Live+3 Ratings for Week of Nov. 26: ‘Good Doctor’ Out Gains ‘Manifest’ in Total Viewers for First Time

For the first time, “The Good Doctor” has beaten out “Manifest” in total viewer growth in the Live+3 ratings. During the week of Nov. 26, sophomore ABC medical drama “The Good Doctor” grew 67%, or 4.5 million viewers…

For the first time, “The Good Doctor” has beaten out “Manifest” in total viewer growth in the Live+3 ratings. During the week of Nov. 26, sophomore ABC medical drama “The Good Doctor” grew 67%, or 4.5 million viewers, over its Live+Same Day haul to 11.2 million total. Freshman NBC drama “Manifest,” meanwhile, grew 72%, or 4.3 […]

Ratings: ‘Deal or No Deal’ Holiday Special Anchors NBC’s Latest Monday Win

“Deal or No Deal” made it back to NBC on Monday, when holiday special “Happy Howie Days” did well enough to close out a primetime win for the broadcaster.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.3 rating/5 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 7.8 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. posted a 1.5/6 and 9 million viewers. At 10, “Deal or No Deal” received a 1.0/4 and 5.4 million viewers.

ABC was second in ratings with a 1.2/5 and in viewers with 6 million. “The Great Christmas Light Fight” from 8-10 averaged a 1.1/5 and 5.4 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” fall finale got a 1.4/6 and 7.2 million viewers.

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CBS was third in ratings with a 0.8/3 and in viewers with 5.7 million. “The Neighborhood” at 8 had a 1.1/4 and 6.5 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” got a 0.8/3 and 4.6 million viewers. After a pair of reruns, an original episode of “Bull” at 10 received a 0.7/3 and 6.5 million viewers.

Fox and Univision tied for fourth in ratings, both with a 0.5/2. Fox was fourth in total viewers with 2.4 million, airing all repeats. Univision was fifth with 1.5 million viewers.

The CW and Telemundo tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. CW had a 2 share, Telemundo got a 1. The CW was sixth in total viewers with 1.14 million, Telemundo was seventh with 1.10 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.4 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 929,000 viewers.

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“Deal or No Deal” made it back to NBC on Monday, when holiday special “Happy Howie Days” did well enough to close out a primetime win for the broadcaster.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.3 rating/5 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 7.8 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. posted a 1.5/6 and 9 million viewers. At 10, “Deal or No Deal” received a 1.0/4 and 5.4 million viewers.

ABC was second in ratings with a 1.2/5 and in viewers with 6 million. “The Great Christmas Light Fight” from 8-10 averaged a 1.1/5 and 5.4 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” fall finale got a 1.4/6 and 7.2 million viewers.

CBS was third in ratings with a 0.8/3 and in viewers with 5.7 million. “The Neighborhood” at 8 had a 1.1/4 and 6.5 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” got a 0.8/3 and 4.6 million viewers. After a pair of reruns, an original episode of “Bull” at 10 received a 0.7/3 and 6.5 million viewers.

Fox and Univision tied for fourth in ratings, both with a 0.5/2. Fox was fourth in total viewers with 2.4 million, airing all repeats. Univision was fifth with 1.5 million viewers.

The CW and Telemundo tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. CW had a 2 share, Telemundo got a 1. The CW was sixth in total viewers with 1.14 million, Telemundo was seventh with 1.10 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.4 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 929,000 viewers.

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‘The Good Doctor’ Fall Finale: A Viral Infection Leads To An Outbreak Of Cliffhangers

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details about Monday night’s episode of The Good Doctor.
The intense fall finale of The Good Doctor starts with a surprise love affair and then gets dark with a viral outbreak which leads to lots of lives on t…

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details about Monday night’s episode of The Good Doctor. The intense fall finale of The Good Doctor starts with a surprise love affair and then gets dark with a viral outbreak which leads to lots of lives on the line. It was a very intense episode to end the year. Early in the episode we see Dr. Lim (Christina Chang) and Dr. Melendez (Nicholas Gonzalez) in bed together after a night of passion — and apparently there are no regrets…

Ratings: ABC’s ‘The Great Christmas Light Fight’ Premieres Brighter Than Last Year

ABC’s “Great Christmas Light Fight” perhaps didn’t do “great” in Monday’s season premiere, but it definitely did good. As a matter of fact, the annual series started higher in both ratings (+10 percent) and total viewers (+4 percent) than it did last year, which is a rarity for TV shows these days.

Paired with “The Good Doctor,” ABC finished primetime third among adults 18-49 and second in total viewers. With “The Voice” and its “Manifest” fall finale, NBC topped the evening.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.4 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8.2 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.6/6 and 9.3 million viewers. At 10, “Manifest” received a 1.1/5 and 6 million viewers.

Also Read: Ratings: ‘Dancing With the Stars Juniors’ Drops to New Series Lows

Fox was second in ratings with a 1.2/5 and third in viewers with 5.6 million. “The Resident” fall finale at 8 had a 0.9/4 and 5.1 million viewers. At 9, the “9-1-1” fall finale got a 1.4/5 and 6 million viewers.

ABC was third in ratings with a 1.1/5 and in second viewers with 6.1 million. “The Great Christmas Light Fight” from 8-10 averaged a 1.1/5 and 5.4 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.2/5 and 7.4 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.7/3 and in viewers with 4.8 million, airing all reruns.

Also Read: ‘Walking Dead’ Midseason Finale Loses 35 Percent of Last Year’s Viewers

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

Telemundo and The CW tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4 rating. Telemundo had a 2 share, CW had a 1. Telemundo was sixth in total viewers with 1.3 million, CW was seventh with 1.2 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.3 million viewers. At 9, “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 989,000 viewers.

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ABC’s “Great Christmas Light Fight” perhaps didn’t do “great” in Monday’s season premiere, but it definitely did good. As a matter of fact, the annual series started higher in both ratings (+10 percent) and total viewers (+4 percent) than it did last year, which is a rarity for TV shows these days.

Paired with “The Good Doctor,” ABC finished primetime third among adults 18-49 and second in total viewers. With “The Voice” and its “Manifest” fall finale, NBC topped the evening.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.4 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8.2 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.6/6 and 9.3 million viewers. At 10, “Manifest” received a 1.1/5 and 6 million viewers.

Fox was second in ratings with a 1.2/5 and third in viewers with 5.6 million. “The Resident” fall finale at 8 had a 0.9/4 and 5.1 million viewers. At 9, the “9-1-1” fall finale got a 1.4/5 and 6 million viewers.

ABC was third in ratings with a 1.1/5 and in second viewers with 6.1 million. “The Great Christmas Light Fight” from 8-10 averaged a 1.1/5 and 5.4 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.2/5 and 7.4 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.7/3 and in viewers with 4.8 million, airing all reruns.

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

Telemundo and The CW tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4 rating. Telemundo had a 2 share, CW had a 1. Telemundo was sixth in total viewers with 1.3 million, CW was seventh with 1.2 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.3 million viewers. At 9, “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 989,000 viewers.

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‘The Good Doctor’ Found Compassion for ‘Virtuous Pedophiles.’ Discuss.

The ABC medical series eschews its inspirational tone to make a point about empathy.

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “The Good Doctor” Season 2, Episode 9, “Empathy.”]

“The Good Doctor” tackled its thorniest storytelling challenge yet with an episode that asks its characters — and viewers — to sympathize with a pedophile. However, “Empathy” sought to make a strong distinction between a person who is suffering from the psychiatric disorder of pedophilia and those who actually molest children.

Distressed patient George Reynolds (Tyler Ritter) is reluctantly attracted to children, but he never acts on those urges and is doing everything possible to eliminate those feelings and behaviors that could endanger kids. Initially, Dr. Morgan Reznik (Fiona Gubelman) treats him as if he were a criminal, whereas Dr. Claire Browne (Antonia Thomas) sees George as having monstrous desires, but he himself is not a monster. However, he is worried the desires will someday make him become one.

Even for “The Good Doctor,” this is a bold storyline. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders draws a distinction between those with the disorder and those who actually abuse children. Real-life support groups like Virtuous Pedophiles liken the urge of pedophilia to any sexual preference — being born straight, gay, bisexual, pansexual, asexual, or otherwise, with people unable to choose or change their urges. Nevertheless, they acknowledge this inborn trait is morally wrong and have no intention of acting on it. To further complicate matters, many people who actually do molest children may not even be pedophiles but have other issues – such as they were also victims of abuse.

Many psychiatrists won’t take on these cases because they are obliged to report patients they feel present a risk to others. The stigma attached to this paraphilia is so strong that most people do not get the help they need. “The Good Doctor” demonstrates what many people do instead: handle the problem in increasingly dangerous ways. George first goes on anti-androgens, which depress the sexual urge, but also cause him to have a stroke. When he’s taken off them, he mutilates himself to try to kill the urge.

“I’m not a monster. I never touched anyone, any child,” he says. “My sister and I were always best friends, but then she had children. If I can’t keep taking the drugs, I had to do this.”

When self-injury fails, he asks the doctors to castrate him, but that is itself a dilemma because it’s stated that hospitals cannot ethically remove healthy organs to prevent crimes. Dr. Neil Melendez (Nicholas Gonzalez) compares it to amputating the hands of a kleptomaniac. George can only seek out psychological help, but this isn’t a clean enough solution for him because he will still have urges.

In the end, George decides to kill himself and steps in front of a moving vehicle. Even for a show that has lost patients before, it’s a shocking move because usually the deaths result from a medical failing after the doctors have done their best. But George’s death by suicide shows a failing on the part of education because he cannot imagine living happily with such deviance.

Usually, the marginalized person is a vehicle for inspiration on the show, but a simple happy ending that had George going into therapy would not have the same impact. Society’s condemnation is too great and the stakes are too high.

Mason Gooding and Freddie Highmore, "The Good Doctor"

Mason Gooding and Freddie Highmore, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

In George’s case, true empathy never was truly achieved. The doctors see he’s unhappy, but they underestimate his desperation even though he’s escaped from the hospital and hurt himself before. While they are not at fault for his suicide, they didn’t see the depth of his self-loathing and fear. It was simply too difficult for them to understand what he was going through because of the horrifying nature of these unwanted urges.

This might also be an insurmountable hurdle for viewers at home, and since George’s storyline is just one of three main plots in the episode, the nuances of the life and problems of a moral pedophile could only be lightly touched upon,  but at least the subject has been broached to inspire further conversation and research.

And yet, the show itself demonstrates an empathy that its characters lacked. The episode makes an effort to make George as sympathetic as possible: Played by Tyler Ritter, son of the late John Ritter and brother to Jason Ritter, he has a familiar and likable face. “The Good Doctor” is known for inclusive storytelling that embraces underrepresented groups, and these virtuous pedophiles fall into one of the most invisible groups of all.

”The Good Doctor” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.

‘The Good Doctor’, ‘Manifest’ Split 10 PM Ratings Win; ‘The Voice’ Tops Night

NBC’s two-hour The Voice  (1.7 rating in the adults 18-48 demo, 8.958 million viewers) topped Monday’s Big 4 competition in total viewers and the demo.
Following the singing competition, NBC’s Manifest (1.1, 6.100M) ranked No. 1 at 10…

NBC’s two-hour The Voice  (1.7 rating in the adults 18-48 demo, 8.958 million viewers) topped Monday’s Big 4 competition in total viewers and the demo. Following the singing competition, NBC’s Manifest (1.1, 6.100M) ranked No. 1 at 10 PM in the demo, though with a season-low rating pending afternoon updates. ABC’s 10 PM The Good Doctor (1.0, 6.521M) topped Manifest in total viewers for a second consecutive week. Earlier, ABC’s Dancing With the Stars (0.9, 7.321M) improved…

Ratings: ‘Manifest’ Descends From Last Week

NBC won another Monday in primetime with “The Voice” and “Manifest.” The steady singing competition is now in its playoff rounds, though that could not keep the Robert Zemeckis drama at the same altitude it reached last week.

ABC finished second in TV ratings last night, edging CBS. That No. 2 claim could change, however, as the Disney-owned broadcast net was preempted in local markets for a particularly competition “Monday Night Football” game.

The CW also had an NFL preemption.

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NBC was first in ratings with a 1.5 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.7/7 and 9.5 million viewers. At 10, “Manifest” had a 1.1/5 and 6.1 million viewers.

ABC was second in ratings with a 0.9/4 and in viewers with 7.1 million. “Dancing With the Stars” at 8 got a 1.0/4 and 7.3 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” received a 1.0/4 and 6.5 million viewers.

CBS was third in ratings with a 0.8/3 and in viewers with 5.7 million. “The Neighborhood”at 8 had a 1.1/4 and 6.1 million viewers. “Happy Together” at 8:30 got a 0.8/3 and 4.5 million viewers. At 9, “Magnum P.I.” received a 0.8/3 and 5.5 million viewers. “Bull” at 10 closed primetime with a 0.8/3 and 6.4 million viewers.

Also Read: Ratings: NBC Rides Cowboys to Another Huge Sunday Night

Fox was fourth in ratings with a 0.6/2 and in viewers with 2.9 million, airing just a pair of reruns.

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

The CW and Telemundo tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. CW had a 2 share, Telemundo had a 1. The CW was sixth in total viewers with 1.4 million, Telemundo was seventh with 1.1 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.5/2 and 1.6 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” at 9 got a 0.4/1 and 1.3 million viewers.

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NBC won another Monday in primetime with “The Voice” and “Manifest.” The steady singing competition is now in its playoff rounds, though that could not keep the Robert Zemeckis drama at the same altitude it reached last week.

ABC finished second in TV ratings last night, edging CBS. That No. 2 claim could change, however, as the Disney-owned broadcast net was preempted in local markets for a particularly competition “Monday Night Football” game.

The CW also had an NFL preemption.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.5 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.7/7 and 9.5 million viewers. At 10, “Manifest” had a 1.1/5 and 6.1 million viewers.

ABC was second in ratings with a 0.9/4 and in viewers with 7.1 million. “Dancing With the Stars” at 8 got a 1.0/4 and 7.3 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” received a 1.0/4 and 6.5 million viewers.

CBS was third in ratings with a 0.8/3 and in viewers with 5.7 million. “The Neighborhood”at 8 had a 1.1/4 and 6.1 million viewers. “Happy Together” at 8:30 got a 0.8/3 and 4.5 million viewers. At 9, “Magnum P.I.” received a 0.8/3 and 5.5 million viewers. “Bull” at 10 closed primetime with a 0.8/3 and 6.4 million viewers.

Fox was fourth in ratings with a 0.6/2 and in viewers with 2.9 million, airing just a pair of reruns.

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

The CW and Telemundo tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. CW had a 2 share, Telemundo had a 1. The CW was sixth in total viewers with 1.4 million, Telemundo was seventh with 1.1 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.5/2 and 1.6 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” at 9 got a 0.4/1 and 1.3 million viewers.

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Ratings: ‘Manifest’ Return Adds Altitude to NBC’s Monday

“Manifest” returned to NBC on Monday night after a one-week hiatus, and fans of the show seemed pretty happy to have it back.

NBC finished first in primetime again, when the network even enjoyed some growth from the prior Monday. Seven days ago, NBC substituted a “Wicked” Halloween special for its “Lost”-like airplane drama.

This Monday, ABC and Fox again tied for second in fast-national ratings, though the Disney-owned broadcaster’s Nielsen numbers may adjust down when ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” game is factored out of a few local markets.

Also Read: ‘Walking Dead’ Sends Andrew Lincoln (and Rick Grimes) Off With Ratings Growth

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.6 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8.1 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” from 8-10 p.m. averaged a 1.7/7 and 9 million viewers. “Manifest” at 10 landed a 1.3/6 and 6.3 million viewers.

This “Manifest’ episode slipped one-tenth of a ratings point from its last original and shed 1 million “live” viewers.

ABC and Fox tied for second in ratings, both with a 1.1. ABC had a 5 share, Fox had a 4. ABC was second in total viewers with 7.7 million, Fox was fourth with 5.3 million.

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For ABC, “Dancing With the Stars” from 8-10 received a 1.1/4 and 7.8 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.3/5 and 7.5 million viewers.

For Fox, “The Resident” at 8 had a 1.0/4 and 5 million viewers. At 9, “9-1-1” slipped from the prior week to a 1.2/5 and 5.6 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.8/3 and third in viewers with 5.5 million. “The Neighborhood” at 8 had a 1.0/4 and 5.8 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” got a 0.8/3 and 4.2 million viewers. “Magnum P.I.” at 9 received a 0.8/3 and 5.2 million viewers. At 10, “Bull” closed primetime with a 0.8/3 and 6.4 million viewers.

Also Read: Ratings: Fox Tops Thursday Despite Bad NFL Matchup, Worse Game

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

Telemundo was sixth in ratings with a 0.4/2 and in viewers with 1.1 million.

The CW was seventh in ratings with a 0.3/1 and in viewers with 970,000. “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.3/1 and 1.1 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” at 9 got a 0.3/1 and 866,000 viewers.

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Ratings: NBC’s ‘Wicked’ Halloween Special Beats ‘Bull’ in Key Demo

“Manifest” returned to NBC on Monday night after a one-week hiatus, and fans of the show seemed pretty happy to have it back.

NBC finished first in primetime again, when the network even enjoyed some growth from the prior Monday. Seven days ago, NBC substituted a “Wicked” Halloween special for its “Lost”-like airplane drama.

This Monday, ABC and Fox again tied for second in fast-national ratings, though the Disney-owned broadcaster’s Nielsen numbers may adjust down when ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” game is factored out of a few local markets.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.6 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and in total viewers with an average of 8.1 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” from 8-10 p.m. averaged a 1.7/7 and 9 million viewers. “Manifest” at 10 landed a 1.3/6 and 6.3 million viewers.

This “Manifest’ episode slipped one-tenth of a ratings point from its last original and shed 1 million “live” viewers.

ABC and Fox tied for second in ratings, both with a 1.1. ABC had a 5 share, Fox had a 4. ABC was second in total viewers with 7.7 million, Fox was fourth with 5.3 million.

For ABC, “Dancing With the Stars” from 8-10 received a 1.1/4 and 7.8 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.3/5 and 7.5 million viewers.

For Fox, “The Resident” at 8 had a 1.0/4 and 5 million viewers. At 9, “9-1-1” slipped from the prior week to a 1.2/5 and 5.6 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.8/3 and third in viewers with 5.5 million. “The Neighborhood” at 8 had a 1.0/4 and 5.8 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” got a 0.8/3 and 4.2 million viewers. “Magnum P.I.” at 9 received a 0.8/3 and 5.2 million viewers. At 10, “Bull” closed primetime with a 0.8/3 and 6.4 million viewers.

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.5 million.

Telemundo was sixth in ratings with a 0.4/2 and in viewers with 1.1 million.

The CW was seventh in ratings with a 0.3/1 and in viewers with 970,000. “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.3/1 and 1.1 million viewers. “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” at 9 got a 0.3/1 and 866,000 viewers.

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‘The Voice’ Strongest In Monday Ratings; ‘The Good Doctor’ Edges ‘Wicked Halloween’

On a generally stable night, NBC’s The Voice (1.8 rating in the adults 18-49 demo, 9.33 million viewers) topped the Big 4 in in every key ratings way Monday, though it ticked down a tenth week-to-week in the demo.
After the singing competition, A Very …

On a generally stable night, NBC's The Voice (1.8 rating in the adults 18-49 demo, 9.33 million viewers) topped the Big 4 in in every key ratings way Monday, though it ticked down a tenth week-to-week in the demo. After the singing competition, A Very Wicked Halloween special (1.0, 4.01M) couldn’t scare up Manifest-like stats in the slot, though it came in on par with NBC’s Monday 10 PM average last season in the demo. ABC's Dancing With the Stars (1.2, 8.32M) posted a…

Ratings: NBC’s ‘Wicked’ Halloween Special Beats ‘Bull’ in Key Demo

Something “Wicked” helped NBC top CBS in the 10 o’clock hour among adults 18-49 last night, though it was two hours of “The Voice” that paved the way for a primetime ratings win. Plus, NBC’s “A Very Wicked Halloween” ended up behind both “Bull” and “The Good Doctor” in terms of overall audience members.

NBC finished first in ratings on Monday thanks to its reality singing competition, but ABC was No. 1 in total viewers with “Dancing With the Stars” and NFL preemptions in Buffalo and New England.

The below fast-national Nielsen numbers for ABC are subject to downward adjustment.

Also Read: CBS Ratings Guru David Poltrack to Retire Next Year

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.5 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and second in total viewers with an average of 7.6 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.8/7 and 9.3 million viewers. The “Wicked” Halloween special at 10 received a 1.0/4 and 4 million viewers.

ABC and Fox tied for second in ratings, both with a 1.2/5. ABC was first in total viewers with 8.1 million, Fox was fourth with 5.3 million.

For ABC, “DWTS” from 8-10 averaged a 1.2/5 and 8.2 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.3/6 and 8 million viewers.

For Fox, “The Resident” at 8 received a 1.0/4 and 4.9 million viewers. At 9, “9-1-1” had a 1.4/5 and 5.7 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.9/4 and third in viewers with 6 million. “The Neighborhood” a 8 got a 1.1/5 and 6.1 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” had a 0.8/3 and 4.4 million viewers. “Magnum P.I.” at 9 received a 0.8/3 and 5.6 million viewers. At 10, “Bull” closed primetime with a 0.9/4 and 7 million viewers.

Also Read: Ratings: ‘God Friended Me’ Doesn’t Have a Prayer Against Fox’s World Series Clincher

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.6 million.

Telemundo and The CW tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. Telemundo had a 2 share, The CW had a 1. Telemundo was sixth in total viewers with 1.2 million, The CW was seventh with 1.1 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.2 million viewers. At 9, “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 966,000 viewers.

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Ratings: ‘Modern Family’ Grows With Much-Teased Halloween Episode Character Death

Something “Wicked” helped NBC top CBS in the 10 o’clock hour among adults 18-49 last night, though it was two hours of “The Voice” that paved the way for a primetime ratings win. Plus, NBC’s “A Very Wicked Halloween” ended up behind both “Bull” and “The Good Doctor” in terms of overall audience members.

NBC finished first in ratings on Monday thanks to its reality singing competition, but ABC was No. 1 in total viewers with “Dancing With the Stars” and NFL preemptions in Buffalo and New England.

The below fast-national Nielsen numbers for ABC are subject to downward adjustment.

NBC was first in ratings with a 1.5 rating/6 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic and second in total viewers with an average of 7.6 million, according to preliminary numbers. “The Voice” at 8 p.m. earned a 1.8/7 and 9.3 million viewers. The “Wicked” Halloween special at 10 received a 1.0/4 and 4 million viewers.

ABC and Fox tied for second in ratings, both with a 1.2/5. ABC was first in total viewers with 8.1 million, Fox was fourth with 5.3 million.

For ABC, “DWTS” from 8-10 averaged a 1.2/5 and 8.2 million viewers. At 10, “The Good Doctor” got a 1.3/6 and 8 million viewers.

For Fox, “The Resident” at 8 received a 1.0/4 and 4.9 million viewers. At 9, “9-1-1” had a 1.4/5 and 5.7 million viewers.

CBS was fourth in ratings with a 0.9/4 and third in viewers with 6 million. “The Neighborhood” a 8 got a 1.1/5 and 6.1 million viewers. At 8:30, “Happy Together” had a 0.8/3 and 4.4 million viewers. “Magnum P.I.” at 9 received a 0.8/3 and 5.6 million viewers. At 10, “Bull” closed primetime with a 0.9/4 and 7 million viewers.

Univision was fifth in ratings with a 0.5/2 and in viewers with 1.6 million.

Telemundo and The CW tied for sixth in ratings, both with a 0.4. Telemundo had a 2 share, The CW had a 1. Telemundo was sixth in total viewers with 1.2 million, The CW was seventh with 1.1 million.

For CW, “Arrow” at 8 had a 0.4/2 and 1.2 million viewers. At 9, “DC’s Legends of Tomorrow” got a 0.3/1 and 966,000 viewers.

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‘The Good Doctor’ Loses Its Mind When a Psychotic Hallucination Leads to the Truth

Showrunner David Shore throws everything but the kitchen sink at Dr. Aaron Glassman, and weighs in on a breakthrough for Shaun and Lea.

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “The Good Doctor” Season 2, Episode 4, “Tough Titmouse.”]

“The Good Doctor” showrunner David Shore throws everything at Dr. Aaron Glassman (Richard Schiff). He just underwent surgery for a brain tumor, but Monday’s episode deals with another kind of trauma when he starts interacting with a hallucination of his dead daughter Maddie (Holly Taylor).

“We wanted an opportunity to deal with what is the most important event in his life and his own unresolved issues,” Shore said. “This seemed like an opportune time as he is himself facing his own mortality.”

Glassman’s hallucination stems from the a combination of brain surgery and extreme sleep deprivation, with psychosis as the result. “ICU psychosis is fairly common. Psychosis obviously can mean many, many things, but sleep deprivation can cause the onset of it,” said Shore. “You experience all this as if it is completely real. It can be disturbing.”

Conversation between father and daughter becomes increasingly distraught as they discuss the events leading to the day she died. Maddie had been using drugs, but never went to rehab because Glassman felt he could be a hero and fix the problem himself. After yet another frustrating fight, he locked her out of the house. This led to her death and to his wife leaving him. The combative hallucination Glassman experiences finally makes him face the blame he’s felt ever since.

Holly Taylor, "The Good Doctor"
Holly Taylor, “The Good Doctor”

“We knew he felt a sense of responsibility, we also knew it’s a lot more complicated than that and we wanted to explore that,” said Shore. “There were a lot of conversations between me and David Hoselton who wrote the episode about the guilt and anger and denial. There had to be all those things — the denial, facing the truth, and being able to deal with the truth — in order to move forward. This is the sort of thing that can never be completely resolved, but I think in the course of this episode, he realizes the things that his anger wasn’t allowing for.”

Related to this is how he’s taken Dr. Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore) under his wing at the hospital. In the psychotic episode, Maddie claims Glassman neglected her and gave all of his attention to Shaun.

Shore said, “I think that is a manifestation of his own guilt. He has stepped up for Shaun to some extent. On some level his mind knows he needs to make up for something; it’s redemption. While that is good and honorable, I think that also carries with it a weight that you’ve failed somebody before this, and I think that is what’s going on there.”

While Glassman helped Shaun navigate through interactions at work, his friend and former neighbor Lea (Paige Spara) has arguably had a greater influence on him by giving him experiences outside of his comfort zone as a person with autism. After Lea left abruptly to pursue a career in her hometown, she returned this season only to find Shaun angry for hurting him with her departure. But he soon discovers that she’s also angry at him for not caring enough to ask why she left Hershey and returned.

Read More:‘The Good Doctor’ Premiere’s Surprise Ending Brings Back a Fan-Favorite Character for a Promising Season 2

After repeated attempts to get back into her good graces in this episode, Shaun is honest with her. “I don’t care what happened in Hershey,” he says, “But I care that you care.” This is apparently enough for a truce, and the two celebrate by singing karaoke in his apartment.

Paige Spara, "The Good Doctor"

Paige Spara, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

“Shaun is learning that she is somebody with whom he’s in a relationship,” Shore said. “He is making missteps but he values that relationship and he’s learning how to navigate that relationship.”

On “The Good Doctor,” the neurotypical characters without autism also learn from Shaun’s unique way of interpreting the world. Shore said, “Lea learns the value of candor and their friendship. I think the thing that she responds to with Shaun is he’s just Shaun. He doesn’t try to be somebody he’s not, he doesn’t try to please her. When he makes that statement at the end that ‘I don’t care, but I do care that you care,’ the first half of that statement could be devastating for somebody else, and it arguably is, but the truth in the second half is what she values and what she wants from him.”

Shaun’s progress can be inconsistent though. In the episode’s last moments, just as the two friends begin to sing, Shaun spills some information that he apparently thinks is good news: He rented the two-bedroom apartment that Lea liked but couldn’t afford, and it’s intended for both of them to share.

“We’re never satisfied with leaving things perfect because they never are,” said Shore. “He does something wonderful and then oversteps at the same time. Those little victories and the little steps forward mean so much, but the little steps backward also mean so much.”

”The Good Doctor” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.

Broadcast Live+3 Ratings for Week of Oct. 1: ‘Good Doctor’ Doubles, ‘Manifest’ Stays on Top

“Manifest” continues to top all other new shows of the season in the delayed viewing ratings. In the Live+3 ratings for week 2 of the 2018-2019 broadcast season, which ran from Oct. 1-Oct. 7, “Manifest” was the top gainer in tot…

“Manifest” continues to top all other new shows of the season in the delayed viewing ratings. In the Live+3 ratings for week 2 of the 2018-2019 broadcast season, which ran from Oct. 1-Oct. 7, “Manifest” was the top gainer in total viewers and second highest gainer in adults 18-49, second only to fellow NBC series […]

‘The Good Doctor’ Squeaks Past ‘Manifest’ In Dramatic Viewership Photo Finish As ‘Dancing’ Rises In Ratings – Update

UPDATED: Snapshot: New Series Week 2: The Neighborhood (CBS, 1.1 Live+Same Day rating in 18-49, -15%, 6.4 million viewers), Happy Together (0.9, -10%, 5 million). The broadcast series faced both Monday Night Football on ESPN and baseball on TBS. There …

UPDATED: Snapshot: New Series Week 2: The Neighborhood (CBS, 1.1 Live+Same Day rating in 18-49, -15%, 6.4 million viewers), Happy Together (0.9, -10%, 5 million). The broadcast series faced both Monday Night Football on ESPN and baseball on TBS. There have been more than the usual upwards and downward adjustments in the finals, the story has been updated throughout.  After the dust settled from the NFL preemptions on NBC and ABC last night, the two networks’ 10 PM drama…

‘The Good Doctor’: Mansplaining MDs Lead to an Episode of Powerful Workplace Drama

The ABC drama demonstrates that gender inequality isn’t just about harassment and the wage gap, but mundane interactions and comments.

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “The Good Doctor” Season 2, Episode 3, “36 Hours.”]

In its Oct. 8 episode, “The Good Doctor” contains one of the most accurate portrayals of everyday sexism on TV. When Dr. Claire Browne (Antonia Thomas) voices concern about a hospital policy, president Dr. Marcus Andrews (Hill Harper) takes umbrage, chastising her for even questioning him and turning his counterargument into a personal attack: “We’re going to have to agree to disagree about whether my foolish new policies make any sense,” he said. “I know I told you to be more assertive, but you also need to make sure you don’t forsake your normally excellent judgment in that effort.”

In a previous episode, he did tell her to be more aggressive at work, and nothing in her approach was disrespectful or warranted Andrews’ anger or condescension. When Browne discusses this interaction over surgery with cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Neil Melendez (Nicholas Gonzalez) and fellow surgical resident Dr. Alex Park (Will Yun Lee), neither man can understand why she’s troubled. As men, being outspoken is praised as strength, and their privilege doesn’t allow them to see the inequity of her treatment; it isn’t part of their reality. Park even suggests that she should have chosen her words more carefully.

Nurse Ann Flores (Liza Lapira) jumps into the conversation, but her anger is targeted at Melendez, whom she feels alternately punished or rewarded Browne during the surgery for her attitude. Whether Flores’ criticism is warranted or not, she gives voice to the simmering anger and resentment that many women feel in response to the frustrating gender politics at work. If her comments seem harsher than the situation calls for, it’s because she’s responding to a cumulative experience of inequality and being silenced.

Hill Harper, "The Good Doctor"

Hill Harper, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

Everything comes to a head when Andrews notices the bickering and demands to know who is at fault for the unprofessional behavior. At this point, Melendez claims everyone is just tired from the 27-hour surgery and then praises Browne’s aggressiveness during the operation. In turn, Flores praises Melendez for being open to input from the surgical staff.

Read More:‘The Good Doctor’ Premiere’s Surprise Ending Brings Back a Fan-Favorite Character for a Promising Season 2

It’s not an entirely satisfying ending because it’s not clear if the change of heart comes from a genuine place of understanding, or if it’s done out of self-preservation to look good in front of the hospital’s president. Their comments could also be viewed as manipulation designed to ensure better behavior in the future. In any case, Andrews never received any blowback for his manner, and likely never will.

The decision to devote an episode to mundane conversations is impressive: Calling attention to how people conduct themselves every day generates powerful drama. Just as important is how these interactions are often swept under the rug, which allows the cycle to continue. Here, “The Good Doctor” names it so we can claim it.

”The Good Doctor” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.

‘A Million Little Things’, ‘The Good Doctor’, ‘S.W.A.T.’, ‘SVU’ & ‘Bull’ Join ‘HTGAWM’ In Premiere Week Triple-Digit DVR Lift Club

After the Live+3 ratings for Premiere Week came in, there was one series, ABC’s How To Get Away With Murder, that posted a three-digit ratings lift from Live+Same Day, 100% in adults 18-49.
After four days of Live+7 data, including all of Premier…

After the Live+3 ratings for Premiere Week came in, there was one series, ABC’s How To Get Away With Murder, that posted a three-digit ratings lift from Live+Same Day, 100% in adults 18-49. After four days of Live+7 data, including all of Premiere Week’s big L3 percentage gainers, six shows more than doubled their L+SD adults tally, four returning ones, ABC’s HTGAWM and The Good Doctor, NBC’s Law & Order: SVU and CBS’ Bull and S.W.A.T, and one new one, ABC’s A Million Litt…

‘The Good Doctor’: Brutal Practice or Cultural Divide? The Show Pushes Ethical Boundaries in Choosing a Side

ABC’s hit medical series coincidentally also addresses when it’s okay to lie or deceive.

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from “The Good Doctor” Season 3, Episode 2, “Middle Ground.”]

“The Good Doctor” excels at two types of storylines: those that highlight underrepresented groups — such as the transgender community, or people with autism — and those that place the San Jose St. Bonaventure Hospital surgeons in ethical quandaries that don’t always have satisfactory conclusions. On Monday’s episode, the medical case of teenage patient Asha (Camille Hyde), who was tied down and “circumcised” at age two by family members, ticks both boxes. Here we see the hospital condemn the brutal practice, but “The Good Doctor” also shows the organization undermining its own authority by crossing ethical boundaries.

Female genital mutilation (FGM) — also known as female genital cutting or female circumcision — is the ritual cutting or removal of some or all of the external female genitalia. It affects 200 million worldwide; it also fuels a complicated conversation about culture and health that surrounds it. In the episode, Asha comes in for Dr. Audrey Lim (Christina Chang) to perform a vaginal reconstruction to fix the damage that she believes makes her hideous in the eyes of her American peers and future romantic partners. Complications set in after she wakes from surgery and experiences extreme pain, which means that despite the extensive damage done to her as a toddler, some nerve endings still work.

It also turns out that she used a fake ID at the hospital. Her real name is Mara, and she’s underage. When her parents arrive, debates rage over the options to alleviate Mara’s pain: undoing Lim’s work and killing the peripheral nerves completely, or additional reconstructive surgery. Dr. Lim believes the latter option could protect Mara’s newly awakened nerve endings, which would also give her hope of someday feeling sexual pleasure. Although Mara states that she will follow her parents’ preferences, Dr. Lim deceives them all and does the reconstruction. Mara wakes with pain in her cheek, realizing that tissue was taken from there for the reconstruction, but happily stays mum.

Alimi Ballard, Khalilah Joi, and Camille Hyde, "The Good Doctor"

FGM can take place from infancy through adulthood, and can involve different degrees of cutting. Both the World Health Organization and United Nations condemn the procedure as a human rights violation. They see it as unnecessary and harmful to a person’s health without any physical benefits, and possibly fatal. It is also deemed to be used as a way to control women’s sexuality and sexual pleasure, while maintaining gender inequality in these groups. In addition, it’s believed that no child too young to give consent should be harmed, even if it’s done with the parents’ approval.

“The Good Doctor” only lightly touches on why some cultures may find the practice desirable. It can be viewed as a rite of passage that identifies womanhood and belonging in some communities, with some groups treating it as a joyous initiation that a young woman will celebrate. Understanding that gulf in perceptions isn’t a politically correct nicety: Merely informing these communities of the health risks isn’t enough to deter them, since those risks can even give extra significance to the cultural value of FGM. Without fully appreciating its value to these communities, it’s difficult to find an argument against it that will resonate.

Mara’s parents are portrayed as loving and proud of her achievements. Mara’s mother mentions how cutting is a tradition that all women of the family have endured, and how it makes Mara desirable for marriage to men in their community. They want what’s best for their daughter, but this definition of what’s best is still rooted in the standards of their old community, not the new one that Mara must grow up in.

Alimi Ballard and Khalilah Joi, "The Good Doctor"

Having Dr. Lim defy the parents’ decision — and even Mara’s stated wish — is a bold choice for the show because it’s not solely rooted in concern for Mara’s physical health. Instead, Lim makes a decision based on what she thinks will help the girl’s emotional and social well-being. While it’s possible that Mara changed her mind and told Lim she wanted the reconstruction offscreen, it’s implied that she did not and that even Dr. Alex Park (Will Yun Lee) understands that Lim is operating without express consent.

Mara’s case is framed in the context of her experiencing psychological stress about assimilating into American society because of what was done to her as a child. Her description of the procedure — how her aunt and grandmother “tied me down” — also sounds incredibly traumatic. For viewers, there’s no doubt that FGM was a negative event in her life, and a doctor choosing to go rogue is positioned as a happy ending for all.

Read More: ‘The Good Doctor’ Is the Perfect Show for Anyone Who Feels Like an Outsider, Marginalized, or Misunderstood

“The Good Doctor” often portrays its medical professionals not only as flawed human beings dealing with romance or addictions on top of their stressful jobs, but as people struggling with the weightier issues of the human condition. However, Lim’s decision should be questioned for its shaky ethics. Her character is an example of how, in its second season, the show has strengthened and expanded its storylines beyond exploring what it’s like to think like the titular good doctor, Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), who has autism and savant syndrome.

This episode’s story slightly dovetails with Murphy’s: He struggles with the nuances of straight-out lying, white lies, and lying by omission. He eventually settles on how intent — to help or harm — will guide the need for and degree of deception. When Dr. Lim decides to leave the parents out of the loop and claim that Mara gave her verbal consent, she did so with the intent to help her patient more holistically.

Nicholas Gonzalez and Freddie Highmore, "The Good Doctor"

While Lim’s decision-making is questionable, it aligns with the show’s aim of understanding ourselves and others’ motivations, and how achieving that goal still doesn’t lead to a clear-cut outcomes. The show’s thoughtful and more nuanced exploration of complicated and often controversial topics informs just enough to inspire more research and discussion, playing with ideas as much as with medical oddities. This is one reason that, despite its unabashed sentimentality, the show avoids becoming inspiration porn.

”The Good Doctor” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.

‘Manifest’ & ‘The Good Doctor’ Lead Premiere Monday Live+3 Ratings Gains

Following an impressive Live+same day debut, NBC’s new drama Manifest was even more impressive in its Live+3 delivery.
After three days of playback, the missing plane series’ L+SD viewership increased by a whopping  +5.7 million viewers (from 10….

Following an impressive Live+same day debut, NBC's new drama Manifest was even more impressive in its Live+3 delivery. After three days of playback, the missing plane series’ L+SD viewership increased by a whopping  +5.7 million viewers (from 10.4 million to 16.1 million, +55%). That was the third largest absolute gain for a broadcast series premiere ever, behind ABC's Roseanne (+6.586 million, 3/27/2018)  How To Get Away with Murder (+5.9 million on 9/25/14). Manifest

‘The Good Doctor’ Premiere’s Surprise Ending Brings Back a Fan-Favorite Character for a Promising Season 2

ABC’s medical drama continues to double down on heart — literally and figuratively — in a return that’s true to form.

[Editor’s Note: The following article contains spoilers from “The Good Doctor” Season 2, Episode 1, “Hello” — the premiere episode.]

“The Good Doctor” is back for another season of medical anomalies, cutting-edge procedures, hospital politics, and uplifting storylines. As the anti-“House,” the series is unapologetically sentimental and heartwarming thanks to its lead. Seen through the lens of Shaun Murphy (Freddie Highmore), a doctor with autism and savant syndrome, everyday human interactions become more fraught, and in turn shine a light on the viewers’ own perceptions of the world.

In short order, the series presses reset on Shaun’s world by removing his mentor Dr. Aaron Glassman (Richard Schiff) as head of the San Jose St. Bonaventure Hospital and installing the much more antagonistic and ambitious former chief of surgery Dr. Marcus Andrews (Hill Harper) in his place. This challenges Shaun to not only navigate his job without the protection of his mentor but also learn to be the moral support for Glassman while he gets treated for his recently diagnosed brain cancer.

Read More:‘The Good Doctor’ Is the Perfect Show for Anyone Who Feels Like an Outsider, Marginalized, or Misunderstood

The show also continues to double down on heart — literally and figuratively — with its two medical cases of the week. The first is concerned with a much-publicized operation in which a patient has a backup heart installed (which will effectively make her a dual-hearted person much like the Timelords on “Doctor Who,” but without the regeneration abilities), while the second allows Shaun to have one of his brainwaves (thanks to physics) and realize that a troubled homeless man isn’t schizophrenic, but has a brain tumor that caused him to act erratically and leave his wife and daughter behind.

Raphael Sbarge and Freddie Highmore, "The Good Doctor"

Raphael Sbarge and Freddie Highmore, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

In trying to convince the man known as Harry (Raphael Sbarge) — but whose real name is found on his ID in the homeless encampment — to trust them and have the operation, Shaun says, “I have a neurological condition; I will always have it. You have a neurological condition too, but yours can be cured; you just need some surgery and you can be Edward Austin Thomas again.”

It’s moments like these that simultaneously plague and empower “The Good Doctor.” On one hand, such incidents — like Shaun’s speech from the pilot about the day his brother went to heaven — can come off as too on-the-nose and ruthlessly mawkish, as if they’re heavy-handedly designed to tug at heartstrings. On the other hand, because viewers have gotten to know and embrace the character, they can also accept this side of him — his ability to lay out his point of view in a raw and unselfconscious way. To Shaun, he is being matter-of-fact, but to those watching who normally shield themselves in everyday interactions, Shaun’s candid nature is refreshing, vulnerable, and brave.

Even though it’s inspiring, it’s also squirm-inducing; it’s just not clear how anyone is expected to react. No wonder Harry, aka Edward, says, “You’re not a doctor are you?” These are the moments when “The Good Doctor” can lose the audience or convert them, depending on one’s ability to lean into the cringe factor and embrace the heart.

Both operations come off beautifully, and the other hospital staff make strides in their own growth as well, including Dr. Jared Kalu (Chuku Modu), who is leaving for a hospital in Denver. The combination of wrapped-up procedural elements and feel-good emotional moments make for a quietly satisfying episode.

That Surprise Coda

Paige Spara, "The Good Doctor"

Paige Spara, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

“The Good Doctor” does one better, however, in its last moments by giving fans an extra reason to be excited this season. As Shaun returns home, he’s greeted by a familiar, smiling face: Lea (Paige Spara). The last time his former neighbor appeared, she had taken Shaun on an unforgettable road trip in which he experienced many firsts, including his first drink of alcohol and first kiss. The life-altering trip also made its mark on her, and she decided to move back to her hometown to pursue her dream of refurbishing classic cars full time.

But now she’s back with enough bags to hint she may intend to bunk with him, at least for a bit. The two characters have always had strong chemistry, and even if she’s back to be his aide, that would be in itself good news. After all, it’s the one significant and positive relationship seen outside of work. And in a way, after that discussion of how his brother looked out for him and made sure to give him fun experiences, it’s easy to see how Lea has also filled this role.

Read More:‘The Good Doctor’ Featured a Teenage Transgender Actress, Raising the Bar for Representation Yet Again

Then again, it’s also likely she’s back to continue that whiff of romance the two shared. At the end of last season, “The Good Doctor” showrunner David Shore confirmed Lea would return and she’d probably be involved with Shaun for his first romantic relationship.

“Lea’s going to be back. I can tell you that,” Shore said at the time. “She’s fantastic. She has a spark and an energy that is really wonderful to watch. If you place him in a ‘relationship’ with any woman, people want that for him. We want him to find a relationship. We want him to find love. It’s got to be with the right woman. It’s got to be with the right person who understands him and accepts him and for sure doesn’t pity him, recognizes all that he is and we got that from Lea almost straight away, I think.”

Of course, the other telling detail is the episode’s title “Hello.” Earlier in the episode, Dr. Claire Browne (Antonia Thomas) asks Shaun to say hello to Jared before he leaves the hospital. It’s her way of expressing that she regrets they ended their romance. When Shaun greets Lea with his own “hello,” this is a direct echo of Claire’s gesture and therefore carries with it romantic implications.

Freddie Highmore, "The Good Doctor"

Freddie Highmore, “The Good Doctor”

ABC

The appeal of romance in media is not anything new, and appears to be in demand more than ever judging by the splash made by “Crazy Rich Asians” and the enduring success of Hallmark movies. “The Good Doctor” has made strides in eliminating misconceptions about people on the spectrum, and its treatment of romance will add to other recent portrayals of characters with autism who’ve found love, including Dean (Harold Perrineau) on TNT’s “Claws” and Sam (Keir Gilchrist) on Netflix’s “Atypical.”

And this may seem silly to point out, but despite some challenges with interactions and expressions, people with autism are capable and desirous of love. And in Shaun’s case, he is a character who is worthy of it. Determined, moral, and good-hearted, he’s aspirational and lovable. One does not need to have autism to understand what it is to feel marginalized or misunderstood. And giving Shaun romance also gives hope to anyone else who identifies with being a misfit or on the outside.

Shaun and Lea’s relationship will probably not go from zero to 60 very quickly. In fact, it’s safe to expect many cautious steps within episodes offering no romance altogether. This is a very different show from “Grey’s Anatomy” after all. Nevertheless, however their relationship advances — whether it’s platonically, romantically, or otherwise — it should make for interesting TV. In the very least, here’s hoping that means Shaun’s replacement neighbor, that horrifying Kenny (Chris D’elia), is out of the picture.

”The Good Doctor” airs Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on ABC.

‘Good Doctor’ Writer David Renaud Aims at ‘Authentic’ Depictions of People With Disabilities

“The Good Doctor” is one of the few shows that puts an autistic character front and center. But the hit Sony TV-ABC series, which returns for its second season on Sept. 24, has another distinction. One of the writers, David Renaud, is a &#8…

“The Good Doctor” is one of the few shows that puts an autistic character front and center. But the hit Sony TV-ABC series, which returns for its second season on Sept. 24, has another distinction. One of the writers, David Renaud, is a “good doctor” himself off-screen — and uses a wheelchair in daily life. Canadian-born […]

‘The Good Doctor’: Beau Garrett Not Returning For Season 2

Beau Garrett is clocking out as hospital attorney Jessica Preston on ABC’s The Good Doctor. The surprise exit comes ahead of the premiere of season 2 on Sept. 24.
Garrett is the second series regular to depart the show. In April, Deadline exclusi…

Beau Garrett is clocking out as hospital attorney Jessica Preston on ABC’s The Good Doctor. The surprise exit comes ahead of the premiere of season 2 on Sept. 24. Garrett is the second series regular to depart the show. In April, Deadline exclusively reported that original cast member Chuku Modu, who played surgical resident Dr. Jared Kalu, turned in his scrubs. Garrett’s Jessica was the former best friend of Dr. Aaron Glassman’s (Richard Schiff) daughter Maddie who died…

‘The Good Doctor’ Season 2 Trailer Is In, Showcasing Lisa Edelstein’s New Character

The first trailer for Season 2 of ABC’s acclaimed medical drama The Good Doctor has been released, showcasing the introduction of Lisa Edelstein, who is joining as recurring character Dr. Blaize.
The Good Doctor is built around Shaun Murphy (play…

The first trailer for Season 2 of ABC’s acclaimed medical drama The Good Doctor has been released, showcasing the introduction of Lisa Edelstein, who is joining as recurring character Dr. Blaize. The Good Doctor is built around Shaun Murphy (played by Freddie Highmore), a young autistic surgeon who has savant syndrome. His integration into San Jose St. Bonaventure Hospital at the instigation of mentor, Dr. Aaron Glassman (Richard Schiff) is one of the key focuses of the…