‘Temptation Island’ Reboot Officially A Go At USA; Mark L. Walberg Returns As Host

USA Network has confirmed its upcoming reboot of the 2001 reality series Temptation Island. The 10-episode revival, produced by Banijay Studios North America, will premiere on January 15 with Mark L. Walberg, who hosted the original, returning as host….

USA Network has confirmed its upcoming reboot of the 2001 reality series Temptation Island. The 10-episode revival, produced by Banijay Studios North America, will premiere on January 15 with Mark L. Walberg, who hosted the original, returning as host. Temptation Island, which had been in the works at USA for the past few months, is part of the network’s aggressive expansion into unscripted series as it is preparing for the departure of WWE Smackdown next fall. Temptation…

‘Suits’ Spinoff: Bethany Joy Lenz Among Quartet Series Regulars Cast In USA Show

EXCLUSIVE: USA Network and Universal Cable Prods. have rounded out the cast of the cast of the upcoming Suits spinoff series starring Suits alumna Gina Torres.
Coming on board  as series regulars are Bethany Joy Lenz (One Tree Hill), who will be playin…

EXCLUSIVE: USA Network and Universal Cable Prods. have rounded out the cast of the cast of the upcoming Suits spinoff series starring Suits alumna Gina Torres. Coming on board  as series regulars are Bethany Joy Lenz (One Tree Hill), who will be playing a main character in a recasting, as well as Chantel Riley (Wynonna Earp), Isabel Arraiza (The Oath) and Eli Goree (Riverdale). They join Torres and fellow series regulars Simon Kassianides and Morgan Spector. The series is…

‘Miz & Mrs’: USA Orders Additional Episodes Of WWE Reality Series

If you’re craving more antics and adventures from wrestling power couple Mike “The Miz” Mizanin and Maryse Mizanin, you’re in luck. WWE said Tuesday night on Smackdown Live that USA Network has ordered an additional 14 episodes of the upcom…

If you’re craving more antics and adventures from wrestling power couple Mike "The Miz" Mizanin and Maryse Mizanin, you’re in luck. WWE said Tuesday night on Smackdown Live that USA Network has ordered an additional 14 episodes of the upcoming reality series Miz & Mrs to air in 2019. The first six episodes of Miz & Mrs currently air on USA on Tuesdays at 10 PM. The series, which follows the humorous and hectic personal lives of the titular WWE Superstars, was the…

USA surrenders to the aliens, cancels Colony after 3 seasons

In a weird bit of counter-programming, the USA Network has decided to cancel sci-fi series Colony in the middle of Comic-Con weekend, the time of year when genre TV shows are supposed to be bigger than everything else. The finale of the show’s third se…

In a weird bit of counter-programming, the USA Network has decided to cancel sci-fi series Colony in the middle of Comic-Con weekend, the time of year when genre TV shows are supposed to be bigger than everything else. The finale of the show’s third season is set to air on Wednesday, meaning it will now have to act as…

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Fox Slates WWE ‘SmackDown Live’ On Fridays As USA Renews ‘Raw’

Fox has slated WWE’s SmackDown Live on Friday nights starting in October 2019, kicking off a five-year deal between the broadcast network and the pro wrestling circuit.
Beginning October 4, 2019, Fox will air a weekly, two-hour, live event 52 wee…

Fox has slated WWE’s SmackDown Live on Friday nights starting in October 2019, kicking off a five-year deal between the broadcast network and the pro wrestling circuit. Beginning October 4, 2019, Fox will air a weekly, two-hour, live event 52 weeks a year. USA Network, meanwhile, which used to air SmackDown, said it is renewing Monday Night Raw, a high-rated mainstay that debuted on the network in 1993. The re-up is also for five years. Sources familiar with the talks…

First Look: Anthony Hopkins Stars as King Lear in BBC/Amazon Adaptation

Emma Thompson, Florence Pugh, Emily Watson, Jim Broadbent, Andrew Scott, Christopher Eccleston and Jim Carter also star in the contemporary take on Shakespeare.read more


Emma Thompson, Florence Pugh, Emily Watson, Jim Broadbent, Andrew Scott, Christopher Eccleston and Jim Carter also star in the contemporary take on Shakespeare.

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The fucks are prepared to fly on Syfy and USA

Swearing on basic cable has always been something of a gray fucking area; while the FCC watches the mainstream networks like a hawk for any signs of f- or s-bombs on their way, it’s always been much more lax when it comes to subscription-based media. Still, most cable networks have Standards & Practices departments…

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Swearing on basic cable has always been something of a gray fucking area; while the FCC watches the mainstream networks like a hawk for any signs of f- or s-bombs on their way, it’s always been much more lax when it comes to subscription-based media. Still, most cable networks have Standards & Practices departments…

Read more...

‘Unsolved’ Director Anthony Hemingway Investigates ’90s Murders Of Tupac & The Notorious B.I.G. — Sundance Studio

Moving to Los Angeles shortly before the murder of Christopher Wallace—also known as Biggie, or The Notorious B.I.G.—writer Kyle Long became fascinated by the rapper’s untimely end, and its handling in the media. Biggie’s murder would be linked by many to the murder a year earlier of another iconic American rapper, Tupac, and Long’s fascination with the pair of cultural icons would ultimately result in USA’s upcoming anthology series Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the…

Moving to Los Angeles shortly before the murder of Christopher Wallace—also known as Biggie, or The Notorious B.I.G.—writer Kyle Long became fascinated by the rapper’s untimely end, and its handling in the media. Biggie’s murder would be linked by many to the murder a year earlier of another iconic American rapper, Tupac, and Long’s fascination with the pair of cultural icons would ultimately result in USA’s upcoming anthology series Unsolved: The Murders of Tupac and the…

‘Vikings’ Creator Launches TV Banner, Strikes MGM Deal for ‘Ronin’ Adaptation (Exclusive)

Michael Hirst has set up Green Pavilion Entertainment alongside longtime producing partners Morgan O’Sullivan and James Flynn.read more


Michael Hirst has set up Green Pavilion Entertainment alongside longtime producing partners Morgan O'Sullivan and James Flynn.

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‘Mr. Robot’ Season 3 Finale Shocker: Sam Esmail On Tonight’s Revelation, Surprise Guest & What’s Next In Season 4

SPOILER ALERT: This story contains details about tonight’s season 3 finale of  Mr. Robot on USA
Holy cow. Everyone take a deep breath, because that had to be the most nail-biting season finale to date in Mr. Robot‘s three-season run.
The biggest sweat of the night involved Bobby Cannavale’s Dark Army gopher/used car salesman Irving. If we ever wondered just how far he could go before he lost it, well, tonight clearly showed that in a scene that rivaled any of Cannavale’s…

SPOILER ALERT: This story contains details about tonight's season 3 finale of  Mr. Robot on USA Holy cow. Everyone take a deep breath, because that had to be the most nail-biting season finale to date in Mr. Robot‘s three-season run. The biggest sweat of the night involved Bobby Cannavale’s Dark Army gopher/used car salesman Irving. If we ever wondered just how far he could go before he lost it, well, tonight clearly showed that in a scene that rivaled any of Cannavale’s…

‘Suits’: Patrick J. Adams & Meghan Markle Poised To Depart After 7 Seasons As Series Eyes Season 8 Renewal By USA

As USA Network’s popular legal drama series Suits is prepping the second half of its seventh season, I hear that co-lead Patrick J. Adams is not expected to continue as a series regular in Season 8, which has not been ordered but I hear is likely. Co-star and fellow original cast member Meghan Markle also is eyeing an exit. The contracts of all Suits original cast members are up after Season 7, so both Adams and Markle will have fulfilled their current obligations. USA…

As USA Network’s popular legal drama series Suits is prepping the second half of its seventh season, I hear that co-lead Patrick J. Adams is not expected to continue as a series regular in Season 8, which has not been ordered but I hear is likely. Co-star and fellow original cast member Meghan Markle also is eyeing an exit. The contracts of all Suits original cast members are up after Season 7, so both Adams and Markle will have fulfilled their current obligations. USA…

‘Damnation’ Review: USA Network’s Overwrought Western Series Takes a Sledgehammer to Happiness and Subtlety

A parable centered on economic strife, the newest Depression-era drama has an interesting show buried under layers of insisted importance.

Traditionally, when describing a show like “Damnation,” it’s customary to describe how the central players figure into the very clear battle it’s drawn for itself. Farmers in a rural Iowa community are fighting Depression-era predatory price-fixing efforts by going on strike. Banking interests are using all the tools at their disposal to gobble up whatever’s left once their resolve is broken. But at the center, two rivals emerge: Seth Davenport (Killian Scott), a preacher with a heart of pyrite and Creeley Turner (Logan Marshall-Green), a corporate minion with murky intentions.

That ambiguity is one of the sole instances where “Damnation” leaves things to interpretation. Aside from some shifting allegiances and some muddled origin stories, everything else about life in this Iowa town is presented in the extreme. Poverty is moving in like a plague. Financial ambitions among its wealthy characters knows no limits. Calls for rebellion are made in no uncertain terms. This is a series that may hide where some of its main characters stand, but it wants you to feel that boiling point in every conversation and every passing glance.

On opposite sides of the picket line, players of all sorts stand ready to use intimidation, coercion, and even murder to reinforce their interests. “Damnation” plays out like an early 20th century combo of a western and a mafia movie, with a delineated power structure on either side, fighting a war that ensnares the local paper, out-of-town anti-Communist vigilantes, and even one unassuming ice cream salesman.

The show certainly doesn’t want for forms of torture meted out against people who end up on the wrong side of their enemies. There are gunshots aplenty, but between meat hooks, pitchforks, nooses, and pocket knives, “Damnation” still subscribes to a frontier justice mentality that doesn’t discriminate against weaponry. Violence, in all its various forms, is baked into the visual language of this show, with on-screen viscera popping up (and out) at regular intervals. (Given the size of the town’s population, it’s difficult to see how this is sustainable.)

But sometimes that damage doesn’t equal the torment these characters inflict on themselves. One by one, characters detail their misery, promising that they will stop at nothing until revenge is achieved. With every single one of these individuals in the fray, minor or otherwise, vowing some sort of retaliation, the result is a long-term psychological standoff with unrelenting threats from all sides. “Damnation” seems fully aware that an entire town of people, each with their own ideas about justice, makes it impossible to keep order. It’s an interesting problem to explore, but it makes a chaotic mission statement for a TV show.

“Damnation” doesn’t offer much breathing room. Every activity, be it an auction or a peaceful Sunday morning church gathering, becomes a battleground for the town’s soul. There’s drama in that, but all of those showdowns bring with them a bevy of grand pronouncements that don’t let either side of this fight get much capture.

DAMNATION -- "Which Side Are You On" Episode 102 -- Pictured: (l-r) Logan Marshall-Green as Creeley Turner, Chasten Harmon as Bessie Louvin -- (Photo by: Chris Large/USA Network)

“Damnation”

Chris Large/USA Network

In true cable drama fashion, no one’s hands are clean either. Villainy certainly exists on a sliding scale, but the fellas at the top of the bad guy list come with their own monologues and verbal treatises that would make Blofeld blush. One particular string-pulling activist, Martin Eggers Hyde (Gabriel Mann), seems like one peak in the show’s neverending search to find someone more egregious and morally bankrupt than the last.

The attention to period detail and use of an oppressive Midwest cocktail of sunlight and summer heat make “Damnation” something worth looking at. Even if much of what its characters tell each other is drenched in self-seriousness, those talks play out against a screenworthy backdrop. It might not reinvent the conceptions of a TV western, but there’s care taken in orchestrating the river of blood and other fluids that quickly line this town’s streets.

Drenched in economic anxiety and anger directed toward power-wielding bank executives, race relations, and the power of the press all factor into this ideological fight. Short of using “1 percent” and “fake news,” this is striving to be a modern story with Depression-era trappings. Luckily, explicitly connecting the efforts of these strikers to any 21st century reform efforts is one connection that “Damnation” leaves its audience to make.

While the show hasn’t quite figured out how to give them more to do than their various social stations would have them be, the promise is there for a version of “Damnation” that lets them feature into the story in less of a cloaked, clandestine way. There are glimmers of Bessie Louvin (Chasten Harmon) becoming more than just the redeemed prostitute. Amelia Davenport (Sarah Jones) has a part in the coming rebellion that may even eclipse her husband’s.

“Damnation” spends so much of its early going caught in a spiral of misdirection that once the emphasis on bloodshed, doom, and duplicity wanes, a series with sharper insights might emerge. But in its current form, it’s a punishing watch, one with not much more to offer than an animalistic view of human nature. You won’t find much hope in “Damnation” and that’s an absence that can only exist unfilled for so long.

Grade: C+

“Damnation” airs Tuesday nights at 9 p.m. ET on USA Network.

TV Review: ‘Damnation’ on USA

The second episode of “Damnation” pivots on a striking scene: A group of shabby farmers walk into a small Iowa town, carrying handmade signs and chanting slogans. The signs demand unity, a living wage, a compassionate economy: “UNITED WE STAND,” “GROW YOUR OWN FOOD,” “WE NEED FAIR PRICES.” It’s a showstopping set piece, set to […]

The second episode of “Damnation” pivots on a striking scene: A group of shabby farmers walk into a small Iowa town, carrying handmade signs and chanting slogans. The signs demand unity, a living wage, a compassionate economy: “UNITED WE STAND,” “GROW YOUR OWN FOOD,” “WE NEED FAIR PRICES.” It’s a showstopping set piece, set to […]

‘Mr. Robot’: The Show’s Best Music Moments, from Burning Cash with Phil Collins to Mocking ‘Full House’

The USA series’ standout sequences wouldn’t be the same without help from some unlikely musical places.

Over the course of “Mr. Robot’s” run, composer Mac Quayle has done a pretty effective job creating an eerie and ethereal (etheerieal?) backdrop to one man’s psychological self-sabotage. The ongoing trials of Elliot Alderson have been underscored by electronic-heavy instrumentals, highlighting the character in moments of triumph and moments of despair (more on that later).

As good as Quayle has been, the series has also benefited from a finely curated set of musical moments, with some of the most memorable “Mr. Robot” sequences bolstered by an impeccable soundtrack selected by music supervisors Amie Bond and Charlie Haggard. Some of these have been the numerous string of classical favorites used to set up Tyrell Wellick in various stages of upper-class crises. Others have drawn on electronic music icons that have influenced the show in more ways than one.

So as the show sets out for a new season, we’ve gathered together some of those show’s standout sequences, each of which were enhanced by some quality cuts.

LEN, “Steal My Sunshine” — A Fake Life

“Mr. Robot” is riddled with hypotheticals, from fantasy sequences about a life never lived to theoretical montages like this one. Filled with all the anti-consumerist apathy that’s the stated DNA of the show, this sequence enlists one of the poppiest tunes of this generation to go as superficial as “Mr. Robot” gets. For a show that wallows in the darkness of humanity for most of its runtime, these contrasts hit harder than they would on other series. (It’s just a shame they couldn’t somehow squeeze a mini-timejump for the line “L-A-T-E-R that week!”)

Maxence Cyrin, “Where is My Mind?” — Saving the World

In hindsight, using this song seems even more inevitable than it did in the moment. Tossing in a Pixies cover into a show dripping with “Fight Club” references seemed like a natural way to go, especially as the opening season was reaching its apex. Of course, when this episode aired, it came in the midst of the song also being used by “The Leftovers,” creating 2014’s equivalent of the Great John Denver Craze of 2017. A piano version was fitting: This scene effectively mourns the character that Elliot would never quite be able to be again.

Alabama Shakes, “Sound and Color” — That Knock

After the monumental way that Season 1 came to a close, leaving audiences with the small-scale tease of who was behind that ominous knock at the door was a solid parting touch. Even after the reveal of just who was doing the knocking (which came a bit longer into Season 2 than was most effective), this ending still stands out as one of the show’s better moments of expectation subterfuge. It also set the stage for a pretty great Season 2 promo that used Wings’ “Let ‘Em In” without needing much new footage.

Lupe Fiasco, “Daydreamin'” — Setting the Stage

Rami Malek in "Mr. Robot."

Rami Malek in “Mr. Robot.”

Peter Kramer/USA Network

Leave it to “Mr. Robot” to pick a song that not only captures the emotional state of its central character, but also works as an easter egg for the season to come. Coming at the open of Season 2’s first episode, this trippy reworking of I Monster’s “Daydream” helped to set the stage for a season built on one giant misdirect. Skip the “Mr. Robot” credits at your own peril.

Phil Collins, “Take Me Home” — Setting Fire to the Cash

Once Season 1 ended and the show no longer had quite the same “Who is Mr. Robot?” hook to mine for mystery and drama, there was a lot of speculation as to where the show would head going forward. If you had your money on “burning piles of cash, set to the sultry strains of Phil Collins,” then you are actually Sam Esmail. Congratulations. You’ve got a pretty good career going.

Philip Glass, “Opening” – Yummy Cement

As the fractures in reality of Season 2 ripped open into a massive fault line, Elliot raking through vomit to find some non-digested Adderall pills was definitely a low point. As Elliot’s life almost literally dissolved around him, it seemed appropriate to have the operatic gravitas of Phillip Glass help drive home the point that this fella is in further over his head than even he thought. Hard to watch? Absolutely. Necessary to up the stakes for a darker, more inward-facing season of TV? You be the judge.

“Imagine a World Gone Insane” — Even the Font is Perfect

An out-of-nowhere wallop, even for a show that prides itself on catching audiences off guard, the ’90s TV opening of the sixth episode of Season 2 was a fascinating exercise in visual mimicry. But as spot-on as the grainy home video feel of that opening was, the “Full House” theme song riff elevated the whole experiment to an entirely different level. (It’s almost as good as a resurrected Gideon laughing at the headline of his own death.) For some extra details on how the impossibly earworm-y “Imagine a World Gone Insane” came together, this is a great quick interview.

The Suffers, “Gwan” — Hallway Heist

MR. ROBOT -- "eps2.4_m4ster%u2010s1ave.aes" Episode 206 -- Pictured: Carly Chaikin as Darlene -- (Photo by: Michael Parmelee/USA Network)

“Mr. Robot”

Michael Parmelee/USA Network

All the ALF shenanigans got the lion’s share of attention the week it aired. But what really put Episode 6 over the top and made it one of the best of the year was Angela’s one-take trek through FBI headquarters. The show needed a pulse-pounding, neo-soul hype track to make the audience forget what Angela most likely suspected herself: This was a horrendously ill-advised plan, but it made for a dramatic entrance.

“Mr. Robot” airs Wednesday nights at — p.m. on USA. 

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USA and Oxygen Acquire Rerun Rights to ‘Chicago P.D.’

USA Network and Oxygen have cut a deal for the rerun rights to NBC’s “Chicago P.D.” The drama series hails from producer Dick Wolf’s prolific Wolf Entertainment banner based at Universal Television. The series is heading into its fifth season its NBC. “Chicago P.D.” is one of three Chicago-based procedurals that have become pillars of… Read more »

USA Network and Oxygen have cut a deal for the rerun rights to NBC’s “Chicago P.D.” The drama series hails from producer Dick Wolf’s prolific Wolf Entertainment banner based at Universal Television. The series is heading into its fifth season its NBC. “Chicago P.D.” is one of three Chicago-based procedurals that have become pillars of... Read more »

How ‘The Sinner’ Turned One Song Into a Terrifying Murder Clue and the Show’s Secret Weapon

Big Black Delta’s “Huggin & Kissin” has been as important to the series as any actor. Derek Simonds explains how (and why) they picked it.

Distill the guilt, pain and trauma of a horrific crime into song form and you’ll probably get something close to “Huggin & Kissin.”

Over the course of seven episodes, the percussive, persistent electronic onslaught of Big Black Delta’s catchiest, eeriest song is one of the secret weapons of USA’s summer hit show “The Sinner.” Though the song has been a part of the show from the beginning, most notably as the soundtrack to the beach stabbing that kicks off the show’s story, Wednesday night’s “Part VII” finally revealed the song’s true connection to the plot.

In the world of “The Sinner,” “Huggin & Kissin” is the creation of Frankie Belmont (Eric Todd) and J.D. Lambert (Jacob Pitts), two characters we now know aren’t just tied by Cora’s (Jessica Biel) memories, but were musical partners in years past. “Part VII” finds “Huggin & Kissin” as the musical undercurrent for another horrifying moment: in a flashback to before the events of the first episode, the song plays as Cora’s sister lies unconscious on the couch, her chest newly caved-in by Frankie’s CPR attempts.

“The Sinner” showrunner Derek Simonds explained in a recent interview with IndieWire that picking this song was a major part of guiding the show, even when it only existed as an Antonio Campos-directed pilot.

We chose that song before we actually shot the scene on the beach in the pilot. We wanted to have a tonal sense of playback when we were actually shooting the scene, for Jessica Biel to respond to as an actress,” Simonds said. “We were making a pilot that may or may not go to series. But we were already zeroing in on that song at a very, very early point. We ended up really cutting the sequence to the rhythms of that song, as well.”

Even though the song has become a staple of the series, a common theme to express Cora’s anxieties over her murder of Frankie Belmont and the various repressed traumas of her past, choosing the right music to express that wasn’t an easy process. Simonds worked with music supervisor Oliver Hild to find the right song for the job.

We were looking for something that was dark and had a sexy quality to it. But we did not want something too dark or aggressive that would be a little too on the nose,” Simonds said.

When that darkness rears its head in “Part VII,” Simonds wanted to be sure that “Huggin & Kissin” would also make sense as the kind of music that Frankie and J.D. would be working on without instruments and an abundance of resources.

“I wanted it to have an electronic element. If the flashback had been in the ’90s, we would have had more guitar-based rock. We wanted to find a song that was believable as something that would be stylistically written about five years ago,” Simonds said. “We were looking for something that had a hook, because the song would come in brief flashes.”

A musician himself (he’s hoping to finish an album of his own within the next month or so), Simonds felt an affinity towards the DNA of “Huggin & Kissin.” Big Black Delta is a one-man outfit itself, the brainchild of Los Angeles musician Jonathan Bates, who recently released a new album, “WHORU812” earlier this summer.

I feel like so many aspiring musicians in their 20s today are working on ProTools or Logic or GarageBand, and while they might be plugging in some actual acoustic live instruments, a lot of people are working with sample-based music. I have a lot of that music myself,” Simonds said. “So I was really drawing on my experience as a bedroom musician making music by myself and thought that electronic textures feel the most current and authentic way to go.”

THE SINNER -- "Part VII" Episode 107 -- Pictured: (l-r) Jessica Biel as Cora Tannetti, Nadia Alexander as Phoebe -- (Photo by: Peter Kramer/USA Network)

“The Sinner”

Peter Kramer/USA Network

Along with the wallpaper at the Beverwyck Club, “Huggin & Kissin” is the series’ biggest clue as to why Cora murdered Frankie on the beach in the opening episode. (The cross-cutting between the two major scenes where the song is used isn’t just a big breakthrough for the audience, it’s one of the more terrifying sequences of the show so far.) In addition to the frequent flashbacks to the full-screen shots of the hypnotically patterned wall decorations, the song has been a conscious influence on the show’s score as well.

“In talking to [composer] Ronit [Kirchman], I always wanted to avoid a really traditional string-heavy suspense score, which is kind of always the first thing that seems apparent to do in a genre like this. I really wanted to mix electronic textures with acoustic textures and have the score feel current and have audiences feel that this show was not resorting to usual tropes, even if it’s on a subliminal level,” Simonds said. “I think the Big Black Delta sounds electronically, definitely feels very contemporary and current and has an edge to it that I think works really well in keeping people a little off-balanced.”

It was important for Simonds to include not just the mammoth hook and instrumentals of “Huggin & Kissin,” but the vocals as well. Bates’ voice in the song functions on an extra layer as an additional trigger for Cora, something that also appealed to the team when they discovered the song.

“It has a great mix of an almost danceable, rhythmic, electronic quality but then the vocals are very distorted and have kind of an indie rock feel. It doesn’t feel like listening to EDM music or something totally hyper-compressed and super slick, it still has a rough quality, especially in the vocals and the way they’re processed. That implies that it wasn’t done in a multi-million dollar studio on a major label but that you would believe that an aspiring musician could do it. A really, good one, though,” Simonds quickly adds. 

He’s also noticed that on Twitter, some fans have had some curious responses of their own.

“It’s interesting seeing people’s reactions,” Simonds said. “On more than one occasion, people write, ‘Am I the only one who likes this song despite the creepiness of the way it’s been used?’”

Of course, there’s an occupational hazard in being surrounded by this song for so long, in all the various cuts of the episodes where “Huggin & Kissin” pops up. But Simonds hasn’t developed thoughts of murder — he’s got far different associations with it now.

“Yeah, I definitely have my own psychological response triggers from that song. Usually it brings up the stress of meeting a show deadline,” Simonds said, with a laugh.

“The Sinner” airs Wednesdays at 10 p.m. ET on USA Network.

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‘Suits’ Finale: Creator Aaron Korsh On Big Cliffhanger & Its Aftermath, Wedding In the Back 6 Episodes & Season 8 Renewal

SPOILER ALERT: The story includes details about the Season 6 midseason finale of USA Network’s Suits.
Suits could be renamed as Darvey: the Harvey & Donna Show. For a second finale in a row, following the Season 6 closer last spring, the last scene involved Harvey and Donna, with Donna making a move that stuns her boss and uttering the episode’s final line that leaves him baffled. Last season, it was the cryptic “I want more.” This time, there was nothing subtle about her…

SPOILER ALERT: The story includes details about the Season 6 midseason finale of USA Network’s Suits. Suits could be renamed as Darvey: the Harvey & Donna Show. For a second finale in a row, following the Season 6 closer last spring, the last scene involved Harvey and Donna, with Donna making a move that stuns her boss and uttering the episode’s final line that leaves him baffled. Last season, it was the cryptic “I want more.” This time, there was nothing subtle about her…