What’s Next for Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider After Disney Closes Deal?

The Walt Disney Co. has officially laid claim to the top-level executives at Fox that the company wants to keep once it finalizes its $71.3 billion acquisition for the majority of the Murdoch family’s entertainment assets — but Fox film chief Stacey Snider won’t be making the move.

That puts Snider, a well-liked and respected executive who has had stints running Universal Pictures, DreamWorks and currently 20th Century Fox, in play at a time when Hollywood is craving experienced leadership.

“Literally I’d be outside the lot right now with a lobster bib on,” REDEF CEO Jason Hirschhorn said at this month’s TheWrap-sponsored media and entertainment conference TheGrill.

Also Read: Fox Executives Emma Watts, Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula to Join Disney Studio After Merger

The problem, however, is that there don’t seem to be a lot of clear landing places at the moment for an executive of her caliber, one who has taken successful risks on films such as “Deadpool,” “Hidden Figures” and “The Greatest Showman.”

“Her first thought is always going to be to work at a studio,” one studio executive told TheWrap. “I’m sure she’ll want to wait for a studio, I just don’t know what’s out there.”

Fox did not respond to requests for comment about Snider’s post-Fox plans, but  interviews with Hollywood insiders suggest several paths for her once the Disney deal closes.

Also Read: Peter Rice, Dana Walden to Lead Disney-ABC’s TV Networks and Studio After Fox Deal Closes

1. Another Major Studio

With her background, it would make sense that Snider would want to run another major studio. She’s been at the solo helm of Fox’s film studio since taking over in 2016 after the ouster of now-Paramount CEO Jim Gianopulos. Before that, she served as co-chairman alongside Gianopulos.

During her tenure, the studio has struck gold with hits like the Ryan Reynolds’ R-rated “Deadpool” franchise, the R-rated “Logan” film (a send-off for Hugh Jackman), “Hidden Figures” and “The Greatest Showman.” In addition, the studio’s specialty banner Fox Searchlight nabbed the Best Picture Oscar for “The Shape of Water” — and two acting prizes for “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri.”

“I know her very well, and she’s going to want to run a studio,” the insider told TheWrap. “But studio-wise, I don’t see anything out there.”

Indeed, the other majors all seem stable at the top. Universal Pictures chairman Donna Langley oversaw the studio’s most profitable year in 2017, crossing $5 billion at the worldwide box office with slate of films that included “Split,” “Get Out,” “The Fate of the Furious” and “Girls Trip.”

Paramount is rebounding and producing hits again under Gianopulos; Sony just reinforced its faith in Tom Rothman by extending his contract for five years on the eve of breakout hit “Venom;” and AT&T retained Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara after its multibillion-dollar acquisition of Time Warner over the summer.

Also Read: Warner Bros Leadership Shake-Up: Toby Emmerich to Run Studio, Sue Kroll Steps Down

2. An Upstart Studio

With the major Hollywood studios locked up, Snider could turn to one of the town’s upstart studios. The insider suggested MGM, which has been run by an assortment of senior leadership and division heads known as the “Office of the CEO” since Gary Barber’s surprise ouster last March.

The James Bond studio has been working its way back to prominence since emerging from bankruptcy in 2010, and has helped produced a number of high-profile films, including a minority stake in Warner Bros.’ hit “A Star Is Born.”

And last year, MGM inked a deal with Annapurna Pictures to return to domestic distribution while retaining control of major projects like next month’s “Rocky” spinoff sequel “Creed 2” and the upcoming 25th James Bond film, starring Daniel Craig.

Speaking of Annapurna, the Megan Ellison-run company lost its head of film Chelsea Barnard last week after parting ways with president Marc Weinstock in June. The company decided over the summer to dissolve Weinstock’s position and redistribute his duties, and Ellison now wants to take a more active role in the studio’s day-to-day as it looks to reevaluate the film division and rein in spending.

There’s also STX, which hasn’t filled the hole left by entertainment president Sophie Watts when she exited the company in January — if at this point STX even has a desire to replace her. CEO Robert Simonds is still running the company.

And Lantern Entertainment is still looking for a new CEO to relaunch the indie studio formerly known as The Weinstein Company, though it’s unclear how much Dallas-based Lantern Capital is interested in investing in a venture that’s well outside its usual wheelhouse as a middle-market private equity firm. The company emerged with TWC in a bankruptcy auction in April at a sale price later lowered to $287 million.

Also Read: Annapurna Upheaval: Megan Ellison Is ‘Reevaluating’ Film Division Amid Money Woes

3. A Streaming Giant

The streaming giants all seem to be looking to make a big splash in film, which would make Snider a desirable commodity. Hirschhorn noted that she might be particularly needed at Hulu, which has been mainly focused on TV and documentaries.

But while companies like Netflix, Amazon Studios and Apple would likely benefit from bringing in an executive with experience running a major studio, most of the top jobs are already taken.

NBC Entertainment president Jennifer Salke took over at Amazon Studios in February months after the ouster of Roy Price in the midst of a sexual harassment accusation. While Amazon is searching for a new head of its film division since the exit of Jason Ropell in July, the insider said Snider is unlikely to want to report to Salke. (The division is currently being overseen in the interim by production chief Ted Hope and international distribution head Matt Newman.)

And Netflix seems to be doing just fine under the supervision of original films head Scott Stuber and chief content officer Ted Sarandos.

“I think she would consider one of the streamers if it was a big enough position,” the insider said. “Say, if Apple came and the guys over there needed a boss — but I don’t think they do.”

Also Read: Annapurna Film President Chelsea Barnard Departs Company

4. Start Her Own Thing

Snider could also become her own boss, partnering with finance types to launch her own production or distribution company. Roy Salter, a senior advisor at FTI Consulting, told TheWrap that an executive Snider’s caliber has endless opportunities in Hollywood.

“Capital, in my view, would be well served to strongly consider the judgment of this type of professional, particularly as there as so few possessing these abilities.” Salter said. “Judging by results, Stacey Snider is one of this industry’s unique professionals that possesses the ability to assess and manage the production and release of content that works both commercially and creatively.

“I would go further to say that Stacey knows how to manage content such as to facilitate positive social impact for the world,” he said “In the upcoming changes within media and entertainment, that type of professional has limitless opportunity.”

There are a lot of risks, however, in trying to get a new company off the ground — and the recent box office record of junior studios like STX and the financial struggles of Ryan Kavanaugh’s Relativity Studios, Global Road and recently Annapurna are not exactly encouraging.

Also Read: Why Hollywood’s Merger Mania Will Leave a Host of Theater Chains and Entertainment Companies in the Dust (Video)

5. Stay on the lot

Another option for Snider would be the more traditional route for top studio executives who find themselves out of the corner office — setting up a production banner on the (soon-to-be Disney) lot.

Former Sony Motion Pictures Group head Amy Pascal transitioned into production after stepping down in the wake of the devastating studio hack. She’s since produced such films as “The Post,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Venom.”

Sue Kroll took a similar approach, launching her own production label Kroll & Co. Entertainment at Warner Bros. after stepping down as head of marketing and distribution in January. She’s an exec producer on the hit “A Star Is Born,” and has set up the upcoming female-led superhero flick “Birds of Prey” at the studio with Margot Robbie.

Disney has offered next to no details into how the Fox studio and its different banners would be incorporated into the new company and exactly what the layout and hierarchy of the studios will look like.

The insider told TheWrap that while it seemed unlikely that Snider would want to launch a full-fledged production shop, producing some films in partnership with a studio could be plausible — especially in the interim, until another top job opens up.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox Executives Emma Watts, Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula to Join Disney Studio After Merger

Peter Rice, Dana Walden to Lead Disney-ABC’s TV Networks and Studio After Fox Deal Closes

Rupert Murdoch and Sons Pay Soars as Fox-Disney Deal Awaits Completion

The Walt Disney Co. has officially laid claim to the top-level executives at Fox that the company wants to keep once it finalizes its $71.3 billion acquisition for the majority of the Murdoch family’s entertainment assets — but Fox film chief Stacey Snider won’t be making the move.

That puts Snider, a well-liked and respected executive who has had stints running Universal Pictures, DreamWorks and currently 20th Century Fox, in play at a time when Hollywood is craving experienced leadership.

“Literally I’d be outside the lot right now with a lobster bib on,” REDEF CEO Jason Hirschhorn said at this month’s TheWrap-sponsored media and entertainment conference TheGrill.

The problem, however, is that there don’t seem to be a lot of clear landing places at the moment for an executive of her caliber, one who has taken successful risks on films such as “Deadpool,” “Hidden Figures” and “The Greatest Showman.”

“Her first thought is always going to be to work at a studio,” one studio executive told TheWrap. “I’m sure she’ll want to wait for a studio, I just don’t know what’s out there.”

Fox did not respond to requests for comment about Snider’s post-Fox plans, but  interviews with Hollywood insiders suggest several paths for her once the Disney deal closes.

1. Another Major Studio

With her background, it would make sense that Snider would want to run another major studio. She’s been at the solo helm of Fox’s film studio since taking over in 2016 after the ouster of now-Paramount CEO Jim Gianopulos. Before that, she served as co-chairman alongside Gianopulos.

During her tenure, the studio has struck gold with hits like the Ryan Reynolds’ R-rated “Deadpool” franchise, the R-rated “Logan” film (a send-off for Hugh Jackman), “Hidden Figures” and “The Greatest Showman.” In addition, the studio’s specialty banner Fox Searchlight nabbed the Best Picture Oscar for “The Shape of Water” — and two acting prizes for “Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri.”

“I know her very well, and she’s going to want to run a studio,” the insider told TheWrap. “But studio-wise, I don’t see anything out there.”

Indeed, the other majors all seem stable at the top. Universal Pictures chairman Donna Langley oversaw the studio’s most profitable year in 2017, crossing $5 billion at the worldwide box office with slate of films that included “Split,” “Get Out,” “The Fate of the Furious” and “Girls Trip.”

Paramount is rebounding and producing hits again under Gianopulos; Sony just reinforced its faith in Tom Rothman by extending his contract for five years on the eve of breakout hit “Venom;” and AT&T retained Warner Bros. CEO Kevin Tsujihara after its multibillion-dollar acquisition of Time Warner over the summer.

2. An Upstart Studio

With the major Hollywood studios locked up, Snider could turn to one of the town’s upstart studios. The insider suggested MGM, which has been run by an assortment of senior leadership and division heads known as the “Office of the CEO” since Gary Barber’s surprise ouster last March.

The James Bond studio has been working its way back to prominence since emerging from bankruptcy in 2010, and has helped produced a number of high-profile films, including a minority stake in Warner Bros.’ hit “A Star Is Born.”

And last year, MGM inked a deal with Annapurna Pictures to return to domestic distribution while retaining control of major projects like next month’s “Rocky” spinoff sequel “Creed 2” and the upcoming 25th James Bond film, starring Daniel Craig.

Speaking of Annapurna, the Megan Ellison-run company lost its head of film Chelsea Barnard last week after parting ways with president Marc Weinstock in June. The company decided over the summer to dissolve Weinstock’s position and redistribute his duties, and Ellison now wants to take a more active role in the studio’s day-to-day as it looks to reevaluate the film division and rein in spending.

There’s also STX, which hasn’t filled the hole left by entertainment president Sophie Watts when she exited the company in January — if at this point STX even has a desire to replace her. CEO Robert Simonds is still running the company.

And Lantern Entertainment is still looking for a new CEO to relaunch the indie studio formerly known as The Weinstein Company, though it’s unclear how much Dallas-based Lantern Capital is interested in investing in a venture that’s well outside its usual wheelhouse as a middle-market private equity firm. The company emerged with TWC in a bankruptcy auction in April at a sale price later lowered to $287 million.

3. A Streaming Giant

The streaming giants all seem to be looking to make a big splash in film, which would make Snider a desirable commodity. Hirschhorn noted that she might be particularly needed at Hulu, which has been mainly focused on TV and documentaries.

But while companies like Netflix, Amazon Studios and Apple would likely benefit from bringing in an executive with experience running a major studio, most of the top jobs are already taken.

NBC Entertainment president Jennifer Salke took over at Amazon Studios in February months after the ouster of Roy Price in the midst of a sexual harassment accusation. While Amazon is searching for a new head of its film division since the exit of Jason Ropell in July, the insider said Snider is unlikely to want to report to Salke. (The division is currently being overseen in the interim by production chief Ted Hope and international distribution head Matt Newman.)

And Netflix seems to be doing just fine under the supervision of original films head Scott Stuber and chief content officer Ted Sarandos.

“I think she would consider one of the streamers if it was a big enough position,” the insider said. “Say, if Apple came and the guys over there needed a boss — but I don’t think they do.”

4. Start Her Own Thing

Snider could also become her own boss, partnering with finance types to launch her own production or distribution company. Roy Salter, a senior advisor at FTI Consulting, told TheWrap that an executive Snider’s caliber has endless opportunities in Hollywood.

“Capital, in my view, would be well served to strongly consider the judgment of this type of professional, particularly as there as so few possessing these abilities.” Salter said. “Judging by results, Stacey Snider is one of this industry’s unique professionals that possesses the ability to assess and manage the production and release of content that works both commercially and creatively.

“I would go further to say that Stacey knows how to manage content such as to facilitate positive social impact for the world,” he said “In the upcoming changes within media and entertainment, that type of professional has limitless opportunity.”

There are a lot of risks, however, in trying to get a new company off the ground — and the recent box office record of junior studios like STX and the financial struggles of Ryan Kavanaugh’s Relativity Studios, Global Road and recently Annapurna are not exactly encouraging.

5. Stay on the lot

Another option for Snider would be the more traditional route for top studio executives who find themselves out of the corner office — setting up a production banner on the (soon-to-be Disney) lot.

Former Sony Motion Pictures Group head Amy Pascal transitioned into production after stepping down in the wake of the devastating studio hack. She’s since produced such films as “The Post,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming” and “Venom.”

Sue Kroll took a similar approach, launching her own production label Kroll & Co. Entertainment at Warner Bros. after stepping down as head of marketing and distribution in January. She’s an exec producer on the hit “A Star Is Born,” and has set up the upcoming female-led superhero flick “Birds of Prey” at the studio with Margot Robbie.

Disney has offered next to no details into how the Fox studio and its different banners would be incorporated into the new company and exactly what the layout and hierarchy of the studios will look like.

The insider told TheWrap that while it seemed unlikely that Snider would want to launch a full-fledged production shop, producing some films in partnership with a studio could be plausible — especially in the interim, until another top job opens up.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox Executives Emma Watts, Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula to Join Disney Studio After Merger

Peter Rice, Dana Walden to Lead Disney-ABC's TV Networks and Studio After Fox Deal Closes

Rupert Murdoch and Sons Pay Soars as Fox-Disney Deal Awaits Completion

Disney Finalizes Film Studio Brass Under Alan Horn: Emma Watts Confirmed To Run Fox

As expected, 20th Century Fox Vice Chairman Emma Watts will continue leading the studio once it is absorbed by The Walt Disney Company. She’ll report directly to Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn in a structure that Disney unveiled Thursday….

As expected, 20th Century Fox Vice Chairman Emma Watts will continue leading the studio once it is absorbed by The Walt Disney Company. She’ll report directly to Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan Horn in a structure that Disney unveiled Thursday. Joining Watts, as Deadline previously reported, in the new Disney structure are Fox Searchlight chiefs Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula, as well as Fox 2000 president of production Elizabeth Gabler. Current 20th Century Fox…

Fox Executives Emma Watts, Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula to Join Disney Studio After Merger

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday announced that Emma Watts, as well as several other Fox film executives, will make the move to Disney’s studio entertainment management team after the company’s deal to acquire a majority of Fox assets closes.

“We’re pleased that these talented executives will be joining our incredible team of studio leaders once the acquisition of 21st Century Fox is completed,” Disney CEO Bob Iger said in a statement. “Under Alan Horn’s leadership, Disney, Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm have reached unprecedented levels of creative and box-office success, and adding Fox’s impressive film brands and franchises to our studio will allow us to create even more appealing high-quality entertainment to delight audiences.”

Watts will report directly to Disney studio head Alan Horn and will serve as vice chairman for Twentieth Century Fox Film and president of production at Fox. Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula will stay on as co-chairmen for Fox Searchlight and will also report directly to Horn, along with Elizabeth Gabler, who will serve as president of production at Fox 2000.

Also Read: Peter Rice, Dana Walden to Lead Disney-ABC’s TV Networks and Studio After Fox Deal Closes

Disney laid out the executive landscape for its TV arm last week. The looming question had been what the crowded executive structure in film would look like. Though the studio announced who from Fox would join the new company, exactly how Disney would incorporate the Fox studio and its different banners was not made clear.

It’s also worth noting that as expected, current Fox film CEO Stacey Snider will not be joining the new company post-merger. What’s next on her plate is still unknown.

“The addition of these respected film groups under the umbrella of The Walt Disney Studios will create endless possibilities as we continue to deliver first-rate motion pictures to audiences around the world,” said Horn in a statement. “This is an experienced group of executives, and Alan Bergman and I look forward to welcoming them to our leadership ranks upon completion of the acquisition.”

Also Read: ‘The Mandalorian’: Taika Waititi, Rick Famuyiwa Among Directors for ‘Star Wars’ TV Show

Disney and Fox shareholders voted in July to approve the Mouse House’s $71.3 billion bid to buy the lion’s share of Fox’s entertainment assets. The deal is expected to close in early 2019, at which point the executive changes Disney laid out will take effect. Executives and rank and file employees at Fox have been in a state of uncertainty about their futures since the two companies agreed to the deal.

Fox and Disney had originally agreed on a $54.2 billion all-stock deal before Comcast proposed a $65 billion bid, forcing Disney to sweeten the pot. Comcast eventually dropped out of the running.

Here’s the list of executives reporting to Horn and Watts:

  • Andrea Miloro and Robert Baird, co-presidents, Fox Animation
  • Vanessa Morrison, president, Fox Family

The executives join Horn’s existing leadership team that includes:

  • Alan Bergman, president, The Walt Disney Studios
  • Sean Bailey, president, Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture Production
  • Ed Catmull, president, Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Jennifer Lee, chief creative officer, Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Pete Docter, chief creative officer, Pixar Animation Studios
  • Kevin Feige, president, Marvel Studios
  • Louis D’Esposito, co-president, Marvel Studios
  • Kathleen Kennedy, president, Lucasfilm
  • Ken Bunt, president, Disney Music Group
  • Thomas Schumacher, president & producer, Disney Theatrical Group
Related stories from TheWrap:

Rupert Murdoch and Sons Pay Soars as Fox-Disney Deal Awaits Completion

Dana Walden Touts ‘Complete Independence’ of ‘New Fox’ After Disney Merger

Fox and Disney Shareholders Vote to Approve $71.3 Billion Merger

The Walt Disney Co. on Thursday announced that Emma Watts, as well as several other Fox film executives, will make the move to Disney’s studio entertainment management team after the company’s deal to acquire a majority of Fox assets closes.

“We’re pleased that these talented executives will be joining our incredible team of studio leaders once the acquisition of 21st Century Fox is completed,” Disney CEO Bob Iger said in a statement. “Under Alan Horn’s leadership, Disney, Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm have reached unprecedented levels of creative and box-office success, and adding Fox’s impressive film brands and franchises to our studio will allow us to create even more appealing high-quality entertainment to delight audiences.”

Watts will report directly to Disney studio head Alan Horn and will serve as vice chairman for Twentieth Century Fox Film and president of production at Fox. Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula will stay on as co-chairmen for Fox Searchlight and will also report directly to Horn, along with Elizabeth Gabler, who will serve as president of production at Fox 2000.

Disney laid out the executive landscape for its TV arm last week. The looming question had been what the crowded executive structure in film would look like. Though the studio announced who from Fox would join the new company, exactly how Disney would incorporate the Fox studio and its different banners was not made clear.

It’s also worth noting that as expected, current Fox film CEO Stacey Snider will not be joining the new company post-merger. What’s next on her plate is still unknown.

“The addition of these respected film groups under the umbrella of The Walt Disney Studios will create endless possibilities as we continue to deliver first-rate motion pictures to audiences around the world,” said Horn in a statement. “This is an experienced group of executives, and Alan Bergman and I look forward to welcoming them to our leadership ranks upon completion of the acquisition.”

Disney and Fox shareholders voted in July to approve the Mouse House’s $71.3 billion bid to buy the lion’s share of Fox’s entertainment assets. The deal is expected to close in early 2019, at which point the executive changes Disney laid out will take effect. Executives and rank and file employees at Fox have been in a state of uncertainty about their futures since the two companies agreed to the deal.

Fox and Disney had originally agreed on a $54.2 billion all-stock deal before Comcast proposed a $65 billion bid, forcing Disney to sweeten the pot. Comcast eventually dropped out of the running.

Here’s the list of executives reporting to Horn and Watts:

  • Andrea Miloro and Robert Baird, co-presidents, Fox Animation
  • Vanessa Morrison, president, Fox Family

The executives join Horn’s existing leadership team that includes:

  • Alan Bergman, president, The Walt Disney Studios
  • Sean Bailey, president, Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture Production
  • Ed Catmull, president, Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Jennifer Lee, chief creative officer, Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Pete Docter, chief creative officer, Pixar Animation Studios
  • Kevin Feige, president, Marvel Studios
  • Louis D’Esposito, co-president, Marvel Studios
  • Kathleen Kennedy, president, Lucasfilm
  • Ken Bunt, president, Disney Music Group
  • Thomas Schumacher, president & producer, Disney Theatrical Group
Related stories from TheWrap:

Rupert Murdoch and Sons Pay Soars as Fox-Disney Deal Awaits Completion

Dana Walden Touts 'Complete Independence' of 'New Fox' After Disney Merger

Fox and Disney Shareholders Vote to Approve $71.3 Billion Merger

Disney-Fox Film Structure Coming Next: Alan Horn Atop Divisions, Streaming Big Priority

Now that Disney has set the hierarchy of Fox TV executives who’ll be part of the merged entities, next comes the film division. Sources said there shouldn’t be much surprise when an announcement is made as early as later this week.
Alan Hor…

Now that Disney has set the hierarchy of Fox TV executives who’ll be part of the merged entities, next comes the film division. Sources said there shouldn’t be much surprise when an announcement is made as early as later this week. Alan Horn, the veteran exec who was unceremoniously pushed out at Warner Bros and then came to Disney and stabilized static divisions that has led to an unparalleled run, will be top dog. Reporting to him will be Sean Bailey, the Walt Disney…

Moguls on a Boat, All-Female Edition! How Oprah, Donna Langley, Gwyneth Spent Their Summer

It ain’t easy being a power woman in entertainment, media and tech  — which is why our annual executive vacation report “Moguls on a Boat” is devoted this year to high-profile women who deserve to play as hard as they work.

This list isn’t as long as in years past, which should probably tell you something about gender parity in the executive ranks of these industries, but our bosses are fierce.

They are spiritual and thought leaders, CEOs, philanthropists, underwriters of art and culture and definitively in charge. They also rake in substantial incomes — the list includes the richest woman in the world, Forbes’ reigning most powerful woman in media and three brand titans who leveraged multimillion-dollar companies based on their celebrity.

Indulge in their summer retreats from the boardroom in places like Capri, Portofino, the lush and hippie hills of Ojai, the seersucker-clad island of Martha’s Vineyard and, of course, plenty of open water to house those chartered and owned floating palaces.

Also Read: Oprah Winfrey Fires Back at ‘Frivolous’ Lawsuit Over ‘Greenleaf’ TV Series

WHO: Oprah, aboard David Geffen’s yacht Rising Sun in Portofino, with Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson and Julianna Margulies

STATUS: Every year is a good year to be Oprah, but she’s been particularly busy since last summer. In January, the mogul delivered a Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award acceptance speech at the Golden Globes that was so inspiring, it inserted her into the 2020 presidential election race.

While she demurred over a White House run, Oprah did return to acting. In February, she starred alongside Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time.” At the top of her summer, she signed a multi-year content partnership with Apple that will “embrace her incomparable ability to connect with audiences around the world,” the tech giant said.

Those checks will add to her 2017 updated net worth of $2.8 billion, according to Forbes.

Also Read: Oprah Winfrey Signs Multi-Year Content Partnership Deal With Apple

WHO: Gwyneth Paltrow — with fiancé Brad Falchuk, designer Valentino Garavani and his partner Giancarlo Giammetti — on Valentino’s yacht T.M. Blue One in Capri.

STATUS: Forget her little movie this year — the $2 billion worldwide box office phenomenon “Avengers: Infinity War” — since acting is officially Gwyneth’s hobby now. This year, Paltrow’s rapidly growing lifestyle company Goop received a $250 million valuation for its editorial and diverse e-commerce business that encompasses fashion, beauty, wellness and live events.

Largely hailed as a prototype for leveraging celebrity into big business (like another mogul on this list, Kylie Jenner), Paltrow continues to be a cultural lightning rod while monetizing the eyeballs of her haters — exquisitely detailed in a recent New York Times magazine profile on her business.

Paltrow is also set to wed “Pose” producer Falchuk this year, following the 2016 finalization of her divorce from Coldplay rocker Chris Martin. Her betrothed has also recruited her back onto the small screen, as she’ll cameo in his new Ben Platt-Barbra Streisand musical comedy “The Politician” at Netflix.

Also Read: Gwyneth Paltrow: Brad Pitt Told Harvey Weinstein ‘I’ll Kill You’ After ‘Weird’ Hotel Encounter

WHO: Stacey Snider, at her home on Martha’s Vineyard

STATUS: If anyone deserves a bike ride around the Gay Head Lighthouse or a few glasses of vino at the Obama-beloved restaurant The Cardboard Box on the Vineyard, its 20th Century Fox Film CEO Snider, who has long had a vacation home on the high-end Massachusetts island.

In 2016, Snider joined an extremely small club of female studio heads when she succeeded Jim Gianopulos as CEO and chairman at the company. Roughly 18 months later, Disney announced its plan to acquire all of Fox’s film and TV content assets, plunging the media establishment into chaos and raising still-prominent question about the fate of thousands of Fox employees as Disney absorbs them.

Snider has been bold in her candor about the uncertain future. Speaking at the movie theater owner convention CinemaCon in April, she could barely contain her emotion as she played a sizzle of the greatest films made in the studio’s 103 years. The Disney transition is expected to be complete by 2019.

Also Read: Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: ‘We Face a New Transition’

WHO: Donna Langley, at her home in Ojai, Calif.

STATUS: Another member of the rarefied female-studio head club, Universal Pictures Chairman Langley is frankly crushing it this year. In July, the studio crossed $1 billion at the domestic box office, the eighth year in a row the NBCUniversal property has hit that milestone. This month, Universal crossed $2 billion at the worldwide box office for the fourth time in its history. This is largely due to the success of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” which also helped put the studio in second place behind monolith Disney in terms of market share.

In January, Langley was honored with the Producers Guild of America Milestone Award, honoring those who have made “historic contributions to the entertainment industry.”

Also Read: ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Proves Power of Women at Box Office

WHO: Beyoncé, on the Amalfi coast aboard the $200 million charter yacht Kismet, with husband Jay-Z and their children in between stops on the “On The Run II” tour.

STATUS: In a career of dizzying highs and milestones for an African American and female artist, Beyonce achieved another transcendent moment as the first black woman to headline the Coachella Valley music festival in April.

More than that, the show was a celebration of deep Southern culture and a nearly two-hour nonstop dance party that one review billed as “two years and a career in the making.” The concert was immediately followed by the announcement of a joint world tour with husband Jay-Z, “On the Run II” — and another surprise album drop, “Everything Is Love.”

Even in the dog days of summer, Beyoncé is still making history. She clocked a second September cover of Vogue magazine this year, and tapped Tyler Mitchell to shoot the photos — the first ever African American photographer to shoot the most important annual issue of the fashion bible.

Also Read: Why Beyonce and Jay-Z Were Allowed to Film ‘Apes-‘ Music Video at the Louvre

WHO: Kylie Jenner, in a multi-bedroom villa at the Turks and Caicos resort Amanyara, with boyfriend Travis Scott and newborn daughter, Stormi.

STAUTS: We are living in a post-reality-stardom age for the polarizing and pouty Kardashian clan. The family has become synonymous with raking in millions on branding and lifestyle businesses where they once were known for a sex tape, vulgar language and staged photo ops.

No family member represents this new Kardashian prototype quite like Kylie, daughter of Kris and Caitlyn Jenner, who stunned this year on the cover of Forbes magazine lauding America’s self-made billionaires. Jenner’s runaway success with Kylie Cosmetics, a makeup range curated and released in flash sales propped up largely by her 113 million (you read that correctly) Instagram followers.

WHO: Alice Walton, heiress to the Walmart Stores fortune, bidding farewell to her horse ranches in Millsap, Texas.

STATUS: Walton is the richest woman in the world, at a reported $44.9 billion, but her vacation spot is not nearly as lavish as her counterparts on our list.

This year Walton, a voracious horse trainer and breeder, sold the last of two Texas ranches that long sat in her real estate portfolio. Nestled in the town of Millsap, Walton offloaded both but doubtlessly enjoyed a last hurrah before shipping off to her new home in Fort Worth, Texas.

Walton is a dedicated philanthropist and art lover. She founded the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and serves as chairman of the board, in Walmart’s hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas.

WHO: Anna Wintour, hosting the wedding of daughter Bee Shaffer and director Francesco Carrozzini, at her Forge River estate in Mastic, N.Y., on Long Island.

STATUS: Conde Nast’s creative director and long-reigning editor of Vogue is looking warily toward retirement, numerous outlets have reported over the last year (she denies any plans to leave her job). Not that a possible abdication is slowing her down.

Wintour was named the most powerful woman in media by Forbes last year, a nod to the iron clutch she has on the famed magazine publisher despite continued setbacks. Her relevance never takes a hit despite the challenges of print media. Vogue’s authoritarian hold on fashion and beauty has transferred seamlessly to social media (ask Beyoncé, a few notches above here) with series like the YouTube makeup tutorial show “Beauty Secrets” earning hundred of millions of views thanks to stars like, well, Jenner, Paltrow, Hailey Baldwin and Priyanka Chopra.

Wintour is also never far from Hollywood’s mind. Her efforts in making the annual Met Gala the American social event of the year was a key plot point in Warner Bros.’s 2018 caper “Ocean’s 8,” which features a brief cameo from Wintour herself alongside Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Anne Hathaway, Cate Blanchett and Helena Bonham Carter.

Fall Forecast: We know where top women executives, talent, thought leaders and game changers will be at summer’s end — the inaugural Power Women Summit in Los Angeles, taking November 1 and 2.

Produced by Wrap Women, the event will be the largest ever gathering of the most influential women in entertainment, media and technology. The summit represents a significant media platform to celebrate positive examples of individuals and companies that are paving the road to greater inclusivity. It is also a launchpad and catalyst for concrete measures to help the media and entertainment industry move toward gender equity across the board.

And you can join them — start here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Moguls on a Boat 2017: Where Jeff Bezos, Lachlan Murdoch, Obamas, Zuck Vacay-tioned

Moguls on a Boat 2015: Where Beyonce, Bob Iger, Oprah, Michael Lynton Kicked Back This Summer

Moguls on a Boat 2014: Where Rupert Murdoch, Ryan Kavanaugh, Clive Davis, Puff Daddy Had Fun in the Sun (Photos)

Moguls on a Boat at Cannes: TheWrap’s Guide to Captains of the Cote d’Azur

It ain’t easy being a power woman in entertainment, media and tech  — which is why our annual executive vacation report “Moguls on a Boat” is devoted this year to high-profile women who deserve to play as hard as they work.

This list isn’t as long as in years past, which should probably tell you something about gender parity in the executive ranks of these industries, but our bosses are fierce.

They are spiritual and thought leaders, CEOs, philanthropists, underwriters of art and culture and definitively in charge. They also rake in substantial incomes — the list includes the richest woman in the world, Forbes’ reigning most powerful woman in media and three brand titans who leveraged multimillion-dollar companies based on their celebrity.

Indulge in their summer retreats from the boardroom in places like Capri, Portofino, the lush and hippie hills of Ojai, the seersucker-clad island of Martha’s Vineyard and, of course, plenty of open water to house those chartered and owned floating palaces.

WHO: Oprah, aboard David Geffen’s yacht Rising Sun in Portofino, with Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson and Julianna Margulies

STATUS: Every year is a good year to be Oprah, but she’s been particularly busy since last summer. In January, the mogul delivered a Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award acceptance speech at the Golden Globes that was so inspiring, it inserted her into the 2020 presidential election race.

While she demurred over a White House run, Oprah did return to acting. In February, she starred alongside Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time.” At the top of her summer, she signed a multi-year content partnership with Apple that will “embrace her incomparable ability to connect with audiences around the world,” the tech giant said.

Those checks will add to her 2017 updated net worth of $2.8 billion, according to Forbes.

WHO: Gwyneth Paltrow — with fiancé Brad Falchuk, designer Valentino Garavani and his partner Giancarlo Giammetti — on Valentino’s yacht T.M. Blue One in Capri.

STATUS: Forget her little movie this year — the $2 billion worldwide box office phenomenon “Avengers: Infinity War” — since acting is officially Gwyneth’s hobby now. This year, Paltrow’s rapidly growing lifestyle company Goop received a $250 million valuation for its editorial and diverse e-commerce business that encompasses fashion, beauty, wellness and live events.

Largely hailed as a prototype for leveraging celebrity into big business (like another mogul on this list, Kylie Jenner), Paltrow continues to be a cultural lightning rod while monetizing the eyeballs of her haters — exquisitely detailed in a recent New York Times magazine profile on her business.

Paltrow is also set to wed “Pose” producer Falchuk this year, following the 2016 finalization of her divorce from Coldplay rocker Chris Martin. Her betrothed has also recruited her back onto the small screen, as she’ll cameo in his new Ben Platt-Barbra Streisand musical comedy “The Politician” at Netflix.

WHO: Stacey Snider, at her home on Martha’s Vineyard

STATUS: If anyone deserves a bike ride around the Gay Head Lighthouse or a few glasses of vino at the Obama-beloved restaurant The Cardboard Box on the Vineyard, its 20th Century Fox Film CEO Snider, who has long had a vacation home on the high-end Massachusetts island.

In 2016, Snider joined an extremely small club of female studio heads when she succeeded Jim Gianopulos as CEO and chairman at the company. Roughly 18 months later, Disney announced its plan to acquire all of Fox’s film and TV content assets, plunging the media establishment into chaos and raising still-prominent question about the fate of thousands of Fox employees as Disney absorbs them.

Snider has been bold in her candor about the uncertain future. Speaking at the movie theater owner convention CinemaCon in April, she could barely contain her emotion as she played a sizzle of the greatest films made in the studio’s 103 years. The Disney transition is expected to be complete by 2019.

WHO: Donna Langley, at her home in Ojai, Calif.

STATUS: Another member of the rarefied female-studio head club, Universal Pictures Chairman Langley is frankly crushing it this year. In July, the studio crossed $1 billion at the domestic box office, the eighth year in a row the NBCUniversal property has hit that milestone. This month, Universal crossed $2 billion at the worldwide box office for the fourth time in its history. This is largely due to the success of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” which also helped put the studio in second place behind monolith Disney in terms of market share.

In January, Langley was honored with the Producers Guild of America Milestone Award, honoring those who have made “historic contributions to the entertainment industry.”

WHO: Beyoncé, on the Amalfi coast aboard the $200 million charter yacht Kismet, with husband Jay-Z and their children in between stops on the “On The Run II” tour.

STATUS: In a career of dizzying highs and milestones for an African American and female artist, Beyonce achieved another transcendent moment as the first black woman to headline the Coachella Valley music festival in April.

More than that, the show was a celebration of deep Southern culture and a nearly two-hour nonstop dance party that one review billed as “two years and a career in the making.” The concert was immediately followed by the announcement of a joint world tour with husband Jay-Z, “On the Run II” — and another surprise album drop, “Everything Is Love.”

Even in the dog days of summer, Beyoncé is still making history. She clocked a second September cover of Vogue magazine this year, and tapped Tyler Mitchell to shoot the photos — the first ever African American photographer to shoot the most important annual issue of the fashion bible.

WHO: Kylie Jenner, in a multi-bedroom villa at the Turks and Caicos resort Amanyara, with boyfriend Travis Scott and newborn daughter, Stormi.

STAUTS: We are living in a post-reality-stardom age for the polarizing and pouty Kardashian clan. The family has become synonymous with raking in millions on branding and lifestyle businesses where they once were known for a sex tape, vulgar language and staged photo ops.

No family member represents this new Kardashian prototype quite like Kylie, daughter of Kris and Caitlyn Jenner, who stunned this year on the cover of Forbes magazine lauding America’s self-made billionaires. Jenner’s runaway success with Kylie Cosmetics, a makeup range curated and released in flash sales propped up largely by her 113 million (you read that correctly) Instagram followers.

WHO: Alice Walton, heiress to the Walmart Stores fortune, bidding farewell to her horse ranches in Millsap, Texas.

STATUS: Walton is the richest woman in the world, at a reported $44.9 billion, but her vacation spot is not nearly as lavish as her counterparts on our list.

This year Walton, a voracious horse trainer and breeder, sold the last of two Texas ranches that long sat in her real estate portfolio. Nestled in the town of Millsap, Walton offloaded both but doubtlessly enjoyed a last hurrah before shipping off to her new home in Fort Worth, Texas.

Walton is a dedicated philanthropist and art lover. She founded the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and serves as chairman of the board, in Walmart’s hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas.

WHO: Anna Wintour, hosting the wedding of daughter Bee Shaffer and director Francesco Carrozzini, at her Forge River estate in Mastic, N.Y., on Long Island.

STATUS: Conde Nast’s creative director and long-reigning editor of Vogue is looking warily toward retirement, numerous outlets have reported over the last year (she denies any plans to leave her job). Not that a possible abdication is slowing her down.

Wintour was named the most powerful woman in media by Forbes last year, a nod to the iron clutch she has on the famed magazine publisher despite continued setbacks. Her relevance never takes a hit despite the challenges of print media. Vogue’s authoritarian hold on fashion and beauty has transferred seamlessly to social media (ask Beyoncé, a few notches above here) with series like the YouTube makeup tutorial show “Beauty Secrets” earning hundred of millions of views thanks to stars like, well, Jenner, Paltrow, Hailey Baldwin and Priyanka Chopra.

Wintour is also never far from Hollywood’s mind. Her efforts in making the annual Met Gala the American social event of the year was a key plot point in Warner Bros.’s 2018 caper “Ocean’s 8,” which features a brief cameo from Wintour herself alongside Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Anne Hathaway, Cate Blanchett and Helena Bonham Carter.

Fall Forecast: We know where top women executives, talent, thought leaders and game changers will be at summer’s end — the inaugural Power Women Summit in Los Angeles, taking November 1 and 2.

Produced by Wrap Women, the event will be the largest ever gathering of the most influential women in entertainment, media and technology. The summit represents a significant media platform to celebrate positive examples of individuals and companies that are paving the road to greater inclusivity. It is also a launchpad and catalyst for concrete measures to help the media and entertainment industry move toward gender equity across the board.

And you can join them — start here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Moguls on a Boat 2017: Where Jeff Bezos, Lachlan Murdoch, Obamas, Zuck Vacay-tioned

Moguls on a Boat 2015: Where Beyonce, Bob Iger, Oprah, Michael Lynton Kicked Back This Summer

Moguls on a Boat 2014: Where Rupert Murdoch, Ryan Kavanaugh, Clive Davis, Puff Daddy Had Fun in the Sun (Photos)

Moguls on a Boat at Cannes: TheWrap's Guide to Captains of the Cote d'Azur

‘Avatar’ Sequels Update & ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ In Fox Spotlight At CineEurope

The Fox presentation tonight at CineEurope included a King of the World, and Queen. But before that, it kicked off with a video of President of International Theatrical Distribution Andrew Cripps and President of International Marketing Kieran Breen pa…

The Fox presentation tonight at CineEurope included a King of the World, and Queen. But before that, it kicked off with a video of President of International Theatrical Distribution Andrew Cripps and President of International Marketing Kieran Breen packing for their trip to Barcelona. After several Deadpool references, an elbow at England's chances in the World Cup and a gag about North Korea being the next emerging market, the execs reached into their suitcases with…

Fox’s Stacey Snider On Making Movies For The World: “They Can’t Just Be Based On Caped Crusaders” – CineEurope

Twentieth Century Fox Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider joined a panel of exhibition experts at the CineEurope conference here in Barcelona today and had a few recommendations for the studios back home, as well as a note for cinema operators.
Discussing a…

Twentieth Century Fox Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider joined a panel of exhibition experts at the CineEurope conference here in Barcelona today and had a few recommendations for the studios back home, as well as a note for cinema operators. Discussing appealing to global audiences, Snider cited some trends that weigh on her mind. “If we're creating this globalized business where the bigger (films) emerge, they can't just be based on caped crusaders,”  she intoned. Later…

Fox Film Chief Stacey Snider Warns Hollywood Not to Rely Solely on ‘Caped Crusaders’

Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider appealed to Hollywood studios Monday to continue providing a broad range of content for diverse audiences instead of relying solely on tentpoles “based on caped crusaders.” “The stud…

Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider appealed to Hollywood studios Monday to continue providing a broad range of content for diverse audiences instead of relying solely on tentpoles “based on caped crusaders.” “The studios need to have a bigger appetite for big cinematic, tentpole-type entertainment that isn’t necessarily based on branded material,” […]

Fox’s Stacey Snider Tells Male Executives to ‘Embrace the Discomfort’ and Hire More Women

Fox studio chief Stacey Snider had one message for the men in the entertainment business: Experience some discomfort. It’s good for business. Snider explained that as a woman coming up in the film industry, “I’ve spent my entire career feeling somewhat…

Fox studio chief Stacey Snider had one message for the men in the entertainment business: Experience some discomfort. It’s good for business. Snider explained that as a woman coming up in the film industry, “I’ve spent my entire career feeling somewhat uncomfortable,” she said, noting she’d often be the lone woman at the table or […]

7 Takeaways From CinemaCon 2018: Change Is Everywhere, Movies Endure

The movie exhibition business wrapped its annual CinemaCon

gathering in Las Vegas this week, and there was plenty to learn about the state of the entertainment industry and the change that is convulsing the entertainment business.

One studio had an entirely new executive team, another had to address the elephant in the room — its pending acquisition by another huge conglomerate — and the bar for entertaining the room was raised by a marching band, a video skit starring a studio mogul and … Cher.

One thing I’ll say for the movies overall — the ones coming down the pipeline about music and musicians and their journeys seem the ones with the most heart. Here are my takeaways

Also Read: Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and ‘Blindspotting,’ But Identity Crisis Looms

Marvel Studios

1. Disney is a monster.

There’s no denying the dominance of this content-creating, brand-defining machine led by Bob Iger and Alan Horn on the movie side. Never was the strategic brilliance of Iger in acquiring Marvel and Lucasfilm more clearly on display than at this year’s presentation (last year the studio barely bothered to show, it felt so confident).

Disney consistently leads the Hollywood pack in market share, has had 12 films hit $1 billion at the box office in the last six years, and looks poised to continue to do so with upcoming films including this weekend’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and the new Star Wars installment, “Solo.”

And while Marvel is a hit machine, spinning off one global superhero hit after another, the other pillars of the Disney palace are also incredibly strong – besides the “Star Wars” saga, Pixar with another “Incredibles” franchise coming, traditional animation and a whole lot of interesting realistic computer graphic-drawn movies. The one most intriguing to me is “The Lion King,” with real animals. Any excuse to bring that beloved title and music to the screen seems like a good idea. Things to worry about: what will happen to animation if John Lasseter doesn’t come back?

Also Read: ‘Mowgli’ Director Andy Serkis Promises a Darker, Bloodier ‘Jungle Book’ Sequel

Getty Images

2. Suddenly, Paramount has come back to life.

After years of moribund production and morale-sucking boardroom battles and family strife, this iconic studio finally seems to have some energy, direction and pulse. New CEO and chairman Jim Gianopulos got everybody’s attention by opening with a self-deprecating video skit, in which a “Vegas Air” flight attendant criticized the mogul for having too many vowels in his name and then did her own imitation of “A Quiet Place,” the studio’s stealth horror hit.

It was a savvy way to win over the crowd since a lot of the upcoming films on Paramount’s slate would not be out until 2019 and an entirely new executive team — Wyck Godfrey, Brian Robbins, Mireille Soria — was being introduced. The studio is counting on good will and a little patience but the overall message was clear — Paramount has a plan, is making movies at a steady clip once again and has its head back in the game.

My only real quibble: Tom Cruise spent waaaaay too much time on stage explaining his latest death-defying stunt jumping out of an airplane for “Mission: Impossible – Fallout,” but that’s because he’s Tom Cruise. At least he didn’t jump on a couch.

Also Read: ‘A Quiet Place’ Sequel in Development at Paramount Pictures

3. Universal brought the delight of movies to the room.

Universal offered a mix of drama (“First Man” is about Neil Armstrong’s journey to the moon), horror (“Halloween” with an irrepressible Jamie Lee Curtis), fantasy (Peter Jackson’s “Mortal Engine” is creating new worlds that, he promises, are like nothing we’ve ever seen) and thrillers (M. Night Shyamalan has a new one coming with Bruce Wiillis and Sam Jackson).

But even though he wasn’t in the room, it was Dwayne Johnson’s new action movie, “Skyscraper,” that seemed like something that you need to see on a massive screen, and that is likely to make your heart stop. That guy is a movie star, can we just say that?

Universal ended it all with a surprise live performance by Cher of “Fernando” by ABBA. She plays the grandmother in the sequel to “Mamma Mia.” The original was an unwatchable mess of a movie with the cheesiest performances on the planet that made a bajillion dollars. I’ll probably watch the sequel.

The great @Cher delights us all at #cinemacon with performance of Fernando by ABBA. Here’s a glimpse: @TheWrap pic.twitter.com/nKthcmHPpy

— Sharon Waxman (@sharonwaxman) April 26, 2018

Also Read: James Wan and ‘Aquaman’ Cast Offer First Look at Work-in-Progress Atlantis

4. Warner Bros. needed help, a lot of help.

The studio is in transition, now under former New Line head Toby Emmerich, and his newness showed. The presentation dragged on as one troupe of movie stars followed another, making small talk and pretending to be relaxed around stilted emcee Will Arnett. (Why bring Anne Hathaway on stage for “Ocean’s 8” if you’re not going to talk to her?)

And if “Life of the Party” with Melissa McCarthy seemed like one too many versions of the movie we’ve already seen her do (clueless fish out of water, this time she’s a mom going back to college), the ensemble film “Tag” — drama? comedy?  thriller? mystery? — about a group of friends who play a highly aggressive form of tag for a month every year was simply a hot mess.

“Crazy Rich Asians” looks like it could be a big winner, though the trailer made it hard to tell. But wait! There’s one huge redeeming movie on the Warner slate that made all of it worthwhile. Bradley Cooper brought “A Star Is Born,” his remake of the famed Barbara Streisand – Kris Kristofferson love story. And the trailer unveiled of Cooper and Lady Gaga was a revelation. The film promises a full-on love story with Gaga dropping all the makeup and pretense and bravada. Which brings us to…

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

5. Music movies rule. 

There are so many wonderful films this year about music and musicians that it’s worth pointing it out. As mentioned, “A Star Is Born” looks like it will deliver. Cooper learned to play an instrument well enough to perform.

But Fox’s upcoming “Bohemian Rhapsody” appears to be a similarly strong take on the legendary Freddy Mercury, an epic performer and rule-breaker, played by Rami Malek. And did I mention that the “Mamma Mia” sequel has Cher in it?

6. 3-D is dead.

Over four days and dozens of movies that were presented to the exhibitors in Vegas, only one movie — ONE — was in 3-D, a technology that was all the rage four or five years ago. The lone exception was “Alita,” a largely CG action movie by technology diehard James Cameron about a young female cyborg given a superhuman body. (I think that’s what it was about.)

Robert Rodriguez directed it, and I’m not entirely sure if the 3-D adds all that much to the story. But what was once supposed to be the salvation of movie theaters — adding a premium ticket price to their weekend box office haul — has mostly fizzled. Calling Jeffrey Katzenberg, who predicted otherwise.

Also Read: Enter a 3-D Jungle With ‘Jumanji’ in Virtual Reality This December

Getty Images

7. And finally: Fox.

Who knows if the studio will be at CinemaCon next year? If the Disney acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox goes through, it won’t. So studio chief Stacey Snider wisely used the moment to remind the thousands of exhibitors in the room that she knew no more than they did about the future of her studio, but that she was committed to delivering great movies in the meantime.

And she backed it up with an emotional reel of Fox movies over the last 80 years, from “Titanic” to Shirley Temple to “12 Years a Slave,” reminding everyone what a contribution Fox has made to the culture. “Let’s wear our heart on our sleeves,” she urged the packed hall, choking up (and she wasn’t the only one). “Let’s celebrate the humanity that comes from discovering that we are more alike than different.”

Her words managed to overshadow the bravura, hilarious opening of the Fox presentation with Deadpool leading dancers to the song “One” from the Broadway classic “A Chorus Line.” And it was a fitting reminder that if Fox goes away, we may all be the poorer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: ‘We Face a New Transition’

Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and ‘Blindspotting,’ But Identity Crisis Looms

The movie exhibition business wrapped its annual CinemaCon

gathering in Las Vegas this week, and there was plenty to learn about the state of the entertainment industry and the change that is convulsing the entertainment business.

One studio had an entirely new executive team, another had to address the elephant in the room — its pending acquisition by another huge conglomerate — and the bar for entertaining the room was raised by a marching band, a video skit starring a studio mogul and … Cher.

One thing I’ll say for the movies overall — the ones coming down the pipeline about music and musicians and their journeys seem the ones with the most heart. Here are my takeaways

Marvel Studios

1. Disney is a monster.

There’s no denying the dominance of this content-creating, brand-defining machine led by Bob Iger and Alan Horn on the movie side. Never was the strategic brilliance of Iger in acquiring Marvel and Lucasfilm more clearly on display than at this year’s presentation (last year the studio barely bothered to show, it felt so confident).

Disney consistently leads the Hollywood pack in market share, has had 12 films hit $1 billion at the box office in the last six years, and looks poised to continue to do so with upcoming films including this weekend’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and the new Star Wars installment, “Solo.”

And while Marvel is a hit machine, spinning off one global superhero hit after another, the other pillars of the Disney palace are also incredibly strong – besides the “Star Wars” saga, Pixar with another “Incredibles” franchise coming, traditional animation and a whole lot of interesting realistic computer graphic-drawn movies. The one most intriguing to me is “The Lion King,” with real animals. Any excuse to bring that beloved title and music to the screen seems like a good idea. Things to worry about: what will happen to animation if John Lasseter doesn’t come back?

Getty Images

2. Suddenly, Paramount has come back to life.

After years of moribund production and morale-sucking boardroom battles and family strife, this iconic studio finally seems to have some energy, direction and pulse. New CEO and chairman Jim Gianopulos got everybody’s attention by opening with a self-deprecating video skit, in which a “Vegas Air” flight attendant criticized the mogul for having too many vowels in his name and then did her own imitation of “A Quiet Place,” the studio’s stealth horror hit.

It was a savvy way to win over the crowd since a lot of the upcoming films on Paramount’s slate would not be out until 2019 and an entirely new executive team — Wyck Godfrey, Brian Robbins, Mireille Soria — was being introduced. The studio is counting on good will and a little patience but the overall message was clear — Paramount has a plan, is making movies at a steady clip once again and has its head back in the game.

My only real quibble: Tom Cruise spent waaaaay too much time on stage explaining his latest death-defying stunt jumping out of an airplane for “Mission: Impossible – Fallout,” but that’s because he’s Tom Cruise. At least he didn’t jump on a couch.

3. Universal brought the delight of movies to the room.

Universal offered a mix of drama (“First Man” is about Neil Armstrong’s journey to the moon), horror (“Halloween” with an irrepressible Jamie Lee Curtis), fantasy (Peter Jackson’s “Mortal Engine” is creating new worlds that, he promises, are like nothing we’ve ever seen) and thrillers (M. Night Shyamalan has a new one coming with Bruce Wiillis and Sam Jackson).

But even though he wasn’t in the room, it was Dwayne Johnson’s new action movie, “Skyscraper,” that seemed like something that you need to see on a massive screen, and that is likely to make your heart stop. That guy is a movie star, can we just say that?

Universal ended it all with a surprise live performance by Cher of “Fernando” by ABBA. She plays the grandmother in the sequel to “Mamma Mia.” The original was an unwatchable mess of a movie with the cheesiest performances on the planet that made a bajillion dollars. I’ll probably watch the sequel.

4. Warner Bros. needed help, a lot of help.

The studio is in transition, now under former New Line head Toby Emmerich, and his newness showed. The presentation dragged on as one troupe of movie stars followed another, making small talk and pretending to be relaxed around stilted emcee Will Arnett. (Why bring Anne Hathaway on stage for “Ocean’s 8” if you’re not going to talk to her?)

And if “Life of the Party” with Melissa McCarthy seemed like one too many versions of the movie we’ve already seen her do (clueless fish out of water, this time she’s a mom going back to college), the ensemble film “Tag” — drama? comedy?  thriller? mystery? — about a group of friends who play a highly aggressive form of tag for a month every year was simply a hot mess.

“Crazy Rich Asians” looks like it could be a big winner, though the trailer made it hard to tell. But wait! There’s one huge redeeming movie on the Warner slate that made all of it worthwhile. Bradley Cooper brought “A Star Is Born,” his remake of the famed Barbara Streisand – Kris Kristofferson love story. And the trailer unveiled of Cooper and Lady Gaga was a revelation. The film promises a full-on love story with Gaga dropping all the makeup and pretense and bravada. Which brings us to…

5. Music movies rule. 

There are so many wonderful films this year about music and musicians that it’s worth pointing it out. As mentioned, “A Star Is Born” looks like it will deliver. Cooper learned to play an instrument well enough to perform.

But Fox’s upcoming “Bohemian Rhapsody” appears to be a similarly strong take on the legendary Freddy Mercury, an epic performer and rule-breaker, played by Rami Malek. And did I mention that the “Mamma Mia” sequel has Cher in it?

6. 3-D is dead.

Over four days and dozens of movies that were presented to the exhibitors in Vegas, only one movie — ONE — was in 3-D, a technology that was all the rage four or five years ago. The lone exception was “Alita,” a largely CG action movie by technology diehard James Cameron about a young female cyborg given a superhuman body. (I think that’s what it was about.)

Robert Rodriguez directed it, and I’m not entirely sure if the 3-D adds all that much to the story. But what was once supposed to be the salvation of movie theaters — adding a premium ticket price to their weekend box office haul — has mostly fizzled. Calling Jeffrey Katzenberg, who predicted otherwise.

Getty Images

7. And finally: Fox.

Who knows if the studio will be at CinemaCon next year? If the Disney acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox goes through, it won’t. So studio chief Stacey Snider wisely used the moment to remind the thousands of exhibitors in the room that she knew no more than they did about the future of her studio, but that she was committed to delivering great movies in the meantime.

And she backed it up with an emotional reel of Fox movies over the last 80 years, from “Titanic” to Shirley Temple to “12 Years a Slave,” reminding everyone what a contribution Fox has made to the culture. “Let’s wear our heart on our sleeves,” she urged the packed hall, choking up (and she wasn’t the only one). “Let’s celebrate the humanity that comes from discovering that we are more alike than different.”

Her words managed to overshadow the bravura, hilarious opening of the Fox presentation with Deadpool leading dancers to the song “One” from the Broadway classic “A Chorus Line.” And it was a fitting reminder that if Fox goes away, we may all be the poorer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'A Star Is Born': Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: 'We Face a New Transition'

Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and 'Blindspotting,' But Identity Crisis Looms

Fox Film Chief Stacey Snider Addresses Sale to Disney in Moving CinemaCon Speech

Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider said she had “no more insight” into the studio’s pending sale to Walt Disney Company during remarks at CinemaCon on Thursday. It what may be the studio’s final presentati…

Twentieth Century Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider said she had “no more insight” into the studio’s pending sale to Walt Disney Company during remarks at CinemaCon on Thursday. It what may be the studio’s final presentation at the exhibition industry trade show Snider saluted her company’s artistic legacy and urged a crowd of […]

Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: ‘We Face a New Transition’

Fox film boss Stacey Snider addressed the elephant — or mouse — in the room at the closing day of CinemaCon, as she acknowledged Acknowledged the studio’s uncertain future given the looming Disney acquisition.
“Today we face a …

Fox film boss Stacey Snider addressed the elephant — or mouse — in the room at the closing day of CinemaCon, as she acknowledged Acknowledged the studio’s uncertain future given the looming Disney acquisition.

“Today we face a new transition,” Snider told U.S. movie exhibitors, after revisiting the glittering history of her studio. “I have no more insight into the transaction than you do.”

“But I’m holding on to the very basics which helped make ‘The Greatest Showman’ a hit,” Snider said of the Hugh Jackman musical, now in it’s rare 18th week in theaters.

The presentation also made reference to the merger. Ryan Reynolds’ Deadpool opened with a pretaped clip in a trashed hotel room at Caesar’s Palace, lying in bed with the studio’s domestic distribution head Chris Aronson. Implying they had a rough night, Hugh Jackman then emerged from another room in a bathrobe, brushing his teeth.

Aronson begs off, saying he’s late to greet the exhibitors.

“He is so fucked. Looks like Comcast really dodged a bullet,” Deadpool joked, referring to Disney’s rival bidder for Fox’s film and TV assets.

As the men exit the den of iniquity, one last straggler emerges from under the bed — it’s  Disney’s beloved dog Pluto, who looks like he’s had the roughest night of all.

The December buyout infused the Disney with a bevy of Fox properties, including its film and TV studios and much of its non-broadcast television business, including regional sports networks and cable networks such as FX, FXX and Nat Geo.

Top film franchises like “X-Men,” “Avatar,” “Deadpool” and “Fantastic Four” now fall under the Disney umbrella, if and when the merger mees regulatory approval in the next 12 to 18 months.

Snider briefly addressed consolidation at at a CinemaCon panel on Wednesday, telling a crowd of exhibitors that “we all live with uncertainty of a business and that is an experience that changes — just buckle up and be professional and play our game.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rupert Murdoch Teases Recombining NewsCorp and Post-Disney Fox: 'Ideally Yes'

What Does Comcast's $31 Billion Sky Bid Mean for Fox and Disney?

Murdoch Family Scores $206 Million in Golden Parachutes After Disney-Fox Deal

20th Century Fox Kicks Off With Deadpool ‘A Chorus Line’ Number; Stacey Snider Talks Disney-Fox Merger – CinemaCon

20th Century Fox always starts their CinemaCon presentations with a musical number, and this year it was A Chorus Line of girls in red bustiers dancing along to that Broadway show’s signature song “One” as Deadpool himself came twirli…

20th Century Fox always starts their CinemaCon presentations with a musical number, and this year it was Chorus Line of girls in red bustiers dancing along to that Broadway show’s signature song “One” as Deadpool himself came twirling on stage. This was followed by  Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) beaming in via video saying that he can’t be there, and that Fox distribution chief Chris Aronson was running late. Deadpool greeted the exhibitors in the room by saying “when do we…

Fox Film Boss Stacey Snider On Industry Consolidation Like Disney-Fox: “Just Buckle Up And Take The Ride” – CinemaCon

So what about the Fox-Disney merger? It’s a prime question in these CinemaCon times that wasn’t broached during Disney’s presentation yesterday. Today during a CinemaCon panel, 20th Century Fox CEO and chairman Stacey Snider and Avata…

So what about the Fox-Disney merger? It’s a prime question in these CinemaCon times that wasn’t broached during Disney’s presentation yesterday. Today during a CinemaCon panel, 20th Century Fox CEO and chairman Stacey Snider and Avatar producer Jon Landau could only say so much, but here’s what the former let on as to why consolidation is occurring in the film industry: “As a 30-year lifelong studio executive, I can see the pressure that the studios have to not only…

Fox Searchlight Launches TV Division; David Greenbaum, Matthew Greenfield Upped To Production Presidents For Film, TV

Capitalizing on its staggering Oscar season success, Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Nancy Utley and Steve Gilula are branching into the television business. They’ve launched Searchlight Television, making the company a 360-degree hub for creative talent and broadening the variety of projects produced under the Searchlight banner. David Greenbaum and Matthew Greenfield have been promoted to Presidents of Production for Film and Television. They add Searchlight…

Capitalizing on its staggering Oscar season success, Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Nancy Utley and Steve Gilula are branching into the television business. They’ve launched Searchlight Television, making the company a 360-degree hub for creative talent and broadening the variety of projects produced under the Searchlight banner. David Greenbaum and Matthew Greenfield have been promoted to Presidents of Production for Film and Television. They add Searchlight…

Tony Sella Returns To Fox Film As Worldwide Chief Content Officer

UPDATED with corrected title: Tony Sella, the marketing guru who left 20th Century Fox Film in 2013 after 23 years, is returning to the fold as Worldwide Chief Content Officer. Fox boss Stacey Snider just sent an internal email to staff about the hire. She says Sella in the newly created role will be “playing a leading role in driving creative for our theatrical marketing group.” (Read the memo below.)
Sella left Fox at the end of 2013 amid a shakeup that saw the exit of…

UPDATED with corrected title: Tony Sella, the marketing guru who left 20th Century Fox Film in 2013 after 23 years, is returning to the fold as Worldwide Chief Content Officer. Fox boss Stacey Snider just sent an internal email to staff about the hire. She says Sella in the newly created role will be “playing a leading role in driving creative for our theatrical marketing group.” (Read the memo below.) Sella left Fox at the end of 2013 amid a shakeup that saw the exit of…

Sundance: Will Fox Searchlight Still Be a Player in Shadow of Disney Acquisition?

All eyes are on Fox Searchlight as the indie unit heads into its first Sundance Film Festival this week since Disney announced plans to acquire 20th Century Fox’s film and TV assets.

Many indie film buyers and sellers are openly questioning how aggressive unit chiefs Nancy Utley and Steve Gulila will be with a cloud hanging over their future — despite an established track record as producers and acquirers of Oscar-winning hits like “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Juno” and “Black Swan.”

“What we are told is that they are going to be a real buyer [but] the conversation they are having with Disney, their buying ability might be affected,” said one top sales agent, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Also Read: Golden Globes: Raising One Last Glass to 20th Century Fox as We Know It

Content makers, reps from talent agencies and producers have been assured that the full acquisition team from Fox Searchlight will be on the ground in Park City, as well as 20th Century Fox Film head Stacey Snider, multiple individuals who spoke with TheWrap said.

Fox Searchlight had no comment, but a studio insider told TheWrap that any shift in the unit’s direction under Disney would not take place until after the deal closes, fully 12 to 18 months from now. “Fox Searchlight has a business model that still has accountability in it,” the insider said, adding that it’s been more than a decade since Searchlight has left Sundance without buying a single film.

Still, those mouse ears is already casting a shadow. “I think they’re going to be cautious,” another senior deal maker with multiple titles in the market said. A third film rep wondered if sellers might be wary of selling to Searchlight with a Disney transition imminent.

Also Read: Fear, Anxiety Sink In at 20th Century Fox After Disney Takeover News

 

In analysis of the Disney deal, many industry experts said Searchlight was the most likely to emerge unscathed after the merger. In recent years, Walt Disney Pictures has never shown the prowess for prestige movies or the ability to capture awards attention the way Searchlight has — and it has also shied away from the more adult-oriented and R-rated fare that is a staple of the indie unit’s slate.

Searchlight’s most recent original productions — “The Shape of Water,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “Battle of the Sexes” this year — have been solid art-house performers at the box office. The first two are prominent players in this year’s awards race.

That’s an area that Disney has consistently de-emphasized since selling its Miramax unit in 2010 and giving up a multiyear distribution deal with DreamWorks.

Also Read: ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ Cancels Fantastic Fest Screening

Searchlight’s Sundance strategy might be further complicated by its recent track record with pricey acquisitions in Park city that have stumbled at the box office.

The company famously ponied up $17.5 million for Nate Parker’s 2016 historical drama “The Birth of a Nation,” which grossed only $15.8 million in the wake of resurfaced rape allegations against its star-director-cowriter (he was acquitted of the charges, which stemmed from his college days).

Last year’s rap drama “Patti Cake$,” bought by Searchlight for $9.5 million, earned just $800,000 domestically ($1.5 million worldwide), while the feel-good documentary “Step” has grossed $1.1 million after a $4 million purchase last January.

Searchlight’s biggest Sundance success story was 2006’s “Little Miss Sunshine,” which it picked up in Park City for $10.5 million and turned into a $60 million box office hit that earned two Oscars.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ava DuVernay, Taika Waititi Heading to 2018 Sundance Film Festival

Sundance: Wes Anderson VR, Joaquin Phoenix Indie, RuPaul Retrospect Join Lineup

Sundance 2018 Lineup: Lizzie Borden, Oscar Wilde, Jane Fonda and a lot of Lakeith Stanfield

All eyes are on Fox Searchlight as the indie unit heads into its first Sundance Film Festival this week since Disney announced plans to acquire 20th Century Fox’s film and TV assets.

Many indie film buyers and sellers are openly questioning how aggressive unit chiefs Nancy Utley and Steve Gulila will be with a cloud hanging over their future — despite an established track record as producers and acquirers of Oscar-winning hits like “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Juno” and “Black Swan.”

“What we are told is that they are going to be a real buyer [but] the conversation they are having with Disney, their buying ability might be affected,” said one top sales agent, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

Content makers, reps from talent agencies and producers have been assured that the full acquisition team from Fox Searchlight will be on the ground in Park City, as well as 20th Century Fox Film head Stacey Snider, multiple individuals who spoke with TheWrap said.

Fox Searchlight had no comment, but a studio insider told TheWrap that any shift in the unit’s direction under Disney would not take place until after the deal closes, fully 12 to 18 months from now. “Fox Searchlight has a business model that still has accountability in it,” the insider said, adding that it’s been more than a decade since Searchlight has left Sundance without buying a single film.

Still, those mouse ears is already casting a shadow. “I think they’re going to be cautious,” another senior deal maker with multiple titles in the market said. A third film rep wondered if sellers might be wary of selling to Searchlight with a Disney transition imminent.

 

In analysis of the Disney deal, many industry experts said Searchlight was the most likely to emerge unscathed after the merger. In recent years, Walt Disney Pictures has never shown the prowess for prestige movies or the ability to capture awards attention the way Searchlight has — and it has also shied away from the more adult-oriented and R-rated fare that is a staple of the indie unit’s slate.

Searchlight’s most recent original productions — “The Shape of Water,” “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” and “Battle of the Sexes” this year — have been solid art-house performers at the box office. The first two are prominent players in this year’s awards race.

That’s an area that Disney has consistently de-emphasized since selling its Miramax unit in 2010 and giving up a multiyear distribution deal with DreamWorks.

Searchlight’s Sundance strategy might be further complicated by its recent track record with pricey acquisitions in Park city that have stumbled at the box office.

The company famously ponied up $17.5 million for Nate Parker’s 2016 historical drama “The Birth of a Nation,” which grossed only $15.8 million in the wake of resurfaced rape allegations against its star-director-cowriter (he was acquitted of the charges, which stemmed from his college days).

Last year’s rap drama “Patti Cake$,” bought by Searchlight for $9.5 million, earned just $800,000 domestically ($1.5 million worldwide), while the feel-good documentary “Step” has grossed $1.1 million after a $4 million purchase last January.

Searchlight’s biggest Sundance success story was 2006’s “Little Miss Sunshine,” which it picked up in Park City for $10.5 million and turned into a $60 million box office hit that earned two Oscars.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ava DuVernay, Taika Waititi Heading to 2018 Sundance Film Festival

Sundance: Wes Anderson VR, Joaquin Phoenix Indie, RuPaul Retrospect Join Lineup

Sundance 2018 Lineup: Lizzie Borden, Oscar Wilde, Jane Fonda and a lot of Lakeith Stanfield

Golden Globes Weekend Party Scene: AFI A-Listers Hit the Red Carpet (Photos)

Time’s Up, the new initiative to combat sexual harassment and gender inequity in the workplace, launched just four days ago (Mon. Jan 1). By Friday’s AFI Awards lunch at the Four Seasons, one of the densest star-packed Hollywood events of the year, “The Post” screenwriter Liz Hannah was already sporting a t-shirt for the mission. Here, she poses with Amy Pascal, Greta Gerwig, and Stacey Snider.

Hannah told TheWrap that she picked up the shirt by making a donation at a fundraiser at the Peninsula Hotel. The location appears to be symbolic as much as much as it is convenient – across the street from the home of the Golden Globes at the Beverly Hilton. For years, the Peninsula was the favored haunt of Harvey Weinstein.

Hannah’s fashion statement rang loudly in a room of Hollywood’s most accomplished artists of 2017. The AFI brought the creative ensembles of the top 10 films and TV shows together at the Four Seasons for this event. The crowd included Gerwig, “Wonder Woman” director Patty Jenkins, and Reese Witherspoon….

Steven Spielberg, Holly Hunter, and Guillermo del Toro…

The masterminds behind “Game of Thrones” with Emilia Clarke…

And unlikely pairings of standout performers, like “The Big Sick’s” Kumail Nanjiani and Emily Gordon making a Tom Hanks sandwich.

This is it, folks. The 200 people who entertained the entire world in 2017.  Every studio head, prestige network chief, filmmaker, showrunner, or star from the marquee productions was distilled to this luncheon.

Timothée Chalamet, you have arrived. In addition to his Globe-nominated performance in “Call Me By Your Name,” he also played in fellow honoree “Lady Bird.” He’s having the breakout year Jessica Chastain had in 2011 where he is suddenly everywhere.

Even Spielberg is on the Chalamet train. The famed director joked that they should pose for a two shot on the carpet on the way in.

Beyond Chalamet, co-lead Armie Hammer is nominated for a Globe. Michael Stuhlbarg plays Chalamet’s father in the film.

All of these heavyweights came together as the guest of AFI President/CEO Bob Gazzale (right).

Over the last 24 hours, young Brooklynn Prince has found a new friend in “Wonder Woman” Gal Gadot.  Producer Zack Snyder joined the group shot.

Aziz Ansari’s “Master of None” table anchored the right side of the room, near Jordan Peele and the “Get Out” crew.  Alessandra Mastronardi plays Francesca.

Sterling K. Brown, nominated for “This is Us” at the Globes, represented one of only two network shows to earn AFI honors. The other is “The Good Place,” also an NBC show.

Richard Jenkins, Guillermo del Toro, and Octavia Spencer at AFI.

everywhere.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Golden Globes: Wonder Women Gal Gadot, Brooklyn Prince, Salma Hayek Huddle with W Mag (Photos)

Golden Globes Film Predictions: From ‘Get Out’ to ‘Lady Bird’ (Photos)

Golden Globes TV Predictions: From ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ to ‘Ozark’ (Photos)

Time’s Up, the new initiative to combat sexual harassment and gender inequity in the workplace, launched just four days ago (Mon. Jan 1). By Friday’s AFI Awards lunch at the Four Seasons, one of the densest star-packed Hollywood events of the year, “The Post” screenwriter Liz Hannah was already sporting a t-shirt for the mission. Here, she poses with Amy Pascal, Greta Gerwig, and Stacey Snider.

Hannah told TheWrap that she picked up the shirt by making a donation at a fundraiser at the Peninsula Hotel. The location appears to be symbolic as much as much as it is convenient – across the street from the home of the Golden Globes at the Beverly Hilton. For years, the Peninsula was the favored haunt of Harvey Weinstein.

Hannah’s fashion statement rang loudly in a room of Hollywood’s most accomplished artists of 2017. The AFI brought the creative ensembles of the top 10 films and TV shows together at the Four Seasons for this event. The crowd included Gerwig, “Wonder Woman” director Patty Jenkins, and Reese Witherspoon….

Steven Spielberg, Holly Hunter, and Guillermo del Toro…

The masterminds behind “Game of Thrones” with Emilia Clarke…

And unlikely pairings of standout performers, like “The Big Sick’s” Kumail Nanjiani and Emily Gordon making a Tom Hanks sandwich.

This is it, folks. The 200 people who entertained the entire world in 2017.  Every studio head, prestige network chief, filmmaker, showrunner, or star from the marquee productions was distilled to this luncheon.

Timothée Chalamet, you have arrived. In addition to his Globe-nominated performance in “Call Me By Your Name,” he also played in fellow honoree “Lady Bird.” He’s having the breakout year Jessica Chastain had in 2011 where he is suddenly everywhere.

Even Spielberg is on the Chalamet train. The famed director joked that they should pose for a two shot on the carpet on the way in.

Beyond Chalamet, co-lead Armie Hammer is nominated for a Globe. Michael Stuhlbarg plays Chalamet’s father in the film.

All of these heavyweights came together as the guest of AFI President/CEO Bob Gazzale (right).

Over the last 24 hours, young Brooklynn Prince has found a new friend in “Wonder Woman” Gal Gadot.  Producer Zack Snyder joined the group shot.

Aziz Ansari’s “Master of None” table anchored the right side of the room, near Jordan Peele and the “Get Out” crew.  Alessandra Mastronardi plays Francesca.

Sterling K. Brown, nominated for “This is Us” at the Globes, represented one of only two network shows to earn AFI honors. The other is “The Good Place,” also an NBC show.

Richard Jenkins, Guillermo del Toro, and Octavia Spencer at AFI.

everywhere.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Golden Globes: Wonder Women Gal Gadot, Brooklyn Prince, Salma Hayek Huddle with W Mag (Photos)

Golden Globes Film Predictions: From 'Get Out' to 'Lady Bird' (Photos)

Golden Globes TV Predictions: From 'The Handmaid's Tale' to 'Ozark' (Photos)

Hollywood in 2018: The Old Order Ends, a New One Rises

Three months ago, I wrote that the change that has been years in coming to the entertainment industry was upon us.

“The new world has been a long time coming, but it seems to be here,” I wrote at the opening of TheWrap’s annual Grill conference on October 1. “The outlines of the new entertainment ecosystem are becoming clear… The next 12 months will be decisive in defining the contours of what the content industry looks like for decades to come.”

As we face 2018, those changes are about to come barreling through the established order of Hollywood, leaving companies in pieces, shattering long-accepted norms, scattering talented executives to the winds and anointing a new set of power brokers.

Also Read: At TheGrill 2017, A Tipping Point: Tech Platforms Have Arrived on the Shores of Content

It will be a time of disruption and transition, and I am not referring to Harvey Weinstein (more on that later). Here is what looms on the horizon.

1. The End of the Major Studios

Two major mergers are hanging in the balance — the AT&T acquisition of Time-Warner and Disney’s purchase of Fox’s movie and TV assets. Both signal an end to the major studio system that has reigned for more than 50 years, and a new era of consolidation at the topmost levels of entertainment and media.

The significance of Rupert Murdoch’s decision to sell the precious pieces of his carefully built entertainment empire to Disney’s Bob Iger, rather than bequeath them to his sons Lachlan and James, cannot be overstated.

To some observers, this represents a kind of surrender by one of the most combative and ambitious media titans of our time. To others, it reflects a canny assessment of the media landscape and a bold move to cut the losses of a mammoth operation that lacks the technology prowess to compete over the long term with the new power players.

Up for discussion are whether CBS and Viacom will ultimately re-merge and whether Sony will let its own entertainment assets go. As the new order rises, these changes will matter less.

Also Read: Behind the Disney-Fox Merger: 7 Things We Still Need to Know – and 3 We Already Do

2. The New Order

We know who the emerging power players are: Facebook, Google, Netflix, Apple, Amazon. For years, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has led a rising challenge to Time-Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes. Now Bewkes is set to retire as soon as the AT&T deal closes and Hastings just got a $30 million stock grant to keep his growth going.

In the last three months, Netflix has continued to swell in size, with a market cap now at $83 billion, making it bigger than any media company besides Disney, including Time Warner. Just as important, the streaming service has signed deals with some of the most talented showrunners in Hollywood, Shonda Rhimes and Jenji Kohan, women who are on the cutting edge of where pop culture is going. Netflix also signed a deal with Jerry Seinfeld in the past week — and I hear that guy is pretty good.

The other new tech challengers in the entertainment space will have to play catch up to Netflix, but no one doubts that they have almost limitless means to do so. The only question is: How big are their ambitions?

In 2017, Facebook announced plans to invest $1 billion in new entertainment content and has been busy striking deals across town. Apple has done the same with the same initial 10-figure investment, a figure that everyone seems to believe is a drop in the bucket of what they intend to spend on programming in the future.

Also Read: Facebook Kills off Paying Publishers for Video Content

In my opinion, though, Amazon is the one to watch. Jeff Bezos has utterly cleaned house at his eight-year-old Amazon Studios division, kicking out studio head Roy Price, comedy chief Joe Lewis and head of alternative Conrad Riggs. (Price resigned shortly after a series of sexual harassment accusations surfaced; the other exits appear to be coincidental.)

With the imminent changes at Fox and Warner Bros., Bezos has a rare opportunity to dip into a deep talent pool to restaff and reboot his content operation. Word on the street is that he has been looking to hire top female executive talent. And thanks to the recent corporate upheavals, there may soon be some heavyweights in play, including Fox TV honcho Dana Walden, Warner Bros. marketing/distribution wiz Sue Kroll, Fox film head Stacey Snider and HBO/Annapurna TV veteran Sue Naegle.

So what does the new power landscape of Hollywood look like when all this shakes out? I believe there will be about six major players dominating the space, led by Comcast, AT&T, Netflix and Disney. I’ll leave blank spots for one more technology titan and one wild card because you just never do know.

Another thing: These so-called  “technology” firms need to be recategorized as media and content companies, since they both distribute and/or create the stuff of popular culture. They also need to shoulder the same responsibilities that the old order did — enforcing standards and practices, serving the community and offering accountability to not just shareholders but to consumers.

Also Read: Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Joins Forbes Richest Americans for First Time, Bill Gates and Jeff Bezos Top List

3. The Indies

In the world of independent studios, the business models are scary and the future rocky.

Lionsgate has already merged with Starz after completing an earlier merger with Summit (which gave the company the now-dormant “Hunger Games” franchise). It’s unclear if this new move makes that company big enough to compete.

The Weinstein Company, already financially challenged, is effectively over — the new incarnation will face serious hurdles (Lionsgate is one bidder to buy the outfit, mostly for its library and development slate).

It’s unclear if Fox Searchlight will survive the move to Disney, which already once declared its disinterest in art-house film and is clearly (and correctly) focused on launching its own streaming service to challenge Netflix head-on.

That leaves Focus at NBCUniversal, Sony Pictures Classics and the unknown unknowns around A24.

Also Read: The Weinstein Company on the Block: Bids Due Today

4. Women and the Future

As should be obvious by now, the culture of Hollywood shifted in 2017. The casting couch, the permissive atmosphere on sets, the casual and constant sexual assaults and harassment of the (apparent) past are no longer tolerated as we look to 2018.

Dozens of bad individuals were drummed out of the entertainment and media industry in 2017. (TheWrap’s rogue’s gallery now has a stunning 68 people in it, all men.) The shock waves of the most heinous behavior are still reverberating, spilling over to harm the reputations of icons like Meryl Streep or companies that canceled every Louis CK sketch ever created.

The pendulum is still swinging far to one side, as the latest round of “he tapped my butt/she tapped by butt” nonsense suggests, and eventually it will swing back, hopefully coming to rest somewhere around the midpoint of decency and common sense.

Also Read: Meryl Streep Answers Rose McGowan’s Slam Over Harvey Weinstein: ‘It Hurt’

But “the reckoning,” as it is aptly called, has been necessary. Like all revolutions, it has been painful and not always just.

There are calls across the industry for gender parity, not just equity, in the decision-making suites and behind the camera. There are early signs that the savviest of companies — such as United Talent Agency — are adopting these goals or considering doing so. This year’s biggest box office hits — “Beauty and the Beast,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Wonder Woman” all had female leads — a positive sign for the future.

Hollywood in 2018 will be about change. Disruption — both on the business side and the cultural side of the entertainment business — will be the guiding theme. Happy New Year.

Related stories from TheWrap:

At TheGrill 2017, A Tipping Point: Tech Platforms Have Arrived on the Shores of Content

Disney’s ‘Star Wars’ Movies Have Already Earned Back $4 Billion Lucasfilm Investment at Box Office

9 Biggest Billion-Dollar Entertainment and Media Deals in 2017 (Photos)

20 Biggest Movie Letdowns of 2017: From ‘Life’ to ‘Justice League’ (Photos)

2017 Box Office Hits and Misses, From Marvel Blockbusters to Matt Damon’s Many Duds

Three months ago, I wrote that the change that has been years in coming to the entertainment industry was upon us.

“The new world has been a long time coming, but it seems to be here,” I wrote at the opening of TheWrap’s annual Grill conference on October 1. “The outlines of the new entertainment ecosystem are becoming clear… The next 12 months will be decisive in defining the contours of what the content industry looks like for decades to come.”

As we face 2018, those changes are about to come barreling through the established order of Hollywood, leaving companies in pieces, shattering long-accepted norms, scattering talented executives to the winds and anointing a new set of power brokers.

It will be a time of disruption and transition, and I am not referring to Harvey Weinstein (more on that later). Here is what looms on the horizon.

1. The End of the Major Studios

Two major mergers are hanging in the balance — the AT&T acquisition of Time-Warner and Disney’s purchase of Fox’s movie and TV assets. Both signal an end to the major studio system that has reigned for more than 50 years, and a new era of consolidation at the topmost levels of entertainment and media.

The significance of Rupert Murdoch’s decision to sell the precious pieces of his carefully built entertainment empire to Disney’s Bob Iger, rather than bequeath them to his sons Lachlan and James, cannot be overstated.

To some observers, this represents a kind of surrender by one of the most combative and ambitious media titans of our time. To others, it reflects a canny assessment of the media landscape and a bold move to cut the losses of a mammoth operation that lacks the technology prowess to compete over the long term with the new power players.

Up for discussion are whether CBS and Viacom will ultimately re-merge and whether Sony will let its own entertainment assets go. As the new order rises, these changes will matter less.

2. The New Order

We know who the emerging power players are: Facebook, Google, Netflix, Apple, Amazon. For years, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings has led a rising challenge to Time-Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes. Now Bewkes is set to retire as soon as the AT&T deal closes and Hastings just got a $30 million stock grant to keep his growth going.

In the last three months, Netflix has continued to swell in size, with a market cap now at $83 billion, making it bigger than any media company besides Disney, including Time Warner. Just as important, the streaming service has signed deals with some of the most talented showrunners in Hollywood, Shonda Rhimes and Jenji Kohan, women who are on the cutting edge of where pop culture is going. Netflix also signed a deal with Jerry Seinfeld in the past week — and I hear that guy is pretty good.

The other new tech challengers in the entertainment space will have to play catch up to Netflix, but no one doubts that they have almost limitless means to do so. The only question is: How big are their ambitions?

In 2017, Facebook announced plans to invest $1 billion in new entertainment content and has been busy striking deals across town. Apple has done the same with the same initial 10-figure investment, a figure that everyone seems to believe is a drop in the bucket of what they intend to spend on programming in the future.

In my opinion, though, Amazon is the one to watch. Jeff Bezos has utterly cleaned house at his eight-year-old Amazon Studios division, kicking out studio head Roy Price, comedy chief Joe Lewis and head of alternative Conrad Riggs. (Price resigned shortly after a series of sexual harassment accusations surfaced; the other exits appear to be coincidental.)

With the imminent changes at Fox and Warner Bros., Bezos has a rare opportunity to dip into a deep talent pool to restaff and reboot his content operation. Word on the street is that he has been looking to hire top female executive talent. And thanks to the recent corporate upheavals, there may soon be some heavyweights in play, including Fox TV honcho Dana Walden, Warner Bros. marketing/distribution wiz Sue Kroll, Fox film head Stacey Snider and HBO/Annapurna TV veteran Sue Naegle.

So what does the new power landscape of Hollywood look like when all this shakes out? I believe there will be about six major players dominating the space, led by Comcast, AT&T, Netflix and Disney. I’ll leave blank spots for one more technology titan and one wild card because you just never do know.

Another thing: These so-called  “technology” firms need to be recategorized as media and content companies, since they both distribute and/or create the stuff of popular culture. They also need to shoulder the same responsibilities that the old order did — enforcing standards and practices, serving the community and offering accountability to not just shareholders but to consumers.

3. The Indies

In the world of independent studios, the business models are scary and the future rocky.

Lionsgate has already merged with Starz after completing an earlier merger with Summit (which gave the company the now-dormant “Hunger Games” franchise). It’s unclear if this new move makes that company big enough to compete.

The Weinstein Company, already financially challenged, is effectively over — the new incarnation will face serious hurdles (Lionsgate is one bidder to buy the outfit, mostly for its library and development slate).

It’s unclear if Fox Searchlight will survive the move to Disney, which already once declared its disinterest in art-house film and is clearly (and correctly) focused on launching its own streaming service to challenge Netflix head-on.

That leaves Focus at NBCUniversal, Sony Pictures Classics and the unknown unknowns around A24.

4. Women and the Future

As should be obvious by now, the culture of Hollywood shifted in 2017. The casting couch, the permissive atmosphere on sets, the casual and constant sexual assaults and harassment of the (apparent) past are no longer tolerated as we look to 2018.

Dozens of bad individuals were drummed out of the entertainment and media industry in 2017. (TheWrap’s rogue’s gallery now has a stunning 68 people in it, all men.) The shock waves of the most heinous behavior are still reverberating, spilling over to harm the reputations of icons like Meryl Streep or companies that canceled every Louis CK sketch ever created.

The pendulum is still swinging far to one side, as the latest round of “he tapped my butt/she tapped by butt” nonsense suggests, and eventually it will swing back, hopefully coming to rest somewhere around the midpoint of decency and common sense.

But “the reckoning,” as it is aptly called, has been necessary. Like all revolutions, it has been painful and not always just.

There are calls across the industry for gender parity, not just equity, in the decision-making suites and behind the camera. There are early signs that the savviest of companies — such as United Talent Agency — are adopting these goals or considering doing so. This year’s biggest box office hits — “Beauty and the Beast,” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” and “Wonder Woman” all had female leads — a positive sign for the future.

Hollywood in 2018 will be about change. Disruption — both on the business side and the cultural side of the entertainment business — will be the guiding theme. Happy New Year.

Related stories from TheWrap:

At TheGrill 2017, A Tipping Point: Tech Platforms Have Arrived on the Shores of Content

Disney's 'Star Wars' Movies Have Already Earned Back $4 Billion Lucasfilm Investment at Box Office

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Fear, Anxiety Sink In at 20th Century Fox After Disney Takeover News

Fear and uncertainty are sinking in on the 20th Century Fox lot now that Hollywood has had a night to sleep on Disney’s $52.4-billion bid to acquire the media company’s prime assets.

Employees at 20th Century’s film and TV studios are wracked with anxiety the prospect of layoffs — which analysts said are a forgone conclusion — according to nearly a dozen staffers and collaborators TheWrap spoke with on Thursday and Friday. Some factions of the business have gone radio silent to partners and vendors in response to the gravity of the situation.

For the Fox businesses that will remain under Murdoch family oversight, there’s less worry about downsizing because their spinoff venture will not face redundancy with existing Disney employees, insiders in the broadcast and sports divisions said. But they face the small matter of a massive content void left by the two studios.

Also Read: Will Disney-Fox Deal Face Antitrust Challenge From Trump Administration Like AT&T-Time Warner?

“Management has been handling this with as much detail as they can,” one high-level Fox executive who works across platforms said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

“Much is unknown. People have been assured that even if they don’t end up with a role, they will be well taken care of,” added the executive, who also applauded the display of “human compassion.”

Still, many are “silently grieving,” another knowledgable insider said. While entertainment executives can be painted as lofty and inaccessible, another Fox executive said the party line inside the company this week was to show kindness to the anxious and afraid.

Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider cancelled her planned appearance at the glittery Washington D.C. premiere of Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” on Thursday, instead choosing to stay and comfort her staff.

Also Read: Disney-Fox Merger Likely to Kill Thousands of Hollywood Jobs, Analysts Say

On top of arranged meetings with a team that included President of Production Emma Watts and distribution chief Chris Aronson, Snider left her door open all day spoke with worried employees, an insider said.

She underscored the studio would operate normally and with “swagger,” TheWrap previously reported, until the Disney oversight begins, the individual said.

Some non-creative departments in the film and TV divisions have gone quiet to outside partners, production entities and clients.

“Some people are radio silent and scared sh–less,” one media company CFO told TheWrap of communication with Fox. “People are nervous from the top down, but I think we’re all anxious to shake the trees and see where this ends up. Who wants to wait in agony?”

Also Read: Disney-Fox Merger Is ‘Bad for Families,’ Says Parents Television Council

In announcing the deal, Disney said it expects at least “$2 billion in cost savings” derived from “efficiencies realized through the combination of businesses,” without elaborating on what that means.

But many analysts say the savings will likely come from job cuts. “There will be thousands of jobs lost,” BTIG analyst Rich Greenfield told CNN. “It is hard to see how any meaningful job creation will come out of this.”

One development executive with several projects set up at Fox Film and TV said there “will probably be a lot of people out on the street,” and said the deal was all people could talk about this week at power lunch haunts like Beverly Hills’ The Grill on the Alley.

While one person suggested “redundancy’ would be the biggest Hollywood buzzword in 2018, the majority of Fox insiders said they were instead focuses on resilience.

“A few departments had their holiday parties on Friday, and they’ve been festive,” another lot insider said. Both companies said transition is expected to take from 12 to 18 months to complete, so no imminent action is expected.

There is no quantifying the ripple effect of Disney swallowing Fox’s film and TV studios, though one poignant takeaway emerges among too many questions: Many feel the acquisition solidifies Disney as the “most powerful company” in Hollywood.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Will Disney-Fox Deal Face Antitrust Challenge From Trump Administration Like AT&T-Time Warner?

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Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider Cancels DC Trip to Console Staff After Disney News

Fear and uncertainty are sinking in on the 20th Century Fox lot now that Hollywood has had a night to sleep on Disney’s $52.4-billion bid to acquire the media company’s prime assets.

Employees at 20th Century’s film and TV studios are wracked with anxiety the prospect of layoffs — which analysts said are a forgone conclusion — according to nearly a dozen staffers and collaborators TheWrap spoke with on Thursday and Friday. Some factions of the business have gone radio silent to partners and vendors in response to the gravity of the situation.

For the Fox businesses that will remain under Murdoch family oversight, there’s less worry about downsizing because their spinoff venture will not face redundancy with existing Disney employees, insiders in the broadcast and sports divisions said. But they face the small matter of a massive content void left by the two studios.

“Management has been handling this with as much detail as they can,” one high-level Fox executive who works across platforms said, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

“Much is unknown. People have been assured that even if they don’t end up with a role, they will be well taken care of,” added the executive, who also applauded the display of “human compassion.”

Still, many are “silently grieving,” another knowledgable insider said. While entertainment executives can be painted as lofty and inaccessible, another Fox executive said the party line inside the company this week was to show kindness to the anxious and afraid.

Fox Film Chairman and CEO Stacey Snider cancelled her planned appearance at the glittery Washington D.C. premiere of Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” on Thursday, instead choosing to stay and comfort her staff.

On top of arranged meetings with a team that included President of Production Emma Watts and distribution chief Chris Aronson, Snider left her door open all day spoke with worried employees, an insider said.

She underscored the studio would operate normally and with “swagger,” TheWrap previously reported, until the Disney oversight begins, the individual said.

Some non-creative departments in the film and TV divisions have gone quiet to outside partners, production entities and clients.

“Some people are radio silent and scared sh–less,” one media company CFO told TheWrap of communication with Fox. “People are nervous from the top down, but I think we’re all anxious to shake the trees and see where this ends up. Who wants to wait in agony?”

In announcing the deal, Disney said it expects at least “$2 billion in cost savings” derived from “efficiencies realized through the combination of businesses,” without elaborating on what that means.

But many analysts say the savings will likely come from job cuts. “There will be thousands of jobs lost,” BTIG analyst Rich Greenfield told CNN. “It is hard to see how any meaningful job creation will come out of this.”

One development executive with several projects set up at Fox Film and TV said there “will probably be a lot of people out on the street,” and said the deal was all people could talk about this week at power lunch haunts like Beverly Hills’ The Grill on the Alley.

While one person suggested “redundancy’ would be the biggest Hollywood buzzword in 2018, the majority of Fox insiders said they were instead focuses on resilience.

“A few departments had their holiday parties on Friday, and they’ve been festive,” another lot insider said. Both companies said transition is expected to take from 12 to 18 months to complete, so no imminent action is expected.

There is no quantifying the ripple effect of Disney swallowing Fox’s film and TV studios, though one poignant takeaway emerges among too many questions: Many feel the acquisition solidifies Disney as the “most powerful company” in Hollywood.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Neil Cavuto Bashes 'Star Wars' Again, Trolls His Employer (Fox) Over Disney Deal (Video)

Will Disney-Fox Deal Face Antitrust Challenge From Trump Administration Like AT&T-Time Warner?

Disney-Fox Merger Likely to Kill Thousands of Hollywood Jobs, Analysts Say

Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider Cancels DC Trip to Console Staff After Disney News

Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider Cancels DC Trip to Console Staff After Disney News

20th Century Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider is staying home to rally her troops.

After Thursday’s announcement that Disney would acquire her division, in addition to the Fox TV studio and other assets, Snider canceled a planned trip to Washington, D.C., for the scheduled premiere of the studio’s awards player “The Post,” an individual familiar with the matter told TheWrap.

Snider is passing on the invite-only event and remaining in L.A. to comfort a rattled staff with a series of meetings and informal talks instead of joining director Steven Spielberg and stars Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks.

“Her door has been open all day,” the individual said, adding that in one meeting she said her division will continue to operate as usual with “high-level excellence and swagger” during a transition that’s expected to take 12 to 18 months to complete.

Also Read: Disney Gets a Landlord: Will Lease Space on Fox Lot for 7 Years Post Merger

Fox Film President of Production Emma Watts and distribution chief Chris Aronson are also giving pep talks, another insider said.

Larger town hall meetings are being held throughout the day, TheWrap previously reported, hosted by 21st Century Fox President Peter Rice.

While everyone from lot producers to the home entertainment staff are worries over the fate of their jobs to the TheWrap, there are no indicators the acquisition will be a rush job.

For employees who work on the Fox lot, “life won’t be that different. If you come to work here, that’s not going to change anytime soon,” a third individual familiar with transition plans said.

Also Read: Fox Film Chief Stacey Snider Says Netflix Offers Not ‘One Distinct Advantage’ to Filmmakers

Once the deal is complete, Disney will be leasing a space on the Fox lot for the employees and productions it is acquiring, an agreement that will span seven years, TheWrap reported on Thursday.

Snider assumed her top position in last fall, succeeding Jim Gianopulos, who now runs Paramount.

A veteran executive, Snider’s top priorities in the coming days are the release of the Hugh Jackman movie “The Greatest Showman,” the wide rollout of the aforementioned Pentagon Papers drama “The Post,” Jennifer Lawrence’s “Red Sparrow” and a sequel to Ryan Reynolds’ perverse superhero smash “Deadpool.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Disney-Fox Merger Is ‘Bad for Families,’ Says Parents Television Council

Disney Gets a Landlord: Will Lease Space on Fox Lot for 7 Years Post Merger

Behind the Disney-Fox Merger: 7 Things We Still Need to Know – and 3 We Already Do

20th Century Fox Film CEO Stacey Snider is staying home to rally her troops.

After Thursday’s announcement that Disney would acquire her division, in addition to the Fox TV studio and other assets, Snider canceled a planned trip to Washington, D.C., for the scheduled premiere of the studio’s awards player “The Post,” an individual familiar with the matter told TheWrap.

Snider is passing on the invite-only event and remaining in L.A. to comfort a rattled staff with a series of meetings and informal talks instead of joining director Steven Spielberg and stars Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks.

“Her door has been open all day,” the individual said, adding that in one meeting she said her division will continue to operate as usual with “high-level excellence and swagger” during a transition that’s expected to take 12 to 18 months to complete.

Fox Film President of Production Emma Watts and distribution chief Chris Aronson are also giving pep talks, another insider said.

Larger town hall meetings are being held throughout the day, TheWrap previously reported, hosted by 21st Century Fox President Peter Rice.

While everyone from lot producers to the home entertainment staff are worries over the fate of their jobs to the TheWrap, there are no indicators the acquisition will be a rush job.

For employees who work on the Fox lot, “life won’t be that different. If you come to work here, that’s not going to change anytime soon,” a third individual familiar with transition plans said.

Once the deal is complete, Disney will be leasing a space on the Fox lot for the employees and productions it is acquiring, an agreement that will span seven years, TheWrap reported on Thursday.

Snider assumed her top position in last fall, succeeding Jim Gianopulos, who now runs Paramount.

A veteran executive, Snider’s top priorities in the coming days are the release of the Hugh Jackman movie “The Greatest Showman,” the wide rollout of the aforementioned Pentagon Papers drama “The Post,” Jennifer Lawrence’s “Red Sparrow” and a sequel to Ryan Reynolds’ perverse superhero smash “Deadpool.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Disney-Fox Merger Is 'Bad for Families,' Says Parents Television Council

Disney Gets a Landlord: Will Lease Space on Fox Lot for 7 Years Post Merger

Behind the Disney-Fox Merger: 7 Things We Still Need to Know – and 3 We Already Do