe is a true quadruple-threat as an actress, filmmaker, writer and singer-songwriter.”

WME Global and QC Entertainment negotiated the deal.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance Sales Market: Netflix, Amazon Returned With Deep Pockets

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Neon Acquires Sundance Award Winner ‘Beach Rats’

Zoe Lister-Jones’ comedy “Band Aid” has been acquired by IFC Films following its premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, it was announced Friday.

Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions picked up the rights to the film outside of North America. “Band Aid” marks the directorial debut of the “New Girl” and “Life in Pieces” star. It had its world premiere in the U.S. Dramatic Competition section at Sundance.

“Band Aid” stars Lister-Jones and Adam Pally as a feuding married couple, whose shared love for music acts as a form of unconventional therapy. Fred Armisen also stars.

“I am extremely proud of this film,” said Lister-Jones. “IFC Films & SPWA’s enthusiasm and passion for the project is beyond exciting, and I am delighted to work with them to bring ‘Band Aid’ to a wider audience.”

The film was produced by Lister-Jones under her production banner Mister Lister Films, with producer Natalia Anderson and executive producer Daryl Wein. It was financed by QC Entertainment with QC’s Ted Hamm, Sean McKittrick, Ray Mansfield, and Shaun Redick serving as executive producers.

“Everyone at IFC Films is thrilled to be working again with the immensely talented Zoe Lister-Jones after our first collaboration on ‘Breaking Upwards,'” said Jonathan Sehring and Lisa Schwartz, co-presidents of Sundance Selects/IFC Films. “‘Band Aid’ is an incredibly impressive directorial debut feature — it is not only funny but also incredibly smart and inventive, proving Zoe is a true quadruple-threat as an actress, filmmaker, writer and singer-songwriter.”

WME Global and QC Entertainment negotiated the deal.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance Sales Market: Netflix, Amazon Returned With Deep Pockets

Neon Acquires Sundance Hip Hop Biopic 'Roxanne Roxanne'

Neon Acquires Sundance Award Winner 'Beach Rats'

‘Band Aid’ Director Zoe Lister-Jones on the ‘Joyous’ Experience of an All-Female Crew (Video)

“Band Aid” writer, director and star Zoe Lister-Jones described the experience of working with an all-female crew as a “joyous” one in an interview with TheWrap at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

Lister-Jones, who first found success collaborating with her partner Daryl Wein on indies like “Breaking Upwards” and “Lola Versus,” said that this was a move to “step out on my own” and direct a project on her own terms.

“It makes it a hundred million times better,” joked Lister-Jones’ co-star Adam Pally of the majority woman work environment. “Men are terrible. If I could, I would only work with female crews for the rest of my career.”

Also Read: ‘Thoroughbred’ Director ‘Grateful’ for Chance to Work With the Late Anton Yelchin (Video)

Lister-Jones, who is currently seen on CBS’ “Life in Pieces,” said that this film marked a return to her indie roots after getting a peak into the big-budget Hollywood studio system.

“The creative process kind of took on a new light for me where it lost some of its joy and its purity,” she said. “And so this film, for me, is something that I just wanted to have fun making.”

Also Read: Roadside Attractions and FilmNation Pick Up Salma Hayek’s ‘Beatriz at Dinner’

“Band Aid” follows an unhappily married couple who turn to music to work through their issues, forming a band with their kooky neighbor (played by Fred Armisen).

“It’s a little something I like to call Thera-oke,” Lister-Jones said. “It’s about finding ways to channel all the historical grievances you have with your partner through music. Music is therapeutic.”

Lister-Jones said the film was at least partially inspired by her relationship with Wein and the challenges they’ve faced as a couple who blurs the line between romantic and professional.

Also Read: Sundance: Elle Fanning, Geena Davis and More Celebs Sip Matching Latte Art (Photos)

“I do think that being in a romantic relationship with someone you’re creating art with is a very specific experience,” she said. “And that was something that I wanted to mine in this.”

And even though Wein and Lister-Jones haven’t turned to music to work through their personal drama yet, Lister-Jones says, “Never say never.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance: Elle Fanning, Geena Davis and More Celebs Sip Matching Latte Art (Photos)

The Scene at TheWrap’s Sundance Panel on Digital Distribution (Photos)

‘Roxanne Roxanne’ Sundance Review: Roxanne Shanté Biopic Celebrates Rapper as Artist, Survivor

“Band Aid” writer, director and star Zoe Lister-Jones described the experience of working with an all-female crew as a “joyous” one in an interview with TheWrap at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

Lister-Jones, who first found success collaborating with her partner Daryl Wein on indies like “Breaking Upwards” and “Lola Versus,” said that this was a move to “step out on my own” and direct a project on her own terms.

“It makes it a hundred million times better,” joked Lister-Jones’ co-star Adam Pally of the majority woman work environment. “Men are terrible. If I could, I would only work with female crews for the rest of my career.”

Lister-Jones, who is currently seen on CBS’ “Life in Pieces,” said that this film marked a return to her indie roots after getting a peak into the big-budget Hollywood studio system.

“The creative process kind of took on a new light for me where it lost some of its joy and its purity,” she said. “And so this film, for me, is something that I just wanted to have fun making.”

“Band Aid” follows an unhappily married couple who turn to music to work through their issues, forming a band with their kooky neighbor (played by Fred Armisen).

“It’s a little something I like to call Thera-oke,” Lister-Jones said. “It’s about finding ways to channel all the historical grievances you have with your partner through music. Music is therapeutic.”

Lister-Jones said the film was at least partially inspired by her relationship with Wein and the challenges they’ve faced as a couple who blurs the line between romantic and professional.

“I do think that being in a romantic relationship with someone you’re creating art with is a very specific experience,” she said. “And that was something that I wanted to mine in this.”

And even though Wein and Lister-Jones haven’t turned to music to work through their personal drama yet, Lister-Jones says, “Never say never.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance: Elle Fanning, Geena Davis and More Celebs Sip Matching Latte Art (Photos)

The Scene at TheWrap's Sundance Panel on Digital Distribution (Photos)

'Roxanne Roxanne' Sundance Review: Roxanne Shanté Biopic Celebrates Rapper as Artist, Survivor

‘Band Aid’: Film Review | Sundance 2017


In ‘Band Aid,’ Zoe Lister-Jones’ helming debut, she and Adam Pally play a couple who transform their marital spats into musical numbers, with an assist from Fred Armisen as the drummer next door.

read more


In 'Band Aid,' Zoe Lister-Jones’ helming debut, she and Adam Pally play a couple who transform their marital spats into musical numbers, with an assist from Fred Armisen as the drummer next door.

read more

45 More Eye-Popping Portraits From TheWrap’s Sundance Studio Presented by Kia (Exclusive Photos)

John Legend, Jeremy Renner and Holly Hunter among the stars shot by photographer Jana Cruder in Park City

 

Executive producers Rashida Jones and Ronna Gradus “Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Miles Fisher, Carla Gallo, Paul Scheer, “Playdates”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actors Aaron Glenane and Maya Strange with director Damien Power, “Killing Ground”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actress Laura Prepon, director Brett Haley, actors Sam Elliott and Katharine Ross, “The Hero”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Dancers Blessin Giraldo, Cori Grainger, Tayla Solomon, “Step”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Writer-director-star Justin Chon, “Gook”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Sarah Gubbins, Roberta Colindrez, Kevin Bacon, Lily Mojekwu, Kathryn Hahn, Jill Soloway, India Menuez, Griffin Dunne, “I Love Dick”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Writer-director Zoe Lister-Jones, “Band Aid”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actress Jenny Slate, “The Polka King”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Actress Olivia Cooke, writer-director Cory Finley and actress Anya Taylor-Joy, “Thoroughbred”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Cathy Moriarty, Danielle MacDonald, Mamoudou Athie, Siddharth Dhananjay, Geremy Jasper, Bridget Everett, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Writer-director Luca Guadagnino, actors Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer and writer Walter Fasano, “Call Me By Your Name”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

 

John Legend, Jeremy Renner and Holly Hunter among the stars shot by photographer Jana Cruder in Park City

 

Executive producers Rashida Jones and Ronna Gradus “Hot Girls Wanted: Turned On”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Miles Fisher, Carla Gallo, Paul Scheer, “Playdates”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actors Aaron Glenane and Maya Strange with director Damien Power, “Killing Ground”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actress Laura Prepon, director Brett Haley, actors Sam Elliott and Katharine Ross, “The Hero”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Dancers Blessin Giraldo, Cori Grainger, Tayla Solomon, “Step”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Writer-director-star Justin Chon, “Gook”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Sarah Gubbins, Roberta Colindrez, Kevin Bacon, Lily Mojekwu, Kathryn Hahn, Jill Soloway, India Menuez, Griffin Dunne, “I Love Dick”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Writer-director Zoe Lister-Jones, “Band Aid”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Actress Jenny Slate, “The Polka King”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Actress Olivia Cooke, writer-director Cory Finley and actress Anya Taylor-Joy, “Thoroughbred”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

Cathy Moriarty, Danielle MacDonald, Mamoudou Athie, Siddharth Dhananjay, Geremy Jasper, Bridget Everett, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap.

Writer-director Luca Guadagnino, actors Michael Stuhlbarg, Timothée Chalamet and Armie Hammer and writer Walter Fasano, “Call Me By Your Name”

Photographed by Jana Cruder for TheWrap

 

Sundance Cues Up a Chorus of Music Docs and Features

From “Once” to “20 Feet From Stardom,” “Searching for Sugar Man,” and “Whiplash,” Sundance has long been a key launchpad for music features and docs, and this year’s edition is primed with a slew of music-infused entries, from documentaries to features. Even though Lucy Walker’s follow-up to “The Buena Vista Social Club” was forced to withdraw from the… Read more »

From “Once” to “20 Feet From Stardom,” “Searching for Sugar Man,” and “Whiplash,” Sundance has long been a key launchpad for music features and docs, and this year’s edition is primed with a slew of music-infused entries, from documentaries to features. Even though Lucy Walker’s follow-up to “The Buena Vista Social Club” was forced to withdraw from the... Read more »

‘Band Aid’ Sundance Clip: Zoe Lister-Jones & Adam Pally Turn A Couple’s Grief Into Song

EXCLUSIVE: “Let’s make a list of our top ten fights of all time.” So begins a clip of Band Aid, dropped ahead of its world premiere Tuesday at the Sundance Film Festival.
Directed, written by and starring Zoe Lister-Jones, Band Aid is the story of a couple, Anna (Lister-Jones) and Ben (Adam Pally), who can’t stop fighting. Advised by their therapist to try and work through their grief unconventionally, they are reminded of their shared love of music. In a last-ditch…

EXCLUSIVE: “Let’s make a list of our top ten fights of all time.” So begins a clip of Band Aid, dropped ahead of its world premiere Tuesday at the Sundance Film Festival. Directed, written by and starring Zoe Lister-Jones, Band Aid is the story of a couple, Anna (Lister-Jones) and Ben (Adam Pally), who can’t stop fighting. Advised by their therapist to try and work through their grief unconventionally, they are reminded of their shared love of music. In a last-ditch…

‘Confirmation’ Writer Susannah Grant to Receive WGA West’s 2017 Paul Selvin Award

Screenwriter Susannah Grant, who recently penned HBO’s “Confirmation,” is set to receive the Writers Guild of America West’s 2017 Paul Selvin Award, the guild announced Thursday.

Grant, whose other credits include “Erin Brokovich” and “In Her Shoes,” recently earned a WGA nomination for Long Form Original for “Confirmation,” and will be honored at the WGAW 2017 Writers Guild Awards ceremony on Feb. 19.

“Confirmation” stars Kerry Washington as Anita Hill, the woman who accused then Supreme Court-nominee Clarence Thomas of sexually harassing her in the workplace years earlier.

Also Read: Emmy Quickie: Zoe Lister-Jones Danced Between Takes of ‘Confirmation’ (Exclusive Video)

“From ‘Erin Brockovich’ onward, Susannah Grant has used her extraordinary talents to tell the stories of those whose lives inspire us to be more courageous – and those whom wealth and power would ignore or discard,” said WGAW President Howard A. Rodman in a statement. “‘Confirmation’ tells Anita Hill’s harrowing tale with grace, heart, and consummate craft, all the while hewing to the historical record. It is a feat of research, writing, and empathy that honors Paul Selvin’s best ideals, and our own.”

“Confirmation” has received numerous nominations this year, including a Golden Globe, Emmy and NAACP Image nomination.

In 2001, Grant received Academy Award, WGA and BAFTA nominations for “Erin Brockovich.” Her other credits include “Ever After: A Cinderella Story,” “28 Days,” “Charlotte’s Web” and “The 5th Wave.” In 2007, Grant wrote and made her feature directorial debut with “Catch and Release.” Grant had also served as a writer, producer and director on the Fox series “Party of Five” from 1994 to 1997, and in 2007, she created and executive produced the series “A Gift Man.”

Also Read: ‘Confirmation’ Review: Kerry Washington Performance Makes the Ordinary Powerful

She has been a WGAW member since 1994 and received the WGAW’s prestigious Valentine Davies Award in 2011.

The Paul Selvin Award is named after Selvin, general counsel to the Guild for 25 years and is given each year to a WGA member whose script embodies the constitutional and civil rights and liberties. Previous recipients have included Tony Kushner, Tate Taylor, Eric Roth, Alex Gibney and Margaret Nagle.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Screenwriter Susannah Grant, who recently penned HBO’s “Confirmation,” is set to receive the Writers Guild of America West’s 2017 Paul Selvin Award, the guild announced Thursday.

Grant, whose other credits include “Erin Brokovich” and “In Her Shoes,” recently earned a WGA nomination for Long Form Original for “Confirmation,” and will be honored at the WGAW 2017 Writers Guild Awards ceremony on Feb. 19.

“Confirmation” stars Kerry Washington as Anita Hill, the woman who accused then Supreme Court-nominee Clarence Thomas of sexually harassing her in the workplace years earlier.

“From ‘Erin Brockovich’ onward, Susannah Grant has used her extraordinary talents to tell the stories of those whose lives inspire us to be more courageous – and those whom wealth and power would ignore or discard,” said WGAW President Howard A. Rodman in a statement. “‘Confirmation’ tells Anita Hill’s harrowing tale with grace, heart, and consummate craft, all the while hewing to the historical record. It is a feat of research, writing, and empathy that honors Paul Selvin’s best ideals, and our own.”

“Confirmation” has received numerous nominations this year, including a Golden Globe, Emmy and NAACP Image nomination.

In 2001, Grant received Academy Award, WGA and BAFTA nominations for “Erin Brockovich.” Her other credits include “Ever After: A Cinderella Story,” “28 Days,” “Charlotte’s Web” and “The 5th Wave.” In 2007, Grant wrote and made her feature directorial debut with “Catch and Release.” Grant had also served as a writer, producer and director on the Fox series “Party of Five” from 1994 to 1997, and in 2007, she created and executive produced the series “A Gift Man.”

She has been a WGAW member since 1994 and received the WGAW’s prestigious Valentine Davies Award in 2011.

The Paul Selvin Award is named after Selvin, general counsel to the Guild for 25 years and is given each year to a WGA member whose script embodies the constitutional and civil rights and liberties. Previous recipients have included Tony Kushner, Tate Taylor, Eric Roth, Alex Gibney and Margaret Nagle.

Related stories from TheWrap:

WGA West Members Reject Proposal for Less Frequent Elections

WGA West Study Finds Mixed Results on Pay for Women, Minority Writers

Women Filmmakers to March on Sundance Screens as Well as the Streets

In the midst of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, powerful Hollywood women will march in protest against President Donald Trump — and their voices will be equally heard in the content playing in films to be screened over the next 10 days.

Marching into the movie houses of Park City are diverse stories from female filmmakers — and a healthy amount of leading ladies pulling double duty as producers.

It’s not just that women are appearing more frequently in below-the-line credits, the lineup has a roundedness of storytelling that inches closer to an ideal form of equal representation.

Also Read: Sorry, Sundance Goers: No Private Choppers, Cushy Uber Lounge on Main Street

Jennifer Aniston is executive producing a war movie. Four women are cooking up a horror franchise. One is taking on the sad objectification of a slain toddler beauty queen. Another is turning her relationship drama into rock ‘n’ roll.

Zoe-Lister Jones is the writer-director behind “Band Aid,” in which a feuding couple starts writing and singing rock songs about their relationship troubles as a Hail Mary to stay together. The star of CBS’ “Life in Pieces” also produced her own debut feature under her banner Mister Lister Films.

Magnolia Pictures has “XX,” a groundbreaking horror anthology with some high-profile women directing four vignettes. The project is a billboard decrying the boys club of horror, and looks seriously twisted to boot.

The directors are Karyn Kusama (behind 2016’s criminally underrated “The Invitation”), Roxanne Benjamin (a producer on “V/H/S”), Jovanka Vuckovic and debut filmmaker Annie Clark (whose day job is a musician under the stage name St. Vincent).

Also Read: Star-Studded Anti-Trump March Planned for Sundance Opening Weekend (Exclusive)

Also making her directorial debut in the Shorts program is Clark’s girlfriend, former “Twilight” actress Kristen Stewart. She also scripted “Come Swim,” about a day in a man’s life, a project that has drawn early buzz for its artistry and tone.

Aniston is executive producing and co-starring in Alexandre Moors’ “The Yellow Birds,” based on an acclaimed novel about two young Iraq war vets who are best friends in combat though only one of them returns home. The former “Friends” star plays the mother of the fallen hero — one not weeping in a veil, but driving the narrative by leading an investigation into her son’s death with the help of a tough detective (Jason Patric).

Then there’s “Beach Rats,” a film that’s drawn buzz from several top dealmakers. Writer-director Eliza Hittman’s feature follows a young boy whose terminally ill father has crippled his home life. He’s also dating a young woman and hooking up with older men on a nearby beach.

Also Read: Verge List for Sundance 2017 Features Michelle Morgan, Lakeith Stanfield (Exclusive Photos)

In the U.S. Dramatic competition, Gillian Robespierre reunites with her “Obvious Child” producer and star Jenny Slate. They’re in town with “Landline,” a look at an analog New York in the 1990s. Specifically, how easy it was to cheat and lie without a GPS tracker.

Althea Jones also has “Fun Mom Dinner” with funny lady Bridget Everett and Toni Collette, which one executive compared to the STX blockbuster “Bad Moms” but with a lot more heart.

And writer-director Maggie Betts comes with “Novitiate,” which centers on Margaret Qualley as an apprentice nun in the 1950s.

In the Documentary competition, Amanda Lipitz has a very strong entry with “Step” — another title dealmakers are talking about — which follows a step team in inner-city Baltimore as they struggle with pending adulthood, social unrest and empowering each other.

Kitty Green looks at the other side of that coin, about the circus surrounding girls pageants and its most famous contestant — JonBenet Ramsey and her tabloid-fodder 1996 murder.

War, toddler beauty queens, unseen horrors, confessions from motherhood and life without cell phones all coming from the minds and elbow grease of women.

“It really comes down to voice,” one agent representing over a dozen of the female-backed films told TheWrap. “But I’m not going to lie, ladies are kicking ass this year.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

17 Stars Going to the Women’s March to Protest Trump (Updating)

22 Percent Fewer Women Directed 2016’s Top 250 Movies, New Study Finds

’20th Century Women’ Director on Filmmaking in Trump Era: ‘I Have to Change My Game’

In the midst of this year’s Sundance Film Festival, powerful Hollywood women will march in protest against President Donald Trump — and their voices will be equally heard in the content playing in films to be screened over the next 10 days.

Marching into the movie houses of Park City are diverse stories from female filmmakers — and a healthy amount of leading ladies pulling double duty as producers.

It’s not just that women are appearing more frequently in below-the-line credits, the lineup has a roundedness of storytelling that inches closer to an ideal form of equal representation.

Jennifer Aniston is executive producing a war movie. Four women are cooking up a horror franchise. One is taking on the sad objectification of a slain toddler beauty queen. Another is turning her relationship drama into rock ‘n’ roll.

Zoe-Lister Jones is the writer-director behind “Band Aid,” in which a feuding couple starts writing and singing rock songs about their relationship troubles as a Hail Mary to stay together. The star of CBS’ “Life in Pieces” also produced her own debut feature under her banner Mister Lister Films.

Magnolia Pictures has “XX,” a groundbreaking horror anthology with some high-profile women directing four vignettes. The project is a billboard decrying the boys club of horror, and looks seriously twisted to boot.

The directors are Karyn Kusama (behind 2016’s criminally underrated “The Invitation”), Roxanne Benjamin (a producer on “V/H/S”), Jovanka Vuckovic and debut filmmaker Annie Clark (whose day job is a musician under the stage name St. Vincent).

Also making her directorial debut in the Shorts program is Clark’s girlfriend, former “Twilight” actress Kristen Stewart. She also scripted “Come Swim,” about a day in a man’s life, a project that has drawn early buzz for its artistry and tone.

Aniston is executive producing and co-starring in Alexandre Moors’ “The Yellow Birds,” based on an acclaimed novel about two young Iraq war vets who are best friends in combat though only one of them returns home. The former “Friends” star plays the mother of the fallen hero — one not weeping in a veil, but driving the narrative by leading an investigation into her son’s death with the help of a tough detective (Jason Patric).

Then there’s “Beach Rats,” a film that’s drawn buzz from several top dealmakers. Writer-director Eliza Hittman’s feature follows a young boy whose terminally ill father has crippled his home life. He’s also dating a young woman and hooking up with older men on a nearby beach.

In the U.S. Dramatic competition, Gillian Robespierre reunites with her “Obvious Child” producer and star Jenny Slate. They’re in town with “Landline,” a look at an analog New York in the 1990s. Specifically, how easy it was to cheat and lie without a GPS tracker.

Althea Jones also has “Fun Mom Dinner” with funny lady Bridget Everett and Toni Collette, which one executive compared to the STX blockbuster “Bad Moms” but with a lot more heart.

And writer-director Maggie Betts comes with “Novitiate,” which centers on Margaret Qualley as an apprentice nun in the 1950s.

In the Documentary competition, Amanda Lipitz has a very strong entry with “Step” — another title dealmakers are talking about — which follows a step team in inner-city Baltimore as they struggle with pending adulthood, social unrest and empowering each other.

Kitty Green looks at the other side of that coin, about the circus surrounding girls pageants and its most famous contestant — JonBenet Ramsey and her tabloid-fodder 1996 murder.

War, toddler beauty queens, unseen horrors, confessions from motherhood and life without cell phones all coming from the minds and elbow grease of women.

“It really comes down to voice,” one agent representing over a dozen of the female-backed films told TheWrap. “But I’m not going to lie, ladies are kicking ass this year.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

17 Stars Going to the Women's March to Protest Trump (Updating)

22 Percent Fewer Women Directed 2016's Top 250 Movies, New Study Finds

'20th Century Women' Director on Filmmaking in Trump Era: 'I Have to Change My Game'

Women In Film Unveils 2016 Film Finishing Fund Winners

Women In Film today announced winners of the organization’s 31st annual Film Finishing Fund grant program. Four narrative features and six documentary films have been selected out of more than 250 submissions from 22 countries. The fund provides cash grants and in-kind production services to complete films that fit the established criteria of being by, for or about women. Winners were selected after their works-in-progress were viewed by a jury of women in the film…

Women In Film today announced winners of the organization’s 31st annual Film Finishing Fund grant program. Four narrative features and six documentary films have been selected out of more than 250 submissions from 22 countries. The fund provides cash grants and in-kind production services to complete films that fit the established criteria of being by, for or about women. Winners were selected after their works-in-progress were viewed by a jury of women in the film…

Zoe Lister-Jones on ‘Life in Pieces,’ Writing Her Own Roles and the Series That Changed Her Life


The actress looks back at her comedic arcs, “crying for cash,” and her directorial debut with THR. “It’s pretty instrumental to write those roles for myself,” she says.

read more


The actress looks back at her comedic arcs, “crying for cash,” and her directorial debut with THR. “It’s pretty instrumental to write those roles for myself,” she says.

read more