‘Unicorn Store’: Brie Larson’s Directing Debut Gets Trailer & Key Art From Netflix

Read on: Deadline.

“The most grownup thing you can do is fail at things you really care about.” “You need to learn to love yourself.” That’s two solid pieces of advice given to Brie Larson’s lead character in Unicorn Store, the Captain…

Brie Larson Buys a Unicorn From Samuel L Jackson in Trailer for Netflix’s ‘Unicorn Store’ (Video)

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Where would one hope to find a unicorn? At the Unicorn Store, of course.

That’s what Brie Larson says in the trailer for her upcoming Netflix film, “Unicorn Store,” which she also directed. And who better to purchase a unicorn from than Larson’s “Captain Marvel” co-star, Samuel L. Jackson, dressed all in pink and with a massive afro?

“You need to love yourself,” Jackson tells Larson’s character, Kit. “Get out there and show us what you can do.”

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Larson made her directorial debut on the comedy-fantasy about a lonely 20-something who is kicked out of school and forced to take a boring temp job and move back in with her parents. But her life changes when she discovers a mysterious store that offers to give her childlike heart its greatest desire. In her case, that’s a unicorn.

Samantha McIntyre wrote the screenplay, and “Unicorn Store” also stars Joan Cusack and Bradley Whitford. The film first premiered at Toronto in 2017, and it was acquired recently by Netflix, who will now release it globally on their streaming service on April 5.

Watch the first trailer for “Unicorn Store” above.

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Here’s Why ‘Pulp Fiction’ Wasn’t Used When De-Aging Samuel L Jackson in ‘Captain Marvel’

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In capturing a young, mid-’90s era Samuel L. Jackson for “Captain Marvel,” the team at Lola VFX started by watching his classics of that time: “Jurassic Park,” “Die Hard: With a Vengeance,” and most notably, “Pulp Fiction.”

Even though Quentin Tarantino’s film came out in 1994, just a year before when “Captain Marvel” is set, the de-aged Nick Fury is not based on Jackson’s look as Jules Winnfield, and there’s a good reason why.

“We had to throw out ‘Pulp Fiction’ almost immediately just because of the facial hair,” Trent Claus, the visual effects supervisor at Lola told TheWrap. “It blocked so much of the reference that we needed, it wasn’t very useful.”

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In de-aging Jackson for “Captain Marvel,” the VFX team did away with a body double and looked to his vast library of films as a reference point. They’re looking for the subtleties in how his cheek might sag in certain places, how light reflects off certain points or how weight hangs on his jaw. It’s a meticulous process that even with a reference from many films, still requires a lot of guesswork and understanding of the physiology of the human face and body.

“It’s not as helpful as it might seem,” Claus said. “Even though you have lots of angles, it’s rare you find the exact right position and lighting and all those things.”

Claus says the film that helped their cause the most was the smaller budget thriller “One Eight Seven.” Though Jackson guessed that they would’ve modeled his look from “The Negotiator,” Claus says it was slightly beyond the age they were looking for.

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The year that the movie was released wasn’t the only thing that they took into consideration.

“If you look at his appearance in say, ‘Jurassic Park,’ which was ’93, compared to his appearance in ‘Pulp Fiction,’ he looks older in ‘Jurassic Park’ than he does in ‘Pulp Fiction,’ just because that’s who his character was,” Claus said. “So we had to factor that in as well. Not only what year was it shot, but what was his character supposed to portray?”

Claus said that for someone who is 70 years old, Jackson has “aged very well.” But that doesn’t always make their job easier.

“That can actually be a double-edged sword. Without the standard wrinkles to remove, that’s kind of the low hanging fruit. If we simply just wipe off the wrinkles from someone, that can immediately take 10, 15 years off them,” Klaus said. “But if you’re working with someone like Sam, who really doesn’t have a whole lot of wrinkles, you really have to rely on physiological changes, changes in structure of musculature, textures of skin, the way the weight hangs on your neck and your jaw, things over time that we’ve studied for so many years now.”

Read more about Samuel L. Jackson’s de-aging process on “Captain Marvel” here.

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Samuel L. Jackson, who is 70 years old, was made to look 25 years younger as Nick Fury for the ’90s throwback movie “Captain Marvel.” And though the studio has previously de-aged Michael Douglas (“Ant-Man” films), Kurt Russell (“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”) and Robert Downey Jr. (“Captain America: Civil War”), the work on Jackson is the first time Marvel has done this for a co-lead actor for an entire movie.

De-aging is a meticulous, time-intensive process. Part of that process involves filming a body double that the visual effects artist can use as a reference. In making the leap between a handful to now hundreds of shots, Marvel tasked the company Lola Visual Effects to make some tests to see what Jackson could look like without the aid of a double. The payoff was enormous.

“That process works if you’ve got five, eight, maybe 10 shots. But in a movie like this where we’ve got about 500 shots, there was no way from a production point of view we could do that,” Christopher Townsend, Marvel’s visual effects supervisor on “Captain Marvel,” told TheWrap. “One of the big gains was Lola coming back to us and saying, ‘we don’t need the body double.’ That was huge for us because it cut down our shooting time by at least half.”

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The end result in “Captain Marvel” is seamless, easily creating the illusion that Fury is far younger than the actor playing him. Townsend said that the goal was to always avoid the “uncanny valley” effect and to make Jackson’s youth look natural and unnoticeable.

“The thing I said to the gang at the beginning is from that first shot you see of Sam, you’ll go ‘Woah! Young Sam!’ But my intention was after that, nobody thinks about it,” Townsend said. “And hopefully that’s what we’ve achieved if we’ve done our job right, and that the audience never questions it and doesn’t even consider it.”

De-aging, or “youthening” as the VFX experts at Marvel also call it, requires repeatedly and painstakingly manipulating an individual frame of a movie to make an actor look younger.

Imagine trying to use Photoshop to make a model look thinner or younger on a magazine cover: you paint out any wrinkles, smooth the skin, fill in pores, bring in a person’s cheeks or chin, etc., but now do that frame by frame across a two-hour movie.

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“The real challenge is making it so that there’s continuity from one frame to the next so that it feels smooth, and it never feels like the face is jiggling around or moving,” Townsend said. “It really comes down to the artistry of the person sitting there and trying to maintain as much of the original performance as possible.”

“You want every shot throughout the whole movie to look like Sam, and specifically to look like Sam at that age. So when you’re working with hundreds of shots and dozens of artists, it would be really easy for each of these shots to go off in their own direction and every shot looking like a different person,” Trent Claus, visual effects supervisor with Lola, added. “So you have to be very strict with consistency and internal reviews and things like that to maintain that continuity.”

Claus helped pioneer the de-aging process with “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” and in creating the “Skinny Steve” effect in the first “Captain America” movie, in which Chris Evans was slimmed down at its start, a precursor to the technique used today. But he said that it’s a “misconception” that the technology itself has changed or evolved drastically in the last 10 years. What has improved is their experience and knowledge of the physiology of the human body and face.

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With the absence of a body double, the visual effects artists looked to ’90s Jackson classics like “The Negotiator,” “Die Hard: With a Vengeance,” “Jurassic Park” and smaller films like “Sphere” and “One Eight Seven.” As VFX artists might also do with a body double, they’re looking for a model for how light reflects on his face or how his cheek might sag when he strikes a similar expression to one used in “Captain Marvel.”

Claus, however, said that the challenge of working with someone who has “aged very well” like Jackson is actually a “double-edged sword.”

“If we simply just wipe off the wrinkles from someone, that can immediately take 10, 15 years off them,” Claus said. “But if you’re working with someone like Sam, who really doesn’t have a whole lot of wrinkles, you really have to rely on physiological changes, changes in structure of musculature, textures of skin, the way the weight hangs on your neck and your jaw, things over time like that we’ve studied for so many years now.”

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Townsend said the goal is always to maintain as much of the performance as possible, to manipulate the image without destroying the original photography. Smooth out too much, and you lose the nuances of the actor’s performance but also end up with unnatural, plastic-y looking skin.

And in striving for realism and understanding the human face, Claus says what they do is much more than photoshopping.

“We don’t want to remove all the imperfections. We don’t want to make them look more perfect than an actual human does. We want to keep all of that pore texture, whiskers, and all of those things that it would be easier for us to just eliminate,” Claus said. “It would be far easier for us to just obliterate all the detail on someone’s face. But then you end up with that mannequin, uncanny valley thing that we all try to avoid.”

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The question that remains is how Marvel will use this technology in the future, or what it means for upcoming movies from other filmmakers. Martin Scorsese is planning to de-age Robert De Niro and Al Pacino for “The Irishman,” and Ang Lee is de-aging Will Smith for “Gemini Man.” Claus says that on future projects, using a body double is still ideal. But considering the scope of projects like “The Irishman” and “Gemini Man,” the VFX teams on those films may look to take Lola’s lead.

Townsend isn’t sure of the specific techniques that Scorsese and Netflix are utilizing but says that the process is the same and reiterated that the goal is always to do the most you can to fully capture the actor’s performance and get out of the way of the story.

“De-aging, youthening, any actor that has had a prolific career, brings advantages and disadvantages,” Townsend said. “There is plenty of onscreen reference from which to draw, but equally, there will be many experts out there critiquing the work and comparing it directly with the younger actor.”

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Is Danai Gurira on the ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Poster Because Okoye Is the New Black Panther?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

There was an interesting real-world subplot that developed last week when the “Avengers: Endgame” trailer dropped. Marvel Studios also released a poster for the film, and every actor whose character was featured got their name listed at the top, save one: Danai Gurira, who plays the Wakandan warrior Okoye from “Black Panther.”

This bit of info understandably irked some folks — Okoye is a great character and Gurira is awesome in the role. So it made perfect sense to question why her name was left off the top of the poster if her face was important enough to be included on the thing in the first place.

Disney quickly put out an updated version of the post with Gurira’s name on it, and the furor died down as everyone resumed parsing every frame of the “Endgame” trailer for clues to how this whole “Avengers” story is going to end. But I say that the fact that Okoye is even on that poster is a big clue about her importance in this film.

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Her inclusion on the poster is particularly interesting because she is the only character on it who hasn’t been seen at some point in one of the two trailers or the Super Bowl commercial. So why in the world would she be on the poster if she isn’t a key character in the film? The answer, we can’t help but think, is that she actually is a key character.

It’s impossible to guess just how important she will be overall, given how secretive Marvel is being in general about “Avengers: Endgame” and the fact that Gurira has not been featured in any of the leaked set photos that have come out. And, of course, the fact that Marvel has not even really suggested that Okoye will be a key figure in “Endgame” at all.

But, again, there has to be some reason why they would put her on the poster, and I can’t help but think that it’s because Okoye will take up the mantle of the Black Panther after T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) becomes one of the victims of Thanos’ (Josh Brolin) deadly finger snap.

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But what does that mean for her involvement in the plot of “Endgame”? She hasn’t been included in any of the team shots from the marketing, but then again neither has Thor (Chris Hemsworth) and there’s no question he’s going to figure in heavily to everything that goes on in the movie. But if I had to guess about the specifics of Okoye’s involvement, I would think that Wakanda would certainly be involved in whatever plan the Avengers eventually cook up since it has by far the best technology on the planet.

Since Shuri (Letitia Wright) is also a victim of Thanos’ snap (she’s listed as one of the missing in the first “Endgame” trailer), our heroes won’t be operating at peak efficiency — but just having those stores of vibranium will no doubt be helpful. And if the Avengers are doing stuff in Wakanda, then Okoye will by extension definitely be around.

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Making any guesses beyond that would be very difficult since we know so little. But you can be sure that Okoye is not the type to want to take advantage of the situation in order to keep her Black Panther powers — T’Challa was her close friend and she, like all our other surviving heroes, will definitely be up for doing whatever it takes to undo the unfathomable damage Thanos caused.

But to find out what exactly “whatever it takes” will involve for Okoye specifically, we’ll probably just have to just watch “Avengers: Endgame” when it hits theaters on April 26. Not long now.

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‘Captain Marvel’: Does Nick Fury’s Tape Trick Actually Work?

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

[Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen “Captain Marvel.”]

“Captain Marvel” is full of references to the ’80s and ’90s, and even Samuel L. Jackson’s Nick Fury throws it way back with an amateur tape trick to get himself out of trouble.

However, would it work in real life?

TheWrap spoke to Valerie Castillo and Elijah Horland from the Discovery Channel’s “MythBusters Jr.” to get to the bottom of it. Castillo is 15 years old and is skilled in robotics, CAD drawing and 3D printing. Horland is 12 years old and is a self-taught maker, programmer and circuit wiz.

In “Captain Marvel,” Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) and Nick Fury (Jackson) are locked in a security room when Fury takes a piece of tape and lifts a fingerprint off his badge that the security guard had touched. He then uses that piece of tape on a fingerprint scanner… and the door magically opens.

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“It definitely wouldn’t be possible,” Horland said, explaining that there are two types of fingerprint scanners: optical scanners and capacitive scanners. Optical scanners uses tiny camera sensors to read the fingerprint’s valleys and ridges, while the capacitive scanner reads your fingerprint with thousands of electric sensors by sending multi currents through it.

“The reason that the tape wouldn’t work is because when you take a fingerprint with tape, you are just getting a layer of oil and skin cells,” Horland explained. “When you place it on the scanner, the valleys and the ridges of the print wouldn’t be deep enough, and it would be like placing nothing on the scanner… with the capacitive scanner, we encounter the same problem — the ridges and valleys aren’t deep enough.”

However, Castillo referenced an old MythBusters episode where Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage tried to get through a security door using a photocopy of his fingerprint, as well as melting Latex on their finger to get the print and using ballistics gel. All of those methods worked.

“It all depends on the kind of scanner they are using, of course,” Castillo said.

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“They were using an optical scanner in that test,” Horland added. “Optical scanners can be fooled with a good picture of the fingerprint. Oil definitely wouldn’t work on the tape.”

Horland and Castillo, both big Marvel fans, brought up another MCU film in which a character needed to get through a scanner: Scott Lang tricks a scanner in “Ant-Man” to get into a vault by using a gel imprint of Hank Pym’s fingerprint.

“That would work in theory because he got the ridges right,” Castillo explained.

Well, there you have it, folks — Fury and Danvers would’ve needed to find another way to get through that door!

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With over 30 years of theatrically released Marvel movies, it’s always a good a time to rank ‘em all, from “Howard the Duck” to this year’s “Black Panther,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” “Deadpool…

‘Captain Marvel’: Here Are All the Throwback Pop Culture References, From Trolls to ‘True Lies’

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(Potential spoiler alerts ahead: Proceed at your own risk.)

“Captain Marvel” is set in the 1990s, so be ready for a nostalgic ride back in time when Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) takes us to Earth.

As seen in the trailer, Larson’s Captain Marvel crashes through the roof of a now-extinct Blockbuster Video store. But that’s not all of antique — and some extinct — items and objects we see in the movie — and TheWrap is here to round ‘em up.

See below for all the references to pop culture in “Captain Marvel” — and yes, some of them are not from the ’90s, but even earlier.

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Pixabay

Toys

“Captain Marvel” is filled with toys reminiscent of the ’90s. We see a “Space Invaders” game, some Troll dolls, a “PacMan” machine as well as pinball machines, a Nerf gun, and even a Gameboy Color and a Koosh ball! A “Happy Days” lunchbox is instrumental in Danvers’ mission.

Movies and TV Shows

While Danvers is at Blockbuster, the racks are filled with amazing films from that era. “Babe” and “The Right Stuff” are scattered around the store, and there’s a “True Lies” cutout that Danvers accidentally fires at.

Later on in the film, Will Smith’s “The Fresh Prince of Bel Air” gets a mention.

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Technology

The step back in the technology used in “Captain Marvel” garnered chuckles from audiences, showing us once again how far we’ve come in just 20 years. There’s dial-up internet, an internet cafe (who remembers those?), an ancient version of Windows software, pagers and CD-ROMS!

Samuel L. Jackson’s Fury speaks about revealing his AOL password, and a Logitech webcam is used for security at a compound. The best part? The search engine of choice in the movie was AltaVista, a search engine that was one of the most-used early search engines before Google took over.

There’s an amazing part in the movie where Larson and her companions put in a CD-ROM into a brick of a computer and wait for it to load for what seems like hours. Danvers asks, “What’s happening?” Who remembers waiting — and waiting — for something to load when all you wanted to play was Oregon Trail? Yeah, we do.

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Culture

As mentioned before, Danvers crashes into the roof of a Blockbuster. She then asks an on-site security officer where she can find something to communicate to her home base with, at which point the security guard points her to, of course, a Radio Shack. The company was at its peak in the late ’90s until various bankruptcy issues and then announcing to close nearly all of its stores and focus on online buying.

You’ll also be able to see a “Rock the Vote” poster, and Danvers sports a NIN (Nine Inch Nails) t-shirt.

And once again, major spoiler alert so do not read this next sentence.

Stan Lee does make a cameo in this movie, and this time, he’s on an elevated train line reading a screenplay for the 1995 movie “Mallrats.” If you remember, Lee appeared in Kevin Smith’s film as himself, so this is a major throwback.

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(Major spoilers ahead for “Captain Marvel”)

“Captain Marvel” may not have provided much in the way of backstory setup for “Avengers: Endgame,” but its plot still made major waves in its own right for how it subverted expectations with its big twist — at least if you’re acquainted with the Mar-Vell character from the comics.

And no, I’m not talking about the choice to have Mar-Vell be played by a woman (Annette Bening) instead of a man, though that’s obviously a pretty cool change. I’m talking about the big twist, that the Kree are actually the bad guys and Carol Danvers’ (Brie Larson) Skrull foes are actually just refugees. And that Mar-Vell was working with them and against her Kree masters.

Mar-Vell, who may or may not have carried the Captain Marvel mantle before she was killed by Yon-Rogg (Jude Law) in 1989, was on Earth because that’s where the Tesseract was at that time — she was trying to develop what various characters refer to as a “lightspeed engine” though would, likely among other things, help the Skrull refugees led by Talos (Ben Mendolsohn) escape from the gaze of the Kree.

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That work would eventually result in Carol herself obtaining her powers — which, since said abilities are fueled by Tesseract energy, could be measures greater even than the ones she has in the comics. The Tesseract, of course, is the casing for the Infinity Stone known as the Space Stone.

But there’s a fascinating detail in “Captain Marvel” that could throw you for a loop: when we first see the Tesseract in the movie, it’s secreted away aboard a cloacked spaceship that Mar-Vell had been using as a laboratory. The film doesn’t explicitly explain why it was up there rather than at the human base where Mar-Vell worked while in disguise, but we can infer based on other movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and clues that “Captain Marvel” itself dropped.

It’s been a while, but you may recall how in the first “Captain America” movie the Tesseract was found by Hydra leader Red Skull (Hugo Weaving), and he used it to create a whole bunch of dastardly new weapons, including bombs that he was going to drop on every major world capital. But Captain America (Chris Evans) foiled that plan, and the Tesseract was briefly lost in the Atlantic Ocean, where Howard Stark found it.

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The next time we saw the Tesseract was in the first “Avengers” movie. At the beginning of that film the Tesseract was in the possession of SHIELD and the United States government at a base that housed Project Pegasus, which existed to study the Tesseract and attempt to harness its energy for various projects. Then Loki stole it and went on his rampage across the planet which culminated in the Battle of New York at the end of the movie.

An important detail in “Captain Marvel” that would be easy to miss is that the base that Mar-Vell worked at in 1989, and which Carol Danvers and Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) infiltrated in 1995, is none other than that same Project Pegasus base that we saw in “Avengers.”

So what we can infer, then, is that Mar-Vell, in disguise as Wendy Lawson, was able to simply take the Tesseract up to her space laboratory because she was in charge of Project Pegasus. It was probably a big deal that the Tesseract went missing for six years before being returned at the end of “Captain Marvel,” but it’s likely that project officials simply thought it had been destroyed in the crash that resulted in Mar-Vell’s death.

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At the end of the movie, in the post-credits stinger, Goose the Flerken puked up the Tesseract onto Nick Fury’s desk and Project Pegasus continued on until the events of “The Avengers.”

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‘Captain Marvel’ Soars With $20.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Captain Marvel,” Marvel’s first female-led superhero film, soared in its Thursday box office previews by earning an estimated $20.7 million. It opens nationwide this weekend on over 4,310 screens.

This total is the fifth biggest preview gross for any MCU title, behind only the “Avengers” films, “Black Panther” and “Captain America: Civil War.” The total also cracks it into the Top 20 of all time preview opening nights, nestled in between “Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince” and “Suicide Squad” at number 18.

Independent trackers have the MCU film projected for an opening of $145 million, with Disney projecting a more conservative $125 million. But by serving as a teaser for “Avengers: Endgame” in April after that film’s dramatic cliffhanger, “Captain Marvel” has its sights set high and hopes to go higher, further, faster than not just other female-led tentpole films but fly past other Marvel films and box office record holders.

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Analysts who spoke with TheWrap say that “Captain Marvel” could catch the opening from “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire,” which is currently the highest grossing film with a sole-female lead. That movie made a whopping $25.2 million in its Thursday previews before making $158 million in its opening weekend. The highest opening ever in March is Disney’s live-action remake of “Beauty and the Beast,” which did $16.3 million in previews and opened to $174.7 million domestically.

DC’s “Wonder Woman” is the second highest grossing film with a solo-female lead, and it’s the highest grossing female superhero film to date. Its Thursday preview numbers and its opening were more modest however, earning $11 million in Thursday previews ahead of a $103.2 million open. And compared to other Marvel movies, last year’s “Ant-Man and the Wasp” made $11.5 million in Thursday previews on its way to a $216 million open, and “Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2” did $17 million in its previews.

And internationally, the film has already earned $44 million from 18 material markets, not including China. It opens there Friday, and early estimates indicate an opening day of around $34 million, which would be the second highest MCU opening day in China behind only “Avengers: Infinity War.”

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Brie Larson stars in “Captain Marvel” as Vers, a member of the Kree empire’s elite intergalactic military unit Starforce. When she crash lands on Earth in the 1990s, her goal is to stop an invasion of shapeshifting aliens known as the Skrulls with the help of future SHIELD director Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). But along the way, she rediscovers memories that were believed to be erased, memories that reveal that she was once a human fighter pilot named Carol Danvers.

Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck directed “Captain Marvel” from a script they co-wrote with Geneva Robertson-Dworet. The film also stars Ben Mendelsohn, Djimon Hounsou, Lee Pace, Lashana Lynch, Gemma Chan, Annette Bening, Clark Gregg, and Jude Law. It currently has an 81 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

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‘Captain Marvel’: What the Hell Actually Is a Flerken?

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(Spoilers ahead for “Captain Marvel.”)

If you’ve seen “Captain Marvel,” then you know that one of the film’s standout characters is Goose, the adorable orange tabby that becomes fast friends with Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson).

Of course, we eventually find out that Goose isn’t a cat at all — it’s actually an alien creature called a “flerken.” So, uh, what the hell is a flerken anyway?

Created in 2014 by writer Kelly Sue DeConnick and artist David Lopez for “Captain Marvel” vol. 8, issue #1, flerkens are a very rare, apparently extremely kind of animal with human-level intellect that just happens to look indistinguishable from earth cats. They’re also able to do some really freaky things.

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For starters, they lay eggs and can reproduce asexually, and in great quantities. (More on that below.) They also hide a giant maw of tendrils, fangs and tentacles in their mouths that can gobble up just about anything they want. It’s pretty gross.

But the weirdest thing of all is that flerkens have a pocket dimension in their mouth that can store anything they want for easy access. Think of them as the cat version of the TARDIS from “Doctor Who”: they’re much bigger on the inside than they are on the outside. By the way, this pocket dimension also, apparently, gives them the ability to teleport.

Their only major weakness is that all of their special powers originate in their mouth-area. So all you have to do to disable a flerken is muzzle it.

Like the movie version, the first flerken encountered —  named “Chewie” instead of “Goose” — was mistaken for an ordinary cat for years. Created by writer Brian Reed and artist Roberto De La Torre in 2006, Chewie was simply Carol Danvers’ pet cat back when she still used the superhero name “Ms. Marvel.” She didn’t seem out of the ordinary except for being maybe a little smarter than most cats.

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But after she adopted the Captain Marvel persona, Carol decided to explore the universe in a cool space ship, and took Chewie with her. Very quickly after she encounters the Guardians of the Galaxy and Rocket Raccoon, freaking out about the fact that there’s a flerken aboard, tries to kill Chewie before she can lay eggs — it’s implied that flerkens have been hunted to near extinction. Carol protects Chewie and insists she’s a regular cat but, lo and behold, Chewie lays 117 eggs all at once. (Don’t worry: Once hatched, Carol took the babies to an alien wildlife sanctuary, and Chewie chose to continue traveling the galaxy with her.)

In “Captain Marvel” the movie, Goose was actually the animal companion of “Marvel” (Annette Bening), encountered by Carol and Nick Fury and absolutely adored by Fury. She ends up tagging along with them on the rest of their adventures and, just like in the comics, is recognized for what she is immediately by the aliens who see her. We also get to see a little bit of those other powers when she gobbles up a couple of enemies, and then manages to swallow the Tesseract without being destroyed.

It turns out that t he movie version of flerkens also have an additional power that, so far, hasn’t been seen in the comics — powerful venom that necrotizes the afflicted area. Poor Nick Fury learned this first hand when he accidentally scared Goose, who lightly scratched his eye. And now we know how Fury ended up with his cool eyepatch.

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(Spoilers ahead for the ending of “Captain Marvel”)

Heading into “Captain Marvel” and “Avengers: Endgame,” we had some questions about Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) inspired by the post-credits stinger in “Infinity War.” But there are two that are most pressing. Where the hell is she? And if Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) knows her and is able to call her for help, then why hasn’t he done that already?

And yet after having watched “Captain Marvel” we still don’t know the answers to those questions — they’ll have to come in “Avengers: Endgame” in April if they do at all. But just because we don’t know that doesn’t mean we can’t make some guesses.

So at the end of “Captain Marvel,” there are two relevant scenes. The first sees Carol return a pager to Fury that she took from him earlier in the movie, but with some modifications. Now, she says, he should be able to contact her if she’s within “two or three galaxies” from Earth. She tells Fury he should use it for “emergencies only,” though she doesn’t specify what constitutes an emergency. And that’s that.

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And in the second, she uses her newly-unlocked powers — which it turns out she received from the Tesseract, AKA the Space infinity stone — to physically move the star cruiser that carrying Skrull refugees out of our solar system and toward an unknown location. And that is also that.

Carol’s explanation for the pager does provide a potential reason why Fury didn’t called her in to help when Loki (Tom Hiddleston) invaded New York with his Chitauri forces, or when Ultron tried to kill everyone on Earth — maybe he did try to use the pager but she was somewhere the pager couldn’t reach.

That is somewhat more plausible than it may initially sound. The Kree Empire is actually based in the Large Magellanic Cloud rather than the Milky Way, and the Kree are clearly capable of traveling to other galaxies since they do so in “Captain Marvel.” So in order to take the Skrull refugees someplace the Kree can’t get to them, they would  have to go beyond the Milky Way.

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And maybe they even ended up traveling to a different plane of existence to find shelter, like the Quantum Realm. Despite the totally out there way it’s depicted in the “Ant-Man” movies, the Quantum Realm is in fact home to entire civilizations — in the comics it’s called the Microverse and it’s more or less just another place in the universe. Though communication between our world and the Quantum Realm is clearly possible (as we see in “Ant-Man and the Wasp”), Fury’s pager may not be equipped for that.

It’s possible that Carol could travel to the Quantum Realm because her powers in the MCU came from the Tesseract. If any Infinity Stone could allow travel to the Quantum Realm it would be the one that can open wormholes to anywhere in the universe. And I previously speculated that the film version of Carol Danvers might obtain some of the powers of the quantum-powered superhero Quasar, who is able to tunnel from our universe to a place he calls the Quantum Zone as a sort of shortcut when he’s traveling from planet to planet. That method of faster-than-light travel is not exclusive to Quasar in the comics — the Fantastic Four travels that way as well — and so the “lightspeed engine” thing that Mar-Vell was trying to use the Tesseract to create in 1989 could also work that way.

You can read plenty more about why I think Quasar’s dimension-hopping abilities are relevant right here.

As for why Carol wouldn’t have at least poked her head back in to check on Earth every once in a while, that would depend on what kind of adventures she got into while out wherever she took the Skrulls. We were vaguely expecting that the plot of “Captain Marvel” could tie into Thanos’ backstory in some way — both because Mar-Vell and Thanos were arch-enemies in the comics and because you’d think there would be a reason for placing this movie where it is on the calendar — it’s conceivable that Carol has some kind of run-in with Thanos while she’s escorting the Skrulls around the universe. Thanos’ Sanctuary is purposefully hidden in a remote corner of the cosmos, so Carol could try to hide the Skrulls there only to be met with a rude purple surprise.

If that’s the case, then that bit of history would likely be explored in “Endgame.” But that’s really just a wild guess since “Captain Marvel” doesn’t hint at anything like that. But given how crucial the Quantum Realm appears poised to be in “Endgame,” Carol spending some time down there in this two-decade interlude seems like a distinct possibility.

Now of course, the real world answer to where Carol was and why Fury didn’t call her during, say, the Chitauri invasion, is that Captain Marvel was not among the heroes Marvel Studios wanted to highlight in the first two phases of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. But once, four years ago, they decided to pull the trigger, they scheduled “Captain Marvel” for the interlude between “Infinity War” and “Endgame,” or as it was known at the time, “Infinity War part 2.”

It’s easy to assume that this means Marvel had a specific reason for introducing her at that point in time. And, if you follow that thread, once they decided to set the movie in 1995 they would have come up with an explanation for where she’s been this whole time. Here’s hoping we’ll get one come April.

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‘Captain Marvel’ Mid-Credits Scene Explained

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(Spoilers ahead, obviously, for the end of “Captain Marvel.”)

In standard fashion for the Marvel Cinematic Universe, “Captain Marvel” does contain some extra content after the credits. Every single MCU movie has had something extra for fans after the credits roll, and in the last few years there’s usually two extra bits (or more than two, in the case of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”). “Captain Marvel” doesn’t buck that trend, but it does buck tradition with regards to what kind of content those scenes typically contain.

The standard thing at this point is for each movie to have two bonus bits — one being a tease for an upcoming MCU movie during the middle of the credits, and the other being a funny little extra at the very end. There are exceptions, like how “Avengers: Infinity War” having only one extra scene at the very end of the credits showing Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) putting out a distress call to Captain Marvel (Brie Larson).

“Captain Marvel” bucks the norm by not just teasing an upcoming film, but actually containing a scene from it. Some past movies have done this before — “Ant-Man” had a scene from “Captain America: Civil War,” and “Doctor Strange” showed us part of Strange’s appearance in “Thor: Ragnarok” — but it doesn’t happen often. Usually the bonus content during or after the credits is unique.

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But for “Captain Marvel,” they straight up put in a scene from “Avengers: Endgame” as the mid-credits scene. This is apparently the scene in which some of the surviving Avengers — Captain America (Chris Evans), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), War Machine (Don Cheadle) and Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo) specifically — meet Carol Danvers for the first time. This is not, I repeat, just a look ahead at “Endgame.” This is actually a scene from that movie.

The scene shows us that our heroes have retrieved Nick Fury’s pager and have plugged it into some kind of array, but they have no idea what its purpose is. Judging by the fact that they’re all staring at screens counting the casualties of the snap, with those numbers going up in realtime as they watch, this scene happens fairly soon after the snap.

At the beginning of the scene, the pager shuts off, an upsetting development since they know the thing is important even if they don’t know who it’s trying to contact. So they’re about to try to figure out what’s wrong with it when, out of nowhere, Carol appears in the room, asking where Fury is.

It’ll be interesting to find out what exactly happened there. Did Carol just materialize out of thin air? Did she teleport in from someplace far away? Neither of those things are abilities she demonstrated she had in “Captain Marvel,” but 24 years is a long time to hone your abilities. So we’ll see.

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Does ‘Captain Marvel’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

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It’s been a long and painful wait for “Captain Marvel” since “Ant-Man and the Wasp” last summer — the longest gap between movies in the Marvel Cinematic Universe in years — but that wait is finally over. Finally.

It’s been quite a weird wait, too, because of how dramatically “Avengers: Infinity War” upended the entire MCU when Thanos snapped his fingers and wiped out half of all life in the universe. We’ve been chomping at the bit for any kind of info about what’s coming next in “Avengers: Endgame” in April — and while “Captain Marvel” doesn’t directly tie into the fight against Thanos in “Infinity War” and “Endgame,” it does set up Carol Danvers as a character. And that’s a very good thing because she’s going to be taking center stage in “Endgame.”

So if you’re here reading this article, you have one and only one question: does “Captain Marvel” deliver what is at this point is the standard Marvel movie experience by delivering a bonus scene or two during or after the credits? Does it have a post-credits scene?

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The answer is yes, “Captain Marvel” does contain two extra scenes, one that comes midway through the credits and another at the very end of the credits. You’ll definitely want to stick around for at least the mid-credits scene, which provides a brief glimpse at “Avengers: Endgame.” The extra scene at the end of the credits is more of a non-essential but hilarious bonus — if you’re really gotta get out of there, you won’t be missing any hugely crucial bit of content.

If you don’t wanna know any of the details for these bonus scenes, you should close this tab now.

Yes, we are saying there are spoilers ahead for the mid- and post-credits scenes in “Captain Marvel.”

You have been warned.

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So the first extra scene, which comes at the break between the cool animated first stage of the credits and the actual credits scroll, is what appears to be an actual scene from “Avengers: Endgame.” It’s a scene we’ve seen pieces of before, back in the first trailer in December.

It begins with Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo), Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), Natasha Romanov (Scarlett Johansson) and Colonel James Rhodes (Don Cheadle) hanging out in Avengers HQ surveying the aftermath of the finger snap. It would appear that this scene takes place relatively soon after “Infinity War,” as we see a death counter that continues to rise as we watch.

Meanwhile, they’ve got Nick Fury’s (Samuel L. Jackson) beeper hooked up to some kind of device, and it’s sending its signal. But as we watch it turns itself off. Our heroes don’t know what the pager is doing, but they know it must be important so they try to get it started again. But before they’re able to do that Carol Danvers (Brie Larson) appears out of nowhere and asks, in a disturbed tone, where Fury is. And then the scene ends.

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There’s not much info to glean from that, beyond the fact that Carol seemed to appear out of thin air. It’s likely that this scene is condensed somewhat and that it will last longer in “Endgame,” but we do have to consider the possibility that Carol is actually able to materialize like that. Or teleport in.

Meanwhile, the end credits scene features scene stealer Goose the cat, who was revealed earlier in the movie to be a Flerken. Goose stumbles up to Nick Fury’s desk, starts heaving like he’s having a hairball, and then suddenly throws up the Tesseract (which he swallowed earlier on Mar-vell’s laboratory). This is, in the MCU tradition, is your more comedic bonus scene .

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Jimmy Kimmel’s mind went to the same exact place yours probably did when he heard that “Captain Marvel” takes place in the 1990s and co-stars a digitally de-aged Samuel L. Jackson. But don’t think we’re complaining.

“What Disney did to cut 25 years off Sam Jackson’s face, they really knocked this one out of the park,” Kimmel gushed before running a clip that mashed up a diner scene from “Captain Marvel” with the very celebrated final Act of “Pulp Fiction.”

Watch the clip from Tuesday’s episode below:

Thanks to the magic of CGI, @SamuelLJackson looks exactly like he did in 1995… #CaptainMarvel pic.twitter.com/Qv4lMVjqGq

— Jimmy Kimmel (@jimmykimmel) March 6, 2019

Frankly, we’d watch the hell out of that movie.

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In case you didn’t know, “Captain Marvel” is set in 1995 and teams its title hero, played by Brie Larson, with Jackson’s Nick Fury to reveal what amounts to the untold backstory for the entire Marvel Cinematic Universe so far. To accomplish this, Marvel made heavy use the de-aging visual effects it previously deployed in “Captain America: Civil War,” “Ant-Man” and “Ant-Man and The Wasp” to make Jackson look two decades younger.

But, for those of you wondering, “Captain Marvel” wisely shows restraint and though it’s chock full of ’90s references, it doesn’t make any obvious “Pulp Fiction” jokes. Though we’d have loved a “did I break your concentration?” moment.

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