‘SNL’ Parodies Netflix’s Massive Volume Of Programming, Suggests ‘The Crown’ & ‘Family Matters’ Reboots

Netflix has been expanding its content at a breakneck speed, even exceeding its own projections. Experts now estimate that the streaming giant has spent $12-$13 billion on programming this year, up from the $8 billion the company had been expected to s…

Netflix has been expanding its content at a breakneck speed, even exceeding its own projections. Experts now estimate that the streaming giant has spent $12-$13 billion on programming this year, up from the $8 billion the company had been expected to shell out. Tonight’s Saturday Night Live, hosted by Claire Foy, the outgoing star of Netflix’s British royal drama The Crown, took notice. “We’ve gone crazy,” SNL‘s Netflix ad proclaimed. “We’re spending billions of dollars…

Bad Robot Options Thriller Pitch From Ed Hemming, Writer On ‘The Crown’

EXCLUSIVE: J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot has optioned an untitled feature pitch from The Crown writer Ed Hemming following a competitive auction.
Plot details are being kept under wraps on the in-demand pitch, which is understood to be a high school-set…

EXCLUSIVE: J.J. Abrams’ Bad Robot has optioned an untitled feature pitch from The Crown writer Ed Hemming following a competitive auction. Plot details are being kept under wraps on the in-demand pitch, which is understood to be a high school-set thriller in the present day with a socially relevant twist. The project was pitched as a TV or film project but Bad Robot is positioning it as a movie. Hemming is the second-lead writer on The Crown after creator Peter Morgan…

How ‘The Crown’ Helped Claire Foy Land ‘The Girl in the Spider’s Web,’ Even Though the Characters Are Totally Different

Filmmaker Fede Alvarez explained to IndieWire how the Emmy-winning actress’ role as Queen Elizabeth made it clear she could play misanthropic hacker Lisbeth Salander.

Emmy-winning actress Claire Foy is in a persistent state of professional transformation. While most audiences only got hip to the British star’s talents thanks to her two-season turn as Queen Elizabeth on Netflix’s hit series “The Crown,” the star has spent the past couple of years rounding out her resume with a series of very different big screen parts, from biopics like “Breathe” to the dramedy “The Lady in the Van.”

This year, with “The Crown” behind her — Olivia Colman will take over the role next season — Foy turned her attentions to three new films, including Fede Alvarez’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web,” which marks her biggest transformation yet.

As misanthropic hacker Lisbeth Salander, Foy is tasked with taking on a role that’s not only been played by two different actresses, including Rooney Mara and Noomi Rapace, but one that requires its star to dramatically alter her appearance to match up with author Stiegg Larson’s vivid descriptions. When Foy was announced for the film in September of last year, the casting was seen as a surprise. The actress who plays Queen Elizabeth? Really? Alvarez expected that, and was eager to work against whatever expectations people already had for both Foy and Lisbeth.

“Every time we announce some cast for some character that you saw before or you read before, it’s very unlikely that the person looks like whatever you imagined when you read the book,” Alvarez said in a recent interview with IndieWire. “Plus, when it’s already been interpreted in some movie with another actor, then you compare with that actor. … When the choice is obvious and everybody goes like, ‘Oh, that’s a great choice,’ it’s because that actor has played similar characters in the past. That’s all it means.”

Foy was also unbothered by those early expectations. She just wanted to play Lisbeth. “I absolutely loved her,” Foy said. “I really relished the challenge of making the movie. … I think it’s an odd thing to want people to have a certain experience when they go to the cinema. It’s not up to me to dictate that to people. It’s just for me to listen and go, ‘Oh, that’s interesting that you thought that.'”

Lisbeth, with her blunt haircut and multiple tattoos and piercings, cuts an instantly recognizable figure. Alvarez said he wasn’t impressed by actors who can just don the exterior look of a character. “The clothes and the makeup, anybody can do that. Most actors, if they’re the right age and physicality, they’ll look the part,” he said. “The hardest part is to be able to play those emotions in a fair way. In order to do that, there has to be something about you this is very similar to the character.”

The Crown - Elizabeth - Elizabeth watches Philip's plane take off

Claire Foy, “The Crown”

Stuart Hendry / Netflix

He found that in Foy, who Alvarez said was much closer to Lisbeth and Queen Elizabeth than she might appear at first glance.

“Claire presents herself in a certain way and she’s very easygoing and light-hearted, but she is in person way more similar to Lisbeth than what you think,” Alvarez said. “She has a lot of fire and a lot of passion for what she does. She says all the time, she’s very angry at a lot of things all the time, she doesn’t even know at what sometimes, but she always says herself that she’s very angry. There’s so many, many, many things that really, really connect with her. So, when it comes to play a lot of those emotions, she takes from her real experience. … I think she knows those emotions and she knows that place in the world in a way, and that’s the toughest part.”

That might also be why Foy proved to be so successful at playing young Queen Elizabeth on “The Crown,” and Alvarez sees some distinct similarities between the two roles: they’re both apart concealing emotion, but they both require an actress who is also able to let the audience realize what’s actually going on under the surface.

“It’s really about how she’s going to show you as an audience what she really feels when what she’s actively doing all of the time is concealing those feelings from you,” he said. “Lisbeth Salander doesn’t want you to know how she really feels. She will hide as much as she can her true emotions. … She’s really good at repressing those emotions. The Queen has to do that all the time. The Queen is not allowed to be herself, she’s not allowed to be angry at someone or be unpolite. She has to stay in this mask, but what makes this performance amazing is that you know exactly what’s going on every moment. You know when she’s angry, when she’s sad, when she’s happy, even though she keeps a poker face. Lisbeth is the same in a way.”

For Alvarez, that’s what sets Foy apart from the pack, and why she’s able to disappear into roles that might seem to be so dissimilar. They’re all Foy.

“There’s certain actors you can tell them, ‘Okay, I want you to be very fierce in this movie, in this scene, but I want you to be terrified at the same time,” the filmmaker said. “Most actors will go, ‘What do you want? Fierce or terrified?’ She gets it right away. She’ll play it fierce, but she’ll be terrified. You’ll see it and you’ll feel it, and that’s truly incredible to see. Not a lot of actors can do that.”

Sony Pictures will release “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” in theaters on Friday, November 9.

‘The Crown’: Emerald Fennell Confirmed To Play Camilla In Season 3 Of Netflix Series

Call the Midwife‘s Emerald Fennell has been tapped to play Camilla Parker Bowles in the third season of The Crown, Netflix has confirmed.
Season 3 of The Crown is set in the 1970s, when Camilla first met Prince Charles, played by Josh O’Con…

Call the Midwife‘s Emerald Fennell has been tapped to play Camilla Parker Bowles in the third season of The Crown, Netflix has confirmed. Season 3 of The Crown is set in the 1970s, when Camilla first met Prince Charles, played by Josh O’Connor. “I’m absolutely over the moon, and completely terrified, to be joining so many hugely talented people on The Crown,” said Fennell. “I absolutely love Camilla, and am very grateful that my teenage years have well prepared me for…

‘The Crown’ Casts ‘Call the Midwife’ Star Emerald Fennell as Camilla Parker Bowles for Season 3

“Call the Midwife” star Emerald Fennell has been cast as Camilla Parker Bowles for Season 3 of Netflix’s “The Crown.”

The third installment of the Netflix royal drama will jump forward in time, showing Camilla meeting Prince Charles (Josh O’Connor) in the ’70s. After his marriage to Princess Diana ended, Charles married Camilla, making her the Duchess of Cornwall.

“I’m absolutely over the moon, and completely terrified, to be joining so many hugely talented people on ‘The Crown,’” the British actress said. “I absolutely love Camilla, and am very grateful that my teenage years have well prepared me for playing a chain-smoking serial snogger with a pudding bowl hair cut.”

Also Read: ‘The Crown’: Tobias Menzies Is Lost in Thought in First Look at Netflix’s New Prince Philip (Photo)

The way Netflix has worked (and is expected to continue to work) this particular show is to swap out its actors every two seasons to allow for the progression of the story of Queen Elizabeth II’s life.

Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth opposite Matt Smith’s Prince Philip on the first two seasons of the royal drama, with Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret and Matthew Goode as Lord Snowdon. For Season 3, it’s already been announced that Olivia Colman will take over for Foy as the queen, with Tobias Menzies playing the older version of Philip, Helena Bonham Carter filling in for Kirby as Margaret and Ben Daniels becoming Lord Snowden, among other casting changes.

“The Crown” Season 3 stars Colman, Menzies, Bonham Carter, Daniels, O’Connor, Marion Bailey (the Queen Mother), and Erin Doherty (Princess Anne), among others.

“The Crown” Season 3 will launch in 2019.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Crown’: Tobias Menzies Is Lost in Thought in First Look at Netflix’s New Prince Philip (Photo)

‘The Crown’ Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith on What They’ll Miss Most About Royal Roles

‘The Crown’: Matt Smith Has Great (Pay Equality) Advice for New Prince Philip Tobias Menzies (Video)

Netflix Orders Dead-DJ Drama ‘White Lines’ From ‘The Crown’ Producers

“Call the Midwife” star Emerald Fennell has been cast as Camilla Parker Bowles for Season 3 of Netflix’s “The Crown.”

The third installment of the Netflix royal drama will jump forward in time, showing Camilla meeting Prince Charles (Josh O’Connor) in the ’70s. After his marriage to Princess Diana ended, Charles married Camilla, making her the Duchess of Cornwall.

“I’m absolutely over the moon, and completely terrified, to be joining so many hugely talented people on ‘The Crown,'” the British actress said. “I absolutely love Camilla, and am very grateful that my teenage years have well prepared me for playing a chain-smoking serial snogger with a pudding bowl hair cut.”

The way Netflix has worked (and is expected to continue to work) this particular show is to swap out its actors every two seasons to allow for the progression of the story of Queen Elizabeth II’s life.

Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth opposite Matt Smith’s Prince Philip on the first two seasons of the royal drama, with Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret and Matthew Goode as Lord Snowdon. For Season 3, it’s already been announced that Olivia Colman will take over for Foy as the queen, with Tobias Menzies playing the older version of Philip, Helena Bonham Carter filling in for Kirby as Margaret and Ben Daniels becoming Lord Snowden, among other casting changes.

“The Crown” Season 3 stars Colman, Menzies, Bonham Carter, Daniels, O’Connor, Marion Bailey (the Queen Mother), and Erin Doherty (Princess Anne), among others.

“The Crown” Season 3 will launch in 2019.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Crown': Tobias Menzies Is Lost in Thought in First Look at Netflix's New Prince Philip (Photo)

'The Crown' Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith on What They'll Miss Most About Royal Roles

'The Crown': Matt Smith Has Great (Pay Equality) Advice for New Prince Philip Tobias Menzies (Video)

Netflix Orders Dead-DJ Drama 'White Lines' From 'The Crown' Producers

U.K. Production Hits New Highs, Spurred by Tax Reliefs

Philip Hammond, Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer, has hailed “Peppa Pig,” “The Crown,” and “Darkest Hour” and said authorities remain committed to tax relief for U.K.-produced film and high-end TV. The chancellor was speaking after new research sh…

Philip Hammond, Britain’s chancellor of the exchequer, has hailed “Peppa Pig,” “The Crown,” and “Darkest Hour” and said authorities remain committed to tax relief for U.K.-produced film and high-end TV. The chancellor was speaking after new research showed that £632 million ($825 million) of relief seeded £3.2 billion of production spend in 2016, the latest […]

Netflix Stock Rises 2% After Streaming Platform’s Strong Emmy Night

Netflix stock is up more than 2% today, to about $359 a share, after the subscription streaming platform tied HBO last night for the most Emmy Awards.
Paced by The Crown and Godless, Netflix captured 23 total Emmys, including those handed out at last w…

Netflix stock is up more than 2% today, to about $359 a share, after the subscription streaming platform tied HBO last night for the most Emmy Awards. Paced by The Crown and Godless, Netflix captured 23 total Emmys, including those handed out at last weekend’s Creative Arts ceremony. The tally equaled that of HBO, whose flagship series Game of Thrones took home top honors for a drama. During the three-hour Emmy ceremony, several Netflix winners saluted the streaming…

Emmys Get Sentimental on the Way to Saluting ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’

Who knew that Emmy voters were such softies?

The 70th Primetime Emmy Awards was supposed to be “Game of Thrones” v. “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” v. “Atlanta” — but from the first award of the night, which handed Henry Winkler his first Emmy after four decades in television, voters turned it into a feel-good, four-hankie affair.

So Winkler won for “Barry.” And “The Americans,” long acclaimed but just as long ignored by Television Academy voters, got two shiny parting gifts in the form of Emmys for star Matthew Rhys and writer/creators Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg for the series’ final season. And Claire Foy scored an upset victory for “The Crown,” which will have a new actress playing an older Queen Elizabeth next year.

Also Read: Emmy Awards: The Complete List of Winners

“This wasn’t supposed to happen,” said Foy when she won. And it wasn’t, if you bought the conventional wisdom that the award was likelier to go to defending champion Elisabeth Moss for “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Sandra Oh for “Killing Eve” or Keri Russell for “The Americans.”

(For the record: Yes, I bought the conventional wisdom.)

But Foy was a deserving choice who also happened to be the sentimental choice, as was Rhys, and Winkler, and “RuPaul’s Drag Race” in the reality-competition category long dominated by “The Amazing Race” and “The Voice.”

So when “The Oscars” director Glenn Weiss decided to use his acceptance speech to propose to his girlfriend, it made perfect sense on a night that was dominated by awards that felt good. (As John Oliver later pointed out, the ceremony would have felt very different if she’d said no.)

Sure, it would have been even more sentimental to give the Outstanding Variety Sketch Series award to the final season of “Portlandia” rather than the 44th season of “Saturday Night Live” — but let’s face it, “Portlandia” was always a little too weird for voters to fully embrace, as was “Twin Peaks” in the movies/miniseries categories.

Also Read: Here’s What the Emmys Bleeped From Thandie Newton’s Acceptance Speech

And yes, it would have been more sentimental to give the night’s final award, Outstanding Drama Series, to “The Americans” or “The Crown.” But nothing on TV has the scale and drama of “Game of Thrones” — and even though voting took place in a year in which the show wasn’t on the air, voters remembered the last season and let habit take over.

Warning to every other drama on television: At next year’s Emmys, you’ll probably be competing against the final season of “Game of Thrones.” You will not win.

As usual, the night’s trends only emerged slowly, as voters doled out mostly-expected wins for the first hour, starting with Winkler and then going into a “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” streak with consecutive wins for supporting actress Alex Borstein, director and writer Amy Sherman-Palladino and lead actress Rachel Brosnahan.

The real surprise didn’t come until almost an hour into the show, when Merritt Wever took the supporting actress in a limited series award for “Godless” over Penelope Cruz and Judith Light in “The Assassination of Gianni Versace.”

Also Read: Emmys 2018: Oscars Director Glenn Weiss Pops the Question to Girlfriend Jan Svendsen on Live TV

In fact, “Gianni Versace” had already lost five times (it had that many nominees in the two supporting categories) by the time it won its first award, for director Ryan Murphy — but then Darren Criss won for his leading role, and as expected, “Gianni” took the Outstanding Limited Series prize.

Despite a record number of non-white nominees, and African-American winners in all four guest-acting categories at the Creative Arts Emmys, this was not a particularly diverse evening, with Regina King (“Seven Seconds”) and Thandie Newton (“Westworld”) the only winners of color in the 12 acting categories.

At the end of the night, there was almost no suspense over which show was going to win the Outstanding Comedy Series award: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” had rolled through the earlier comedy categories so easily, with only supporting-actor Tony Shalhoub not winning, that its victory was all but preordained.

Also Read: Teddy Perkins, Donald Glover’s Creepy ‘Atlanta’ Character, Spotted in Emmys Audience

But the Outstanding Drama Series category was a real question mark, because the defending champion, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” hadn’t won a single award all night, and “Game of Thrones” had only won the supporting actor award for Peter Dinklage.

But that didn’t matter. And while it might not have been the most sentimental ending to the night, it made sense and maybe even felt right. Even on a night of sentiment, there’s a place for a few dragons.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys 2018: 9 Snubs and Surprises (Photos)

Emmys 2018: Rick and Morty Call All Emmy Winners ‘Monsters’

‘Happy Days’ Reunion: Henry Winkler Tweets Emmys Pic With Ron Howard (Photo)

Who knew that Emmy voters were such softies?

The 70th Primetime Emmy Awards was supposed to be “Game of Thrones” v. “The Handmaid’s Tale,” “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” v. “Atlanta” — but from the first award of the night, which handed Henry Winkler his first Emmy after four decades in television, voters turned it into a feel-good, four-hankie affair.

So Winkler won for “Barry.” And “The Americans,” long acclaimed but just as long ignored by Television Academy voters, got two shiny parting gifts in the form of Emmys for star Matthew Rhys and writer/creators Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg for the series’ final season. And Claire Foy scored an upset victory for “The Crown,” which will have a new actress playing an older Queen Elizabeth next year.

“This wasn’t supposed to happen,” said Foy when she won. And it wasn’t, if you bought the conventional wisdom that the award was likelier to go to defending champion Elisabeth Moss for “The Handmaid’s Tale,” Sandra Oh for “Killing Eve” or Keri Russell for “The Americans.”

(For the record: Yes, I bought the conventional wisdom.)

But Foy was a deserving choice who also happened to be the sentimental choice, as was Rhys, and Winkler, and “RuPaul’s Drag Race” in the reality-competition category long dominated by “The Amazing Race” and “The Voice.”

So when “The Oscars” director Glenn Weiss decided to use his acceptance speech to propose to his girlfriend, it made perfect sense on a night that was dominated by awards that felt good. (As John Oliver later pointed out, the ceremony would have felt very different if she’d said no.)

Sure, it would have been even more sentimental to give the Outstanding Variety Sketch Series award to the final season of “Portlandia” rather than the 44th season of “Saturday Night Live” — but let’s face it, “Portlandia” was always a little too weird for voters to fully embrace, as was “Twin Peaks” in the movies/miniseries categories.

And yes, it would have been more sentimental to give the night’s final award, Outstanding Drama Series, to “The Americans” or “The Crown.” But nothing on TV has the scale and drama of “Game of Thrones” — and even though voting took place in a year in which the show wasn’t on the air, voters remembered the last season and let habit take over.

Warning to every other drama on television: At next year’s Emmys, you’ll probably be competing against the final season of “Game of Thrones.” You will not win.

As usual, the night’s trends only emerged slowly, as voters doled out mostly-expected wins for the first hour, starting with Winkler and then going into a “Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” streak with consecutive wins for supporting actress Alex Borstein, director and writer Amy Sherman-Palladino and lead actress Rachel Brosnahan.

The real surprise didn’t come until almost an hour into the show, when Merritt Wever took the supporting actress in a limited series award for “Godless” over Penelope Cruz and Judith Light in “The Assassination of Gianni Versace.”

In fact, “Gianni Versace” had already lost five times (it had that many nominees in the two supporting categories) by the time it won its first award, for director Ryan Murphy — but then Darren Criss won for his leading role, and as expected, “Gianni” took the Outstanding Limited Series prize.

Despite a record number of non-white nominees, and African-American winners in all four guest-acting categories at the Creative Arts Emmys, this was not a particularly diverse evening, with Regina King (“Seven Seconds”) and Thandie Newton (“Westworld”) the only winners of color in the 12 acting categories.

At the end of the night, there was almost no suspense over which show was going to win the Outstanding Comedy Series award: “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” had rolled through the earlier comedy categories so easily, with only supporting-actor Tony Shalhoub not winning, that its victory was all but preordained.

But the Outstanding Drama Series category was a real question mark, because the defending champion, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” hadn’t won a single award all night, and “Game of Thrones” had only won the supporting actor award for Peter Dinklage.

But that didn’t matter. And while it might not have been the most sentimental ending to the night, it made sense and maybe even felt right. Even on a night of sentiment, there’s a place for a few dragons.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys 2018: 9 Snubs and Surprises (Photos)

Emmys 2018: Rick and Morty Call All Emmy Winners 'Monsters'

'Happy Days' Reunion: Henry Winkler Tweets Emmys Pic With Ron Howard (Photo)

Claire Foy Crowned With Drama Actress Emmy

Claire Foy won the lead drama actress Emmy for “The Crown” at the 70th annual awards and paid homage to the next season of the series. “The show goes on, which makes me so, so proud. I dedicate this to the next cast, the next generati…

Claire Foy won the lead drama actress Emmy for “The Crown” at the 70th annual awards and paid homage to the next season of the series. “The show goes on, which makes me so, so proud. I dedicate this to the next cast, the next generation, and I also dedicate it to Matt Smith,” Foy […]

Claire Foy Gets Her Final Jewel In ‘The Crown’ With Best Actress Emmy Win

Claire Foy, who has wrapped her two-season run as Queen Elizabeth in Netflix’s The Crown, got a royal send-off Monday when she won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Actress.
The victory came after she was nominated in the same category last ye…

Claire Foy, who has wrapped her two-season run as Queen Elizabeth in Netflix’s The Crown, got a royal send-off Monday when she won the Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Actress. The victory came after she was nominated in the same category last year for Season 1 of the series. She lost to Elisabeth Moss of Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, who was also nominated tonight in a loaded category that included The Americans‘ Keri Russell, Sandra Oh’s Killing Eve, Tatiana Maslany for Or…

‘The Crown’ Director Stephen Daldry Wins In Second Shot At Emmy

He wasn’t there to accept, but Stephen Daldry found the second time is the charm when it comes to victory at the Emmy awards.
Daldry won the Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series award for the Paterfamilias episode of the Netflix series The Cr…

He wasn’t there to accept, but Stephen Daldry found the second time is the charm when it comes to victory at the Emmy awards. Daldry won the Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series award for the Paterfamilias episode of the Netflix series The Crown, produced by Left Bank Pictures in association with Sony Pictures Television The British director also has three Oscar nominations for Billy Elliot, The Hours, and Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. It comes after he was…

Emmy Winners and Nominees: The Complete List (Updating Live)

The curtain just rose on the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards, and the first trophy went to Henry Winkler for his work on “Barry.” Among those the “Happy Days” alum defeated was Alec Baldwin, who was nominated for his President Donald Trump impression on “SNL.”

Bill Hader also won for his starring role on “Barry,” but not before “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” took four awards in a row.

Plenty of statues were previously handed out during Creative Arts Emmys earlier this month. You can see the winners from Night 1 of that show here and Night 2 here.

Below is the full list of Primetime Emmy Award nominees. We’re updating this post with winners in real-time as the show progresses.

Also Read: Why Mark Burnett Won’t Be at the Emmys This Year

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Brian Tyree Henry – “Atlanta” (FX)
Louie Anderson – “Baskets” (FX)
Kenan Thompson – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Tituss Burgess – “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
Henry Winkler – “Barry” (HBO) *WINNER
Alec Baldwin – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Tony Shalhoub – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Zazie Beetz – “Atlanta” (FX)
Laurie Metcalf – “Roseanne” (ABC)
Leslie Jones – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Alex Borstein “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER
Betty Gilpin – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Aidy Bryant – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Kate McKinnon – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Megan Mullally – “Will & Grace” (NBC)

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Stefani Robinson – “Atlanta” (FX)
Alec Berg, Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO
Liz Sarnoff – “Barry” (HBO)
Alec Berg – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Amy Sherman-Palladino – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Also Read: Jenifer Lewis Sports Nike In Support Of Colin Kaepernick At 2018 Emmys

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Hiro Murai – “Atlanta” (FX)
Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO)
Mark Cendrowski – “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)
Jesse Peretz – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Mike Judge – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Amy Sherman-Palladino – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Pamela Adlon – “Better Things” (FX)
Lily Tomlin – “Grace & Frankie” (Netflix)
Allison Janney – “Mom” (CBS)
Tracee Ellis Ross – “Black-ish” (ABC)
Issa Rae – “Insecure” (HBO)
Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Anthony Anderson – “Black-ish”(ABC)
Ted Danson – “The Good Place” (NBC)
Larry David – “Curb Your Enthusiasm” (HBO)
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO) *WINNER
William H. Macy – “Shameless” (Showtime)

Also Read: How to Watch the 2018 Emmys Ceremony Live Online

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Adina Porter – “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX)
Merritt Wever – “Godless” (Netflix) *WINNER
Penelope Cruz – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Letitia Wright – “Black Museum” (“Black Mirror”) (Netflix)
Sara Bareilles – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Judith Light – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Jeff Daniels – “Godless” (Netflix) *WINNER
Ricky Martin – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Finn Wittrock – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
John Leguizamo – “Waco” (Paramount Network)
Brandon Victor Dixon – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Edgar Ramirez – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Michael Stuhlbarg – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)

Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special
Kevin McManus, Matthew McManus – “American Vandal” (Netflix)
Scott Frank – “Godless” (Netflix)
David Nicholls – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Tom Rob Smith – “The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
David Lynch, Mark Frost – “Twin Peaks” (Showtime)
William Bridges, Charlie Brooker – “USS Callister” (Black Mirror) (Netflix)

Also Read: Tom Arnold Files Battery Charges Against Mark Burnett After ‘Choking’ Incident

Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special
Scott Frank – “Godless” (Netflix)
David Leveaux, Alex Rudzinski – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Barry Levinson – “Paterno” (HBO)
Edward Berger – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Ryan Murphy – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Craig Zisk – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)
David Lynch – “Twin Peaks” (Showtime)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Movie
Jessica Biel – “The Sinner” (USA Network)
Laura Dern – “The Tale” (HBO)
Michelle Dockery – “Godless” (Netflix)
Edie Falco – “Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders” (NBC)
Regina King – “Seven Seconds” (Netflix)
Sarah Paulson – “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or a Movie
Antonio Banderas – “Genius: Picasso” (National Geographic)
Darren Criss – “Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Jeff Daniels – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)
John Legend – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert” (NBC)
Jesse Plemons – “USS Callister”/”Black Mirror” (Netflix)

Also Read: How to Watch the 2018 Emmy Awards Red Carpet Live Online

Outstanding Writing for a Variety Special
Melinda Taub, Samantha Bee – “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee Presents: The Great American* Puerto Rico (*It’s Complicated)” (TBS)
John Mulaney – “John Mulaney: Kid Gorgeous At Radio City” (Netflix)
Michelle Wolf – “Michelle Wolf: Nice Lady” (HBO)
Patton Oswalt – “Patton Oswalt: Annihilation” (Netflix)
Steve Martin, Martin Short – “Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life” (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special
Stan Lathan – “Dave Chappelle: Equanimity” (Netflix)
Michael Bonfiglio – “Jerry Seinfeld: Jerry Before Seinfeld” (Netflix)
Marcus Raboy – “Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life” (Netflix)
Hamish Hamilton – “Super Bowl LII Halftime Show Starring Justin Timberlake” (NBC)
Glenn Weiss – “The Oscars” (ABC)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Mandy Patinkin – “Homeland” (Showtime)
Matt Smith – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Peter Dinklage – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
David Harbour – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Joseph Fiennes – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Also Read: Hulu Hits 1 Million Live TV Customers Ahead of Emmys

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Lena Headey – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Vanessa Kirby – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Ann Dowd – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Thandie Newton – “Westworld” (HBO)
Millie Bobby Brown – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Alexis Bledel – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Yvonne Strahovski – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
David Benioff, D.B. Weiss – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Phoebe Waller-Bridge – “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
The Duffer Brothers – “Stranger Things” (Netfix)
Joe Fields, Joe Weisberg – “The Americans” (FX)
Peter Morgan – “The Crown” (Neflix)
Bruce Miller – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Alan Taylor – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Jeremy Podeswa – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Jason Bateman – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Daniel Sackheim – “Ozark” (Netflix)
The Duffer Brothers – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Stephen Daldry – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Kari Skogland – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Also Read: LAPD on Tom Arnold-Mark Burnett Dispute: ‘No Police Report Filed’

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Jason Bateman – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Sterling K. Brown – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Ed Harris – “Westworld” (HBO)
Matthew Rhys – “The Americans” (FX)
Milo Ventimiglia – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Jeffrey Wright – “Westworld” (HBO)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Claire Foy – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Tatiana Maslany – “Orphan Black” (BBC America)
Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Sandra Oh – “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
Keri Russell – “The Americans” (FX)
Evan Rachel Wood – “Westworld” (HBO)

Outstanding Reality Competition Program
“American Ninja Warrior” (NBC)
“Project Runway” (Lifetime)
“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)
“The Amazing Race” (CBS)
“The Voice” (NBC)
“Top Chef” (Bravo)

Also Read: Tom Arnold Says Mark Burnett ‘Went Apes-‘ and ‘Choked’ Him at Pre-Emmy Party

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
“At Home with Amy Sedaris” (TruTV)
“Drunk History” (Comedy Central)
“I Love You, America with Sarah Silverman” (Hulu)
“Portlandia” (IFC)
“Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
“The Tracey Ullman Show” (HBO)

Outstanding Variety Talk Series
“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah” (Comedy Central)
“Full Frontal With Samantha Bee” (TBS)
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!” (ABC)
“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” (HBO)
“The Late Late Show With James Corden” (CBS)
“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” (CBS)

Outstanding Limited Series
“Genius: Picasso” (National Geographic)
“Godless” (Netflix)
“Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
“The Alienist” (TNT)
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)

Also Read: Emmy Predictions in All 26 Major Categories, From ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ to ‘Mrs Maisel’ (Photos)

Outstanding Comedy Series
“Atlanta” (FX)
“Barry” (HBO)
“Black-ish” (ABC)
“Curb Your Enthusiasm” (HBO)
“GLOW” (Netflix)
“The Marvelous Ms. Maisel” (Amazon)
“Silicon Valley” (HBO)
“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)

Outstanding Drama Series
“The Americans” (FX)
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“Game of Thrones” (HBO)
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
“This Is Us” (NBC)
“Westworld” (HBO)

Related stories from TheWrap:

2018 Creative Arts Emmys: The Complete List of Night 2 Winners

2018 Creative Arts Emmys: The Complete List of Night 1 Winners

Constance Wu, Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey Among 70th Emmy Awards Presenters

The curtain just rose on the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards, and the first trophy went to Henry Winkler for his work on “Barry.” Among those the “Happy Days” alum defeated was Alec Baldwin, who was nominated for his President Donald Trump impression on “SNL.”

Bill Hader also won for his starring role on “Barry,” but not before “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” took four awards in a row.

Plenty of statues were previously handed out during Creative Arts Emmys earlier this month. You can see the winners from Night 1 of that show here and Night 2 here.

Below is the full list of Primetime Emmy Award nominees. We’re updating this post with winners in real-time as the show progresses.

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Brian Tyree Henry – “Atlanta” (FX)
Louie Anderson – “Baskets” (FX)
Kenan Thompson – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Tituss Burgess – “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)
Henry Winkler – “Barry” (HBO) *WINNER
Alec Baldwin – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Tony Shalhoub – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Zazie Beetz – “Atlanta” (FX)
Laurie Metcalf – “Roseanne” (ABC)
Leslie Jones – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Alex Borstein “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER
Betty Gilpin – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Aidy Bryant – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Kate McKinnon – “Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
Megan Mullally – “Will & Grace” (NBC)

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Stefani Robinson – “Atlanta” (FX)
Alec Berg, Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO
Liz Sarnoff – “Barry” (HBO)
Alec Berg – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Amy Sherman-Palladino – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Hiro Murai – “Atlanta” (FX)
Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO)
Mark Cendrowski – “The Big Bang Theory” (CBS)
Jesse Peretz – “GLOW” (Netflix)
Mike Judge – “Silicon Valley” (HBO)
Amy Sherman-Palladino – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Pamela Adlon – “Better Things” (FX)
Lily Tomlin – “Grace & Frankie” (Netflix)
Allison Janney – “Mom” (CBS)
Tracee Ellis Ross – “Black-ish” (ABC)
Issa Rae – “Insecure” (HBO)
Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon) *WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Anthony Anderson – “Black-ish”(ABC)
Ted Danson – “The Good Place” (NBC)
Larry David – “Curb Your Enthusiasm” (HBO)
Donald Glover – “Atlanta” (FX)
Bill Hader – “Barry” (HBO) *WINNER
William H. Macy – “Shameless” (Showtime)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Adina Porter – “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX)
Merritt Wever – “Godless” (Netflix) *WINNER
Penelope Cruz – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Letitia Wright – “Black Museum” (“Black Mirror”) (Netflix)
Sara Bareilles – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Judith Light – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Jeff Daniels – “Godless” (Netflix) *WINNER
Ricky Martin – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Finn Wittrock – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
John Leguizamo – “Waco” (Paramount Network)
Brandon Victor Dixon – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Edgar Ramirez – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Michael Stuhlbarg – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)

Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special
Kevin McManus, Matthew McManus – “American Vandal” (Netflix)
Scott Frank – “Godless” (Netflix)
David Nicholls – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Tom Rob Smith – “The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
David Lynch, Mark Frost – “Twin Peaks” (Showtime)
William Bridges, Charlie Brooker – “USS Callister” (Black Mirror) (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or Dramatic Special
Scott Frank – “Godless” (Netflix)
David Leveaux, Alex Rudzinski – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert” (NBC)
Barry Levinson – “Paterno” (HBO)
Edward Berger – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Ryan Murphy – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Craig Zisk – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)
David Lynch – “Twin Peaks” (Showtime)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Movie
Jessica Biel – “The Sinner” (USA Network)
Laura Dern – “The Tale” (HBO)
Michelle Dockery – “Godless” (Netflix)
Edie Falco – “Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders” (NBC)
Regina King – “Seven Seconds” (Netflix)
Sarah Paulson – “American Horror Story: Cult” (FX)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or a Movie
Antonio Banderas – “Genius: Picasso” (National Geographic)
Darren Criss – “Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
Jeff Daniels – “The Looming Tower” (Hulu)
John Legend – “Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert” (NBC)
Jesse Plemons – “USS Callister”/”Black Mirror” (Netflix)

Outstanding Writing for a Variety Special
Melinda Taub, Samantha Bee – “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee Presents: The Great American* Puerto Rico (*It’s Complicated)” (TBS)
John Mulaney – “John Mulaney: Kid Gorgeous At Radio City” (Netflix)
Michelle Wolf – “Michelle Wolf: Nice Lady” (HBO)
Patton Oswalt – “Patton Oswalt: Annihilation” (Netflix)
Steve Martin, Martin Short – “Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life” (Netflix)

Outstanding Directing for a Variety Special
Stan Lathan – “Dave Chappelle: Equanimity” (Netflix)
Michael Bonfiglio – “Jerry Seinfeld: Jerry Before Seinfeld” (Netflix)
Marcus Raboy – “Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget For The Rest Of Your Life” (Netflix)
Hamish Hamilton – “Super Bowl LII Halftime Show Starring Justin Timberlake” (NBC)
Glenn Weiss – “The Oscars” (ABC)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Mandy Patinkin – “Homeland” (Showtime)
Matt Smith – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Peter Dinklage – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
David Harbour – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Joseph Fiennes – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Lena Headey – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Vanessa Kirby – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Ann Dowd – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Thandie Newton – “Westworld” (HBO)
Millie Bobby Brown – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Alexis Bledel – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Yvonne Strahovski – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
David Benioff, D.B. Weiss – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Phoebe Waller-Bridge – “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
The Duffer Brothers – “Stranger Things” (Netfix)
Joe Fields, Joe Weisberg – “The Americans” (FX)
Peter Morgan – “The Crown” (Neflix)
Bruce Miller – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Alan Taylor – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Jeremy Podeswa – “Game of Thrones” (HBO)
Jason Bateman – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Daniel Sackheim – “Ozark” (Netflix)
The Duffer Brothers – “Stranger Things” (Netflix)
Stephen Daldry – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Kari Skogland – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Jason Bateman – “Ozark” (Netflix)
Sterling K. Brown – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Ed Harris – “Westworld” (HBO)
Matthew Rhys – “The Americans” (FX)
Milo Ventimiglia – “This Is Us” (NBC)
Jeffrey Wright – “Westworld” (HBO)

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Claire Foy – “The Crown” (Netflix)
Tatiana Maslany – “Orphan Black” (BBC America)
Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
Sandra Oh – “Killing Eve” (BBC America)
Keri Russell – “The Americans” (FX)
Evan Rachel Wood – “Westworld” (HBO)

Outstanding Reality Competition Program
“American Ninja Warrior” (NBC)
“Project Runway” (Lifetime)
“RuPaul’s Drag Race” (VH1)
“The Amazing Race” (CBS)
“The Voice” (NBC)
“Top Chef” (Bravo)

Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
“At Home with Amy Sedaris” (TruTV)
“Drunk History” (Comedy Central)
“I Love You, America with Sarah Silverman” (Hulu)
“Portlandia” (IFC)
“Saturday Night Live” (NBC)
“The Tracey Ullman Show” (HBO)

Outstanding Variety Talk Series
“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah” (Comedy Central)
“Full Frontal With Samantha Bee” (TBS)
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!” (ABC)
“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” (HBO)
“The Late Late Show With James Corden” (CBS)
“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” (CBS)

Outstanding Limited Series
“Genius: Picasso” (National Geographic)
“Godless” (Netflix)
“Patrick Melrose” (Showtime)
“The Alienist” (TNT)
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)

Outstanding Comedy Series
“Atlanta” (FX)
“Barry” (HBO)
“Black-ish” (ABC)
“Curb Your Enthusiasm” (HBO)
“GLOW” (Netflix)
“The Marvelous Ms. Maisel” (Amazon)
“Silicon Valley” (HBO)
“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” (Netflix)

Outstanding Drama Series
“The Americans” (FX)
“The Crown” (Netflix)
“Game of Thrones” (HBO)
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Hulu)
“Stranger Things” (Netflix)
“This Is Us” (NBC)
“Westworld” (HBO)

Related stories from TheWrap:

2018 Creative Arts Emmys: The Complete List of Night 2 Winners

2018 Creative Arts Emmys: The Complete List of Night 1 Winners

Constance Wu, Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey Among 70th Emmy Awards Presenters

‘The Crown’ Wins Best Drama As Brits Dominate Rose d’Or Awards

The Crown picked up Best Drama as British shows dominated the Rose d’Or Awards.
Netflix’s royal drama was crowned king of the scripts at the event in Berlin, which is organized by the European Broadcasting Union. It was one of five British winners acro…

The Crown picked up Best Drama as British shows dominated the Rose d'Or Awards. Netflix's royal drama was crowned king of the scripts at the event in Berlin, which is organized by the European Broadcasting Union. It was one of five British winners across the ten awards. Other UK winners included Hugh Grant drama A Very English Scandal, which won best limited series and TV movie, Mackenzie Crook and Toby Jones' Detectorists, which won best sitcom, Betroffenheit, which won…

IFC Films Lands US Rights to Charles Manson Family Drama ‘Charlie Says’

IFC Films has picked up U.S. rights to “Charlie Says,” about three young women who fell under Charles Manson’s spell and carried out a series of brutal murders, including that of Sharon Tate, Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife. The company announced the deal on Monday.

The film, which premiered earlier this month at the Venice Film Festival, was directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho”) from a script penned by Guinevere Turner (“American Psycho”). The film is based on Ed Sanders’ 1971 bestselling book “The Family.”

Matt Smith (“The Crown,” “Doctor Who”) stars as the infamous Charles Manson alongside Suki Waterhouse, Hannah Murray, Sosie Bacon, Marianne Rendon and Merritt Wever.

Also Read: ‘Once Upon a Time in Hollywood’ Adds Rumer Willis, Margaret Qualley and Damon Herriman (Exclusive)

The film follows three young women who were sentenced to death in the Manson murder case. But after the death penalty was lifted, their sentence became life imprisonment. As one young graduate student visits Manson’s former followers in prison, the audience witnesses their psychological rehabilitation through her eyes, as the women face the reality of their horrific crimes.

The deal is in the seven figures, according to an individual with knowledge of the pact who told TheWrap.  It was negotiated by Arianna Bocco, EVP of acquisitions and production at IFC Films and UTA Independent Film Group on behalf of the filmmaker. IFC Films is planning for a 2019 theatrical release.

“Charlie Says” was produced by Epic Level Entertainment and Roxwell Films.

Also Read: Fox Has a Charles Manson Special Based on Rare Footage From Inside the Cult

The movie was produced by Dana Guerin, Cindi Rice, John Frank Rosenblum and Jeremy Rosen. David Hillary, Ed Sanders and Michael Guerin executive produced.

Variety first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Matt Smith to Play Charles Manson in ‘Charlie Says’ From ‘American Psycho’ Director

Former Manson Girl Says Charles Manson Seduced Her at Age 14

Leslie Van Houten, Charles Manson’s Youngest Follower, Granted Parole

IFC Films has picked up U.S. rights to “Charlie Says,” about three young women who fell under Charles Manson’s spell and carried out a series of brutal murders, including that of Sharon Tate, Roman Polanski’s pregnant wife. The company announced the deal on Monday.

The film, which premiered earlier this month at the Venice Film Festival, was directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho”) from a script penned by Guinevere Turner (“American Psycho”). The film is based on Ed Sanders’ 1971 bestselling book “The Family.”

Matt Smith (“The Crown,” “Doctor Who”) stars as the infamous Charles Manson alongside Suki Waterhouse, Hannah Murray, Sosie Bacon, Marianne Rendon and Merritt Wever.

The film follows three young women who were sentenced to death in the Manson murder case. But after the death penalty was lifted, their sentence became life imprisonment. As one young graduate student visits Manson’s former followers in prison, the audience witnesses their psychological rehabilitation through her eyes, as the women face the reality of their horrific crimes.

The deal is in the seven figures, according to an individual with knowledge of the pact who told TheWrap.  It was negotiated by Arianna Bocco, EVP of acquisitions and production at IFC Films and UTA Independent Film Group on behalf of the filmmaker. IFC Films is planning for a 2019 theatrical release.

“Charlie Says” was produced by Epic Level Entertainment and Roxwell Films.

The movie was produced by Dana Guerin, Cindi Rice, John Frank Rosenblum and Jeremy Rosen. David Hillary, Ed Sanders and Michael Guerin executive produced.

Variety first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Matt Smith to Play Charles Manson in 'Charlie Says' From 'American Psycho' Director

Former Manson Girl Says Charles Manson Seduced Her at Age 14

Leslie Van Houten, Charles Manson's Youngest Follower, Granted Parole

German Director Christian Schwochow To Helm Two Episodes Of Netflix’s ‘The Crown’

German director Christian Schwochow is getting the royal treatment and taking on two episodes of Netflix’s The Crown.
Schwochow will be behind the camera for two episodes for the third season of Left Bank Pictures’ drama.
It is Schwochow’s most high-pr…

German director Christian Schwochow is getting the royal treatment and taking on two episodes of Netflix's The Crown. Schwochow will be behind the camera for two episodes for the third season of Left Bank Pictures' drama. It is Schwochow's most high-profile English-language project, having previously directed series including German History X, produced by Dark producer Wiedemann & Berg, Federation Entertainment's insider trading drama Bad Banks and period drama The…

U.S. Streamers and International Business Drive U.K. Production Sector Growth

International revenue accounted for a record £802 million ($1 billion) of the U.K.’s overall production sector total of £2.7 billion last year. New data released by producers’ trade body PACT shows international commissions, sales of finished shows suc…

International revenue accounted for a record £802 million ($1 billion) of the U.K.’s overall production sector total of £2.7 billion last year. New data released by producers’ trade body PACT shows international commissions, sales of finished shows such as “Midsomer Murders” and “Victoria,” and orders from Netflix and Amazon including “The Crown” and “The Grand […]

‘The Crown’: Tobias Menzies Is Lost in Thought in First Look at Netflix’s New Prince Philip (Photo)

Netflix has unveiled the first-look photos of Tobias Menzies taking over as the reigning Prince Philip on Season 3 of “The Crown.”

See Menzies in all his royal garb in the photo below:

Ambition. pic.twitter.com/u2AVWK1u5c

— The Crown (@TheCrownNetflix) August 28, 2018

Clearly, producers (or Netflix) are keen on assigning one-word descriptions to the characters. The word for Olivia Colman’s Queen Elizabeth II was “patience” — see her first-look photo here. And they used “hope” for Helena Bonham Carter’s Princess Margaret and “hurt” for Ben Daniels’ Lord Snowdon — see their first-look photos here.

Also Read: ‘The Crown’ Casts Older Prince Charles, Queen Mother for Season 3 Time Jump

Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth opposite Smith’s Prince Philip on the first two seasons of the royal drama, with Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret and Matthew Goode as Lord Snowdon.

The way Netflix has worked (and is expected to continue to work) this particular show is to swap out its actors every two seasons to allow for the progression of the story of Queen Elizabeth’s life.

“The Crown” Season 3 stars Colman, Menzies, Bonham Carter, Daniels, Josh O’Connor (as Prince Charles), Marion Bailey (the Queen Mother), and Erin Doherty (Princess Anne), among others.

There is currently no premiere date set for the upcoming third season.

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‘The Crown’ Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith on What They’ll Miss Most About Royal Roles

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‘The Crown’: Matt Smith Has Great (Pay Equality) Advice for New Prince Philip Tobias Menzies (Video)

Netflix Orders Dead-DJ Drama ‘White Lines’ From ‘The Crown’ Producers

See Menzies in all his royal garb in the photo below:

Clearly, producers (or Netflix) are keen on assigning one-word descriptions to the characters. The word for Olivia Colman’s Queen Elizabeth II was “patience” — see her first-look photo here. And they used “hope” for Helena Bonham Carter’s Princess Margaret and “hurt” for Ben Daniels’ Lord Snowdon — see their first-look photos here.

Claire Foy played Queen Elizabeth opposite Smith’s Prince Philip on the first two seasons of the royal drama, with Vanessa Kirby as Princess Margaret and Matthew Goode as Lord Snowdon.

The way Netflix has worked (and is expected to continue to work) this particular show is to swap out its actors every two seasons to allow for the progression of the story of Queen Elizabeth’s life.

“The Crown” Season 3 stars Colman, Menzies, Bonham Carter, Daniels, Josh O’Connor (as Prince Charles), Marion Bailey (the Queen Mother), and Erin Doherty (Princess Anne), among others.

There is currently no premiere date set for the upcoming third season.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Crown' Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith on What They'll Miss Most About Royal Roles

'Lethal Weapon' Meets 'The Crown' in Fake Promo for James Corden, Matt Smith's New Cop Drama (Video)

'The Crown': Matt Smith Has Great (Pay Equality) Advice for New Prince Philip Tobias Menzies (Video)

Netflix Orders Dead-DJ Drama 'White Lines' From 'The Crown' Producers

‘The Crown’: Netflix Releases First Look at Tobias Menzies as Prince Philip

Netflix has released its first look at Tobias Menzies as Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, in the new season of “The Crown,” which is in production. Menzies will play the husband to Olivia Colman’s Queen Ellizabeth II in the third and fourth season…

Netflix has released its first look at Tobias Menzies as Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, in the new season of “The Crown,” which is in production. Menzies will play the husband to Olivia Colman’s Queen Ellizabeth II in the third and fourth seasons of the smash-hit show, taking over the role from Matt Smith. […]

‘The Crown’: First Look At Tobias Menzies As Prince Philip In Netflix’s Royal Drama

His Royal Highness… Prince Philip. Netflix has released the first look at Tobias Menzies as the Duke of Edinburgh, husband and consort to the Queen in the third season of The Crown.
Menzies takes over from Matt Smith in seasons three and four to …

His Royal Highness… Prince Philip. Netflix has released the first look at Tobias Menzies as the Duke of Edinburgh, husband and consort to the Queen in the third season of The Crown. Menzies takes over from Matt Smith in seasons three and four to play the eccentric patriarch alongside Olivia Colman, who replaces Claire Foy as The Queen. Elsewhere, in seasons three and four, The Exorcist star Ben Daniels will play Antony Armstrong-Jones, starring alongside Helena Bonham…

‘The Crown’ Star Matt Smith on ‘Naughty’ Prince Philip, the First Female ‘Doctor’ and Pay Parity

By now, Matt Smith should be familiar with handing over a part to another actor — after four years of playing The Doctor, he left the role to next be embodied by Peter Capaldi. And now, after two season of playing Prince Philip on the Netflix’s &…

By now, Matt Smith should be familiar with handing over a part to another actor — after four years of playing The Doctor, he left the role to next be embodied by Peter Capaldi. And now, after two season of playing Prince Philip on the Netflix’s “The Crown,” he’s stepping aside to let Tobias Menzies […]

‘The Crown’ Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith on What They’ll Miss Most About Royal Roles

This story about Matt Smith and Claire Foy first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Peter Morgan was forthcoming from the start about the nature of his drama series “The Crown,” in that the series would span several decades and would require multiple actors to portray the British royal family and their cohorts at different ages.

But every time we saw Claire Foy and Matt Smith (Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, respectively) discuss their inevitable exits, it didn’t feel quite real.

The pair were dazzling as the pre-coronation couple of Season 1, before Elizabeth’s father passed and she was called to duty. They were even more compelling in Season 2 as two people in an imploding marriage, with an ancient monarchy and increasingly modern subjects hanging in the balance. By day they may have represented an aspirational ideal, but in the bedrooms and hallways of Buckingham Palace they lived out entirely common human melodrama.

Also Read: ‘The Crown’: Matt Smith Has Great (Pay Equality) Advice for New Prince Philip Tobias Menzies (Video)

“Just because this family is royal doesn’t mean that they don’t go through the universal things we all do,” Smith said. “That’s where I think the show lives and dies, in that domesticity — yes, they are royal, but they do come in drunk and dive on the bed.”

And make no mistake, those are the moments he loves. “Often, the stuff that looks really ugly on the screen is the stuff that you’re enthralled by as an actor,” he said. “It means you can sink your teeth into something. Sometimes the mundane can be the hardest to play.”

Olivia Colman (“Broadchurch”) will take Foy’s crown and scepter to play Elizabeth II. Tobias Menzies (“Game of Thrones”) will step into Philip’s shoes, a baton-passing Smith is familiar with thanks to his work on the BBC anthology “Doctor Who.”

“There’s something kind of groovy about going, ‘Hey, here’s this part,’” he said. “No matter what you think of him, Philip has been a wonderful servant to this country and a wonderful support. There have been bumps in the road, but he’s making a laugh. He’s a total rebel.”

Also Read: ‘The Crown’ Casts Older Prince Charles, Queen Mother for Season 3 Time Jump

We’re not worried about Morgan’s long-proven ability to pull compelling drama out of the dustiest historical retellings — “The Crown” has an episode about an unpleasant fog that plays more like an action movie — but it will be difficult to let go of seeing these icons in their historical infancy.

For his part, Smith is happy to be relieved of his title — though he will miss one of the role’s best perks. “Claire and I are very close friends and have had a wonderful working relationship,” he said. “We were a team, on screen and off.”

That friendship was tested by one offscreen story: the revelation that Foy was paid less than Smith despite her more prominent role.

“I am incredibly proud of what I’ve been part of, and I don’t want my work in that program to be overshadowed by my pay,” she said. “Something good has got to come out of all the shame and the embarrassment of talking about my worth in comparison to one of my best friends.”

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Evan Rachel Wood, Gina Rodriguez and Other Stars Take Aim at TV’s Patriarchy: ‘There’s No Going Back’

‘The Crown’: See the First Images of Helena Bonham Carter and Ben Daniels (Photos)

‘The Crown’ Producers Apologize to Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith Over Pay Gap ‘Media Storm’

This story about Matt Smith and Claire Foy first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Peter Morgan was forthcoming from the start about the nature of his drama series “The Crown,” in that the series would span several decades and would require multiple actors to portray the British royal family and their cohorts at different ages.

But every time we saw Claire Foy and Matt Smith (Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, respectively) discuss their inevitable exits, it didn’t feel quite real.

The pair were dazzling as the pre-coronation couple of Season 1, before Elizabeth’s father passed and she was called to duty. They were even more compelling in Season 2 as two people in an imploding marriage, with an ancient monarchy and increasingly modern subjects hanging in the balance. By day they may have represented an aspirational ideal, but in the bedrooms and hallways of Buckingham Palace they lived out entirely common human melodrama.

“Just because this family is royal doesn’t mean that they don’t go through the universal things we all do,” Smith said. “That’s where I think the show lives and dies, in that domesticity — yes, they are royal, but they do come in drunk and dive on the bed.”

And make no mistake, those are the moments he loves. “Often, the stuff that looks really ugly on the screen is the stuff that you’re enthralled by as an actor,” he said. “It means you can sink your teeth into something. Sometimes the mundane can be the hardest to play.”

Olivia Colman (“Broadchurch”) will take Foy’s crown and scepter to play Elizabeth II. Tobias Menzies (“Game of Thrones”) will step into Philip’s shoes, a baton-passing Smith is familiar with thanks to his work on the BBC anthology “Doctor Who.”

“There’s something kind of groovy about going, ‘Hey, here’s this part,'” he said. “No matter what you think of him, Philip has been a wonderful servant to this country and a wonderful support. There have been bumps in the road, but he’s making a laugh. He’s a total rebel.”

We’re not worried about Morgan’s long-proven ability to pull compelling drama out of the dustiest historical retellings — “The Crown” has an episode about an unpleasant fog that plays more like an action movie — but it will be difficult to let go of seeing these icons in their historical infancy.

For his part, Smith is happy to be relieved of his title — though he will miss one of the role’s best perks. “Claire and I are very close friends and have had a wonderful working relationship,” he said. “We were a team, on screen and off.”

That friendship was tested by one offscreen story: the revelation that Foy was paid less than Smith despite her more prominent role.

“I am incredibly proud of what I’ve been part of, and I don’t want my work in that program to be overshadowed by my pay,” she said. “Something good has got to come out of all the shame and the embarrassment of talking about my worth in comparison to one of my best friends.”

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Evan Rachel Wood, Gina Rodriguez and Other Stars Take Aim at TV's Patriarchy: 'There's No Going Back'

'The Crown': See the First Images of Helena Bonham Carter and Ben Daniels (Photos)

'The Crown' Producers Apologize to Stars Claire Foy and Matt Smith Over Pay Gap 'Media Storm'