‘Grown-ish’, ‘Good Trouble’ Stars Encourage Voters To “March To The Polls” For Midterm Elections

In an effort to encourage young voters to use their voice and vote, Freeform has partnered with ATTN: for the “March to the Polls” campaign which includes actors from shows such as grown-ish and the forthcoming Fosters spinoff Good Trouble….

In an effort to encourage young voters to use their voice and vote, Freeform has partnered with ATTN: for the “March to the Polls” campaign which includes actors from shows such as grown-ish and the forthcoming Fosters spinoff Good Trouble. The PSA campaign includes Freeform talent Maia Mitchell, Cierra Ramirez, Deon Cole, Trevor Jackson, Chloe & Halle Bailey, and more talk about how voter wait time during the 2016 presidential election was only an average of 11 minutes…

‘The Incredibles 2’ Soars to Record $18.5 Million at Thursday Box Office

“The Incredibles 2” earned $18.5 million at the Thursday box office, surpassing “Finding Dory’s” animation preview record of $9.2 million.

“Minions” earned $6.2 million in Thursday previews, while “The Secret Life of Pets” grossed $5.3 million. The preview gross for “Incredibles 2” is higher than those for “Beauty and the Beast” ($16.3 million), “Spider-Man: Homecoming” ($15.4 million) and “Justice League” ($13 million).

The sequel to “The Incredibles” is looking at a weekend opening of $120 million to $145 million.  The first “Incredibles” opened to $70 million in 2004, and “Incredibles 2” will still have a higher opening than its predecessor even after inflation adjustments are made.

Also Read: ‘Incredibles 2’ Film Review: Pixar’s Superhero Family Is Back, Baby – and What a Baby

Taking place right after the end of the first film, “The Incredibles 2” sees the Parr family face a new family dynamic after Elastigirl is recruited for a campaign to help bring superheroes back. While she fights the bad guys, Mr. Incredible is left to take care of his three kids, including the infant Jack-Jack, who begins to develop his own powers.

Brad Bird returns to write and direct, as well as provide the voice for fan favorite Edna Mode. Craig T. Nelson, Helen Hunt, and Samuel L. Jackson also return to the cast, being joined by “Better Call Saul” stars Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks. Critics have nearly unanimously praised the film, giving it a current Rotten Tomatoes score of 94 percent.

Warner Bros./New Line’s “Tag” earned $1.33 million in preshows, compared to “Game Night,” which grossed $1 million in February.

Also Read: Does ‘Incredibles 2’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“Tag” is based on the true story of a lifelong group of friends who played a game of tag for 23 years. The film stars Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Burress, and Jake Johnson as the crew of friends, with the cast completed by Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Leslie Bibb, Brian Dennehy, and Lil Rel Howrey. Jeff Tomsic directed from a script by Rob McKittrick and Mark Steilen.

Sony/Silver Pictures’ “Superfly” opened on Wednesday and is looking to earn $7 million to $12 million over the five days., with the film sporting a reported budget of $16 million.

“Superfly” stars Trevor Jackson as Youngblood Priest, a career criminal who wants out of the Atlanta drug business, only to get dragged into even deeper trouble after one bad deal. Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis, and Jennifer Morrison also star, with Director X helming the film. “Watchmen” co-writer Alex Tse penned the script, with Joel Silver producing with Atlanta rapper Future.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Every Pixar Character Voiced by John Ratzenberger, from ‘Toy Story’ to ‘Incredibles 2’ (Photos)

‘Incredibles 2’ Takes Aim at Animation’s Debut Weekend Record

‘Incredibles 2’ Is ‘One of the Greatest Superhero Movies Ever Made’ and 6 Other Fantastic Reviews

“The Incredibles 2” earned $18.5 million at the Thursday box office, surpassing “Finding Dory’s” animation preview record of $9.2 million.

“Minions” earned $6.2 million in Thursday previews, while “The Secret Life of Pets” grossed $5.3 million. The preview gross for “Incredibles 2” is higher than those for “Beauty and the Beast” ($16.3 million), “Spider-Man: Homecoming” ($15.4 million) and “Justice League” ($13 million).

The sequel to “The Incredibles” is looking at a weekend opening of $120 million to $145 million.  The first “Incredibles” opened to $70 million in 2004, and “Incredibles 2” will still have a higher opening than its predecessor even after inflation adjustments are made.

Taking place right after the end of the first film, “The Incredibles 2” sees the Parr family face a new family dynamic after Elastigirl is recruited for a campaign to help bring superheroes back. While she fights the bad guys, Mr. Incredible is left to take care of his three kids, including the infant Jack-Jack, who begins to develop his own powers.

Brad Bird returns to write and direct, as well as provide the voice for fan favorite Edna Mode. Craig T. Nelson, Helen Hunt, and Samuel L. Jackson also return to the cast, being joined by “Better Call Saul” stars Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks. Critics have nearly unanimously praised the film, giving it a current Rotten Tomatoes score of 94 percent.

Warner Bros./New Line’s “Tag” earned $1.33 million in preshows, compared to “Game Night,” which grossed $1 million in February.

“Tag” is based on the true story of a lifelong group of friends who played a game of tag for 23 years. The film stars Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Burress, and Jake Johnson as the crew of friends, with the cast completed by Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Leslie Bibb, Brian Dennehy, and Lil Rel Howrey. Jeff Tomsic directed from a script by Rob McKittrick and Mark Steilen.

Sony/Silver Pictures’ “Superfly” opened on Wednesday and is looking to earn $7 million to $12 million over the five days., with the film sporting a reported budget of $16 million.

“Superfly” stars Trevor Jackson as Youngblood Priest, a career criminal who wants out of the Atlanta drug business, only to get dragged into even deeper trouble after one bad deal. Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis, and Jennifer Morrison also star, with Director X helming the film. “Watchmen” co-writer Alex Tse penned the script, with Joel Silver producing with Atlanta rapper Future.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Every Pixar Character Voiced by John Ratzenberger, from 'Toy Story' to 'Incredibles 2' (Photos)

'Incredibles 2' Takes Aim at Animation's Debut Weekend Record

'Incredibles 2' Is 'One of the Greatest Superhero Movies Ever Made' and 6 Other Fantastic Reviews

Trevor Jackson Was Originally Told He Was ‘Too Young’ to Star in ‘Superfly’ Remake

MIAMI — “Superfly” star Trevor Jackson wasn’t sure that he would land the starring role of the latest Hollywood remake. “I really wanted to be a part of this film,” said Jackson. “I auditioned twice, but I was told I was t…

MIAMI — “Superfly” star Trevor Jackson wasn’t sure that he would land the starring role of the latest Hollywood remake. “I really wanted to be a part of this film,” said Jackson. “I auditioned twice, but I was told I was too young and I didn’t have a big enough name. I was [later] invited to […]

‘Superfly’ Film Review: Remake Updates Blaxploitation Genre With Wit and Resonance

It doesn’t matter how smart you are if you’re constantly surrounded by armed stupidity. That’s the wise revelation that launches “SuperFly,” the new remake of the 1972 blaxploitation classic starring Ron O’Neal.

In both versions, a successful coke dealer named Priest decides to pull off one last job before retiring from the drug business, only to find himself in a Chinese finger trap: The harder he tries to get out, the more he’s pulled back in.

Helmed by music video visionary Director X (making his feature debut) and written by Alex Tse (“Watchmen”), “SuperFly” is a delightful surprise: funny, brutal, stylish, and thoughtful. It updates the blaxploitation genre with wit and resonance: Police brutality is an inescapable scourge in Priest’s Atlanta, and our hero dispatches one of his enemies while toppling over a Confederate statue.

Watch Video: Watch ‘Superfly’ Trailer for ‘the Hair, the Fashion, the Women and the Cars’

Sure, young star Trevor Jackson (“Grown-ish,” “American Crime”) can’t fill O’Neal’s effortlessly dapper, achingly world-weary shoes, and few movie soundtracks can rival Curtis Mayfield’s legendary album for the first “Super Fly.” But this is a remake worthy of its original.

Even its familiar themes eventually give way to greater complexity: The asset that gives Priest his edge in the streets is his discretion, i.e., the ability to stay under the radar. But as his aspirations grow bigger — there’s no greater ambition than leaving the drug life behind in Priest’s world — his friends want a bigger slice of the pie, a rival gang grows hostile, the cartel from whom Priest buys his product won’t let him retire, and the police catch on.

Also Read: Marvel Boss Kevin Feige on Ryan Coogler’s ‘Black Panther’: ‘Best Movie We’ve Ever Made’

Most compellingly, Priest’s best friend Eddie (Jason Mitchell, nearly stealing the picture as he did in “Straight Outta Compton) throws some cold water on Priest’s dream of leaving everything he knows behind. The debate between their opposing viewpoints, about whether it’s safer to run or stay as a black man in America, is brief but fascinating. As in the original, Priest’s final undertaking is complicated, yet wholly comprehensible.

And true to its roots, “SuperFly” is also about flair and humor, which it has in spades. This is a movie that knows how to make the most of an egg-white snakeskin jacket, as well as a supporting role by Outkast’s Big Boi. A dirty cop singing Chamillionaire’s “Ridin,’” about racial profiling by the police, had my screening howling in laughter. Similarly striking is the spectacle of the adversarial gang, Snow Patrol (led by Rick Ross and Allen Maldonado), in head-to-toe, toothpaste-commercial white: A swell of urban Stormtroopers in chalk-colored clothes, cars, even a hearse.

Also Read: Drake Addresses Blackface Image Used on Pusha T’s ‘The Story of Adidon’

Jackson isn’t particularly emotive on his own, but he has such stirring, naturalistic chemistry with his co-stars — Mitchell, Michael K. Williams (playing his mentor, Scatter), and Lex Scott Davis and Andrea Londo (playing the two girlfriends in his domestic triad) — that I feared for Priest’s loved one’s lives whenever they were on screen.

“SuperFly” is the first blaxploitation remake to come out of the gate this decade; newer editions of “Shaft,” “Cleopatra Jones,” and “Foxy Brown” are currently in the works. Despite the all-around excellence of “SuperFly,” I’m not sure we need to resurrect the 70s right now. But as long as we’re mired in franchise culture, you could do far worse than a double feature of “SuperFly” and “Ocean’s 8” — crime movies where the historically disenfranchised groups are finally encouraged to enjoy revenge.



Related stories from TheWrap:

The Black List, Lena Waithe and Eva Longoria Team With Macro to Promote TV Writers of Color

The ‘Black Lightning’ Discussion That Was Supposed to Be About ‘This Is America’ (Podcast)

Spike Lee Denounces ‘That Motherf–er’ Trump, Explains Charlottesville Scenes in ‘BlacKkKlansman’

‘SNL’: Donald Glover’s Lando Calrissian Addresses All Four Black People in ‘Star Wars’ (Video)

It doesn’t matter how smart you are if you’re constantly surrounded by armed stupidity. That’s the wise revelation that launches “SuperFly,” the new remake of the 1972 blaxploitation classic starring Ron O’Neal.

In both versions, a successful coke dealer named Priest decides to pull off one last job before retiring from the drug business, only to find himself in a Chinese finger trap: The harder he tries to get out, the more he’s pulled back in.

Helmed by music video visionary Director X (making his feature debut) and written by Alex Tse (“Watchmen”), “SuperFly” is a delightful surprise: funny, brutal, stylish, and thoughtful. It updates the blaxploitation genre with wit and resonance: Police brutality is an inescapable scourge in Priest’s Atlanta, and our hero dispatches one of his enemies while toppling over a Confederate statue.

Sure, young star Trevor Jackson (“Grown-ish,” “American Crime”) can’t fill O’Neal’s effortlessly dapper, achingly world-weary shoes, and few movie soundtracks can rival Curtis Mayfield’s legendary album for the first “Super Fly.” But this is a remake worthy of its original.

Even its familiar themes eventually give way to greater complexity: The asset that gives Priest his edge in the streets is his discretion, i.e., the ability to stay under the radar. But as his aspirations grow bigger — there’s no greater ambition than leaving the drug life behind in Priest’s world — his friends want a bigger slice of the pie, a rival gang grows hostile, the cartel from whom Priest buys his product won’t let him retire, and the police catch on.

Most compellingly, Priest’s best friend Eddie (Jason Mitchell, nearly stealing the picture as he did in “Straight Outta Compton) throws some cold water on Priest’s dream of leaving everything he knows behind. The debate between their opposing viewpoints, about whether it’s safer to run or stay as a black man in America, is brief but fascinating. As in the original, Priest’s final undertaking is complicated, yet wholly comprehensible.

And true to its roots, “SuperFly” is also about flair and humor, which it has in spades. This is a movie that knows how to make the most of an egg-white snakeskin jacket, as well as a supporting role by Outkast’s Big Boi. A dirty cop singing Chamillionaire’s “Ridin,'” about racial profiling by the police, had my screening howling in laughter. Similarly striking is the spectacle of the adversarial gang, Snow Patrol (led by Rick Ross and Allen Maldonado), in head-to-toe, toothpaste-commercial white: A swell of urban Stormtroopers in chalk-colored clothes, cars, even a hearse.

Jackson isn’t particularly emotive on his own, but he has such stirring, naturalistic chemistry with his co-stars — Mitchell, Michael K. Williams (playing his mentor, Scatter), and Lex Scott Davis and Andrea Londo (playing the two girlfriends in his domestic triad) — that I feared for Priest’s loved one’s lives whenever they were on screen.

“SuperFly” is the first blaxploitation remake to come out of the gate this decade; newer editions of “Shaft,” “Cleopatra Jones,” and “Foxy Brown” are currently in the works. Despite the all-around excellence of “SuperFly,” I’m not sure we need to resurrect the 70s right now. But as long as we’re mired in franchise culture, you could do far worse than a double feature of “SuperFly” and “Ocean’s 8” — crime movies where the historically disenfranchised groups are finally encouraged to enjoy revenge.

Related stories from TheWrap:

The Black List, Lena Waithe and Eva Longoria Team With Macro to Promote TV Writers of Color

The 'Black Lightning' Discussion That Was Supposed to Be About 'This Is America' (Podcast)

Spike Lee Denounces 'That Motherf–er' Trump, Explains Charlottesville Scenes in 'BlacKkKlansman'

'SNL': Donald Glover's Lando Calrissian Addresses All Four Black People in 'Star Wars' (Video)

‘Superfly’ Trailer: Director X Moves The Action To Atlanta

If you weren’t around when Curtis Mayfield’s hit song from Superfly was inescapable in the early ’70s, this new trailer for Columbia Picture’s upcoming remake has some explaining for you.
“Power never stopped a bullet,” narrates Trevor Jackson as the lead character. “No car can outrun fate. But if you can play the game by your own rules and win, that’s Superfly.”
Based on the 1972 blaxploitation classic about a cocaine dealer looking to make one final sale, the Sony redo…

If you weren’t around when Curtis Mayfield’s hit song from Superfly was inescapable in the early ’70s, this new trailer for Columbia Picture’s upcoming remake has some explaining for you. “Power never stopped a bullet,” narrates Trevor Jackson as the lead character. “No car can outrun fate. But if you can play the game by your own rules and win, that's Superfly.” Based on the 1972 blaxploitation classic about a cocaine dealer looking to make one final sale, the Sony redo…

Trevor Jackson & Jason Mitchell To Star In Sony’s ‘Superfly’ Remake From Director X; Future, Steven R. Shore To Produce

EXCLUSIVE: Sony’s Superfly film is assembling a team aptly fit for its title. As Deadline previously reported, Director X is officially attached to direct the remake with Trevor Jackson confirmed to star as Youngblood Priest. In addition, Mudbound and Straight Outta Compton star Jason Mitchell has signed on to co-star as Eddie, along with Lex Scott Davis as Georgia, Andrea Londo as Cynthia, Jacob Ming-Trent (Showtime’s White Famous) as Fat Freddy, and Omar Chapparo as…

EXCLUSIVE: Sony’s Superfly film is assembling a team aptly fit for its title. As Deadline previously reported, Director X is officially attached to direct the remake with Trevor Jackson confirmed to star as Youngblood Priest. In addition, Mudbound and Straight Outta Compton star Jason Mitchell has signed on to co-star as Eddie, along with Lex Scott Davis as Georgia, Andrea Londo as Cynthia, Jacob Ming-Trent (Showtime's White Famous) as Fat Freddy, and Omar Chapparo as…

Director X In Talks To Helm Sony’s ‘Super Fly’ Remake

EXCLUSIVE: Director X (a.k.a Julien Christian Lutz) is in talks to direct the remake to the 1972 blaxploitation film, Super Fly, which is set up at Sony Pictures. Watchmen scribe Alex Tse drafting the screenplay, while Sony exec Palak Patel is producing with Joel Silver.  We hear grown-ish star Trevor Jackson is in the mix for the lead role of Youngblood Priest. The studio declined to comment.
The original was directed by Gordon Parks Jr. and starred Ron O’Neal as Priest…

EXCLUSIVE: Director X (a.k.a Julien Christian Lutz) is in talks to direct the remake to the 1972 blaxploitation film, Super Fly, which is set up at Sony Pictures. Watchmen scribe Alex Tse drafting the screenplay, while Sony exec Palak Patel is producing with Joel Silver.  We hear grown-ish star Trevor Jackson is in the mix for the lead role of Youngblood Priest. The studio declined to comment. The original was directed by Gordon Parks Jr. and starred Ron O'Neal as Priest…

‘Black-ish’ Spinoff Series Gets New Name, Adds 3 To Cast, Including Chris Parnell

Freeform has lined up three more regular cast members for its upcoming black-ish spinoff series, which has been retitled to grown-ish. The 13 episode single-camera comedy, toplined by black-ish‘s Yara Shahidi, was previously known as college-ish.
Saturday Night Live alum Chris Parnell, Emily Arlook (The Good Place), and Trevor Jackson (American Crime) have been tapped as series regulars on the comedy, joining previously cast Shahidi and Deon Cole. Parnell and Jackson will…

Freeform has lined up three more regular cast members for its upcoming black-ish spinoff series, which has been retitled to grown-ish. The 13 episode single-camera comedy, toplined by black-ish‘s Yara Shahidi, was previously known as college-ish. Saturday Night Live alum Chris Parnell, Emily Arlook (The Good Place), and Trevor Jackson (American Crime) have been tapped as series regulars on the comedy, joining previously cast Shahidi and Deon Cole. Parnell and Jackson will…

‘Burning Sands’ Star on Bringing Black Fraternity Hazing to the Screen, Potential Backlash

Netflix’s newest film “Burning Sands” has yet to debut, but already generated controversy. After a debut at Sundance, the movie will be released to subscribers on March 10. Starring Trevor Jackson, the drama also taps Trevante Rhodes, Alfre Woodard, Steve Harris, Imani Hakim, and more for an unforgiving look at the secret life of fraternities and… Read more »

Netflix’s newest film “Burning Sands” has yet to debut, but already generated controversy. After a debut at Sundance, the movie will be released to subscribers on March 10. Starring Trevor Jackson, the drama also taps Trevante Rhodes, Alfre Woodard, Steve Harris, Imani Hakim, and more for an unforgiving look at the secret life of fraternities and... Read more »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Burning Sands’

The occasional heavy-handed or clumsy elements don’t seriously impair a film whose high spirits, talented cast and always-luridly-intriguing subject consistently entertain.

The occasional heavy-handed or clumsy elements don't seriously impair a film whose high spirits, talented cast and always-luridly-intriguing subject consistently entertain.

Haley Lu Richardson, Michelle Morgan Top Verge List of Rising Sundance Stars (Exclusive Videos)

Jeff Vespa, the official photographer of the Sundance Film Festival since 2003, on Wednesday unveiled his Verge List of emerging talent with movies at this month’s festival in Park City, Utah.

Haley Lu Richardson, Josh O’Connor and Trevor Jackson are among this year’s selections, featured in the new issue of Vespa’s digital magazine, Verge. O’Connor and Harris Dickinson are two actors hailing from the U.K., which Vespa says gives the list a broader range.

“This actually was one of the easiest years for choices,” he told TheWrap. “Every year, this is my favorite story to do. Meeting every actor and knowing this is just the beginning for them. It is fun to be a part of all of that. That is why I like doing this before the festival. Most of them have never been, and I can kind of give them some guidance on what to expect. They are in for a wild ride.”

Also Read: Verge List for Sundance 2016 Features Francesca Eastwood, Ben Schnetzer (Exclusive Photos)

Vespa has shot stars like John Boyega and Nick Robinson, who went on starring roles in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Jurassic World,” respectively.

He also shot Rebecca Ferguson long before she landed the lead opposite Tom Cruise in “Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation.” Boyega used one of Vespa’s shots on his various social media accounts for years.

“I started this magazine to support emerging talent, and wanted to do something that wasn’t being done.” Vespa told TheWrap last year. “The idea is to really find these people before the festival starts, and to be a resource to people in the industry to say, ‘Here are the people you should be paying attention to at the festival.”

Also Read: Teresa Palmer Thriller ‘Berlin Syndrome’ Acquired by Vertical, Netflix

See Vespa’s 2017 list of up-and-coming talent below.

Danielle MacDonald, “Patti Cake$”

“I play a girl called Patti in the film, ‘Patti CakeS’ and she’s a girl from New Jersey and she dreams of being a famous rapper,” MacDonald said. “There is a lot of music in it — all kinds — there’s blues, there’s rapping, there’s a bit of pop, a bit of ’80s classic.”

Haley Lu Richardson, “Columbus”

“I literally don’t know how to describe this film,” Richardson said with a shrug. “My character’s name is Casey.”

“Columbus” will feature Richardson alongside “Star Trek” actor John Cho in a drama that marks the feature directorial debut of visual artist :: kogonada (not a typo), whom Richardson calls a “cinematic genius.”

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

“My character from the movie ‘Beach Rats’ by Eliza Hittman is a troubled and tortured conflicted teenager lived in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn,” Dickinson said. “It was a shot on 35 mm film. A lot of it was street-cast, there’s a lot of non-actors which is exciting and brings more energy to it.”

Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

O’Connor described his character, Johnny Saxby, as “a miserable young boy with troubles in his life, and then he meets the love of his life and it changes him.” He described “God’s Own Country” as a film with a “European” and “naturalistic” style.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Stanfield said that his character in “Crown Heights” goes “from Point A to Point B” in a movie “about people who love each other.”

Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Qualley was also very to the point when describing her “holy” film, “Novitiate,” simply describing her character as “a young nun in love.”

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Morgan described her character, Annette, as “a very well-intentioned, opinionated, sometimes irritating, adorable person who is often misunderstood.” She hopes that “L.A. Times,” which she also wrote and directed, is seen as “a fun, fresh take on Los Angeles” that highlights the “people and things you don’t normally see in a movie about Los Angeles.”

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

“Heartfelt, hardworking, and selfless I feel are [my character’s] key attributes,” said Jackson. “I feel that there have been a lot of fraternity films throughout the years, but none of them have been this raw and show the hardships of being in a fraternity.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance Parties 2017: Elle Fanning, Mark Hamill, Claire Danes Projects Set Party Plans

Star-Studded Anti-Trump March Planned for Sundance Opening Weekend (Exclusive)

Netflix Acquires Sundance Documentary ‘Casting JonBenet’

Jeff Vespa, the official photographer of the Sundance Film Festival since 2003, on Wednesday unveiled his Verge List of emerging talent with movies at this month’s festival in Park City, Utah.

Haley Lu Richardson, Josh O’Connor and Trevor Jackson are among this year’s selections, featured in the new issue of Vespa’s digital magazine, Verge. O’Connor and Harris Dickinson are two actors hailing from the U.K., which Vespa says gives the list a broader range.

“This actually was one of the easiest years for choices,” he told TheWrap. “Every year, this is my favorite story to do. Meeting every actor and knowing this is just the beginning for them. It is fun to be a part of all of that. That is why I like doing this before the festival. Most of them have never been, and I can kind of give them some guidance on what to expect. They are in for a wild ride.”

Vespa has shot stars like John Boyega and Nick Robinson, who went on starring roles in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Jurassic World,” respectively.

He also shot Rebecca Ferguson long before she landed the lead opposite Tom Cruise in “Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation.” Boyega used one of Vespa’s shots on his various social media accounts for years.

“I started this magazine to support emerging talent, and wanted to do something that wasn’t being done.” Vespa told TheWrap last year. “The idea is to really find these people before the festival starts, and to be a resource to people in the industry to say, ‘Here are the people you should be paying attention to at the festival.”

See Vespa’s 2017 list of up-and-coming talent below.

Danielle MacDonald, “Patti Cake$”

“I play a girl called Patti in the film, ‘Patti CakeS’ and she’s a girl from New Jersey and she dreams of being a famous rapper,” MacDonald said. “There is a lot of music in it — all kinds — there’s blues, there’s rapping, there’s a bit of pop, a bit of ’80s classic.”

Haley Lu Richardson, “Columbus”

“I literally don’t know how to describe this film,” Richardson said with a shrug. “My character’s name is Casey.”

“Columbus” will feature Richardson alongside “Star Trek” actor John Cho in a drama that marks the feature directorial debut of visual artist :: kogonada (not a typo), whom Richardson calls a “cinematic genius.”

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

“My character from the movie ‘Beach Rats’ by Eliza Hittman is a troubled and tortured conflicted teenager lived in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn,” Dickinson said. “It was a shot on 35 mm film. A lot of it was street-cast, there’s a lot of non-actors which is exciting and brings more energy to it.”

Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

O’Connor described his character, Johnny Saxby, as “a miserable young boy with troubles in his life, and then he meets the love of his life and it changes him.” He described “God’s Own Country” as a film with a “European” and “naturalistic” style.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Stanfield said that his character in “Crown Heights” goes “from Point A to Point B” in a movie “about people who love each other.”

Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Qualley was also very to the point when describing her “holy” film, “Novitiate,” simply describing her character as “a young nun in love.”

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Morgan described her character, Annette, as “a very well-intentioned, opinionated, sometimes irritating, adorable person who is often misunderstood.” She hopes that “L.A. Times,” which she also wrote and directed, is seen as “a fun, fresh take on Los Angeles” that highlights the “people and things you don’t normally see in a movie about Los Angeles.”

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

“Heartfelt, hardworking, and selfless I feel are [my character’s] key attributes,” said Jackson. “I feel that there have been a lot of fraternity films throughout the years, but none of them have been this raw and show the hardships of being in a fraternity.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sundance Parties 2017: Elle Fanning, Mark Hamill, Claire Danes Projects Set Party Plans

Star-Studded Anti-Trump March Planned for Sundance Opening Weekend (Exclusive)

Netflix Acquires Sundance Documentary 'Casting JonBenet'

Verge List for Sundance 2017 Features Michelle Morgan, Lakeith Stanfield (Exclusive Photos)

Photographer and magazine founder Jeff Vespa unveils eight artists to watch at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Actress Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actress Danielle Macdonald, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Haley Lu Richardson,”Columbus”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actor Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

 

Photographer and magazine founder Jeff Vespa unveils eight artists to watch at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

Actress Margaret Qualley, “Novitiate” and “Sidney Hall”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Trevor Jackson, “Burning Sands”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Harris Dickinson, “Beach Rats”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actress Danielle Macdonald, “Patti Cake$”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Lakeith Stanfield, “Crown Heights”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Haley Lu Richardson,”Columbus”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Actor Josh O’Connor, “God’s Own Country”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.

Michelle Morgan, “L.A. Times”

Photographed by Jeff Vespa for TheWrap.