IFC Films Co-President & Indie Film Champion Jonathan Sehring To Step Down

EXCLUSIVE: Marking the end of a remarkable four decade run at its parent company, IFC Films co-president Jonathan Sehring is stepping down at year end. The decision is his, and he will take some time for himself, but retains the right to do other thing…

EXCLUSIVE: Marking the end of a remarkable four decade run at its parent company, IFC Films co-president Jonathan Sehring is stepping down at year end. The decision is his, and he will take some time for himself, but retains the right to do other things in the indie film space where he has been an important figure for years. The affable Long Islander helped launch the Independent Film Channel in 1994 and later created IFC Films. Stepping up to lead IFC Films into the…

Richard Linklater to Write and Direct Biopic on Texas Comedian Bill Hicks for Focus Features

Both raised in Houston, the indie filmmaker always admired the controversial comedian who died young but left a lasting legacy.

Richard Linklater’s love affair with Texas is still going strong. The beloved indie filmmaker has reportedly signed on to direct a biopic about controversial comedian Bill Hicks for Focus Features, Collider reports.

Although Hicks may be an unknown name to some, the Houston-raised comedian was a huge influence on Linklater growing up, and was deeply admired by his contemporaries in stand-up comedy, including his friend Denis Leary. Tragically, Hicks died young at age 32 from pancreatic cancer. Before his death in 1994, Hicks achieved widespread acclaim for his controversial act, which used dark comedy to tackle social issues of the day. In the years following his death, his legacy has lived on as he has developed a devoted cult following.

“There’s not quite any others like him … It’s a rare combination of that kind of intelligence, mysticism, political, you know… his politics, his angle, it’s pretty unique,” Linklater told Collider. “I always think, what would Bill Hicks be doing? You just miss him.”

Linklater is of course best known for the “Before Sunset” trilogy and the Oscar-nominated “Boyhood.” Hicks was apparently a fan of the 1993 film that put Linklater on the map, “Dazed and Confused.”

Linklater will write and direct the feature film for Focus Features. The report did not specify whether this film will be Linklater’s next project, though it did indicate that the status of a forthcoming movie about the moon landing was up in the air. Linklater’s newest film with Annapurna Pictures, “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” is set to hit theaters on March 22, 2019. The film stars Cate Blanchett, Kristen Wiig, and Laurence Fishburne and is based on a novel by Maria Semple.

A 2009 documentary about Hicks, entitled “American: The Bill Hicks Story,” based on interviews with friends and family, premiered at SXSW in 2010 and was warmly received by critics and audiences alike.

Richard Linklater Directing Biopic on Comedian Bill Hicks for Focus

Richard Linklater will write and direct an untitled film based on the life of comedian Bill Hicks for Focus Features. Hicks was raised as a Southern Baptist and began performing comedy in the late 1970s in Texas. He toured extensively during the 1980s,…

Richard Linklater will write and direct an untitled film based on the life of comedian Bill Hicks for Focus Features. Hicks was raised as a Southern Baptist and began performing comedy in the late 1970s in Texas. He toured extensively during the 1980s, specializing in dark humor and social commentary. A typical joke: “I never […]

Richard Linklater’s New Ad Questions Ted Cruz’s Love of Texas Because of His Odd Fast Food Choices — Watch

Ted Cruz prefers White Castle over the hamburger chain Whataburger, which is essentially unheard of in Texas.

Richard Linklater isn’t letting Ted Cruz off the hook. On the heels of an October 8 advertisement in which Linklater questioned whether or not Cruz was “tough as Texas,” as his political slogan claims, the director has released a second anti-Cruz political ad on behalf of the Fire Ted Cruz PAC that asks whether or not Cruz truly loves Texas or not. Texas senator Cruz is seeking re-election this November against Democrat Beto O’Rourke.

Cruz dissed O’Rourke earlier this year by referring to the democrat as a “Triple Meat Whataburger liberal who is out of touch with Texas values.” O’Rourke responded by taking a video of himself ordering food at a Texas Whataburger following a September debate against Cruz. Linklater’s new ad, once again starring his “Bernie” actor Sonny Carl Davis, plays directly into the feud.

“Everybody I know in Texas likes Whataburger,” Sonny says in the ad. Linklater then cuts to footage of Cruz declaring his love of White Castle burgers.

“There’s not a White Castle within 900 miles of Texas, Ted,” Davis says. “Uh, maybe up in Canada, huh? But not in Texas.”

Watch Linklater’s latest “Fire Ted Cruz” advertisement in the video below.

Richard Linklater Ad Calls Out Ted Cruz for Not Being ‘Tough as Texas’ and Letting Trump Bully Him — Watch

The filmmaker reunites with one of his “Bernie” stars to take aim at the Texas senator in a bold new anti-Ted Cruz advertisement.

Filmmaker Richard Linklater has thrown his hat into the political ring by directing a new anti-Ted Cruz advertisement. The video launched October 8 and is sponsored by the Fire Ted Cruz PAC. Texas senator Cruz is seeking re-election this November over Democrat Beto O’Rourke.

The advertisement, “Is Ted Cruz ‘Tough as Texas?,'” reunites Linklater with Sonny Carl Davis, who appeared in a small role in the director’s 2011 movie “Bernie.” Davis sits at a diner table and mocks Cruz and his “Tough as Texas” campaign slogan. “Somebody left something on my door the other day that said, ‘Ted Cruz: tough as Texas.’ If somebody called my wife a dog, and said my daddy was in on the Kennedy assassination, I wouldn’t be kissin’ their ass.”

Davis is referring to the fact that Cruz continues to support Donald Trump despite being consistently bullied by Trump when the two competed against each other to be the Republican presidential nominee. Trump made a series of comments about Cruz’s wife, Heidi, and supported a conspiracy theory placing Cruz’s father with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before President Kennedy’s death.

The ad ends with Davis saying that if Cruz really was tough as Texas, he would “stick [his] finger in their chest and give them a few choice words. Or you drag their ass out by the woodshed and kick their ass.”

Linklater is a born and raised Texan and continues to live and make films in Austin. Watch the advertisement in the video below.

‘Dazed and Confused’ Stars: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

As Richard Linklater‘s “Everybody Wants Some!!” opens to acclaim, TheWrap looks back to the director’s 1993 stoner comedy “Dazed and Confused”

As Richard Linklater‘s “Everybody Wants Some!!” opens to acclaim, TheWrap looks back to the director’s 1993 stoner comedy “Dazed and Confused”

‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Why Parker Posey Knew Matthew McConaughey Would Be a Star

Pinned to makeup artist Jean Black’s mirror on the set of “Dazed and Confused” were several Polaroid pictures of some of the actors in the film. As star Parker Posey described it in her book, one of the photos looked like “Ted Nugent meets daredevil Evel Knievel and just as gorgeous as Jesus Christ.”

That was Matthew McConaughey.

“What can I say but ‘Wow,’” Posey wrote in her book “You’re on an Airplane.” “We screamed at how genius his whole look was. That guy! Yes!”

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got ‘Alright, Alright, Alright’

Posey pointed TheWrap to the section in her book when we spoke with her for the 25th anniversary of “Dazed and Confused.” She reflected on the bond she formed with everyone set and the openness between the actors during shooting. And she had a feeling McConaughey was destined to be a star.

“I called my agent right away and told him he had to sign him. He was going to be a huge star,” Posey wrote. “But he didn’t listen.”

After seeing the photo, Posey asked director Richard Linklater if she could be in a scene with McConaughey’s character Wooderson, specifically Wooderson’s entrance to a party at a pool hall. Upon meeting him, she quickly described her character to McConaughey as “a bad girl, but cool,” and they improvised their delightfully brief moment together on screen.

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Stars: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

“He slapped my ass and said, ‘Hey Darla,’” Posey wrote. “That’s what guys did back then, and in those days it was a compliment.”

Of course part of the reason “Dazed and Confused” has endured after 25 years is because, in addition to Posey and McConaughey, Linklater’s films helped birth the careers of Jason London, Wiley Wiggins, Milla Jovovich, Anthony Rapp and even Ben Affleck.

“I want to see more of everyone in that movie. I want to see more of Rory Cochran, Joey Adams, Adam Goldberg, Cole Hauser,” Posey told TheWrap, speaking to how some actors simply look so authentic in a specific time period, they end up becoming tied to it.

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Parker Posey Tells Us Why Film Set Had Perfect Hangout Vibe

“I think the movie is more about the whole and not about the parts,” Posey said. “It’s about this feeling. It’s this portrayal of a decade of people and what it was like to grow up in the ’70s, what it was like to have that music, what it was like to be alive at that age at that time. Especially with that music. It was a wonderful, great time. We made a classic.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got ‘Alright, Alright, Alright’

Watch Matthew McConaughey Play the Bongo Shirtless in NSFW ‘The Beach Bum’ Trailer (Video)

Matthew McConaughey ‘Making Noises’ Supercut May Be the Best Thing You See All Day (Video)

Pinned to makeup artist Jean Black’s mirror on the set of “Dazed and Confused” were several Polaroid pictures of some of the actors in the film. As star Parker Posey described it in her book, one of the photos looked like “Ted Nugent meets daredevil Evel Knievel and just as gorgeous as Jesus Christ.”

That was Matthew McConaughey.

“What can I say but ‘Wow,'” Posey wrote in her book “You’re on an Airplane.” “We screamed at how genius his whole look was. That guy! Yes!”

Posey pointed TheWrap to the section in her book when we spoke with her for the 25th anniversary of “Dazed and Confused.” She reflected on the bond she formed with everyone set and the openness between the actors during shooting. And she had a feeling McConaughey was destined to be a star.

“I called my agent right away and told him he had to sign him. He was going to be a huge star,” Posey wrote. “But he didn’t listen.”

After seeing the photo, Posey asked director Richard Linklater if she could be in a scene with McConaughey’s character Wooderson, specifically Wooderson’s entrance to a party at a pool hall. Upon meeting him, she quickly described her character to McConaughey as “a bad girl, but cool,” and they improvised their delightfully brief moment together on screen.

“He slapped my ass and said, ‘Hey Darla,'” Posey wrote. “That’s what guys did back then, and in those days it was a compliment.”

Of course part of the reason “Dazed and Confused” has endured after 25 years is because, in addition to Posey and McConaughey, Linklater’s films helped birth the careers of Jason London, Wiley Wiggins, Milla Jovovich, Anthony Rapp and even Ben Affleck.

“I want to see more of everyone in that movie. I want to see more of Rory Cochran, Joey Adams, Adam Goldberg, Cole Hauser,” Posey told TheWrap, speaking to how some actors simply look so authentic in a specific time period, they end up becoming tied to it.

“I think the movie is more about the whole and not about the parts,” Posey said. “It’s about this feeling. It’s this portrayal of a decade of people and what it was like to grow up in the ’70s, what it was like to have that music, what it was like to be alive at that age at that time. Especially with that music. It was a wonderful, great time. We made a classic.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Dazed and Confused' Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got 'Alright, Alright, Alright'

Watch Matthew McConaughey Play the Bongo Shirtless in NSFW 'The Beach Bum' Trailer (Video)

Matthew McConaughey 'Making Noises' Supercut May Be the Best Thing You See All Day (Video)

‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Parker Posey Tells Us Why Film Set Had Perfect Hangout Vibe

Sometimes when Parker Posey is watching a movie, she looks at the screen and wonders if the actors got along when they were working together. Other times, she said, she can even tell if they didn’t.

Though Posey has worked in many close-knit casts in Christopher Guest’s many films — including “Best in Show” — she told TheWrap that one of her best on-set experiences remains Richard Linklater’s 1993 cult classic “Dazed and Confused.”

The film, about 1970s-era teenagers partying it up after last day of school, turns 25 this month. It endures in the annals of cinema, with a reputation as one of the ultimate hangout movies and expressions of high school nostalgia. Posey said the mood Linklater established as they filmed in Austin, Texas was “a pure experience” and a beautiful bonding moment between actors.

To most longtime fans of the film, it shows.

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Stars: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

“It was so open. You could go up to actors; that was really great,” Posey told TheWrap in a recent interview about the film, which helped launch the careers of Ben Affleck, Adam Goldberg, Jason London, Milla Jovovich, Anthony Rapp and Joey Adams. “It just felt like a kinship there. There weren’t a lot of egos, no ‘this is my power play, we’re going to turn it around here on camera.’”

In the film, Posey plays Darla, a bitchy, foul-mouthed senior and cheerleader who hazes incoming freshman girls. She shouts “AIR RAID” and the young ladies hit the ground to lie on their stomachs on command. “What are you looking at? Wipe that face off your head, bitch,” Darla famously says.

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Why Parker Posey Knew Matthew McConaughey Would Be a Star

In her book “You’re on an Airplane,” Posey described her character as a “bad girl, but cool.” And you can see the thought and dimension that went into her character in a behind-the-scenes clip where Posey is interviewed in character:



“She was a bad girl with a rough upbringing, I decided,” Posey wrote. “She would make her friends do things they regretted the next day, like drink too much and say something they wish they hadn’t or go to the drug store and swap the hair dye in the boxes or put Ex-L’Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Parker Posey Tells Us Why Set Had Perfect Hangout Vibeax in a batch of brownies or Nair her dad’s hairy back when her dad’s passed out drunk. She was one of those my feelings are facts people, one of those drama queens.”

Also Read: ‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got ‘Alright, Alright, Alright’

Fittingly, the ensemble is rich with personalities, a whole community of kids you might’ve known once upon a time, the ones you dated, smoked with, or gotten beaten up by. And though it’s a movie intrinsically tied to the ’70s, it feels timeless because it’s all so relatable and familiar.

“So much of the group is a collaboration between all these different kinds of people. The balance of such a huge cast, that’s amazing,” Posey told TheWrap. “There are so many similar people, they don’t feel like characters. It’s like, I know that person, I knew that person in high school.”

Posey described a dorm room-like vibe in the hotel shared between the 20 or so members of the cast. Linklater provided everyone with mixtapes of the songs he intended to be in the film in the hopes that the music could get everyone in the headspace of the 1970s.

Also Read: All 20 Richard Linklater Movies Ranked, From Worst to Best (Photos)

“I think music has a big part of it. You get to the soul of something a lot more easily when there’s music, time, anything that has this attention to detail,” Posey said. “It was so independent, so free. You could dance like no one was watching. There was a freedom there. It was such a different time. And it was 25 years ago.”

Posey said she became close friends with her on-screen best friend, played by Joey Lauren Adams. The two of them suggested a scene where Darla and Simone would be relieving themselves in the woods during the film’s big party sequence. They had never seen a girl go in a film before, they told the director.

She also mentioned to Linklater another hazing tactic that was even more ruthless than the seniors covering the freshman in condiments and forcing them to “fry like bacon.” In her book, she pitched Linklater on something her Aunt Peggy remembers, knotting together oysters on a line of dental floss and making the freshman swallow it so the seniors could pull it out of their stomachs. But that one didn’t make it into “Dazed.”

The film still endures and feels profound because, Posey said, the entire cast shared the vibe of that time and Linklater’s collective focus in a way that many films never fully achieve.

“All these ideas that were nostalgic that we carried around on set, what do I remember about my childhood and these people. I still have vivid memories of behavior and this idea of cool,” Posey said. “It’s that kind of intimacy, and I think that’s one of the things that makes ‘Dazed’ such a classic.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got ‘Alright, Alright, Alright’

420 Day: 9 Best Marijuana Moments in Movies, From ‘The Big Lebowski’ to ‘Dazed and Confused’ (Videos)

‘Dazed and Confused’ Stars: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

Sometimes when Parker Posey is watching a movie, she looks at the screen and wonders if the actors got along when they were working together. Other times, she said, she can even tell if they didn’t.

Though Posey has worked in many close-knit casts in Christopher Guest’s many films — including “Best in Show” — she told TheWrap that one of her best on-set experiences remains Richard Linklater’s 1993 cult classic “Dazed and Confused.”

The film, about 1970s-era teenagers partying it up after last day of school, turns 25 this month. It endures in the annals of cinema, with a reputation as one of the ultimate hangout movies and expressions of high school nostalgia. Posey said the mood Linklater established as they filmed in Austin, Texas was “a pure experience” and a beautiful bonding moment between actors.

To most longtime fans of the film, it shows.

“It was so open. You could go up to actors; that was really great,” Posey told TheWrap in a recent interview about the film, which helped launch the careers of Ben Affleck, Adam Goldberg, Jason London, Milla Jovovich, Anthony Rapp and Joey Adams. “It just felt like a kinship there. There weren’t a lot of egos, no ‘this is my power play, we’re going to turn it around here on camera.'”

In the film, Posey plays Darla, a bitchy, foul-mouthed senior and cheerleader who hazes incoming freshman girls. She shouts “AIR RAID” and the young ladies hit the ground to lie on their stomachs on command. “What are you looking at? Wipe that face off your head, bitch,” Darla famously says.

In her book “You’re on an Airplane,” Posey described her character as a “bad girl, but cool.” And you can see the thought and dimension that went into her character in a behind-the-scenes clip where Posey is interviewed in character:

“She was a bad girl with a rough upbringing, I decided,” Posey wrote. “She would make her friends do things they regretted the next day, like drink too much and say something they wish they hadn’t or go to the drug store and swap the hair dye in the boxes or put Ex-L’Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: Parker Posey Tells Us Why Set Had Perfect Hangout Vibeax in a batch of brownies or Nair her dad’s hairy back when her dad’s passed out drunk. She was one of those my feelings are facts people, one of those drama queens.”

Fittingly, the ensemble is rich with personalities, a whole community of kids you might’ve known once upon a time, the ones you dated, smoked with, or gotten beaten up by. And though it’s a movie intrinsically tied to the ’70s, it feels timeless because it’s all so relatable and familiar.

“So much of the group is a collaboration between all these different kinds of people. The balance of such a huge cast, that’s amazing,” Posey told TheWrap. “There are so many similar people, they don’t feel like characters. It’s like, I know that person, I knew that person in high school.”

Posey described a dorm room-like vibe in the hotel shared between the 20 or so members of the cast. Linklater provided everyone with mixtapes of the songs he intended to be in the film in the hopes that the music could get everyone in the headspace of the 1970s.

“I think music has a big part of it. You get to the soul of something a lot more easily when there’s music, time, anything that has this attention to detail,” Posey said. “It was so independent, so free. You could dance like no one was watching. There was a freedom there. It was such a different time. And it was 25 years ago.”

Posey said she became close friends with her on-screen best friend, played by Joey Lauren Adams. The two of them suggested a scene where Darla and Simone would be relieving themselves in the woods during the film’s big party sequence. They had never seen a girl go in a film before, they told the director.

She also mentioned to Linklater another hazing tactic that was even more ruthless than the seniors covering the freshman in condiments and forcing them to “fry like bacon.” In her book, she pitched Linklater on something her Aunt Peggy remembers, knotting together oysters on a line of dental floss and making the freshman swallow it so the seniors could pull it out of their stomachs. But that one didn’t make it into “Dazed.”

The film still endures and feels profound because, Posey said, the entire cast shared the vibe of that time and Linklater’s collective focus in a way that many films never fully achieve.

“All these ideas that were nostalgic that we carried around on set, what do I remember about my childhood and these people. I still have vivid memories of behavior and this idea of cool,” Posey said. “It’s that kind of intimacy, and I think that’s one of the things that makes ‘Dazed’ such a classic.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Dazed and Confused' Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got 'Alright, Alright, Alright'

420 Day: 9 Best Marijuana Moments in Movies, From 'The Big Lebowski' to 'Dazed and Confused' (Videos)

'Dazed and Confused' Stars: Where Are They Now? (Photos)

‘Dazed and Confused’ Turns 25: How Matthew McConaughey Got ‘Alright, Alright, Alright’

Great eras are often marked by a famous adage. For the Enlightenment Era, just after the Renaissance swept Europe, it was the axiom coined by Descartes: “Cogito, ergo sum” (“I think, therefore I am.”)

For the McConaissance, a period of rebirth for actor Matthew McConaughey, it was a more casual mantra: “Alright, alright, alright.”

McConaughey recited those three words in his acceptance speech at the 2014 Academy Awards for winning Best Actor. It marked the height of the McConaissance, with the actor appearing in critically-acclaimed projects such as “True Detective” and “Dallas Buyers Club,” the latter of which won him the Oscar.

Of course, the origin of the easy-going phrase predates the McConaissance, going back even before the McConaughey rom-com epoch. He first uttered his famous tagline in Richard Linklater’s 1993 coming-of-age film, “Dazed and Confused,” 25 years ago.

Also Read: Aaron Paul Joins ‘Westworld’ for Season 3

In 2014, McConaughey told television host George Stroumboulopoulos how the unscripted phrase came about during his “first scene ever on film.”  His character, David Wooderson, was a suave ladies man who only had a few lines in the film, but they survived as the most iconic ones.

McConaughey said director Richard Linklater brought him in for a last-minute shoot — the scene was at Top Notch, the fictional hamburger joint in the film, on a Friday night.

The actor said that just before filming the scene, he had been listening to a live recording of The Doors, and in between tracks, Jim Morrison repeated the word “alright” four times. This number became a template for McConaughey’s first lines shot on film.

A semi-important sidenote: Morrison actually says “alright” five times, but we can let it slide.

“So right before we’re about to go, I’m, like, ‘Well, what is Wooderson about?” McConaughey recounted.

“Man, he’s about four things: He’s about his car, he’s about getting high, he’s about rock n’ roll, and picking up chicks,” the actor said he thought to himself. “And I go, ‘I’m in my car, I’m high as a kite, I’m listening to rock ‘n’ roll… Action! And there’s the chick — alright, alright, alright. Three out of four.”

Also Read: ‘AHS: Apocalypse’: The Biggest Questions We Have After That Crazy Premiere

To break it down, McConaughey clarified that his triple “alright” referred to the three things his character already had — a car, music and a nice high. The last one, a girl he sees in the distance, is the missing fourth.

The line has since stuck with him, and it seems like he’s the only person who could earnestly burble the phrase — whether wearing a matted-down ’70s ‘do or a stark white tuxedo jacket — without making a fool of themselves. He closed out his aforementioned Oscars speech with it, slipped it into his 2014 Golden Globes speech, his 2014 Critics Choice Award speech, his 2014 Independent Spirit Awards Speech, and… you know what, someone already did the hard work for us and made a supercut of every “alright, alright, alright” they could find.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sorry, Parrotheads! Matthew McConaughey’s ‘The Beach Bum’ Trailer Misspells Jimmy Buffett’s Name

Watch Matthew McConaughey Play the Bongo Shirtless in NSFW ‘The Beach Bum’ Trailer (Video)

Nicole Kidman, Robert Redford, Matthew McConaughey Movies Headed to Telluride Film Festival

Great eras are often marked by a famous adage. For the Enlightenment Era, just after the Renaissance swept Europe, it was the axiom coined by Descartes: “Cogito, ergo sum” (“I think, therefore I am.”)

For the McConaissance, a period of rebirth for actor Matthew McConaughey, it was a more casual mantra: “Alright, alright, alright.”

McConaughey recited those three words in his acceptance speech at the 2014 Academy Awards for winning Best Actor. It marked the height of the McConaissance, with the actor appearing in critically-acclaimed projects such as “True Detective” and “Dallas Buyers Club,” the latter of which won him the Oscar.

Of course, the origin of the easy-going phrase predates the McConaissance, going back even before the McConaughey rom-com epoch. He first uttered his famous tagline in Richard Linklater’s 1993 coming-of-age film, “Dazed and Confused,” 25 years ago.

In 2014, McConaughey told television host George Stroumboulopoulos how the unscripted phrase came about during his “first scene ever on film.”  His character, David Wooderson, was a suave ladies man who only had a few lines in the film, but they survived as the most iconic ones.

McConaughey said director Richard Linklater brought him in for a last-minute shoot — the scene was at Top Notch, the fictional hamburger joint in the film, on a Friday night.

The actor said that just before filming the scene, he had been listening to a live recording of The Doors, and in between tracks, Jim Morrison repeated the word “alright” four times. This number became a template for McConaughey’s first lines shot on film.

A semi-important sidenote: Morrison actually says “alright” five times, but we can let it slide.

“So right before we’re about to go, I’m, like, ‘Well, what is Wooderson about?” McConaughey recounted.

“Man, he’s about four things: He’s about his car, he’s about getting high, he’s about rock n’ roll, and picking up chicks,” the actor said he thought to himself. “And I go, ‘I’m in my car, I’m high as a kite, I’m listening to rock ‘n’ roll… Action! And there’s the chick — alright, alright, alright. Three out of four.”

To break it down, McConaughey clarified that his triple “alright” referred to the three things his character already had — a car, music and a nice high. The last one, a girl he sees in the distance, is the missing fourth.

The line has since stuck with him, and it seems like he’s the only person who could earnestly burble the phrase — whether wearing a matted-down ’70s ‘do or a stark white tuxedo jacket — without making a fool of themselves. He closed out his aforementioned Oscars speech with it, slipped it into his 2014 Golden Globes speech, his 2014 Critics Choice Award speech, his 2014 Independent Spirit Awards Speech, and… you know what, someone already did the hard work for us and made a supercut of every “alright, alright, alright” they could find.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sorry, Parrotheads! Matthew McConaughey's 'The Beach Bum' Trailer Misspells Jimmy Buffett's Name

Watch Matthew McConaughey Play the Bongo Shirtless in NSFW 'The Beach Bum' Trailer (Video)

Nicole Kidman, Robert Redford, Matthew McConaughey Movies Headed to Telluride Film Festival

Ethan Hawke Explains How He Multi-Tasks As Director and Actor With ‘Blaze’ and ‘Juliet, Naked’

He’s good at acting, playing music, writing, and directing. Here, he explains how he got that way.

Ethan Hawke is a notorious multi-tasker. He writes articles, books, and scripts — both “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” (with Julie Delpy and Richard Linklater) were nominated for Adapted Screenplay Oscars. He’s a gifted theater director (“A Lie of the Mind”), musician, and songwriter.

His day job has yielded a couple of Supporting Actor Oscar nominations (Antoine Fuqua’s “Training Day” and Linklater’s “Boyhood”). He can do everything from action westerns (“The Magnificent Seven” and the upcoming “The Kid”) to heist movies (Robert Budreau’s upcoming “Stockholm”) and sincere romance (“Maude,” “Born to Be Blue,” “Maggie’s Plan”). And he’s having a good year: He’s in the running for a Best Actor nod for his performance as an angst-ridden priest in the Paul Schrader drama “First Reformed.”

Like fellow multi-taskers Mark Duplass, David Lowery, Amy Seimetz and Jeff Bridges, Hawke feeds his creative mojo with rich nutrients. That’s why, at age 47, he’s already directed four features: “Seymour: An Introduction,” a documentary portrait of concert pianist Seymour Bernstein, and three fiction films, play adaptation “Chelsea Walls,” “The Hottest State,” based on his novel, and his latest, the romantic musical biopic “Blaze” (August 17, Sundance Selects), based on the life of the late great Blaze Foley (Ben Dickey) as told by his early lover Sybil Rosen (Alia Shawkat) in her memoir. Hawke and Rosen wrote the script together.

Shot on a shoestring for less than $1 million, “Blaze” is tonally less “Crazy Heart” and more “Inside Llewyn Davis” — it takes its authentic music seriously, like a Nick Hornby movie (Hawke wanted to be in both “About a Boy” and “High Fidelity”). Hawke also stars as a reclusive famous musician gone to seed in scruffy midlife romantic comedy “Juliet, Naked” (August 17, Roadside Attractions), co-starring Rose Byrne and Chris O’Dowd (and, coincidentally or not, based on Hornby’s novel), for which he supplied some music.

One sunny afternoon at Sundance, Hawke and I sat down and dug into his multiple creative interests.

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“Juliet, Naked”

Alex Bailey

Why do you pursue so many forms of artistic expression?

It’s a difficult ship to sail to port. It’s the central question of my life, because I put in a lot of thought about it. Some of us, that’s the way our brain works. The Shaker expression is: “improve in one talent and God will give you more.” And, “to master a craft you have to apprentice three.” And it is through writing and directing that I am spending my life mastering acting. The work of my life is as an actor. In many ways, it doesn’t mean it has to be limited to that. It helps with really understanding how to give voice to cinema as a director.

I learn about acting from Ben Dickey. “First Reformed” is the best script I’ve had in long time — a part like that with a real director like Paul Schrader. To have it in the same year: I learned from watching Ben’s joy in performance, he’s cherishing every second. I tried to eat that part alive with Paul.

Did you always want to make movies?

Photography is a big part of being a director. I love running around with a camera, I always have. If you had asked me around the time of “Dead Poets Society,” I’d have thought I would have directed more than I have at 47. That’s where I thought I would go. But acting got more interesting to me.

I directed a lot of theater, which I love. I didn’t know when I was young how much I would like that. My breakthrough moment was directing Sam Shepherd’s “A Lie of the Mind,” when I figured out how to integrate costumes, sets, lights, music, performance, and writing, getting all those pistons working. When you see “Goodfellas,” you see all the departments working together like a fist, you can’t differentiate one from the other. Everything is working in such unison. I got to that on “Blaze” too, so everyone is making the same movie.

You’ve learned from directing a few films now. “Blaze” required chops.

You need experience with the camera and editing. It helps so much when you’ve spent hours in an editing room. When I directed “Chelsea Walls,” I undervalued acting: It came easy to me, I took it for granted. But when I shot film — “I need these people.” You can plan ’till you are blue in the teeth, but if they don’t have a special relationship to the camera, the movie dies. I didn’t understand that until after “Chelsea Walls.”

With “The Hottest State,” I was born and raised in Fort Worth, and after my parents split up, I was coming and going. There are different narratives I can tell. “Write what you know” is a great place to start, but it doesn’t mean the movie works. “The Hottest State” was a great way to learn.

"Blaze"

“Blaze”

Sundance Selects/Screenshot

You took on a high degree of difficulty with “Blaze.” Dickey’s a musician, not a professional actor. 

It was a dare for sure. It was a scary thing for both of us to do. My favorite moment at the [Sundance] Q&A was when he said the hardest thing about playing this role was acting. Everybody else says it was learning how to play the guitar!

I saw a show in Philly with his Blood Feathers band eight years ago. I liked the way he talked to the audience and related though his songs. The joy and the sadness he could communicate with music was really powerful. I left the club saying, “I just saw a 28-year-old Neil Young.”

The music business is so tough. One door closes and another one opens: A big break happens; he got signed, then the bass player had a problem and the band broke up; then he got a gig opening for a big band and then they broke up. Breaks start to happen and not happen, but I knew he had a huge talent.

I knew from myself: As a young person I faced so much resistance whenever I tried to step outside of the role of teen idol. If I stayed in that role I would die there, I would turn into a formaldehyde version of myself.

Benjamin Dickey Alia Shawkat BLAZE

“BLAZE”

Courtesy of Sundance Institute, photo by Steve Cosens.

You allow both Dickey and Shawkat to be ugly-beautiful and not movie glam.

He’s worthwhile because she thinks he’s worthwhile. They don’t look like looks matter, but they are beautiful when you see them rolling around in bed in their treehouse. They don’t look like Brad and Angie, but it’s so fun.

Ben never has a false moment, which I spent 30 years of my life trying to do. Vincent D’Onofrio is the best acting teacher I have ever known, and Austin Pendleton taught him how to think about acting: get out of the thing about being self-conscious. What’s important is what’s in your pocket. If the guy was talented and patient, you didn’t let him think too much. I got a great DP [Steve Cosens], I knew how to create an environment conducive to acting. I let him run, and he’d run.

The best thing was his DNA with Alia. We combined Charlie and Ben with two professional actors who were always around. Josh Hamilton is a sublime actor. He did a controlled improvisation to capture that spontaneity. That worked.

You wrote music for several of your films.

I did music for “Boyhood,” played music on “Reality Bites,” and I’ve done a lot of Shakespeare where I played and sang. Actors and musicians are storytellers, troubadours.

Charlie Sexton appears in <i>BLAZE</i> by Ethan Hawke, an official selection of the U.S. Dramatic Competition at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Josh Hamilton. All photos are copyrighted and may be used by press only for the purpose of news or editorial coverage of Sundance Institute programs. Photos must be accompanied by a credit to the photographer and/or 'Courtesy of Sundance Institute.' Unauthorized use, alteration, reproduction or sale of logos and/or photos is strictly prohibited.

Charlie Sexton in “Blaze”

How did you come to cast Charlie Sexton?

I met him on “Boyhood.” Charlie is a world-class musician. When he talks about acting he lights up, the same way I feel about music: When you’re an amateur, it’s easier to get in touch with your pure love and start using whatever it is. If you love carpentry and sanding wood and then start doing it to pay your bills, the love dissipates.

When I did “Born to Be Blue,” I had to learn how to play the trumpet, nine months every day, squeak, squeak, it keeps life exciting, constantly putting yourself in a situation where you could fall on your ass. Then you don’t want to fall on your ass!

Ethan Hawke, Julie Delpy, and Richard Linklater

There’s a photo of you and Richard Linklater and Julie Delpy writing “Before Sunset”  together in a room.

We spent a month in that room in Paris; it had a small little bathroom and tiny walled kitchen. My first marriage was falling apart; this was a sacred space to go to where everyone loved me and I felt everything was going to be okay, eventually.

The “Blaze” screenplay has a complicated time structure. 

It was the biggest risk of the movie and the hardest thing to get right, to braid past, present, and future. They all connect and touch each other. Who has control of the narrative? Who’s telling the story of what really happened? He’s singing his story. She’s remembering. It’s a country western opera. We used Blaze’s song “If I Could Only Fly,” which I’m proud of. You’ve seen a lot of breakup scenes: “Let’s let Blaze write the breakup scene.” He’s gonna live and she’s not going to come with him; he wishes she could.

But the hard thing was the time braid. Audiences need narrative. They need a plot. How to do what I wanted to do? You have to tell them he was shot and killed in the second shot of the movie, like Walter Hill with “Crossroads.” I wanted it to feel like “The Ballad of Blaze and Sybil.” If this movie was one image, it’s “Blaze Loves Sybil” carved into a tree at that treehouse, at its essence.

And now you’re playing a dissipated musician.

In “Juliet, Naked” I get to play Charlie Sexton. And being a father is the biggest part of my life. The central issues of that movie are about fatherhood, art, failure, and success. I wanted to do a comedy. I hadn’t done one since “Reality Bites.” He’s like Troy Dyer looks at 50, you could imagine him evolving into Tucker Crowe in some way.

I could see that movie coming out of a studio like Paramount. It’s an old-fashioned studio comedy. My mother and wife’s friends will love this movie. It’s not “Moonlight.”

You turned out to be good at westerns.  

I got old. When you get old enough they put you in westerns. Now I play the Nick Nolte parts. I’m working with [director] Vincent D’Onofrio as Pat Garrett in “The Kid.” Dane DeHaan is good as Billy the Kid.

Richard Linklater on Casting Alex Jones in ‘Waking Life’: ‘I Just Thought He Was Kind of Funny’

17 years later, he thinks it’s “insane” that the InfoWars host is taken seriously.

Alex Jones may have been banned from Facebook and YouTube, but the Deep State can never take away his “Waking Life” cameo. We have Richard Linklater to thank for the InfoWars host, conspiracy theorist, and Sandy Hook truther’s most notable film performance, not that Jones was as dangerously unhinged back in 2001. That’s according to the filmmaker himself, who in a Daily Beast interview said that Jones was simply “this hyper guy that we’d all kind of make fun of” back then.

A mere public-access TV host when he auditioned for a role in Linklater’s rotoscoped meditation on the nature of consciousness and reality, Jones is now a hugely controversial (and frighteningly influential) peddler of baseless conspiracies. 17 years ago, however, “he wasn’t so virulent, he just had all that energy,” Linklater added. “I just thought he was kind of funny.”

And, to be fair, Jones’ brief megaphone rant in the film is in keeping with its overall tone. “You know, I haven’t talked to him in years,” Linklater said. “I talked to him a bit during the Bush-Cheney years. He always positioned himself as anti. So when you’re anti, he’s your bedfellow.”

The writer/director also finds it odd that Jones is “taken seriously on a national level. I would have never thought I’d see the day when the president of the United States knew who he was, much less going on his show. It’s crazy, it’s insane, but it fits our times.”

Here’s Jones’ “Waking Life” scene:

Pixelvision: How a Failed ‘80s Fisher-Price Toy Camera Became One of Auteurs’ Favorite ’90s Tools

The children’s camera was put to use by Richard Linklater, Michael Almereyda and Sadie Benning – and now, a new series is bringing them back.

In 1987, Fisher-Price introduced a lightweight plastic camcorder that recorded video footage to an audio cassette. Fisher-Price marketed the PXL 2000, quickly dubbed “Pixelvision,” as the children’s version of the VHS camcorders that dominated the home-movie market, but that was a miscalculation: It was both too expensive and too temperamental to be successful as a toy, and it didn’t last a year.

However, numerous filmmakers found inventive ways to use the technology, and a new series in New York is bringing them back.

Despite its immediate commercial failures, the Pixelvision story had only just begun. “After Pixelvision flopped, it was taken up by all these experimental filmmakers who were drawn to the way it captured grainy, spectral, colorless images,” said Thomas Beard, programmer of “Flat Is Beautiful: The Strange Case of Pixelvision,” a retrospective that will play the Film Society of Lincoln Center Aug. 10-16. “It’s an interesting story of the actual camera, but then when you just looked at all the works that were made on it, they include some of the most important works of video art of that era.”

The Pixelvision pioneer is Sadie Benning — daughter of experimental filmmaker James Benning, who gave his then-teenage daughter a Pixelvision as a Christmas gift in 1988. The 15-year-old was initially disappointed; in 1992, she told Kim Masters at the Washington Post that she thought it was “a piece of shit” made for kids, and what she really wanted was a camcorder.

Growing up in Milwaukee, at one point Benning left high school in the face of homophobia. She started using the camera to make videos in her bedroom that were almost like daydream diaries; these would go on to become landmarks in the history of queer cinema. Benning would later say that she fell in love with the “animated quality” of the image that gave video an abstract quality.

“That lo-fi quality is used in such different ways, said Beard. “In the case of Sadie Benning, it’s almost akin to the way an image degrades on a Xerox machine. They make sense as almost the video equivalent of a Riot Grrrl zine. [For the films] that have autobiographical elements, there’s also something to how the image is fuzzy like a faded memory. So that ethereal quality seems especially well suited to the tricky matter of autobiography or retrieving these moments from the past and putting them onto the screen.”

In the early ’90s, the Sadie Benning tapes made the rounds in New York, including the Whitney Biennial; they also became some of the most popular titles at Chicago’s Video Data Bank. As the films became increasingly popular in the experimental art and LGBTQ film communities, they inspired a number of filmmakers to hunt down the now-extinct camera. One was Michael Almereyda, who saw the camera as a tool to make feature-length scripted films.

Almereyda used the camera’s limitations to different effect than Benning, later describing how he loved how the camera forced him to be both “reckless” and “original.” In the case of the “Nadja,” an idiosyncratic horror film produced by David Lynch, Almereyda tells the story of Dracula’s daughter Nadja, who leaves Transylvania after the death of her father to search for her brother in the strange and uncharted land of Brooklyn.

As with his other Pixelvision films, Almereyda uses the camera’s ability to render space as compressed; this created what Beard described as a “ghostly image quality.” While the “Flat Is Beautiful” retrospective shares the title of a great Benning film, Beard said “flat” doesn’t quite capture the allusive nature of the Pixelvision image.

“You can see the individual pixels making up the image, so in that sense there’s something very active about the surface of the image,” Beard said. “It also favors the close-up, so there’s something very intimate, or — seen from a different perspective — claustrophobic, about the image. Because you have this very tiny lens, everything is equally in-focus and out-of-focus. There’s sort of an illusion of deep focus, except that things that are far away become illegible.”

It’s an incredibly limiting image, but one that when projected on the big screen is unlike anything you have ever seen. What’s most fascinating about Pixelvision films is how that unique quality and the lo-fi restrictions are employed in radically different ways by different artists.

Pixelvision "Swallow" by Elizabeth Subrin

“Swallow” by Elizabeth Subrin

Copyright Elizabeth Subrin, courtesy of Video Data Bank, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Today there is still an active online community keeping the art of Pixelvision alive. Artist Ben Coonley’s 3D piece, using side-by-side PXL 2000s, that will be on display in the Film Society’s amphitheater throughout the week, being just one example of how the camera is still being used.
And while experimental filmmakers continue to experiment with the camera today, indie film filmmakers in the late 1990s and early 2000s turned to the first DV cameras to capture their lo-fi images, which became more textured – filled with artifacts, imperfections and grain – when blown up to 35mm film stock.
In many ways Pixelvision as a medium becomes more obsolete every day. “Pixelvision is an aberrant art form, underscored by the fact that since the cameras wear out quickly, and are no longer being manufactured,” said Erik Saks, one of the artists featured in the series, in the program notes. “It holds within itself authorized obsolescence. Each time an artist uses a PXL 2000, the whole form edges closer to extinction.”

The “Flat Is Beautiful” series will run August 10-16 at the Film Society of Lincoln Center. In addition to films by Benning and Almereyada, seminal Pixelvision films by Peggy Ahwesh, Michael O’Reilly, Elisabeth Subrin, Cecilia Dougherty will be featured, along with Richard Linklater’s “Slacker,” which used the camera to shoot one of the film’s most memorable segments. For more information about the series, click here.

Director Richard Linklater on What Inspires Him to Keep Creating

Director Richard Linklater sat down with Variety film critic Peter Debruge at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival to talk about filmmaking inspirations, as well as his non-profit, the Austin Film Society. “I love movies, I want to keep doing movies,&#…

Director Richard Linklater sat down with Variety film critic Peter Debruge at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival to talk about filmmaking inspirations, as well as his non-profit, the Austin Film Society. “I love movies, I want to keep doing movies,” he said at the film festival, which just kicked off in the Czech Republic. “If […]

Karlovy Vary Film Festival to Honor Tim Robbins

Academy Award winner Tim Robbins will be honored by the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, Central and Eastern Europe’s top annual film event.
The multi-hyphenate star will take the Crystal Globe Award for his “contributions to world…

Academy Award winner Tim Robbins will be honored by the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival, Central and Eastern Europe’s top annual film event.

The multi-hyphenate star will take the Crystal Globe Award for his “contributions to world cinema,” festival organizers announced on Tuesday.

Robbins won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 2003 for “Mystic River,” among other trophies that year, opposite Sean Penn. The prolific performer’s greatest hits include “Bull Durham,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and Robert Altman’s “The Player.”

His directorial efforts include the Oscar-winning “Dead Man Walking,” “Cradle Will Rock” and “Bob Roberts.” Robbins is also a principal in the experimental theater group The Actor’s Gang, and a musician.

Robbins will claim the prize in Karlovy Vary, Czech Republic at the festival which runs from June 29 – July 7. His band will also perform a gig for industry types and the spa town at large on July 4.

In addition to Robbins, the festival will honor veteran director Barry Levinson (“Rain Man,” “Good Morning Vietnam”).

Another stateside honoree includes Richard Linklater’s Austin Film Society. KVIFF is devoting an entire screening section to the grassroots organization, which spotlights the artists and filmmakers from Texas. Highlights in the selection include Jeff Nichols’ “Take Shelter,” Laura Dunn’s “The Unforeseen” and Linklater’s own “Slacker.”

Just under a dozen films will see their world premiere in the main competition, including: “To the Night,” a buzzy drama that stars Caleb Landry Jones as the sole survivor in a house fire deal with trauma as an adult, directed by Peter Burnner; “Brothers,” from Omur Atay that examines moral conflicts against family tradition; the female coming-of-age drama “The Fireflies Are Gone,” from Sebastien Pilote; Radu Jude’s “I Do Not Care If We Go Down in History as Barbarians,” about an art installation recreating ethnic cleansing perpetrated by the Romanian Army in 1941; and Ivan I. Tverdoskiy’s unexpected reunion drama “Jumpan.”

This year’s grand jury includes writer-director Mark Cousins (“The Eyes of Orson Welles”), actress Zrinka Cvitešić (“London Spy”), producer Marta Donzelli (the forthcoming “Nico, 1988”), director Zdeněk Holý (“Cobain”) and journalist and producer Zdeněk Holý.

Many holdovers from May’s Cannes Film Festival will have their anticipated second run in the official selection out of competition, including Spike Lee’s “BlacKkKlansman,” Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem’s “Everybody Knows” from Asghar Farhadi and especially the Palme d’Or winner “Burning” from Lee Chang-dong.

Check out the complete lineup, including the East of the West category known for launching global indies, here in the official KVIFF catalogue.

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Cannes Film Festival Signs Pledge for More Women Directors, More Transparency

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Richard Linklater and PETA Fight Texas A&M’s Experiments on Dogs With Muscular Dystrophy — Exclusive

It’s a personal cause for the acclaimed director, whose sister graduated from the university.

Richard Linklater is imploring a veterinary college in his native state to stop its experimentation on dogs with muscular dystrophy. In the name of medical research, Joseph Kornegay, a professor at Texas A&M University’s College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, performs tests on golden retrievers and other canines that carry disease genetics. On Wednesday, the Oscar-nominated writer-director-producer (“Boyhood”) sent the following letter to Kornegay’s boss and the school’s president, Michael K. Young:

Dear President Young,

I’m contacting you today after PETA shared with me the disturbing video footage documenting that golden retrievers and other dogs are caged in barren metal cells — often alone — at Texas A&M University’s canine muscular dystrophy (MD) laboratory. I’m urging you to end these experiments and release the dogs for adoption so that they can live out their remaining days in comfort.

These tests are unjustifiable. There’s no doubt in my mind that a cure must be found for MD, but these experimenters are purposely bringing dogs into the world in order to subject them to a shortened life of pain, misery, and neglect. Thirty-five years of experiments on dogs have not led to a cure or even produced an effective treatment that reverses symptoms of the disease in humans, and even MD patients are speaking out against this. I’m sure that the university’s resources could be applied to better research methods.

I’m a lifelong Texan. I grew up nearby in Huntsville, my sister graduated from A&M, and my mother did graduate work there—and I really don’t want this great university to become a symbol of superfluous cruelty to animals to the outside world. Our society is evolving very quickly in this area (it’s just not “OK” anymore), and it pains me to see my home state lagging behind. Please end this unbelievably cruel work, stop breeding dogs, and allow those suffering in your laboratories to be adopted out to families who will give them love, care, and affection. PETA and other animal-support organizations are standing by to help. Thank you for your time and attention to this important matter.

Sincerely,

Richard Linklater

In December 2016, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals posted a video obtained inside Kornegay’s laboratory, showing dogs struggling to walk and excessively drooling, a side effect of swollen tongues. At the time, Texas A&M answered that the footage was “from several years ago” and released “with no context provided.”

PETA claims Kornegay breeds sick dogs, and has done so since the early ’80s; Texas A&M denies this allegation, insisting Kornegay’s subjects arrive “already affected by this disease.” The animal rights organization circulated an online petition to end the school’s use of the animals, and has coordinated multiple related protests, including one at Texas A&M’s May 10 graduation.

A representative from Kornegay’s college at Texas A&M responded to Linklater’s letter thusly:

[Duchenne muscular dystrophy] is a devastating disease that affects both children and dogs. It is a genetic disease that affects boys, all of whom die early in life, living only into their twenties, but only after much suffering. Any parent with an affected child is acutely aware of how devastating this disease is, not only to the affected children but also to their families.

The dogs with DMD at Texas A&M are treated with great care and tenderness, as they help unravel the mysteries and potential cures for this dreadful disease. Not only do our people who work with these dogs truly care about them as individuals, the work being conducted is highly regulated and there is rigorous oversight of their care by a number of organizations, including:

    • USDA (United States Department of Agriculture)
    • NIH (National Institutes of Health)
    • DOD (Department of Defense)
    • AAALAC (Accrediting body that comes around every 3 years)

It saddens us that without full knowledge — of what we are doing, how the dogs are treated, and how close we are to an effective treatment — groups have taken a rigid position and are using slander that adversely affects the opinion of those who don’t know all of the facts.

Please be assured that those who work with our dogs have chosen to devote their lives and careers to the care and well-being of all animals.

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Newcomer Emma Nelson Joins As Daughter To Cate Blanchett For Richard Linklater’s ‘Where’d You Go Bernadette’

EXCLUSIVE: Richard Linklater’s adaptation of Maria Semples’ Where’d You Go Bernadette has finally found his Bee, the daughter to the character Bernadette, portrayed by Cate Blanchett. Emma Nelson was plucked out of 500 other young wom…

EXCLUSIVE: Richard Linklater’s adaptation of Maria Semples’ Where’d You Go Bernadette has finally found his Bee, the daughter to the character Bernadette, portrayed by Cate Blanchett. Emma Nelson was plucked out of 500 other young women who auditioned for the role and makes her feature film debut for the role of a teenaged daughter who is determined to find her Mom, an architect-turned-recluse who goes missing just prior to a family vacation. The cast also includes Billy…

Paul Thomas Anderson Speaks to Richard Linklater About Grieving His ‘Hero’ Jonathan Demme — Watch

You’re probably going to want to take 30 minutes and watch two of the best directors working today honoring the legacy of Jonathan Demme.

Paul Thomas Anderson was asked by The Criterion Collection in 2013 which three directors influenced his career most. His answer tells you everything you need to know about his love for one particular filmmaker: “Jonathan Demme, Jonathan Demme, and Jonathan Demme.” Anderson has spoken about Demme numerous times since “The Silence of the Lambs” Oscar winner passed away in April 2017, but a recent sit down with Richard Linklater might be the most emotional Demme-centric discussion yet.

Linklater and Anderson honored Demme’s legacy during a conversation at the 2018 Texas Film Awards, where Anderson was awarded the inaugural Jonathan Demme Award. The Austin Film Society has finally released the entire half-hour talk online (via The Playlist), and it’s an incredible look at how one director ended up influencing two of the best working American directors in vastly different ways.

Read More: Paul Thomas Anderson Shares 5 Reasons Why Jonathan Demme Was His Favorite Filmmaker

“You imagine [Demme] being a pinball in a pinball machine, the way that he’s ricocheted around here through the course of his life and the branches that have grown off of these things that he’s done,” Anderson said. “He’s my hero. That was the person I looked at. If I could make my films, I want to make them look like that, sound like that, everything.”

Anderson continued: “Those moments when you feel that you’re in a jam, you have to say to yourself — and I do — ‘What would Jonathan do?’ And it is, at times, very helpful to help yourself get back on track.”

The conversation also finds Anderson talking about the moment he heard about Demme’s passing, which just so happened to be during the last day of production on “Phantom Thread.” The six-time Oscar-nominated drama was dedicated in Demme’s memory. Watch the Linklater/Anderson discussion below.

Richard Linklater to Attend Karlovy Vary as Festival Fetes Austin Film Society (EXCLUSIVE)

The 53rd Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival, which runs June 29-July 7, will dedicate a special section to the Austin Film Society, the nonprofit film organization founded in 1985 that has grown into one of the U.S.’s key film institutions. AFS founder and artistic director Richard Linklater will be among the guests of the program, […]

The 53rd Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival, which runs June 29-July 7, will dedicate a special section to the Austin Film Society, the nonprofit film organization founded in 1985 that has grown into one of the U.S.’s key film institutions. AFS founder and artistic director Richard Linklater will be among the guests of the program, […]

Valentine’s Day Viewing Guide: 10 Movies for All Relationship Statuses (Photos)

Valentine’s Day is a typical date night, and in case couples are looking to save some money by spending the evening snuggled up in front of a television, TheWrap compiled a home movie viewing guide with suggestions for all tastes, ages and romantic situations.

From the most obvious to most obscure, here are 10 romantic movies worth considering — for one reason or another.

DON’T THINK TOO HARD: “Valentine’s Day”
It’s Valentine’s Day, and this movie is called “Valentine’s Day,” so it must be the perfect movie to watch. Right? Well, no. It was actually critically panned when it was released in 2010, but hey, you don’t care about that. You just want to pop in a movie that seems like appropriately timed viewing so you have an excuse to make a move on that special someone sitting next to you on the couch.

SNUGGLE BAIT: “The Conjuring”

It’s true, dudes. If you’re looking to get close to your valentine this year, your best shot isn’t to butter her up (not to mention raise her expectations) with unrealistic romantic drivel — but a truly terrifying horror film that will make her a) jump into your safe and strong arms and b) too scared to sleep alone that night.

TRUE ROMANCE: “Before Sunrise”

Want to watch a true cinematic romance unfold? Start off with Richard Linklater‘s 1995 drama about a young American (Ethan Hawke) and French grad student (Julie Delpy) falling deeply in love over nothing but meaningful conversation as they wander the streets of Vienna until it’s time for one to catch a flight. If you like what you see, prepare to marathon sequels “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” — nominated for a screenwriting Oscar this  year — to see just how far one spontaneous date can lead in life.

HE’LL LOVE IT, SHE’LL TOLERATE IT: “Knocked Up”/”40-Year-Old Virgin”

Enjoy writer-director Judd Apatow‘s finest films, which are filled with just enough romance in between all of those dick jokes to keep both men and women happy.

LOVE SUCKS: “Blue Valentine”
Single? Lonely? Depressed? Cheer up! Derek Cianfrance’s remarkably raw 2010 drama proves you’re not missing out on anything, anyway, as even a relationship with Ryan Gosling can end up being a giant waste of time for all parties involved. You’ll never be happier to be single after watching Gosling’s realistic romance with Michelle Williams fizzle.

AT LEAST YOU’RE NOT THIS GUY: “Carnal Knowledge”

Need proof that your love life doesn’t suck as much as you think it does? Rent a copy of “Carnal Knowledge” and allow Jack Nicholson’s Jonathan Fuerst character to make you feel better by comparison. Skip ahead to where Fuerst delivers his ultra-bitter “Ballbusters on Parade” slideshow, detailing his encounters with the women in his life. Unless one of your hands is shoving a gun in your mouth while the other is wrapping a noose around your neck, you’re definitely better off than this miserable pig.

SO BAD IT’S GREAT: “The Room”

Still haven’t seen this unintentionally comedic cult classic? Grab your significant other — or a bunch of rowdy friends — a football, some spoons and a bunch of booze to experience love through the lens of a filmmaker named Tommy Wiseau, whose ethnicity is as mysterious as his cinematic influences, considering this relationship drama doesn’t actually make a lick of sense.

WITNESS UNCONDITIONAL LOVE: “Marley & Me”
If you want someone to love and to love you in your best and worst moments, get a dog. That’s one of the lessons of “Marley & Me.” The other lesson is, make sure you watch it with a guy or gal who doesn’t mind your ugly-cry face, because you’ll definitely turn on the waterworks by the end of this tearjerker.

LOVE LIKE A KID AGAIN: “13 Going on 30”/”Big”
Sometimes it’s hard to remember, but finding a significant other used to just be a dream when we were kids, so conjure up those junior-high inspired tummy butterflies with the coming-of-age classic “Big” or the 2004 chick flick it inspired, “13 Going On 30.” As fans know, 1988’s “Big” stars a ridiculously likable Tom Hanks while “13 Going On 30” celebrates Jennifer Garner at her most adorable. Just don’t forget the Oreos and Fruit Roll-Ups.

DAILY DOSE OF DAVID LYNCH: “Wild at Heart”
In this dark and raw David Lynch road movie, Laura Dern and Nicolas Cage are Sailor Ripley and Lula Pace Fortune, young lovers on the run from a malevolent mom (an Oscar-nominated Diane Ladd, Dern’s real-life mother) and the mob. There’s murder, sex, derangement, sex, mutilation, sex, allusions to “The Wizard of Oz” and Elvis Presley covers. Cuddle up!

Valentine’s Day is a typical date night, and in case couples are looking to save some money by spending the evening snuggled up in front of a television, TheWrap compiled a home movie viewing guide with suggestions for all tastes, ages and romantic situations.

From the most obvious to most obscure, here are 10 romantic movies worth considering — for one reason or another.

DON’T THINK TOO HARD: “Valentine’s Day”
It’s Valentine’s Day, and this movie is called “Valentine’s Day,” so it must be the perfect movie to watch. Right? Well, no. It was actually critically panned when it was released in 2010, but hey, you don’t care about that. You just want to pop in a movie that seems like appropriately timed viewing so you have an excuse to make a move on that special someone sitting next to you on the couch.

SNUGGLE BAIT: “The Conjuring”

It’s true, dudes. If you’re looking to get close to your valentine this year, your best shot isn’t to butter her up (not to mention raise her expectations) with unrealistic romantic drivel — but a truly terrifying horror film that will make her a) jump into your safe and strong arms and b) too scared to sleep alone that night.

TRUE ROMANCE: “Before Sunrise”

Want to watch a true cinematic romance unfold? Start off with Richard Linklater‘s 1995 drama about a young American (Ethan Hawke) and French grad student (Julie Delpy) falling deeply in love over nothing but meaningful conversation as they wander the streets of Vienna until it’s time for one to catch a flight. If you like what you see, prepare to marathon sequels “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight” — nominated for a screenwriting Oscar this  year — to see just how far one spontaneous date can lead in life.

HE’LL LOVE IT, SHE’LL TOLERATE IT: “Knocked Up”/”40-Year-Old Virgin”

Enjoy writer-director Judd Apatow‘s finest films, which are filled with just enough romance in between all of those dick jokes to keep both men and women happy.

LOVE SUCKS: “Blue Valentine”
Single? Lonely? Depressed? Cheer up! Derek Cianfrance’s remarkably raw 2010 drama proves you’re not missing out on anything, anyway, as even a relationship with Ryan Gosling can end up being a giant waste of time for all parties involved. You’ll never be happier to be single after watching Gosling’s realistic romance with Michelle Williams fizzle.

AT LEAST YOU’RE NOT THIS GUY: “Carnal Knowledge”

Need proof that your love life doesn’t suck as much as you think it does? Rent a copy of “Carnal Knowledge” and allow Jack Nicholson’s Jonathan Fuerst character to make you feel better by comparison. Skip ahead to where Fuerst delivers his ultra-bitter “Ballbusters on Parade” slideshow, detailing his encounters with the women in his life. Unless one of your hands is shoving a gun in your mouth while the other is wrapping a noose around your neck, you’re definitely better off than this miserable pig.

SO BAD IT’S GREAT: “The Room”

Still haven’t seen this unintentionally comedic cult classic? Grab your significant other — or a bunch of rowdy friends — a football, some spoons and a bunch of booze to experience love through the lens of a filmmaker named Tommy Wiseau, whose ethnicity is as mysterious as his cinematic influences, considering this relationship drama doesn’t actually make a lick of sense.

WITNESS UNCONDITIONAL LOVE: “Marley & Me”
If you want someone to love and to love you in your best and worst moments, get a dog. That’s one of the lessons of “Marley & Me.” The other lesson is, make sure you watch it with a guy or gal who doesn’t mind your ugly-cry face, because you’ll definitely turn on the waterworks by the end of this tearjerker.

LOVE LIKE A KID AGAIN: “13 Going on 30”/”Big”
Sometimes it’s hard to remember, but finding a significant other used to just be a dream when we were kids, so conjure up those junior-high inspired tummy butterflies with the coming-of-age classic “Big” or the 2004 chick flick it inspired, “13 Going On 30.” As fans know, 1988’s “Big” stars a ridiculously likable Tom Hanks while “13 Going On 30” celebrates Jennifer Garner at her most adorable. Just don’t forget the Oreos and Fruit Roll-Ups.

DAILY DOSE OF DAVID LYNCH: “Wild at Heart”
In this dark and raw David Lynch road movie, Laura Dern and Nicolas Cage are Sailor Ripley and Lula Pace Fortune, young lovers on the run from a malevolent mom (an Oscar-nominated Diane Ladd, Dern’s real-life mother) and the mob. There’s murder, sex, derangement, sex, mutilation, sex, allusions to “The Wizard of Oz” and Elvis Presley covers. Cuddle up!

Massive Tax Break and Strong Box Office Push Lionsgate Past Q3 Wall Street Earnings Expectations

A massive one-time tax cut and a strong performance at the box office pushed Lionsgate to a better than expected third quarter, with the studio reporting a nearly $200 million profit on Thursday.

After markets closed, the studio reported $1.14 billion in revenue and earnings of 87 cents a share for the three months ended December 31, which the company classifies as its fiscal third quarter. The sales and earnings beat analyst expectations of $1.08 billion in revenue and 25 cents EPS, respectively.

Earnings were bolstered by $165 million stemming from a lower tax rate, with net income coming out to $193 million. The strong quarter comes amid reports Lionsgate is a potential takeover target.

Also Read: Lionsgate Moves ‘The Spy Who Dumped Me’ to August, ‘Madea Family Funeral’ to Fall 2018

Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer said the quarter pushed the company to resume its quarterly cash dividend, which the company suspended in 2016.

“Our strong performance in the quarter, with robust contributions from our Motion Picture Group and Starz, keeps us on track for our fiscal year expectations,” said Feltheimer in a statement accompanying earnings. “With this financial strength, we’re pleased to announce that our Board has approved the resumption of our quarterly cash dividend, returning value to our shareholders as we continue to grow our Company.  Despite a disruptive operating environment, the quarter shows our success in creating premium content that cuts through the clutter of a crowded marketplace and our ability to supply it to a diverse array of media companies.”

The company will resume its quarterly cash dividend at $0.09 per common share.

Also Read: ‘Pod Save America’ to Become Series of HBO Election Specials

Lionsgate released five films during the quarter, with “Wonder,” the Owen Wilson-Julia Roberts coming-of-age drama, leading the way at the box office with $277 million pulled in. The studio also released “Jigsaw,” “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2!,” “My Little Pony: The Movie,” and Richard Linklater’s small comedy-drama “Last Flag Flying.” Motion picture revenue was up 14 percent year-over-year to $539.1 million, while registering $54.3 million in profit.

It was a quiet quarter for its TV business,with revenue dropping about 2 percent year-over-year to $227.3 million. Lionsgate didn’t offer much news on Starz — which had about 2 million subscribers coming into the quarter — but its media networks division did see a revenue increase of 6 percent to $382 million.

Lionsgate shares fell more than 3 percent to about $30 on Thursday, but jumped 1 percent after earnings were reported.

Also Read: Michael Bay Eyed to Direct DC Superhero ‘Lobo’ Movie (Exclusive)

The company will hold a conference call to discuss the earnings report at 5:00 p.m. ET.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Incredible Hulk’ Director Louis Leterrier Hired for ‘Monster Hunt’ at Lionsgate (Exclusive)

Jesse Peretz Sundance Hit ‘Juliet, Naked’ Goes to Lionsgate, Roadside Attractions

Lionsgate Nabs Worldwide Rights to ‘Blindspotting’

A massive one-time tax cut and a strong performance at the box office pushed Lionsgate to a better than expected third quarter, with the studio reporting a nearly $200 million profit on Thursday.

After markets closed, the studio reported $1.14 billion in revenue and earnings of 87 cents a share for the three months ended December 31, which the company classifies as its fiscal third quarter. The sales and earnings beat analyst expectations of $1.08 billion in revenue and 25 cents EPS, respectively.

Earnings were bolstered by $165 million stemming from a lower tax rate, with net income coming out to $193 million. The strong quarter comes amid reports Lionsgate is a potential takeover target.

Lionsgate CEO Jon Feltheimer said the quarter pushed the company to resume its quarterly cash dividend, which the company suspended in 2016.

“Our strong performance in the quarter, with robust contributions from our Motion Picture Group and Starz, keeps us on track for our fiscal year expectations,” said Feltheimer in a statement accompanying earnings. “With this financial strength, we’re pleased to announce that our Board has approved the resumption of our quarterly cash dividend, returning value to our shareholders as we continue to grow our Company.  Despite a disruptive operating environment, the quarter shows our success in creating premium content that cuts through the clutter of a crowded marketplace and our ability to supply it to a diverse array of media companies.”

The company will resume its quarterly cash dividend at $0.09 per common share.

Lionsgate released five films during the quarter, with “Wonder,” the Owen Wilson-Julia Roberts coming-of-age drama, leading the way at the box office with $277 million pulled in. The studio also released “Jigsaw,” “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2!,” “My Little Pony: The Movie,” and Richard Linklater’s small comedy-drama “Last Flag Flying.” Motion picture revenue was up 14 percent year-over-year to $539.1 million, while registering $54.3 million in profit.

It was a quiet quarter for its TV business,with revenue dropping about 2 percent year-over-year to $227.3 million. Lionsgate didn’t offer much news on Starz — which had about 2 million subscribers coming into the quarter — but its media networks division did see a revenue increase of 6 percent to $382 million.

Lionsgate shares fell more than 3 percent to about $30 on Thursday, but jumped 1 percent after earnings were reported.

The company will hold a conference call to discuss the earnings report at 5:00 p.m. ET.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Incredible Hulk' Director Louis Leterrier Hired for 'Monster Hunt' at Lionsgate (Exclusive)

Jesse Peretz Sundance Hit 'Juliet, Naked' Goes to Lionsgate, Roadside Attractions

Lionsgate Nabs Worldwide Rights to 'Blindspotting'

Richard Linklater’s Secret Movie: The Director Confirms 1969 Coming-of-Age Film and Needs Your Help

Linklater is going full “Boyhood” by directing a secret project in Houston, Texas.

Richard Linklater is up to his old tricks again. The director has confirmed to The Houston Chronicle that he’s currently at work directing a secret project in Houston, Texas. Linklater isn’t ready to reveal any cast or plot details, but he’s ok with letting everyone know the film will be a coming-of-age story that takes place in 1969 and centers around the moon landing.

“You had so much going on in Houston at once: NASA, the Medical Center, the Astrodome,” Linklater said. “There was a communal atmosphere. You had all these kids with parents working at NASA for a common goal.”

The Chronicle says the new film was partly inspired by Linklater’s time shooting his magnum opus “Boyhood.” The film got the director thinking about his own childhood and growing up in the wake of the moon landing, which is where the script was inspired from. The movie will feature “regional hits” from 1969 and be set during the summer. Similar to “Boyhood,” the film will be told from a child’s point of view.

Linklater has already announced he’s tackling an adaptation of the novel “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” with Cate Blanchett, so it seems like the Houston-set secret project is a quick trip back to his indie roots before he takes on a larger project. He was last in theaters in the fall with “Last Flag Flying,” starring Bryan Cranston, Steve Carrell, and Laurence Fishburne.

The Houston Film Commission has issued the following statement, which announces Linklater needs your help for any nostalgic Houston memorabilia you may have in your possession.

Director Richard Linklater needs your Houston area photos, videos from the 1960s for a new movie. Have a home movie from Astroworld or the Astrodome, or a recording of your little brother with Kitirik? Did someone you know use a Kinescope to record the moon landing? If so, we want to see it and anything else that documents that era. There is no wrong material, as long as it from Houston in the 1960s we want to see it.

Linklater is aiming to release the film in 2019 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing.