FilmStruck Save Letter #2: More Filmmakers Rally Around Endangered Service

A second group of filmmakers have petitioned WarnerMedia to reconsider its decision to shutter FilmStruck at month’s end. Here is . the second letter
To whom it may concern at Turner and Warner Bros. Digital Networks:
Roger Ebert once said “the m…

A second group of filmmakers have petitioned WarnerMedia to reconsider its decision to shutter FilmStruck at month’s end. Here is . the second letter To whom it may concern at Turner and Warner Bros. Digital Networks: Roger Ebert once said "the movies are like a machine that generates empathy. It lets you understand a little bit more about different hopes, aspirations, dreams and fears. It helps us to identify with the people who are sharing this journey with us." No truer…

‘Bird Box’ Film Review: Sandra Bullock Battles Her Fears in Thoughtful Thriller

There is no shortage of post-apocalyptic thrillers in film; audiences seem to be obsessed with watching, analyzing and thinking about when and how humanity will reach its end. “Bird Box,” the upcoming Netflix sci-fi thriller adapted from Josh Malerman’s novel, offers both an interesting take on the end of the world and riveting, emotional insights on survival, parenthood, and humanity itself.

Director Susanne Bier (“The Night Manager”) uses a very intuitive and keen style that combines the wise use of environment, as well as the innate psychology of a woman facing an uncertain journey that requires her to ultimately face her biggest fear: connection. Many will be tempted to compare it to “A Quiet Place,” and while the two share many similarities, “Bird Box” differs by building its thrills on emotion rather than playing with the quiet anticipation of the unexpected.

The film opens as Malorie (Sandra Bullock) is barking orders at two young children she calls Boy (Julian Edwards) and Girl (Vivien Lyra Blair). They must head to the river nearby, get on a small riverboat quickly, and head to safety — while being blindfolded the entire time. Not exactly a nice boat ride with mom. Through a series of rapidly unfolding flashbacks, the film unveils that they are running from unidentified “creatures” that, if you look at them, will show you your deepest fears and then make you kill yourself.

Watch Video: Sandra Bullock Faces Her Worst Fears in Apocalyptic First ‘Bird Box’ Trailer

Malorie first encounters the effects of the creatures midway through her pregnancy, as she waits for her sister Jessica (Sarah Paulson) to pull up the car after an OB-GYN appointment. In rapid succession, Malorie watches in horror as people all around her find ways to kill themselves, filling the streets with chaos and danger that will remind many of the Sudden Departure scene from “The Leftovers.” She finds shelter in the home of Greg (BD Wong) home, which is filled with other terrified and bewildered survivors: Tom (Trevante Rhodes), an Iraqi war vet with a soft spot for Malorie; Charlie (Lil Rel Howery), a grocery-store employee with dreams of being a novelist; Doug (John Malkovich), an ornery and always on-guard neighbor; as well as Sheryl (Jacki Weaver), Lucy (Rosa Salazar), Felix (Colson Baker aka rapper Machine Gun Kelly). This group discovers what’s happening during the few minutes they are able to access the local news, and they discover that whatever this phenomenon is, it’s happening all over the world, and they must find a way to survive.

There is much to be said of the messages and symbolism within the film. The novel was written in 2014, but screenwriter Eric Heisserer (“Arrival”) brilliantly interweaves subtle contrasts that reflect on today’s world. His adaptation offers fleeing refugees seeking shelter (with a quick shot of the borders being ordered closed), climate change that no one can outrun, the mass amount of gun violence and more, all the while asking, How do you prepare the next generation, when you aren’t even sure you will survive the day?

Also Read: ‘Roma,’ ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ and ‘Bird Box’ to Open in Theaters Ahead of Netflix Debuts

Bullock’s performance is brilliant — she takes all these internalized fears and crafts a character who has already disconnected from emotion. Throughout the films, she challenges what “maternal” means in circumstances this dire. Does motherhood mean cuddles, rainbows, and filling a child with hope, or does it mean you raise a survivor, constantly teaching and training them, as you remain on guard, always holding them at arm’s length for fear of losing them to the ways of the world? How a mother protects her children from the world is a question every single parent contemplates, and figuring out how to raise the next generation is one of the scariest and most difficult issues we cope with every day.

For generations, the picture of motherhood has been that of a woman who connects with her child immediately, who is openly loving and soft. Motherhood today is not as simple. There are real dangers that our children face daily, simply by walking outside. There’s no new handbook to teach us how to prep our kids in case their school is taken over by a shooter, nor is there a guide on how to lead our children when we ourselves are uncertain of what the future holds. We’re all fumbling into this new parenthood blindly, hoping that we’re raising smart and strong kids while also allowing them to experience the joys of childhood, and it’s that innate understanding of parenthood that makes Bullock’s performance feel real. It’s equally fascinating and terrifying to watch.

Also Read: Sandra Bullock Says She Considered Leaving Hollywood Over Sexism

The supporting ensemble each brings a unique personality to the mix, but it’s Rhodes’ Tom who gives the story its heart and soul. He brings charm as well as a nuanced take on how strength can mean giving all of yourself, living and loving fully, even in times of chaos. An interesting insight within the dynamic of Malorie and Tom is the idea that there must be a balance of both, the survivor and the caretaker, in order to ensure humanity’s survival.

“Bird Box” is not the jump-scare thrill machine that some might expect when they hear “post-apocalyptic thriller.” It’s quiet at times and quick in others. Much like the film’s creatures, it digs into our deepest human fears and opens a world that lives in that fear. And when it asks you to remove the blindfold and watch what happens, it really is beautiful.



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There is no shortage of post-apocalyptic thrillers in film; audiences seem to be obsessed with watching, analyzing and thinking about when and how humanity will reach its end. “Bird Box,” the upcoming Netflix sci-fi thriller adapted from Josh Malerman’s novel, offers both an interesting take on the end of the world and riveting, emotional insights on survival, parenthood, and humanity itself.

Director Susanne Bier (“The Night Manager”) uses a very intuitive and keen style that combines the wise use of environment, as well as the innate psychology of a woman facing an uncertain journey that requires her to ultimately face her biggest fear: connection. Many will be tempted to compare it to “A Quiet Place,” and while the two share many similarities, “Bird Box” differs by building its thrills on emotion rather than playing with the quiet anticipation of the unexpected.

The film opens as Malorie (Sandra Bullock) is barking orders at two young children she calls Boy (Julian Edwards) and Girl (Vivien Lyra Blair). They must head to the river nearby, get on a small riverboat quickly, and head to safety — while being blindfolded the entire time. Not exactly a nice boat ride with mom. Through a series of rapidly unfolding flashbacks, the film unveils that they are running from unidentified “creatures” that, if you look at them, will show you your deepest fears and then make you kill yourself.

Malorie first encounters the effects of the creatures midway through her pregnancy, as she waits for her sister Jessica (Sarah Paulson) to pull up the car after an OB-GYN appointment. In rapid succession, Malorie watches in horror as people all around her find ways to kill themselves, filling the streets with chaos and danger that will remind many of the Sudden Departure scene from “The Leftovers.” She finds shelter in the home of Greg (BD Wong) home, which is filled with other terrified and bewildered survivors: Tom (Trevante Rhodes), an Iraqi war vet with a soft spot for Malorie; Charlie (Lil Rel Howery), a grocery-store employee with dreams of being a novelist; Doug (John Malkovich), an ornery and always on-guard neighbor; as well as Sheryl (Jacki Weaver), Lucy (Rosa Salazar), Felix (Colson Baker aka rapper Machine Gun Kelly). This group discovers what’s happening during the few minutes they are able to access the local news, and they discover that whatever this phenomenon is, it’s happening all over the world, and they must find a way to survive.

There is much to be said of the messages and symbolism within the film. The novel was written in 2014, but screenwriter Eric Heisserer (“Arrival”) brilliantly interweaves subtle contrasts that reflect on today’s world. His adaptation offers fleeing refugees seeking shelter (with a quick shot of the borders being ordered closed), climate change that no one can outrun, the mass amount of gun violence and more, all the while asking, How do you prepare the next generation, when you aren’t even sure you will survive the day?

Bullock’s performance is brilliant — she takes all these internalized fears and crafts a character who has already disconnected from emotion. Throughout the films, she challenges what “maternal” means in circumstances this dire. Does motherhood mean cuddles, rainbows, and filling a child with hope, or does it mean you raise a survivor, constantly teaching and training them, as you remain on guard, always holding them at arm’s length for fear of losing them to the ways of the world? How a mother protects her children from the world is a question every single parent contemplates, and figuring out how to raise the next generation is one of the scariest and most difficult issues we cope with every day.

For generations, the picture of motherhood has been that of a woman who connects with her child immediately, who is openly loving and soft. Motherhood today is not as simple. There are real dangers that our children face daily, simply by walking outside. There’s no new handbook to teach us how to prep our kids in case their school is taken over by a shooter, nor is there a guide on how to lead our children when we ourselves are uncertain of what the future holds. We’re all fumbling into this new parenthood blindly, hoping that we’re raising smart and strong kids while also allowing them to experience the joys of childhood, and it’s that innate understanding of parenthood that makes Bullock’s performance feel real. It’s equally fascinating and terrifying to watch.

The supporting ensemble each brings a unique personality to the mix, but it’s Rhodes’ Tom who gives the story its heart and soul. He brings charm as well as a nuanced take on how strength can mean giving all of yourself, living and loving fully, even in times of chaos. An interesting insight within the dynamic of Malorie and Tom is the idea that there must be a balance of both, the survivor and the caretaker, in order to ensure humanity’s survival.

“Bird Box” is not the jump-scare thrill machine that some might expect when they hear “post-apocalyptic thriller.” It’s quiet at times and quick in others. Much like the film’s creatures, it digs into our deepest human fears and opens a world that lives in that fear. And when it asks you to remove the blindfold and watch what happens, it really is beautiful.

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‘Bird Box’ Review: Netflix’s Sandra Bullock Thriller Is So Intense You’ll Want to Cover Your Eyes — AFI FEST

Susanne Bier’s inventive drama is a welcome addition to the post-apocalyptic canon.

If ever you find yourself trying to survive the end of the world, don’t look to Malorie (Sandra Bullock) for an inspiring pep talk. “Bird Box” begins with her telling two small children to do exactly as she says if they want to survive, with the most important lesson being to never remove their blindfolds — if they look at it, they will die. We won’t know what it is for some time, but the urgency in her voice comes across to us just as clearly as it does to Boy and Girl (the meaning of whose names — or lack thereof — will likewise be made clear in time).

Bullock convincingly transforms herself into a gritty survivalist in Susanne Bier’s gripping thriller, which brings to mind everything from “The Road” to “The Happening” as it carves a space for itself in the post-apocalyptic canon. She’s joined in the ensemble by Trevante Rhodes, Sarah Paulson, John Malkovich, Jacki Weaver, and Lil Rel Howery; though all of them contribute to the dour milieu in their own ways, it’s Rhodes who most impresses. The physical charisma he brought to “Moonlight” is on full display here, with his Tom acting as the kind of stabilizing force that out-there narratives like this require.

Flashbacks set five years before Malorie’s speech reveal that a spate of unexplained mass suicides began in Eastern Europe before creeping across the globe, with no one understanding how or why; all anyone seems to know is that looking upon a certain entity inspires such profound sorrow in the beholder that he or she is instantly compelled to commit suicide. The pandemic reaches Malorie at the worst possible moment, and the hellish scene that ensues is more than a little reminiscent of the Sudden Departure from “The Leftovers”: chaos and confusion that almost feels biblical in its end-of-the-world scope. One woman bashes her head through a glass window with the force of a ram locking horns, while another throws herself in front of a bus to end her inexplicable agony.

“Bird Box”

Bird Box

That premise — that something is out there and must be avoided at all costs — is like “A Quiet Place” in reverse, and further evidence that denying your characters one of their senses makes for incredibly tense moments. Wondering as to the cause of this affliction is good fun, even as your thoughts are frequently interrupted by the many white-knuckle sequences where “Bird Box” most excels. Bier’s direction is coolly efficient, which fits the material to a t — anything more ostentatious would just feel wasteful.

The filmmaker, whose work on “In a Better World” and “The Night Manager” have earned her an Oscar and an Emmy, respectively, doesn’t have much of a background in genre cinema to speak of, but it’s hard not to wonder what else she could do with this kind of material. She lays out the film’s ideas a little too overtly — ignoring your problems doesn’t make them go away, in case you hadn’t noticed — but you may be too busy covering your own eyes in fear to notice or care.

Most of the film takes place five years before Malorie’s would-be pep talk, which is occasioned by her decision to move herself and the children downstream. There’s said to be a safe haven somewhere in the woods, as there always is in stories of this kind, and outside forces have made her current situation untenable; these scenes almost function as a kind of fragmentary epilogue, as learning how Malorie came to be here is no less compelling than watching her float down a river on a rowboat with her eyes covered.

The “creatures,” as they’re called, draw people like moths to a flame: Some appear to hear or see deceased loved ones in the moment before they kill themselves, while a select few manage to survive their encounter and devote themselves to forcing others to open their eyes and bask in its beauty. Removing your blindfold can only end one way, but “Bird Box” makes you want to look closer nonetheless.

Grade: B

“Bird Box” premiered at AFI FEST. Netflix will release it in theaters on December 13 before making it available to stream on December 21.

AFI Fest Film Review: Sandra Bullock in ‘Bird Box’

When it comes to the movie “Jaws,” there’s a myth so often repeated that hardly anyone stops to question it anymore: The story goes that because Spielberg couldn’t get his giant mechanical shark to work, he was forced to shoot around it, resulting in a…

When it comes to the movie “Jaws,” there’s a myth so often repeated that hardly anyone stops to question it anymore: The story goes that because Spielberg couldn’t get his giant mechanical shark to work, he was forced to shoot around it, resulting in a more effective film. That’s true up to a point. Sharks […]

Susanne Bier To Direct ‘The Undoing’ HBO Limited Series Starring Nicole Kidman

This is a major coup for HBO — Susanne Bier has signed on to direct all six episodes of The Undoing, the network’s high-profile upcoming limited series starring Nicole Kidman and written by David E. Kelley.
Bier, who also will serve as an e…

This is a major coup for HBOSusanne Bier has signed on to direct all six episodes of The Undoing, the network’s high-profile upcoming limited series starring Nicole Kidman and written by David E. Kelley. Bier, who also will serve as an executive producer, has been at the top of every network’s list of director choices following her work on The Night Manager, which earned her an Emmy Award. She had been unavailable, working on her feature Bird Box; this marks her first…

Susanne Bier to Direct Nicole Kidman HBO Series ‘The Undoing’

Emmy-winning director Susanne Bier has signed on to helm the upcoming HBO series “The Undoing.” Bier will direct all six episodes of the series, which is based on the book “You Should Have Known” by Jean Hanff Korelit, in additi…

Emmy-winning director Susanne Bier has signed on to helm the upcoming HBO series “The Undoing.” Bier will direct all six episodes of the series, which is based on the book “You Should Have Known” by Jean Hanff Korelit, in addition to serving as an executive producer. The series stars and is executive produced by Nicole […]

‘Night Manager’s’ Susanne Bier to Direct Nicole Kidman in HBO Limited Series ‘The Undoing’

“The Night Manager” filmmaker Susanne Bier has been set as the director for “The Undoing,” HBO’s next limited series from Nicole Kidman and “Big Little Lies” boss David E. Kelley, an individual with knowledge o…

“The Night Manager” filmmaker Susanne Bier has been set as the director for “The Undoing,” HBO’s next limited series from Nicole Kidman and “Big Little Lies” boss David E. Kelley, an individual with knowledge of production tells TheWrap.

Based on the book “You Should Have Known” by Jean Hanff Korelitz, the six-episode series stars Kidman as Grace Sachs, a loving wife, devoted mother and successful therapist whose life unravels when she makes discoveries about her husband’s past.

Here’s the official logline for the series: Grace Sachs (Kidman) is living the only life she ever wanted for herself. She’s a successful therapist, has a devoted husband and young son who attends an elite private school in New York City. Overnight a chasm opens in her life: a violent death, a missing husband, and, in the place of a man Grace thought she knew, only a chain of terrible revelations. Left behind in the wake of a spreading and very public disaster, and horrified by the ways in which she has failed to heed her own advice, Grace must dismantle one life and create another for her child and herself.

Bier will direct all episodes of the series and executive produce, with Kelley writing and showrunning the series. Kelley executive produces through his David E. Kelley Productions banner, with Kidman (who is re-teaming with Kelley after Seasons 1 and 2 of “Big Little Lies”) and Per Saari executive producing under Blossom Films, and Bruna Papandrea for Made Up Stories.

She won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie or a Dramatic Special for “The Night Manager.” Her other film credits include “A Second Chance,” “Love Is All You Need,” “In A Better World,” “Things We Lost In The Fire,” “After The Wedding,” “Brothers,” “Once in A Lifetime,” and the upcoming “Bird Box.”

Bier is repped by CAA, Brillstein Entertainment Partners and Jackoway, Tyerman, Wertheimer, Austen, Mandelbaum, Morris & Klein.

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‘Bird Box’s Sandra Bullock Donned A Blindfold For Fresh Take On Motherhood – The Contenders LA

While Sandra Bullock would eventually fall in love with Bird Box—a Netflix horror-thriller based on a novel by Josh Malerman and directed by Susanne Bier—the Oscar winner had quite a different reaction to the material in her first interacti…

While Sandra Bullock would eventually fall in love with Bird Box—a Netflix horror-thriller based on a novel by Josh Malerman and directed by Susanne Bier—the Oscar winner had quite a different reaction to the material in her first interaction with it some years ago. "I thought it was intriguing, but there was something about it that didn't click,” she told Deadline’s Pete Hammond during the Netflix film’s panel at Deadline’s The Contenders award-season event Saturday at…

Netflix Alters Model; Gives Awards Films ‘Roma’, ‘Buster Scruggs’ & ‘Bird Box’ Theatrical Runs Before Streaming

In a seismic move that Deadline earlier this week revealed was coming, Netflix will boost the awards chances of several contending films by setting exclusive limited theatrical releases prior to the streaming service releases of the Alfonso Cuaron-dire…

In a seismic move that Deadline earlier this week revealed was coming, Netflix will boost the awards chances of several contending films by setting exclusive limited theatrical releases prior to the streaming service releases of the Alfonso Cuaron-directed Roma, the Joel & Ethan Coen-directed The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and the Susanne Bier-directed Bird Box, latter of which stars Sandra Bullock. Netflix is selectively evolving its streaming-first model in hopes that…

‘Roma,’ ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ and ‘Bird Box’ to Open in Theaters Ahead of Netflix Debuts

Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” Joel and Ethan Coen’ “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” and Susanne Bier’s “Bird Box” are getting exclusive limited theatrical releases ahead of their releases on Netflix, the streaming platform announced on Wednesday.

“Roma” will hit theaters on Nov. 21 in Los Angeles, New York and Mexico, with additional engagements beginning Nov. 29 in other U.S. cities and other U.S. markets and international territories rolling out on Dec. 7. The film will then be released on Netflix on Dec. 14, along with an expanded theatrical release. In total, “Roma” will be released theatrically in more than 20 territories. This is Netflix’s longest window between a theatrical and streaming platform release ever, giving users a choice in how they want to see Cuaron’s newest movie.

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” will have theatrical engagements starting Nov. 8 in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London, with a global release on Netflix on Nov. 16 as well as an expanded theatrical release.

Also Read: ‘Roma’ Enters Oscar Foreign-Language Race, Becomes the Instant Favorite

“Bird Box” will receive a limited theatrical release starting Dec. 13 in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London. It will later debut on Netflix on Dec. 21 along with an expanded theatrical release.

Allowing a theatrical release is also signaling that Netflix is looking for a heavy awards push for all three films, especially among Oscar voters who prefer seeing movies on cinematic screens.

“These upcoming engagements are following the success of our theatrical and Netflix releases of ‘Private Life’ and ’22 July,’” Netflix film group head Scott Stuber said in a statement. “There’s been an overwhelming response to all of our films this festival season, including ‘Outlaw King,’ which will be in theaters and on Netflix next week, and this plan is building on that momentum. Netflix’s priority is our members and our filmmakers, and we are constantly innovating to serve them. Our members benefit from having the best quality films from world class filmmakers and our filmmakers benefit by being able to share their artistry with the largest possible audience in over 190 countries worldwide.”

“Roma” stars Yalitza Aparicio as Cleo, a young domestic worker for a family living in the middle class neighborhood of Roma in Mexico City. This is Cuaron’s first project since 2013’s “Gravity.”

Also Read: Ava DuVernay to Direct Prince Documentary for Netflix

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” is a six-part anthology film about the American West. James Franco, Tyne Daly, Zoe Kazan, Liam Neeson, Tom Waits and Brendan Gleeson star. The film received the Best Screenplay award at the Venice Film Festival.

“Bird Box” stars Sandra Bullock, Sarah Paulson, Trevante Rhodes and John Malkovich and follows a woman who must flee down a river with her two children when a mysterious force dominates the world’s population.

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Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” Joel and Ethan Coen’ “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” and Susanne Bier’s “Bird Box” are getting exclusive limited theatrical releases ahead of their releases on Netflix, the streaming platform announced on Wednesday.

“Roma” will hit theaters on Nov. 21 in Los Angeles, New York and Mexico, with additional engagements beginning Nov. 29 in other U.S. cities and other U.S. markets and international territories rolling out on Dec. 7. The film will then be released on Netflix on Dec. 14, along with an expanded theatrical release. In total, “Roma” will be released theatrically in more than 20 territories. This is Netflix’s longest window between a theatrical and streaming platform release ever, giving users a choice in how they want to see Cuaron’s newest movie.

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” will have theatrical engagements starting Nov. 8 in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London, with a global release on Netflix on Nov. 16 as well as an expanded theatrical release.

“Bird Box” will receive a limited theatrical release starting Dec. 13 in Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco and London. It will later debut on Netflix on Dec. 21 along with an expanded theatrical release.

Allowing a theatrical release is also signaling that Netflix is looking for a heavy awards push for all three films, especially among Oscar voters who prefer seeing movies on cinematic screens.

“These upcoming engagements are following the success of our theatrical and Netflix releases of ‘Private Life’ and ’22 July,'” Netflix film group head Scott Stuber said in a statement. “There’s been an overwhelming response to all of our films this festival season, including ‘Outlaw King,’ which will be in theaters and on Netflix next week, and this plan is building on that momentum. Netflix’s priority is our members and our filmmakers, and we are constantly innovating to serve them. Our members benefit from having the best quality films from world class filmmakers and our filmmakers benefit by being able to share their artistry with the largest possible audience in over 190 countries worldwide.”

“Roma” stars Yalitza Aparicio as Cleo, a young domestic worker for a family living in the middle class neighborhood of Roma in Mexico City. This is Cuaron’s first project since 2013’s “Gravity.”

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” is a six-part anthology film about the American West. James Franco, Tyne Daly, Zoe Kazan, Liam Neeson, Tom Waits and Brendan Gleeson star. The film received the Best Screenplay award at the Venice Film Festival.

“Bird Box” stars Sandra Bullock, Sarah Paulson, Trevante Rhodes and John Malkovich and follows a woman who must flee down a river with her two children when a mysterious force dominates the world’s population.

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Sandra Bullock Faces Her Worst Fears in Apocalyptic First ‘Bird Box’ Trailer (Video)

In Sandra Bullock’s new film “Bird Box,” she’s immersed in an apocalyptic nightmare in which people are seeing their worst fears and killing themselves once they do. It sounds like “A Quiet Place,” but with sight instead of sound.

In the first trailer, you can see Bullock alone in the woods, hunting for her children but with a blindfold on to avoid whatever might be her undoing.

“Under no circumstance are you allowed to take off your blindfold,” Bullock says to her children as they ring a bell to alert her to the “creatures.”

Also Read: Sandra Bullock Says She Considered Leaving Hollywood Over Sexism

Bullock stars in the horror film directed by the Danish director Susanne Bier and written by “Arrival’s” Eric Heisserer.

Trevante Rhodes, Jacki Weaver, Rosa Salazar, Danielle Macdonald, Lil Rel Howery, Tom Hollander, Colson Baker, BD Wong, Sarah Paulson and John Malkovich all co-star.

“Bird Box” is based on a book from 2014 by Josh Malerman, and it will be available for streaming on Netflix starting on Dec. 21.

Also Read: John Krasinski Reveals He Also Played the Monsters in ‘A Quiet Place’ (Video)

Here’s the full, official synopsis:

When a mysterious force decimates the world’s population, only one thing is certain: if you see it, you take your life.  Facing the unknown, Malorie finds love, hope and a new beginning only for it to unravel. Now she must flee with her two children down a treacherous river to the one place left that may offer sanctuary. But to survive, they’ll have to undertake the perilous two-day journey blindfolded. Academy Award® winner Sandra Bullock leads an all-star cast that includes Trevante Rhodes, with Sarah Paulson, and John Malkovich in BIRD BOX, a compelling new thriller from Academy Award® winner Susanne Bier.

You may not want to look, but watch the first trailer for “Bird Box” above … if you dare.

Netflix

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In Sandra Bullock’s new film “Bird Box,” she’s immersed in an apocalyptic nightmare in which people are seeing their worst fears and killing themselves once they do. It sounds like “A Quiet Place,” but with sight instead of sound.

In the first trailer, you can see Bullock alone in the woods, hunting for her children but with a blindfold on to avoid whatever might be her undoing.

“Under no circumstance are you allowed to take off your blindfold,” Bullock says to her children as they ring a bell to alert her to the “creatures.”

Bullock stars in the horror film directed by the Danish director Susanne Bier and written by “Arrival’s” Eric Heisserer.

Trevante Rhodes, Jacki Weaver, Rosa Salazar, Danielle Macdonald, Lil Rel Howery, Tom Hollander, Colson Baker, BD Wong, Sarah Paulson and John Malkovich all co-star.

“Bird Box” is based on a book from 2014 by Josh Malerman, and it will be available for streaming on Netflix starting on Dec. 21.

Here’s the full, official synopsis:

When a mysterious force decimates the world’s population, only one thing is certain: if you see it, you take your life.  Facing the unknown, Malorie finds love, hope and a new beginning only for it to unravel. Now she must flee with her two children down a treacherous river to the one place left that may offer sanctuary. But to survive, they’ll have to undertake the perilous two-day journey blindfolded. Academy Award® winner Sandra Bullock leads an all-star cast that includes Trevante Rhodes, with Sarah Paulson, and John Malkovich in BIRD BOX, a compelling new thriller from Academy Award® winner Susanne Bier.

You may not want to look, but watch the first trailer for “Bird Box” above … if you dare.

Netflix

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Ocean's 8' Film Review: Sandra Bullock and Her Female Crew Idle Amiably in Heist Farce

13 of Sandra Bullock's Biggest Box Office Bombs and Blockbusters (Photos)

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‘Bird Box’ Trailer: Sandra Bullock Goes Post-Apocalyptic in Susanne Bier’s Nerve-Shredding Netflix Adaptation

Susanne Bier is about to do for seeing what John Krasinski did for speaking, thanks to a thrilling adaptation of the Josh Malerman novel of the same name.

Susanne Bier is about to do for seeing what John Krasinski did for speaking. In the Academy Award winner’s newest feature film, Bier takes on Josh Malerman’s post-apocalyptic novel of the same name, which imagines a world consumed by a strange evil that drives people mad with just a glance. Per the film’s official synopsis, “When a mysterious force decimates the world’s population, only one thing is certain: if you see it, you take your life.  Facing the unknown, Malorie finds love, hope and a new beginning only for it to unravel. Now she must flee with her two children down a treacherous river to the one place left that may offer sanctuary. But to survive, they’ll have to undertake the perilous two-day journey blindfolded.”

That’s right, blindfolded. Adapted for the screen by Eric Heisserer (“Arrival,” “Lights Out”), “Bird Box” follows Bullock’s Malorie, a woman intent on getting to a possibly mythical safe haven where she and her kids can not only live out their lives peacefully, but do so without literally being afraid to look outside.

Read More: AFI FEST Adds World Premieres of ‘Bird Box’ and ‘The Kominsky Method,’ Plus ‘Widows,’ ‘Green Book,’ and ‘Buster Scruggs’ Galas

Malerman’s book was divided into three parts — before the start of what is referred to as “The Problem,” after Malorie has her children, and the journey the three of them undertake after many years of waiting and preparing — and the film’s first trailer hints that Bier is at least partially adhering to the structure, thanks to an early look at a pregnant Bullock and a chilling section about life post-“Problem.” 

Bullock stars alongside Trevante Rhodes, Sarah Paulson, Jacki Weaver, Rosa Salazar, Danielle Macdonald, Lil Rel Howery, Tom Hollander, Colson Baker, BD Wong, and John Malkovich. The film will have its world premiere at AFI FEST next month.

Netflix will release “Bird Box” in select theaters and via streaming platform on December 21. Check out the first trailer for the film below.

Motion Picture Academy Launches Program to Boost Women Filmmakers

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced the launch of Action: The Academy Women’s Initiative, designed to create opportunities for female filmmakers to connect, share their stories and celebrate inclusion. The program consists of …

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced the launch of Action: The Academy Women’s Initiative, designed to create opportunities for female filmmakers to connect, share their stories and celebrate inclusion. The program consists of the Academy Gold Fellowship for Women, the Academy Directory and annual events, which this year will take place […]

Venice Facetime: Susanne Bier Talks About the VR Experience

Danish director Susanne Bier is president of the jury for its Venice Virtual Reality section. Over the past three decades, she’s received widespread acclaim for projects ranging from the globe-trotting 2016 miniseries adaptation of John le Carre&…

Danish director Susanne Bier is president of the jury for its Venice Virtual Reality section. Over the past three decades, she’s received widespread acclaim for projects ranging from the globe-trotting 2016 miniseries adaptation of John le Carre’s “The Night Manager,” which earned her an Emmy, to dark family dramas such as 2007’s “Things We Lost […]

Susanne Bier’s Danish Baby Snatching Drama ‘A Second Chance’ Gets Theatrical Bow In U.S. With Rock Salt Releasing

EXCLUSIVE: Susanne Bier’s baby snatching drama A Second Chance is finally coming to the United States after Rock Salt Releasing picked up the feature film, which stars Game of Thrones’ Nikolaj Coster-Waldau.
The film, which is produced by Zentropa, Fil…

EXCLUSIVE: Susanne Bier's baby snatching drama A Second Chance is finally coming to the United States after Rock Salt Releasing picked up the feature film, which stars Game of Thrones' Nikolaj Coster-Waldau. The film, which is produced by Zentropa, FilmFyn and Film I Vast, initially premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2014 before being released in Denmark in 2015. However, with the issues surrounding children being separated from their parents front…

Movie Academy Unveils 2018-19 Governors; Alfred Molina & Susanne Bier Elected; Jason Blum & Jennifer Todd In Runoff

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2018–19 Board of Governors, including four first-timers, 10 incumbents and two returnees. There also will be a runoff between Jason Blum and Jennifer Todd in the Pr…

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences today announced its newly elected 2018–19 Board of Governors, including four first-timers, 10 incumbents and two returnees. There also will be a runoff between Jason Blum and Jennifer Todd in the Producers Branch. The rookies are Alfred Molina, Actors Branch; Tom Duffield, Designers Branch; Susanne Bier, Directors Branch; Bonnie Arnold, Short Films and Feature Animation Branch. Molina, who replaces Tom Hanks, beat out…

Alfred Molina and Susanne Bier Among Newly Elected Film Academy Governors

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Thursday its newly elected individuals to its Board of Governors for 2018-2019. Those elected to the board for the first time are: Alfred Molina (Actors Branch) Tom Duffield (Designers Branch…

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Thursday its newly elected individuals to its Board of Governors for 2018-2019. Those elected to the board for the first time are: Alfred Molina (Actors Branch) Tom Duffield (Designers Branch) Susanne Bier (Directors Branch) Bonnie Arnold (Short Films and Feature Animation Branch) Incumbent governors reelected […]

Julianne Moore and Bart Freundlich To Remake Susanne Bier’s ‘After The Wedding’

Husband and wife pair Julianne Moore and Bart Freundlich are to find out what happens After The Wedding after setting up a U.S. remake of Susanne Bier‘s Danish drama.
The Hunger Games star Moore is set to star in the feature, which will be written and directed by Wolves director Freundlich. It will be produced by Joel Michaels (Terminator Salvation) and Silvio Muraglia (Black Butterfly) through Paradox Studios and production will begin this spring. Paradox Studios is also…

Husband and wife pair Julianne Moore and Bart Freundlich are to find out what happens After The Wedding after setting up a U.S. remake of Susanne Bier's Danish drama. The Hunger Games star Moore is set to star in the feature, which will be written and directed by Wolves director Freundlich. It will be produced by Joel Michaels (Terminator Salvation) and Silvio Muraglia (Black Butterfly) through Paradox Studios and production will begin this spring. Paradox Studios is also…

Lars Von Trier Producer Peter Aalbaek Jensen Accused of Sexual Harassment

Peter Aalbaek Jensen, the founder and former CEO of the Danish film company Zentropa and frequent collaborator of director Lars von Trier, has become the latest prominent figure in the film world of accused of sexual harassment.

Nine former female employees said they had experienced what they called “degradation, sexual harassment and bullying” over the last several decades, the Danish newspaper Politiken reported on Saturday.

Former female employees said that Jensen — who stepped down as Zentropa’s CEO in 2016 but still maintains a stake in the company — would grope their breasts and ask them to lie across his knee and “get spanked.”

Also Read: DC Comics Fires Editor After Sexual Assault Accusations

Young female trainees were singled out for attention, Politiken wrote, ordered to “fetch nipple clamps” and handed awards at the office Christmas party if they “undressed the fastest” or had “the longest public hair.”

Jensen corroborated many of the the stories to Politiken, noting that some he could not recall some but that they “probably happened.”

“I’ll say this: I have no interest in submission and degradation,” he told the paper. “I’m interested in testing boundaries, especially where the red line is.”

Also Read: Marc Maron Calls Louis CK a Liar After Disgraced Star Finally Admitted to Sexual Misconduct

Zentropa’s current CEO, Anders Kjaerhaude, told Screen Daily that the company plans to “initiate a process with our employees in order to prepare a more clear vision in regards to what is a good working place.”

In his decades at Zentropa, Jensen produced more than 70 feature films, including Susanne Bier’s Oscar-nominated “After the Wedding” and many of the films in the Dogme95 series.

He also produced most of von Trier’s films, including “Dancer in the Dark,” “Dogville” and “Melancholia.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

DC Comics Fires Editor After Sexual Assault Accusations

Marc Maron Calls Louis CK a Liar After Disgraced Star Finally Admitted to Sexual Misconduct

Louis CK Accuser Says Comedian’s Sexual Misconduct Was ‘Common Knowledge’ (Video)

Hollywood Hair-Trigger: 11 Films and TV Shows Impacted by Sexual Harassment Accusations (Photos)

Peter Aalbaek Jensen, the founder and former CEO of the Danish film company Zentropa and frequent collaborator of director Lars von Trier, has become the latest prominent figure in the film world of accused of sexual harassment.

Nine former female employees said they had experienced what they called “degradation, sexual harassment and bullying” over the last several decades, the Danish newspaper Politiken reported on Saturday.

Former female employees said that Jensen — who stepped down as Zentropa’s CEO in 2016 but still maintains a stake in the company — would grope their breasts and ask them to lie across his knee and “get spanked.”

Young female trainees were singled out for attention, Politiken wrote, ordered to “fetch nipple clamps” and handed awards at the office Christmas party if they “undressed the fastest” or had “the longest public hair.”

Jensen corroborated many of the the stories to Politiken, noting that some he could not recall some but that they “probably happened.”

“I’ll say this: I have no interest in submission and degradation,” he told the paper. “I’m interested in testing boundaries, especially where the red line is.”

Zentropa’s current CEO, Anders Kjaerhaude, told Screen Daily that the company plans to “initiate a process with our employees in order to prepare a more clear vision in regards to what is a good working place.”

In his decades at Zentropa, Jensen produced more than 70 feature films, including Susanne Bier’s Oscar-nominated “After the Wedding” and many of the films in the Dogme95 series.

He also produced most of von Trier’s films, including “Dancer in the Dark,” “Dogville” and “Melancholia.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

DC Comics Fires Editor After Sexual Assault Accusations

Marc Maron Calls Louis CK a Liar After Disgraced Star Finally Admitted to Sexual Misconduct

Louis CK Accuser Says Comedian's Sexual Misconduct Was 'Common Knowledge' (Video)

Hollywood Hair-Trigger: 11 Films and TV Shows Impacted by Sexual Harassment Accusations (Photos)

‘The Night Manager’ Season 2?: “Not Ruled Out, Not Ruled In”, Says EP

Following a misleading report in a British trade this week, questions have arisen as to the status of a second season of BBC/AMC hit event series, The Night Manager. The partners, along with producer The Ink Factory, have sought to quell the hullabaloo that story caused, clearly stating that nothing is set. In a statement today, they say, “The Ink Factory, BBC and AMC are in the early stages of developing a potential second series of The Night Manager, but nothing is…

Following a misleading report in a British trade this week, questions have arisen as to the status of a second season of BBC/AMC hit event series, The Night Manager. The partners, along with producer The Ink Factory, have sought to quell the hullabaloo that story caused, clearly stating that nothing is set. In a statement today, they say, “The Ink Factory, BBC and AMC are in the early stages of developing a potential second series of The Night Manager, but nothing is…

‘The Night Manager’: Second Season in the Works, BBC, AMC Confirm

A second season of thriller series “The Night Manager” is in the works, the show’s production company The Ink Factory, and broadcasters AMC and the BBC have confirmed, while underscoring the point that it has yet to be greenlit. In a joint statement, the three companies said: “The Ink Factory, AMC and the BBC are… Read more »

A second season of thriller series “The Night Manager” is in the works, the show’s production company The Ink Factory, and broadcasters AMC and the BBC have confirmed, while underscoring the point that it has yet to be greenlit. In a joint statement, the three companies said: “The Ink Factory, AMC and the BBC are... Read more »