‘The Hate U Give’ Stars Amandla Stenberg & Russell Hornsby On “The Talk” And Power Of Timely Drama – The Contenders NY

Based on the YA novel of the same name by Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give tackles relevant social issues that are not just applicable to young adults. The George Tillman Jr.-directed pic adapted by the late Audrey Wells follows the story of Starr as she …

Based on the YA novel of the same name by Angie Thomas, The Hate U Give tackles relevant social issues that are not just applicable to young adults. The George Tillman Jr.-directed pic adapted by the late Audrey Wells follows the story of Starr as she witnesses the killing of her best friend at the hands of a cop, making her face the pressure from her majority black neighborhood and her privileged majority white school to find her voice and stand up for what’s right. The…

‘The Hate U Give’: How the Emotional #BlackLivesMatter Drama Brought Its Cast Together

The story of a teenager’s burgeoning activism is making waves around the country — but for the cast, the revelations began much earlier.

The Hate U Give” is not your ordinary sentimental studio drama that rounds off the edges, designed for maximum uplift. Much credit goes to Angie Thomas’ edgy 2017 novel (whose title was inspired by Tupac Shakur’s “THUG LIFE”: “The Hate U Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody”), which remained on the New York Times Young Adult bestseller list for 50 weeks. That gave Fox 2000 chief Elizabeth Gabler the confidence to hew close to its gritty #BlackLivesMatter narrative about high schooler Starr (Amandla Stenberg), who finds her activist identity after witnessing a white police officer shoot and kill her childhood friend.

After its welcoming Toronto International Film Festival debut, “The Hate U Give” shot out of the gate in platform release — Fox is building word of mouth as it expands to more theaters — with rave reviews. But for the cast, the current success is just a natural extension of the galvanizing experience on set.

“This is what you get when we are able to tell our own stories our way,” said actor Russell Hornsby (“Fences,” “Seven Seconds”), who is generating Oscar talk for his fiercely tender role as Starr’s grocer father, Maverick. “We’re in this together, we want this to succeed. That’s rare. With this type of film, and the subject matter, you could botch it. Pull some punches. Take some teeth out of it. Dull it a little. People know when you are pulling the wool over their eyes. Young people will instantly tell everyone what’s real and not. They kept the authenticity.”

The film’s centerpiece is The Talk, when Maverick sits down his children and sternly directs  them to always put their hands on the car dashboard if a police officer pulls them over. Both Hornsby and filmmaker George Tillman, Jr. (“Soul Food,” “Men of Honor”) were raised by parents who made them well aware of the dangers of being a black man anywhere near white cops.

DF-08750_08789_R_COMP_CROP – Amandla Stenberg and Lamar Johnson in Twentieth Century Fox’s THE HATE U GIVE. Photo Credit: Erika Doss.

“The Hate U Give”

Photo Credit: ERIKA DOSS

Tillman pulled the project together smooth and fast after reading an early manuscript in January 2016, while directing an episode of “Luke Cage.” Having enjoyed an 18-year relationship with Fox 2000, he thought that Gabler would respond to the material. “It had edge and bite to it,” he said. “I knew the characters were there. You get into the police brutality, but the heart of it is this 16-year-old’s journey finding herself, and she is not ashamed of where she came from.”

At the same time, “Hunger Games” star and outspoken feminist Amandla Stenberg (who is now 19), had read the unpublished book and passionately pitched herself to Tillman for the role of Starr. “I never related to anything so hard,” said Stenberg in a phone interview, “in the timeless way it portrays #BlackLivesMatter and brings empathy and humanity to these experiences.”

A year later, after screenwriter Audrey Wells finished the 126-page script — sadly, she succumbed to cancer the day before the movie opened — Fox asked Stenberg to audition and commit. She did both. And it took three auditions to convince the studio that Hornsby, who usually plays lawyers and working professionals, would look natural in braids and tattoos. For the second audition, he showed up dressed for the part. The actor had played a range of roles in theater, but the Hollywood suits hadn’t seen them. “I’d done the work,” he said. “‘What are you talking about? I can do this!'”

THUG-002 – Amandla Stenberg stars in Twentieth Century Fox’s THE HATE U GIVE. Photo Credit: Erika Doss.

“The Hate U Give”

Photo Credit: ERIKA DOSS

Fox greenlit a $20-million movie to be shot in Atlanta, co-starring Regina Hall (“Support the Girls”) and “Detroit” star Algee Smith, with Common, Anthony Mackie, and Issa Rae.

Hornsby plays an ex-con who has built a life as a store owner and family man. “As a man he is strong and sturdy,” said Hornsby, “but he is also passionate and also tender and also gentle. He’s evolved.” In “The Hate U Give,” Maverick tells his daughter, “I want you to do better. I want to break the cycle.”

Tillman could relate. His father, who did not go to college, cried when he dropped him off at Chapman College, where Tillman fell in love with the French New Wave and Richard Lester on the way to learning his craft, first in Chicago and then Los Angeles.

Both Tillman and Stenberg related to Starr, a black teenager who straddles two identities: one at home with her family and friends in Garden Heights, another at Williamson Prep. Both had grown up in lower-income urban neighborhoods, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Inglewood in Los Angeles, respectively, and attended largely white private schools.

“Starr was very similar to me,” said Stenberg. “I was able to bring my own personal life experience, to make the dialogue and references authentic. I understood those dualities and complexities of how I present myself depending on the environment I was entering, in order to be accepted. A huge part of all that came from the book. I made sure to portray Starr in a way that wasn’t overly sanitized or stereotyped. She is so nuanced and real. It blew me out of the water, how she’s allowed to be so multidimensional in a way most black characters are not.”

DF-03394_R2 - Amandla Stenberg and Algee Smith in Twentieth Century Fox’s THE HATE U GIVE. Photo Credit: Erika Doss.

“The Hate U Give”

Photo Credit: ERIKA DOSS

The director organized a boot camp for his actors, giving them booklets with back stories for each character. “It’s called rehearsal,” said theater-trained Hornsby, while admitting that it’s not normal these days for a cast to get together for two-and-a-half weeks before shooting. This allowed Hornsby, Hall and Stenberg to bond as a family.

And it helped Hornsby to take on a mentor role for the younger actors, especially Stenberg. “He was constantly teaching me on set,” she said, “whether it was how to behave or navigate the industry or how to carry yourself and be grateful and professional, very much in the way a father would, never in a way that was demanding or reprimanding, always offering a guiding hand both creatively and professionally, from the moment we began rehearsals.”

During the film, Hornsby transitioned to being an elder statesman. “It’s no longer about me,” he said. “I have to be secure in my work and who I am and these young kids are looking for me to impart some wisdom, to be reassured. With Amandla, it was little things like reminding her to breathe; we’d talk about keeping everything simple.”

‘The Hate U Give’ Review: YA Adaptation With A Powerful, Timely Message Deserves To Be Seen And Heard

With more of an edge than most of today’s YA adaptations that tend to center on futuristic dystopian societies, director George Tillman Jr.’s effective The Hate U Give is set right in the heart of today’s real world in which young people fa…

With more of an edge than most of today's YA adaptations that tend to center on futuristic dystopian societies, director George Tillman Jr.’s effective The Hate U Give is set right in the heart of today’s real world in which young people face intensely difficult circumstances just living a normal existence. Angie Thomas’ best seller, nicely adapted by Audrey Wells (who sadly died today after a long battle with cancer), in some ways was ripped right out of the headlines…

‘The Hate U Give’ Film Review: Teen Drama Unflinchingly Examines Racism

In 2015, The New York Times posted a video called “A Conversation with My Black Son,” which discusses the fact that black parents in this country have to talk to their children about what to do and how to act when pulled over by the police. “The Hate U Give” begins with that same talk, as Maverick (Russell Hornsby, “Fences”) and Lisa Carter (Regina Hall) explain to their tween son and daughter that they are to put their hands on the dashboard, fingers spread, and answer all of the officer’s questions politely and directly.

It’s very practical advice when several years later, teenage Starr (Amandla Stenberg) sees a childhood friend shot and killed by a cop when the policeman mistakes the victim’s hairbrush for a gun. But even before this tragedy occurs, that opening scene makes its presence felt throughout the entire film. “The Hate U Give,” adapted by Audrey Wells (“Under the Tuscan Sun”) from the popular YA novel by Angie Thomas, often has the trappings of a teen movie — stolen kisses, prom dates — but the threat of random, uncontrolled violence at the hands of the police weighs down on everything.

That opening speech put a knot in my stomach for the entire running time of the film, and while that knot is a pale approximation of the ongoing PTSD many black Americans experience as a result of racial discrimination, the film’s narrative power is such that what could have been merely a message movie is something larger, an empathy-driven family drama about people living in a fractured country that is all too recognizable.

Watch Video: Amandla Stenberg Gets Woke in ‘The Hate U Give’ First Trailer

The shooting affects Starr in many ways, mainly by forcing a collision between the two worlds she travels through by constant code-switching. At her exclusive (and mostly white) prep school, she’s “Starr 2.0,” shrugging off casual racism, being overly pleasant and amenable, and never using any slang that a rapper would. At home in her working-class black neighborhood, she hides in plain sight in a hoodie and has no real intimate friends outside her family, although she does hang out with Kenya (Dominique Fishback, “The Deuce”), the half-sister of Starr’s half-brother Seven (Lamar Johnson, “Kings”).

Kenya takes Starr to a party where she runs into her old pal Khalil (Algee Smith, “Detroit”). As children, Starr and Khalil pretended to be “Harry Potter” characters, but now he’s supporting his addicted mother and cancer-stricken grandma by dealing drugs for King (Anthony Mackie), a local crime lord. When a fight breaks out at the party, Khalil whisks Starr out for a drive, but when they get pulled over and Khalil gets shot, she’s the one witness to the murder. Does she testify, jeopardizing her best-little-girl-in-the-world status at school and drawing King’s ire upon her and her family? Or does she remain quiet, allowing Khalil to be just another unarmed black teenager cut down in his prime without consequence?

Also Read: ‘Hate U Give’ Star Amandla Stenberg on Impact of Co-Star Kian Lawley’s Firing for Old Racist Clip

This isn’t a “who do I take to the prom” dilemma, and director George Tillman Jr. (“Notorious,” “Soul Food”) understands the ramifications of Starr’s plight, from police harassment of her family to the fact that her school friends (including K.J. Apa of “Riverdale” as her boyfriend) don’t always know what to say or how to respond to the shooting. (At one point, her classmates stage a walkout to protest police violence, but they mainly treat it as an opportunity to cut class.)

And while so many movies about race operate in a way to make as many viewers as comfortable as possible — usually by setting the story safely in the past, and presenting racism as the acts of select mean people rather than the result of endemic, structural, institutionalized oppression — “The Hate U Give” doesn’t provide that level of comfort. (Apa’s well-meaning character, while mocked for actually saying “I don’t see color,” is ultimately presented as not beyond redemption.)

Also Read: Kian Lawley Fired From Fox’s ‘The Hate U Give’ After YouTuber’s N-Word-Laced Clip Surfaces

“The Hate U Give” is one of the most emotional viewing experiences I’ve had in a long while, but it’s by no means a perfect movie. The big climax is overplayed, and the movie wants to eat its cake and have it too when it comes to the police and the prison system, opting for a compromise stance that will probably please neither the #BlueLivesMatter crowd nor those calling for more radical reforms of the criminal justice system.

These elements are far overshadowed by the film’s many triumphs, from the unilaterally excellent cast — Stenberg, Hall and Hornsby are heartbreaking, and Smith charms us with a character we only just get to know — to the sense of zeitgeist that permeates every frame. We’re universes away from the sanitized suburbia of so many adolescent dramas; this feels like the world outside our windows, with the same stakes and dangers.

This certainly isn’t the first movie to tackle the subject of police shootings; in recent years, there have been noteworthy narratives (“Fruitvale Station,” “Monsters and Men”) and hard-hitting documentaries (“Whose Streets,” “13th”) on the subject. But “The Hate U Give” is opening on more screens, and aiming younger, than anything that’s come before it. It’s powerful, provocative and devastating, blending the incisive power of dramatic emotion with the immediacy of the evening news.



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‘Where Hands Touch’ Film Review: Amandla Stenberg Packs Emotion in Earnest Holocaust Drama

‘Monsters and Men’ Film Review: Timely Race-Based Drama Centers on Controversial Killing

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‘Support the Girls’ Film Review: Regina Hall Uplifts Observant Workplace Comedy

In 2015, The New York Times posted a video called “A Conversation with My Black Son,” which discusses the fact that black parents in this country have to talk to their children about what to do and how to act when pulled over by the police. “The Hate U Give” begins with that same talk, as Maverick (Russell Hornsby, “Fences”) and Lisa Carter (Regina Hall) explain to their tween son and daughter that they are to put their hands on the dashboard, fingers spread, and answer all of the officer’s questions politely and directly.

It’s very practical advice when several years later, teenage Starr (Amandla Stenberg) sees a childhood friend shot and killed by a cop when the policeman mistakes the victim’s hairbrush for a gun. But even before this tragedy occurs, that opening scene makes its presence felt throughout the entire film. “The Hate U Give,” adapted by Audrey Wells (“Under the Tuscan Sun”) from the popular YA novel by Angie Thomas, often has the trappings of a teen movie — stolen kisses, prom dates — but the threat of random, uncontrolled violence at the hands of the police weighs down on everything.

That opening speech put a knot in my stomach for the entire running time of the film, and while that knot is a pale approximation of the ongoing PTSD many black Americans experience as a result of racial discrimination, the film’s narrative power is such that what could have been merely a message movie is something larger, an empathy-driven family drama about people living in a fractured country that is all too recognizable.

The shooting affects Starr in many ways, mainly by forcing a collision between the two worlds she travels through by constant code-switching. At her exclusive (and mostly white) prep school, she’s “Starr 2.0,” shrugging off casual racism, being overly pleasant and amenable, and never using any slang that a rapper would. At home in her working-class black neighborhood, she hides in plain sight in a hoodie and has no real intimate friends outside her family, although she does hang out with Kenya (Dominique Fishback, “The Deuce”), the half-sister of Starr’s half-brother Seven (Lamar Johnson, “Kings”).

Kenya takes Starr to a party where she runs into her old pal Khalil (Algee Smith, “Detroit”). As children, Starr and Khalil pretended to be “Harry Potter” characters, but now he’s supporting his addicted mother and cancer-stricken grandma by dealing drugs for King (Anthony Mackie), a local crime lord. When a fight breaks out at the party, Khalil whisks Starr out for a drive, but when they get pulled over and Khalil gets shot, she’s the one witness to the murder. Does she testify, jeopardizing her best-little-girl-in-the-world status at school and drawing King’s ire upon her and her family? Or does she remain quiet, allowing Khalil to be just another unarmed black teenager cut down in his prime without consequence?

This isn’t a “who do I take to the prom” dilemma, and director George Tillman Jr. (“Notorious,” “Soul Food”) understands the ramifications of Starr’s plight, from police harassment of her family to the fact that her school friends (including K.J. Apa of “Riverdale” as her boyfriend) don’t always know what to say or how to respond to the shooting. (At one point, her classmates stage a walkout to protest police violence, but they mainly treat it as an opportunity to cut class.)

And while so many movies about race operate in a way to make as many viewers as comfortable as possible — usually by setting the story safely in the past, and presenting racism as the acts of select mean people rather than the result of endemic, structural, institutionalized oppression — “The Hate U Give” doesn’t provide that level of comfort. (Apa’s well-meaning character, while mocked for actually saying “I don’t see color,” is ultimately presented as not beyond redemption.)

“The Hate U Give” is one of the most emotional viewing experiences I’ve had in a long while, but it’s by no means a perfect movie. The big climax is overplayed, and the movie wants to eat its cake and have it too when it comes to the police and the prison system, opting for a compromise stance that will probably please neither the #BlueLivesMatter crowd nor those calling for more radical reforms of the criminal justice system.

These elements are far overshadowed by the film’s many triumphs, from the unilaterally excellent cast — Stenberg, Hall and Hornsby are heartbreaking, and Smith charms us with a character we only just get to know — to the sense of zeitgeist that permeates every frame. We’re universes away from the sanitized suburbia of so many adolescent dramas; this feels like the world outside our windows, with the same stakes and dangers.

This certainly isn’t the first movie to tackle the subject of police shootings; in recent years, there have been noteworthy narratives (“Fruitvale Station,” “Monsters and Men”) and hard-hitting documentaries (“Whose Streets,” “13th”) on the subject. But “The Hate U Give” is opening on more screens, and aiming younger, than anything that’s come before it. It’s powerful, provocative and devastating, blending the incisive power of dramatic emotion with the immediacy of the evening news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Where Hands Touch' Film Review: Amandla Stenberg Packs Emotion in Earnest Holocaust Drama

'Monsters and Men' Film Review: Timely Race-Based Drama Centers on Controversial Killing

37 Fall Movies to Obsess Over, From 'Halloween' to 'Mary Poppins Returns' (Photos)

'Support the Girls' Film Review: Regina Hall Uplifts Observant Workplace Comedy

New ‘Creed II’ Trailer: Michael B Jordan Takes on the Fight of His Life (Video)

Michael B. Jordan is taking on the fight of his life in a new trailer for “Creed II.”

In the trailer, Adonis Creed (Jordan) has to decide whether he wants to fight Viktor Drago (Florian Munteanu), the son of Ivan Drago, who infamously killed his father, Apollo Creed, in the ring years before, in “Rocky IV.”

Meanwhile, his family is struggling with his decision, as is Adonis’ mentor Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), who of course remembers Apollo dying in his arms.

Also Read: Michael B Jordan to Play Tom Clancy’s John Clark in Paramount Film Series

“If we don’t do what we love, then we wouldn’t exist,” Jordan says in the trailer.

Stallone also wrote the new movie and produced along with Kevin King-Templeton, Charles Winkler, William Chartoff, David Winkler and Irwin Winkler. Executive producers include Ryan Coogler, who directed the 2015 hit “Creed,” along with Jordan and Guy Riedel.

See Video: ‘Creed II’ Trailer: Michael B Jordan Preps for a Showdown With a New Drago

The film, directed by Steven Caple Jr., also stars Tessa Thompson, Wood Harris, Russell Hornsby, Andre Ward, Phylicia Rashad and Dolph Lundgren.

The movie hits theaters Nov. 21.

Watch the video above.

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Michael B. Jordan is taking on the fight of his life in a new trailer for “Creed II.”

In the trailer, Adonis Creed (Jordan) has to decide whether he wants to fight Viktor Drago (Florian Munteanu), the son of Ivan Drago, who infamously killed his father, Apollo Creed, in the ring years before, in “Rocky IV.”

Meanwhile, his family is struggling with his decision, as is Adonis’ mentor Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), who of course remembers Apollo dying in his arms.

“If we don’t do what we love, then we wouldn’t exist,” Jordan says in the trailer.

Stallone also wrote the new movie and produced along with Kevin King-Templeton, Charles Winkler, William Chartoff, David Winkler and Irwin Winkler. Executive producers include Ryan Coogler, who directed the 2015 hit “Creed,” along with Jordan and Guy Riedel.

The film, directed by Steven Caple Jr., also stars Tessa Thompson, Wood Harris, Russell Hornsby, Andre Ward, Phylicia Rashad and Dolph Lundgren.

The movie hits theaters Nov. 21.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Florian Munteanu to Get in the Ring With Michael B. Jordan in 'Creed 2'

'Creed II': This MMA Fighter Really Wants to Play Ivan Drago's Son

How 'Creed' Director Ryan Coogler Brought 'Rocky' Back to Life

Amandla Stenberg Gets Woke in ‘The Hate U Give’ First Trailer (Video)

Amandla Stenberg gets woke in the first trailer for director George Tillman Jr.’s Black Lives Matter-themed drama “The Hate U Give.”

Stenberg stars as Starr Carter, a young woman who is constantly switching between two worlds: the poor, mostly black, neighborhood where she lives and the rich, mostly white, prep school she attends.

The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a white police officer. Now, facing pressures from all sides of the community, Starr must find her voice and stand up for what’s right.

Also Read: ‘Hate U Give’ Star Amandla Stenberg on Impact of Co-Star Kian Lawley’s Firing for Old Racist Clip

Audrey Wells adapted the critically acclaimed New York Times best-seller by Angie Thomas. The film also stars Regina Hall, Russell Hornsby, Issa Rae, K.J. Apa, Algee Smith, Sabrina Carpenter, Common and Anthony Mackie.

Robert Teitel, George Tillman, Jr., Marty Bowen and Wyck Godfrey produced.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amandla Stenberg’s ‘The Hate U Give’ Gets Fall Release Date

Kian Lawley Fired From Fox’s ‘The Hate U Give’ After YouTuber’s N-Word-Laced Clip Surfaces

Amandla Stenberg gets woke in the first trailer for director George Tillman Jr.’s Black Lives Matter-themed drama “The Hate U Give.”

Stenberg stars as Starr Carter, a young woman who is constantly switching between two worlds: the poor, mostly black, neighborhood where she lives and the rich, mostly white, prep school she attends.

The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a white police officer. Now, facing pressures from all sides of the community, Starr must find her voice and stand up for what’s right.

Audrey Wells adapted the critically acclaimed New York Times best-seller by Angie Thomas. The film also stars Regina Hall, Russell Hornsby, Issa Rae, K.J. Apa, Algee Smith, Sabrina Carpenter, Common and Anthony Mackie.

Robert Teitel, George Tillman, Jr., Marty Bowen and Wyck Godfrey produced.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amandla Stenberg's 'The Hate U Give' Gets Fall Release Date

Kian Lawley Fired From Fox's 'The Hate U Give' After YouTuber's N-Word-Laced Clip Surfaces

‘The Hate U Give’ Trailer: Amandla Stenberg Finds Empowering Voice In Adaptation Of Angie Thomas Novel

Considering the social climate and the mistreatment and unlawful murder of Black men, the story behind 20th Century Fox’s The Hate U Give is wildly — and regrettably — similar to the reality making headlines.
Directed by George Tillma…

Considering the social climate and the mistreatment and unlawful murder of Black men, the story behind 20th Century Fox’s The Hate U Give is wildly — and regrettably — similar to the reality making headlines. Directed by George Tillman, The Hate U Give follows Starr Carter (Amandla Stenberg) who is constantly switching between two worlds: the poor, mostly black, neighborhood where she lives and the rich, mostly white, prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between…

Film News Roundup: Russell Hornsby Joins ‘Creed’ Sequel for MGM-Warner Bros.

In today’s film news roundup, “Creed II” rounds out its cast, the African American Film Critics Association starts a screening series with American Cinematheque and Sundance award winner Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers begins shooting her first feature. CASTINGS “Fences” star Russell Hornsby has joined Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone in MGM-Warner Bros.’ “Creed II,” which began […]

In today’s film news roundup, “Creed II” rounds out its cast, the African American Film Critics Association starts a screening series with American Cinematheque and Sundance award winner Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers begins shooting her first feature. CASTINGS “Fences” star Russell Hornsby has joined Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone in MGM-Warner Bros.’ “Creed II,” which began […]

Russell Hornsby Joins ‘Creed II’; Melvin Gregg Cast In ‘High Flying Bird’

Russell Hornsby, last seen on the big screen in the Denzel Washington-directed Oscar-nominated film, Fences, has been cast in Warner Bros/MGM’s Creed II, starring Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone, reprising their roles of Adonis Creed and Rocky Balboa respectively. Production is officially underway with director Steven Caple Jr. at the helm and Ryan Coogler, who directed the first film, serving as an executive producer. The film continues to follow Adonis who is…

Russell Hornsby, last seen on the big screen in the Denzel Washington-directed Oscar-nominated film, Fences, has been cast in Warner Bros/MGM’s Creed II, starring Michael B. Jordan and Sylvester Stallone, reprising their roles of Adonis Creed and Rocky Balboa respectively. Production is officially underway with director Steven Caple Jr. at the helm and Ryan Coogler, who directed the first film, serving as an executive producer. The film continues to follow Adonis who is…

Regina King Talks Heaviness of Role in ‘Seven Seconds’

The cast of “Seven Seconds” shared the difficulties that accompany tackling a story about the killing of a young, black man. At the premiere in Beverly Hills, Calif., star Regina King said the heavy emotions she displays in each of the 10 episodes was a challenge. “As an actor, having to carry that much grief […]

The cast of “Seven Seconds” shared the difficulties that accompany tackling a story about the killing of a young, black man. At the premiere in Beverly Hills, Calif., star Regina King said the heavy emotions she displays in each of the 10 episodes was a challenge. “As an actor, having to carry that much grief […]

‘The Affair’: Russell Hornsby, Tim Matheson & Dina Meyer Set To Recur On Showtime Drama Series

Grimm alum Russell Hornsby, Tim Matheson (Hart of Dixie) and Dina Meyer (Kingdom) are set to recur on the upcoming fourth season of Showtime’s The Affair.
Created by Sarah Treem and Hagai Levi, The Affair explores the emotional and psychological effects of an affair that destroyed two marriages and the crime that brings these individuals back together, as told through multiple perspectives.
Season 4 finds Noah (Dominic West), Helen (Maura Tierney), Alison (Ruth Wilson)…

Grimm alum Russell Hornsby, Tim Matheson (Hart of Dixie) and Dina Meyer (Kingdom) are set to recur on the upcoming fourth season of Showtime’s The Affair. Created by Sarah Treem and Hagai Levi, The Affair explores the emotional and psychological effects of an affair that destroyed two marriages and the crime that brings these individuals back together, as told through multiple perspectives. Season 4 finds Noah (Dominic West), Helen (Maura Tierney), Alison (Ruth Wilson)…

‘Fences’ Trailer Shows Denzel Washington’s Family Falling Apart (Video)

In the new trailer for Paramount’s “Fences,” Denzel Washington’s family falls apart as his son strives for independence while his wife, played by Viola Davis, tries to hold it all together.

The film, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning August Wilson play of the same name, follows a black family in 1950s Pittsburgh.

Troy (Washington) is the head of the household, but is bitter about his life working as a trash collector. His son, Cory (Jovan Adepo), dreams of a better life but gets nothing but disdain from his father. Throughout it all, Troy’s wife, Rose (Davis), tries to hold everything together.

Also Read: ‘Fences’ Review: Denzel Washington and Viola Davis Take Center Stage

The film also stars Mykelti Williamson, Saniyya Sidney, Russell Hornsby and Stephen Henderson.

Washington directed and produced the film in addition to starring. Molly Allen, Kim Roth, Charles King, Eli Bush, Jason Cloth, and Aaron L. Gilbert executive produced.

Scott Rudin and Todd Black also produced. Paramount Pictures produced in association with Bron Creative and Macro Media.

Also Read: First ‘Fences’ Screening Turns Into Love Fest for Denzel Washington Drama

“Fences” will open in theaters on Dec. 25.

Watch the trailer above.

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Denzel Washington Clashes With Viola Davis in First ‘Fences’ Trailer (Video)

In the new trailer for Paramount’s “Fences,” Denzel Washington’s family falls apart as his son strives for independence while his wife, played by Viola Davis, tries to hold it all together.

The film, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning August Wilson play of the same name, follows a black family in 1950s Pittsburgh.

Troy (Washington) is the head of the household, but is bitter about his life working as a trash collector. His son, Cory (Jovan Adepo), dreams of a better life but gets nothing but disdain from his father. Throughout it all, Troy’s wife, Rose (Davis), tries to hold everything together.

The film also stars Mykelti Williamson, Saniyya Sidney, Russell Hornsby and Stephen Henderson.

Washington directed and produced the film in addition to starring. Molly Allen, Kim Roth, Charles King, Eli Bush, Jason Cloth, and Aaron L. Gilbert executive produced.

Scott Rudin and Todd Black also produced. Paramount Pictures produced in association with Bron Creative and Macro Media.

“Fences” will open in theaters on Dec. 25.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Could 'Fences' and 'Hidden Figures' Replace #OscarsSoWhite With #OscarsSoBlack?

Viola Davis Opts Out of Brutal Best Actress Race to Campaign in Supporting Category for 'Fences'

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‘Seven Seconds’: Russell Hornsby, Raul Castillo & Zackary Momoh Cast In Netflix Series

With NBC’s Grimm wrapping production soon on its sixth and final season, co-star Russell Hornsby has lined up his next series gig, a regular role in the 10-episode Netflix crime drama Seven Seconds. Also cast in the series, from The Killing creator Veena Sud and Fox 21 TV Studios, are Looking alum Raul Castillo and British actor Zackary Momoh (A United Kingdom).
Written by Sud, Seven Seconds is based on the 2013 Russian action movie The Major (Майор). Tensions run high…

With NBC’s Grimm wrapping production soon on its sixth and final season, co-star Russell Hornsby has lined up his next series gig, a regular role in the 10-episode Netflix crime drama Seven Seconds. Also cast in the series, from The Killing creator Veena Sud and Fox 21 TV Studios, are Looking alum Raul Castillo and British actor Zackary Momoh (A United Kingdom). Written by Sud, Seven Seconds is based on the 2013 Russian action movie The Major (Майор). Tensions run high…