WFAN Host Mike Francesa Has Least-Touching Stan Lee Tribute of the Day: ‘Oh, Who Cares?’ (Video)

Millions of people were saddened by the death of comic book icon Stan Lee on Monday. Mike Francesa wasn’t one of them.

The New York City sports radio host was absolutely clueless when a caller asked him to weigh in on the Marvel legend — dismissively letting his audience know he was “not a comic book guy.” Caller Eddie in Hoboken, New Jersey, thinking that the “Sports Pope” might have some fond memories to share and the answer wasn’t what he was expecting.

“Hey Mike, Stan Lee died today? Did you ever meet the guy? What did you think of him?” asked Eddie.

Also Read: Mike Francesa Will Reclaim His WFAN Throne on Tuesday

“Stan Lee?” Francesa shot back.

“Yeah, Stan Lee. You never heard of Stan Lee?” Eddie continued.

“I don’t know who he is. I don’t know who he is, no.”

Also Read: Chris Christie Eyed to Replace Sports Talk Radio Host Mike Francesa

“Jesus,” Eddie said incredulously, before hanging up.

The guessing game didn’t stop there for Francesa, however. “Who is he? Who is he? Who is Stan Lee?”

His producer finally lets him in on the secret: “He was one of the creators of Marvel Comics.”

“Oh, who cares? I mean, I’m sorry, I’m not a comic book guy,” said Francesa, with a waft of contempt for Spider-Man. “Is that who he is? Stan Lee?”

Francesca then explained he never read comics as a kid.

Also Read: Ex-WFAN Host Craig Carton Faces 45 Years Behind Bars for Million-Dollar Ticket Scam

Our transcription can’t do the moment justice, however. Watch it here:

????WATCH ???? … Mike Francesa learned about Stan Lee’s death while he was on the air today, and he delivered a very emotional tribute. pic.twitter.com/quXh7c4TJY

— Ƒunhouse (@BackAftaThis) November 13, 2018

Francesa then doubled down in pridefully showing his lack of pop culture knowledge, letting his listeners know he had “nevah” seen a single “Star Wars” movie. And luckily for hardcore Francesa fans, they can get riveting analysis like this for only $8.99 per month on his “Mike’s On” app.

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Millions of people were saddened by the death of comic book icon Stan Lee on Monday. Mike Francesa wasn’t one of them.

The New York City sports radio host was absolutely clueless when a caller asked him to weigh in on the Marvel legend — dismissively letting his audience know he was “not a comic book guy.” Caller Eddie in Hoboken, New Jersey, thinking that the “Sports Pope” might have some fond memories to share and the answer wasn’t what he was expecting.

“Hey Mike, Stan Lee died today? Did you ever meet the guy? What did you think of him?” asked Eddie.

“Stan Lee?” Francesa shot back.

“Yeah, Stan Lee. You never heard of Stan Lee?” Eddie continued.

“I don’t know who he is. I don’t know who he is, no.”

“Jesus,” Eddie said incredulously, before hanging up.

The guessing game didn’t stop there for Francesa, however. “Who is he? Who is he? Who is Stan Lee?”

His producer finally lets him in on the secret: “He was one of the creators of Marvel Comics.”

“Oh, who cares? I mean, I’m sorry, I’m not a comic book guy,” said Francesa, with a waft of contempt for Spider-Man. “Is that who he is? Stan Lee?”

Francesca then explained he never read comics as a kid.

Our transcription can’t do the moment justice, however. Watch it here:

Francesa then doubled down in pridefully showing his lack of pop culture knowledge, letting his listeners know he had “nevah” seen a single “Star Wars” movie. And luckily for hardcore Francesa fans, they can get riveting analysis like this for only $8.99 per month on his “Mike’s On” app.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sports Talk Radio Legend Mike Francesa to Launch 'Mike's On' Digital Platform

Mike Francesa Will Reclaim His WFAN Throne on Tuesday

WFAN Morning Show Host Boomer Esiason Calls Mike Francesa's Pending Return 'Pathetic'

Sony Pictures Promotes Michael Marshall to President of Studio’s Business Affairs

Michael Marshall has been promoted to president of business affairs for the Sony Pictures Entertainment Motion Pictures Group, Sony Pictures chairman Tom Rothman announced in a memo to staff that was obtained by TheWrap.
Marshall previously held the sa…

Michael Marshall has been promoted to president of business affairs for the Sony Pictures Entertainment Motion Pictures Group, Sony Pictures chairman Tom Rothman announced in a memo to staff that was obtained by TheWrap.

Marshall previously held the same title at Sony’s Columbia Pictures division.

“Mike has negotiated some of our biggest development and production-related deals for feature projects, including ‘Venom,’ ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming,’ ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home,’ ‘Once Upon A Time in Hollywood’ and ‘Men in Black,'” Rothman wrote in the memo. “Please join me in thanking Mike for his continued hard work and dedication to our business, and in congratulating him on this well-deserved role expansion.”

In his new role, Marshall will assume expanded oversight for the studio at large and across Sony’s film labels, including business affairs for TriStar Pictures and Sony Pictures Animation.

Rothman also touted Marshall’s work in acquiring rights for projects and closing deals for writers, directors and actors, “including our studio-wide deal with Stephen Curry’s production company Unanimous Media,” Rothman wrote.

“Mike’s excellent relationships with our talent and filmmakers continues to further our goal as a studio to be a choice home for top talent,” he continued.

Marshall previously served as executive vice president of business and legal affairs for Our Stories Film and held the same role at Marvel Studios before that. He has also had stints at Universal, MGM, Miramax and Dimension.

Variety first reported the news.

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Stan Lee Remembers His ‘Spider-Man’ Co-Creator Steve Ditko: ‘His Talent Was Indescribable’ (Video)

Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee has made his first public comments on the death of Steve Ditko, the legendary comic book artist who co-created Spider-Man and Doctor Strange with Lee.

“I really cannot let the week go without commenting on Steve Ditko,” Lee said in a video posted on his Twitter account. “Steve was certainly one of the most important creators in the comic book business. His talent was indescribable.”

Remembering Sturdy Steve Ditko – Stan pic.twitter.com/gpmbSF9s5S

— stan lee (@TheRealStanLee) July 13, 2018

Also Read: Steve Ditko, ‘Spider-Man’ and ‘Doctor Strange’ Co-Creator, Dies at 90

Ditko died in late June at 90. New York police found Ditko dead in his apartment on June 29th, and is believed to have died two days prior from natural causes. Along with his more famous comic book co-creations, Ditko was as well known for his idiosyncratic politics as his contributions to comics.

“He told the story like a fine movie director would. I think that he will be very greatly missed by the public and by his fans,” Lee continued. “I’m sure there will be a lot written about him as time goes by, and I will be one of guys who buys the first book. You made a real impression here in the world. Excelsior.”

Ditko first joined Marvel in 1955, back when it was known as Atlas comics, and created the popular webslinger with Lee in 1962.

Also Read: Tom Holland Pays Tribute to Spider-Man Co-Creator Steve Ditko: He Changed My Life ‘Most of All’

The two continued to collaborate, creating iconic Spider-Man villains like Doctor Octopus (July 1963), the Sandman (Sept. 1963), the Lizard (Nov. 1963), Electro, and the Green Goblin (July 1964), Hulk villains like The Leader, and another flagship Marvel hero, Doctor Strange (1963).

Despite their output and success, Ditko and Lee increasingly clashed over artistic decisions, what Ditko felt was a lack of proper credit and compensation, and even personal, social and even political differences. Eventually the pair were no longer on speaking terms. Ditko eventually quit Marvel in 1966.

Ditko was inducted into the comics industry’s Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990, and into the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1994.

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Marvel Comics icon Stan Lee has made his first public comments on the death of Steve Ditko, the legendary comic book artist who co-created Spider-Man and Doctor Strange with Lee.

“I really cannot let the week go without commenting on Steve Ditko,” Lee said in a video posted on his Twitter account. “Steve was certainly one of the most important creators in the comic book business. His talent was indescribable.”

Ditko died in late June at 90. New York police found Ditko dead in his apartment on June 29th, and is believed to have died two days prior from natural causes. Along with his more famous comic book co-creations, Ditko was as well known for his idiosyncratic politics as his contributions to comics.

“He told the story like a fine movie director would. I think that he will be very greatly missed by the public and by his fans,” Lee continued. “I’m sure there will be a lot written about him as time goes by, and I will be one of guys who buys the first book. You made a real impression here in the world. Excelsior.”

Ditko first joined Marvel in 1955, back when it was known as Atlas comics, and created the popular webslinger with Lee in 1962.

The two continued to collaborate, creating iconic Spider-Man villains like Doctor Octopus (July 1963), the Sandman (Sept. 1963), the Lizard (Nov. 1963), Electro, and the Green Goblin (July 1964), Hulk villains like The Leader, and another flagship Marvel hero, Doctor Strange (1963).

Despite their output and success, Ditko and Lee increasingly clashed over artistic decisions, what Ditko felt was a lack of proper credit and compensation, and even personal, social and even political differences. Eventually the pair were no longer on speaking terms. Ditko eventually quit Marvel in 1966.

Ditko was inducted into the comics industry’s Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1990, and into the Will Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 1994.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fans Remember 'Spider-Man, 'Doctor Strange' Creator Steve Ditko: 'Often Copied. Never Equalled.'

Stan Lee's Message to Fans and Friends: 'I'm Back!' (Video)

Stan Lee Withdraws $1 Billion Lawsuit Against POW! Entertainment

How Marvel Bounced Back From Bankruptcy to Become Hollywood’s Biggest Brand

Marvel Studios’ interconnected universe of films, now spanning 10 years and 19 individual projects, has earned $6 billion in domestic box office and nearly $15 billion worldwide, according to data from Box Office Mojo.

That ain’t bad considering that in 1996 Marvel mired in bankruptcy, and a decade later banked its nascent film franchise on a second-tier superhero called Iron Man.

“There was a lot of skepticism in the beginning,” Barton Crockett, a media and entertainment analyst at B. Riley FBR, told TheWrap. “Who did these guys think they were trying to make movies out of characters people hadn’t heard of before? Who would want to see a movie about Iron Man? What’s amazed me is the ability to make these tertiary characters popular, and that really started right out the gate.”

Also Read: Marvel President Kevin Feige Explains Origin of MCU’s Post-Credit Scenes

“Iron Man,” which helped pull Robert Downey Jr. from the depths of a scandal-ridden career, went on to make $318.4 million domestically and $585.2 million worldwide.

In 1996, Marvel was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy after the comic book industry started to collapse in the ’90s. After tense legal battles and struggles to pay back creditors, the company was salvaged in 1997 and merged with Isaac Perlmutter’s Toy Biz.

The Israel-born toy manufacturer entrusted his business partner Avi Arad to help dig Marvel out of its slump. Arad wooed bankers and preached the value of Marvel’s characters, according to a 2012 Slate article on the studio’s rise.

Marvel also auctioned off the film rights to some of its most prized characters. Spider-Man went to Sony, the Hulk went to Paramount and 21st Century Fox bought the rights to Daredevil, the X-Men and Fantastic Four.

Also Read: Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies Ranked by Box Office (Photos)

By that time, Marvel Studios no longer had the film rights to its most bankable characters. So Arad & Co. found a “brilliant way to operate out of the licensing box” in which it had placed itself, Crockett said.

The company, with toy sales in its DNA, thought first: What character could sell the most toys? “Mr. Perlmutter didn’t expect to make much money off the movies, but he thought they’d make great advertisements for toys,” Ben Fritz wrote in his book “The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies.” “The question wasn’t who the kids would want to watch on the big screen, but which action figure would they want to play with. The answer was Iron Man.”

Under Kevin Feige, a young producer promoted to Marvel’s president of production in 2007, the company doubled down on its strategy. The following year, Paramount released “Iron Man” — the first in a series of blockbuster films from source material that few fathomed would find mainstream success.

Also Read: The Complete Timeline of Marvel Cinematic Universe Movies, From ‘Iron Man’ to ‘Infinity War’

It starts with the comics and us getting to rip pages out, put them on the walls and start to be inspired,” Feige told the press on the eve of Marvel’s latest film, “Avengers: Infinity War.” “It is always a guide point, a North Star for us as we lead these giant productions into reality are right from those books where it all started.”

The success of “Iron Man” caught the eye of Disney, which bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. The acquisition gave Marvel the platform and the pocketbook to chase the audacious multi-superhero, multi-film crossover project that’s coming to fruition with “Avengers: Infinity War” and its untitled “Avengers” sequel due next summer.

Perhaps the first real test of whether Marvel could actually pull off a universe films based on virtually unknown comic book characters was 2014’s “The Guardians of the Galaxy” — based on a long-dormant comic that few diehards even remembered.

When Djimon Hounsou’s Korath jokes that he doesn’t know who Star Lord (Chris Pratt) is, the character wasn’t alone. A talking raccoon? A sentient tree? Two oddly colored alien warriors and a half-man, half-celestial captain? Who were these characters that Disney, with a history of capitalizing on established IP, was willing to invest nearly $200 million in?

Also Read: ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Reaction: Here’s What We Think of Marvel’s Latest Installment (Video)

Since that film broke opening weekend records on its way to $773.3 million worldwide, Marvel has been able to make hits out of similarly unlikely characters like Black Panther and Doctor Strange.

“It’s incredible. The whole idea is working,” Crockett said. “We’re approaching a weekend where a Marvel movie might very well have the biggest box office opening of all time, which is stunning when you consider where they came from.”

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Marvel Studios’ interconnected universe of films, now spanning 10 years and 19 individual projects, has earned $6 billion in domestic box office and nearly $15 billion worldwide, according to data from Box Office Mojo.

That ain’t bad considering that in 1996 Marvel mired in bankruptcy, and a decade later banked its nascent film franchise on a second-tier superhero called Iron Man.

“There was a lot of skepticism in the beginning,” Barton Crockett, a media and entertainment analyst at B. Riley FBR, told TheWrap. “Who did these guys think they were trying to make movies out of characters people hadn’t heard of before? Who would want to see a movie about Iron Man? What’s amazed me is the ability to make these tertiary characters popular, and that really started right out the gate.”

“Iron Man,” which helped pull Robert Downey Jr. from the depths of a scandal-ridden career, went on to make $318.4 million domestically and $585.2 million worldwide.

In 1996, Marvel was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy after the comic book industry started to collapse in the ’90s. After tense legal battles and struggles to pay back creditors, the company was salvaged in 1997 and merged with Isaac Perlmutter’s Toy Biz.

The Israel-born toy manufacturer entrusted his business partner Avi Arad to help dig Marvel out of its slump. Arad wooed bankers and preached the value of Marvel’s characters, according to a 2012 Slate article on the studio’s rise.

Marvel also auctioned off the film rights to some of its most prized characters. Spider-Man went to Sony, the Hulk went to Paramount and 21st Century Fox bought the rights to Daredevil, the X-Men and Fantastic Four.

By that time, Marvel Studios no longer had the film rights to its most bankable characters. So Arad & Co. found a “brilliant way to operate out of the licensing box” in which it had placed itself, Crockett said.

The company, with toy sales in its DNA, thought first: What character could sell the most toys? “Mr. Perlmutter didn’t expect to make much money off the movies, but he thought they’d make great advertisements for toys,” Ben Fritz wrote in his book “The Big Picture: The Fight for the Future of Movies.” “The question wasn’t who the kids would want to watch on the big screen, but which action figure would they want to play with. The answer was Iron Man.”

Under Kevin Feige, a young producer promoted to Marvel’s president of production in 2007, the company doubled down on its strategy. The following year, Paramount released “Iron Man” — the first in a series of blockbuster films from source material that few fathomed would find mainstream success.

It starts with the comics and us getting to rip pages out, put them on the walls and start to be inspired,” Feige told the press on the eve of Marvel’s latest film, “Avengers: Infinity War.” “It is always a guide point, a North Star for us as we lead these giant productions into reality are right from those books where it all started.”

The success of “Iron Man” caught the eye of Disney, which bought Marvel for $4 billion in 2009. The acquisition gave Marvel the platform and the pocketbook to chase the audacious multi-superhero, multi-film crossover project that’s coming to fruition with “Avengers: Infinity War” and its untitled “Avengers” sequel due next summer.

Perhaps the first real test of whether Marvel could actually pull off a universe films based on virtually unknown comic book characters was 2014’s “The Guardians of the Galaxy” — based on a long-dormant comic that few diehards even remembered.

When Djimon Hounsou’s Korath jokes that he doesn’t know who Star Lord (Chris Pratt) is, the character wasn’t alone. A talking raccoon? A sentient tree? Two oddly colored alien warriors and a half-man, half-celestial captain? Who were these characters that Disney, with a history of capitalizing on established IP, was willing to invest nearly $200 million in?

Since that film broke opening weekend records on its way to $773.3 million worldwide, Marvel has been able to make hits out of similarly unlikely characters like Black Panther and Doctor Strange.

“It’s incredible. The whole idea is working,” Crockett said. “We’re approaching a weekend where a Marvel movie might very well have the biggest box office opening of all time, which is stunning when you consider where they came from.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Danai Gurira on All-Female 'Avengers' Movie: 'There's This Hunger for This Type of Thing' (Video)

Top 3 Ways to Avoid 'Avengers: Infinity War' Spoilers Online Before Seeing the Movie

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Quentin Tarantino Steals The Show At Sony’s Slick Presentation Of A Pretty Dark Slate And Very Special Dog – CinemaCon

From my perspective, truly the most exciting and personally anticipated piece of footage of upcoming films touted at tonight’s kick-off Sony Pictures CinemaCon presentation was for a movie for which not one foot of film has yet to be shot.
Pickin…

From my perspective, truly the most exciting and personally anticipated piece of footage of upcoming films touted at tonight’s kick-off Sony Pictures CinemaCon presentation was for a movie for which not one foot of film has yet to be shot. Picking up the pieces after the Harvey Weinstein debacle, Sony and movie savvy chairman Tom Rothman nabbed a big one when they got the rights to Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming L.A.-set 1969 fantasia, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood…