‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Finale Gives Birth To A Brand New Jimmy

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul.
There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 final…

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul. There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 finale addresses this and continues to clear the path for the inevitable intersection with the Breaking Bad timeline — although we’ll probably have to wait a little longer to see Walter White or Jesse Pinkman make an appearance in Saul. Even…

‘Better Call Saul’ Co-Showrunner Breaks Down That Long-Awaited Moment in the Season Finale

(Warning: This story contains spoilers from the season finale of AMC’s “Better Call Saul”)

Exit Jimmy McGill. And finally, after four seasons, enter Saul Goodman.

The “Breaking Bad” spinoff wrapped its fourth season on Monday with a moment that viewers had been anticipating ever since we first met Bob Odenkirk’s lovable-but-flawed Jimmy McGill.

“I’m so thankful that everyone stuck with us this long,” Peter Gould, “Better Call Saul’s” co-showrunner tells TheWrap.

After delivering a heartfelt, tearful story about his late brother Chuck (Michael McKean) and winning his appeal to the New Mexico State Bar committee to be reinstated as a lawyer, as they walk out Jimmy does an about-face to Kim (Rhea Seehorn): He was faking the whole thing in an attempt to get a sympathy vote.

Also Read: AMC Renews Paul Giamatti-Produced ‘Lodge 49’ for Season 2

“Did you see those suckers? That one a—— was crying,” he excitedly tells Kim, who looks on horror as she is unwittingly witnessing the “birth” of his “Breaking Bad” alter-ego. Upon being reinstated, he asks for a DBA, or “Doing Business As,” form so he can practice law under a different name. And if there was still any doubt what that name would be, the final words of the season made it crystal clear: He’s finally Saul Goodman, Attorney at Law.

“It’s one of those things that emerged, sort of organically, as we broke the season,” Gould said of the four-years-in-the-making moment.

The introduction (or re-introduction) of Saul Goodman was something that took far longer than Gould had anticipated, as it’s well known that he and co-creator Vince Gilligan had originally planned to have Jimmy become Saul at the end of the first season. But the tragic descent of Jimmy into the sleazy lawyer from “Breaking Bad” ending up being too interesting to speed through.

But all throughout the fourth season, it felt like the clock was counting down to midnight on Jimmy. He was already using the “Saul Goodman” moniker when he was selling his cell phones to criminals and in the penultimate episode he laments to Kim that, while he sees those same criminals as potential new business (after all, criminals tend to need lawyers), they only know him under his pseudonym.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

“Jimmy has this very specific problem, which is that his former business of doing wills for the elders is closed off to him,” says Gould. “Even when he’s a lawyer again, he’s ruined his reputation, so what kind of law is he going to practice next?”

Gould said that around midseason they figured out how they were going to get Jimmy to that point where he decides it’s more advantageous to him to practice law under a different name. “All season long we’ve been kind of teasing out and going step by step to try and figure out how he comes to the conclusion that he comes to.” And as Gould explains, to Jimmy, it makes perfect sense. “This crazy decision of calling himself Saul Goodman is, in his eyes, logical.”

But Gould teases, is it also a way for Jimmy to put on a mask and shut himself off to anybody that still cares for him?

All throughout “Better Call Saul” the writers have presented Jimmy McGill as this down-on-his-luck screw up, always looking to cut corners, and always failing to earn the respect of Chuck. Despite Jimmy’s insistence to Kim at the end that his statement about his late brother in front of the committee was an act, Gould argues there was probably some truth to those words, where Jimmy talks about his desire to make his big brother proud.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

“He uses the death of his brother to evoke an emotional reaction from the panel to win the day. But, it feels very real,” said Gould. “Has he just become a much better actor? There’s a lot of ways to interpret that [scene].”

Gould said the writers are just starting to plan out the fifth season, which will see Odenkirk have to essentially play two characters.

“The big question for us is what does it mean to be Saul?” he asks. “It’s the Bruce Wayne/Batman question. Which one is the real guy?”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould: ‘Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks’ (Podcast)

‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim’s Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

(Warning: This story contains spoilers from the season finale of AMC’s “Better Call Saul”)

Exit Jimmy McGill. And finally, after four seasons, enter Saul Goodman.

The “Breaking Bad” spinoff wrapped its fourth season on Monday with a moment that viewers had been anticipating ever since we first met Bob Odenkirk’s lovable-but-flawed Jimmy McGill.

“I’m so thankful that everyone stuck with us this long,” Peter Gould, “Better Call Saul’s” co-showrunner tells TheWrap.

After delivering a heartfelt, tearful story about his late brother Chuck (Michael McKean) and winning his appeal to the New Mexico State Bar committee to be reinstated as a lawyer, as they walk out Jimmy does an about-face to Kim (Rhea Seehorn): He was faking the whole thing in an attempt to get a sympathy vote.

“Did you see those suckers? That one a—— was crying,” he excitedly tells Kim, who looks on horror as she is unwittingly witnessing the “birth” of his “Breaking Bad” alter-ego. Upon being reinstated, he asks for a DBA, or “Doing Business As,” form so he can practice law under a different name. And if there was still any doubt what that name would be, the final words of the season made it crystal clear: He’s finally Saul Goodman, Attorney at Law.

“It’s one of those things that emerged, sort of organically, as we broke the season,” Gould said of the four-years-in-the-making moment.

The introduction (or re-introduction) of Saul Goodman was something that took far longer than Gould had anticipated, as it’s well known that he and co-creator Vince Gilligan had originally planned to have Jimmy become Saul at the end of the first season. But the tragic descent of Jimmy into the sleazy lawyer from “Breaking Bad” ending up being too interesting to speed through.

But all throughout the fourth season, it felt like the clock was counting down to midnight on Jimmy. He was already using the “Saul Goodman” moniker when he was selling his cell phones to criminals and in the penultimate episode he laments to Kim that, while he sees those same criminals as potential new business (after all, criminals tend to need lawyers), they only know him under his pseudonym.

“Jimmy has this very specific problem, which is that his former business of doing wills for the elders is closed off to him,” says Gould. “Even when he’s a lawyer again, he’s ruined his reputation, so what kind of law is he going to practice next?”

Gould said that around midseason they figured out how they were going to get Jimmy to that point where he decides it’s more advantageous to him to practice law under a different name. “All season long we’ve been kind of teasing out and going step by step to try and figure out how he comes to the conclusion that he comes to.” And as Gould explains, to Jimmy, it makes perfect sense. “This crazy decision of calling himself Saul Goodman is, in his eyes, logical.”

But Gould teases, is it also a way for Jimmy to put on a mask and shut himself off to anybody that still cares for him?

All throughout “Better Call Saul” the writers have presented Jimmy McGill as this down-on-his-luck screw up, always looking to cut corners, and always failing to earn the respect of Chuck. Despite Jimmy’s insistence to Kim at the end that his statement about his late brother in front of the committee was an act, Gould argues there was probably some truth to those words, where Jimmy talks about his desire to make his big brother proud.

“He uses the death of his brother to evoke an emotional reaction from the panel to win the day. But, it feels very real,” said Gould. “Has he just become a much better actor? There’s a lot of ways to interpret that [scene].”

Gould said the writers are just starting to plan out the fifth season, which will see Odenkirk have to essentially play two characters.

“The big question for us is what does it mean to be Saul?” he asks. “It’s the Bruce Wayne/Batman question. Which one is the real guy?”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould: 'Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks' (Podcast)

'Better Call Saul': Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim's Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

'Better Call Saul': Nacho Is a 'Samurai Without a Master' Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Dives Deep Into the Jaw-Dropping Jimmy and Kim Confrontation of ‘Wiedersehen’

Seehorn also teases that the upcoming Season 4 finale will end on “a very big cliffhanger” about the fate of Jimmy McGill.

[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Better Call Saul” Season 4 Episode 9, “Wiedersehen.”]

You’ll rarely talk to an actor who’s put more time and thought into who their character is, and what their relationships are, then someone working on “Better Call Saul.” And the results show in the deeply nuanced work that can make the most seemingly mundane fight into some of the year’s most captivating television.

In “Wiedersehen,” the penultimate episode of Season 4, longtime partners Kim (Rhea Seehorn) and Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk) have the sort of war of words that can destroy a relationship permanently. The brawl on the parking garage rooftop is fueled by Jimmy’s anger and frustration on his past year of work trying to rehabilitate himself in the eyes of the bar association and regain his license to practice law.

Key to the scene, Seehorn told IndieWire, was both careful collaboration between herself, director Vince Gilligan, co-creator Peter Gould, and writer Gennifer Hutchinson, and Odenkirk — including, at a certain point, putting some distance between herself and her co-star prior to filming.

“We rehearsed just lines,” she said, “…but then we kind of retreated, Bob and I, to allow ourselves the room to come at it from the very different points-of-view that are happening in that scene.”

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 9 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Rhea Seehorn and Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

This was because “it was necessary for Bob to understand and believe that Jimmy’s point-of-view is in that scene as much as it’s necessary and helpful for me to understand Kim’s, and they’re diametrically opposed for a large chunk of that scene. We both felt very honest in portraying those two sides.”

The fight is about far more than Jimmy’s failure to reattain his license; seemingly smaller issues that have been planted all season long as Kim and Jimmy’s relationship has been complicated by underlying insecurities, slights, and insults.

“I’m good enough to live with, good enough to sleep with, but god forbid you should have an office with me,” Jimmy slings at her at one point, one of the scene’s most memorable moments, one that was key for Seehorn’s take on the scene.

“These are partners in every sense of the word and the fact that he would throw that at me — I think that Kim and Jimmy, they are romantic and I think they are sexually attracted to each other, and that is part of why they are a couple instead of remaining as friends,” Seehorn said. “They made that decision. But the fact that he would choose to throw it back at me in the middle of a heated argument is actually what struck me when I’m coming from Kim’s point of view of, ‘Why is that necessary?'”

It speaks to a key part of Kim’s characterization — her instinct to compartmentalize various aspects of her life, which lets her both serve as a practicing corporate lawyer while also running cons with Jimmy on the side, and live with Jimmy while also not fully committing to a law practice together.

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 9 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Rhea Seehorn and Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

“The fact that he would throw in the fact that we’re romantically involved is just another flag to her that he’s just going for the jugular,” she said. “He’s being utterly insensitive and coming from just an absolute place of defensiveness, which can, on a great day, Kim can walk away from, I think.”

Continued Seehorn, “That was fun to play too. I think normally, Kim can see, and we see it all the time. When she sees people metaphorically hanging themselves, she usually just waits until they have enough rope. She doesn’t really speak or engage and that’s one of her tactics. In this case, she engages and she engages quite violently by the end of that argument.”

By the end, Jimmy and Kim have left each other both metaphorically quite bloody. “Vince was key and Gennifer was key in really wanting me to dig in to everything Kim might be feeling and how far she could be pushed in this scene, because Jimmy is relentless. He’s relentless in it as far as assuming things about her without her saying a word, and she fights back, and I think one of the things people really do love about Kim, male and female of our audience, is that she’s a fighter.”

Things don’t end there for the pair in this episode — instead, a tentative effort is made to reconnect in the end, though on very specific terms.

“That was a hard scene too,” Seehorn said of their final moments together. “Two people in two different rooms trying to figure out who’s gonna offer a peace offering and what’s that look like to them.”

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 9 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Bob Odenkirk and Rhea Seehorn in “Better Call Saul”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

Seehorn noted that she and Odenkirk had different ideas about the meaning of those scenes, “not in an argumentative or contentious way between us as actors — we enjoy each other very much. But just, that, what are you doing when you come home and insist you’re moving? Is it hoping somebody will stop you or is it a real offering of love to say, ‘I think you’d be better off without me’?”

In the end, it’s Kim who does go to him, but, Seehorn noted with a laugh, “then still has to put a caveat on it by saying, ‘This is about helping me to be a lawyer.’ It’s just very funny. They’re both such peculiar characters to me in that often, I’m just like, ‘Jesus.’ In many ways, they’re more alike than not alike. It gets highlighted so much how they’re different, but in those moments, in the arguments, sometimes, and then in the small reparation, I find them to be incredibly similar.”

With Season 4 almost wrapped, and a fifth season greenlit, there wasn’t much Seehorn could say about the future. “I’m pretty sure the writers [for Season 5] just recently assembled, and I don’t have a clue,” she said. “I don’t know where they plan on picking up the story timeline-wise, I don’t know where Jimmy is or if he’s Saul or…”

She trailed off. “There’s a very big cliffhanger that will cause you to at least be even more pensive about that question in Episode 10. They usually do that with the penultimate and the finale. They answer one question and raise two.”

“All I can tell you is that you’ll be left with the same feeling that I had which is, ‘What is happening?’ Oh my god.”

The “Better Call Saul” Season 4 finale premieres Monday, October 8 at 9 p.m. on AMC.

‘Better Call Saul’ Star Rhea Seehorn: ‘It Is A Crazy Ride From Here To The End’

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched episode 407 of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Something Stupid.” Can this relationship be saved? Given Kim’s (Rhea Seehorn) absence in the future that we know in “Br…

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched episode 407 of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Something Stupid.” Can this relationship be saved? Given Kim’s (Rhea Seehorn) absence in the future that we know in “Breaking Bad,” it seems only a matter of time before she splits up with Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk). And that fate seems […]

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

“Better Call Saul” co-creator and “Breaking Bad” veteran Peter Gould is one of the most successful writers in Hollywood, but it wasn’t always so. In the early 2000s, he tried unsuccessfully to get HBO to make his project a…

“Better Call Saul” co-creator and “Breaking Bad” veteran Peter Gould is one of the most successful writers in Hollywood, but it wasn’t always so. In the early 2000s, he tried unsuccessfully to get HBO to make his project about the Clinton-Lewinsky saga — with shadow puppets.

Listen to Gould explain the project — and offer some excellent writing advice — in our new “Shoot This Now” podcast. You can listen on Apple or right here.

Gould told us that before he was hired on “Breaking Bad” — where he created criminal lawyer Saul Goodman, aka Jimmy McGill, the antihero of “Breaking Bad” spinoff “Better Call Saul” — he spent years writing projects that never got made. One of them was a Pam Grier story he also describes on the podcast. Another was the Clinton-Lewinsky story, which Gould wrote in both movie and miniseries form in the hopes that HBO would air it. The network unfortunately passed.

The scandal was still all-too-fresh in people’s minds in the early 2000s, and Gould was looking for a way to illustrate certain graphic details. That’s when he hit on the idea of shadow puppets — figures placed between a light and a screen to act out the drama.

Ever make a dog with your hands when your teacher turned on a film projector? Congratulations: You understand the basics of shadow puppets. Masters of the art form cut figures from paper and other materials to create characters who can walk, dance, and… do other stuff, as Gould explains.

Could the Clinton-Lewinsky story still work today? We think so. Earlier this year, Ryan Murphy abandoned plans for a season of “American Crime Story” that would have focused on the star-crossed relationship between President Bill Clinton’s relationship and White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

But interest in the case remains high: Donald Trump tried to make it an issue during the 2016 presidential campaign, when he ran against Clinton’s wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. And the scandal is the new subject of the captivating “Slow Burn” podcast.

Gould also tells us about his interesting job interview for “Breaking Bad,” how he beats writer’s block, and what’s in store for “Better Call Saul” leads Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk) and Kim (Rhea Seehorn). Things are about to get shadowy.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould: 'Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks' (Podcast)

'Better Call Saul': Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim's Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

'Better Call Saul' Writers: Walter White May Still Be Alive During Gene's Omaha Cinnabon Scenes

‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim’s Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

Rhea Seehorn says the fact that her “Better Call Saul” character Kim Wexler didn’t appear on “Breaking Bad” has her terrified about her eventual fate. So terrified, in fact, that she flips through every script immediately to check if she makes it through the episode intact.

“Patrick Fabian [who plays Howard Hamlin] and I, every time we get the scripts, we flip through them as fast as possible and then we call each other: ‘I’m not dead! You’re not dead!,’” Seehorn told Seth Meyers on his “Late Night” show on Tuesday. “And then we get back to doing the work. But yea, you always have to check.”

Set prior to the events of “Breaking Bad,” “Better Call Saul” focuses on the transformation of Bob Odenkirk’s Jimmy McGill into the criminal lawyer Saul Goodman that advises Bryan Cranston’s Walter White. A popular theory for any “Better Call Saul” character that didn’t first show up in “Breaking Bad” is that they’re living on borrowed time. We already saw that with one character: Michael McKean’s Charles McGill.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

As Meyers so aptly put it: “It’s a universe where people die a lot.”

Since Kim is arguably the last character that’s keeping Jimmy from turning fully into the smarmy lawyer we meet in “Breaking Bad,” it would appear that something tragic is going to happen.

“In the end if it’s better to kill Kim, [showrunners Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould] would kill Kim, but at this point I’m not even sure that’s the most tragic end for her,” Seehorn said.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Writers: Walter White May Still Be Alive During Gene’s Omaha Cinnabon Scenes

However, Seehorn said she’s been pitching Gilligan and Gould on a future that includes Kim, referencing the black-and-white flash-forwards of Jimmy/Saul’s life after the events of “Breaking Bad,” where he’s essentially in witness protection as a Cinnabon manager named “Gene.”

“We do the Gene-Cinnabon scenes that are black and white, but you just slowly pull back and Kim works next door at Claire’s accessories… with her own comb-over,” she said. “She could be selling ponytail holders.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of ‘Better Call Saul’ (Video)

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New ‘Better Call Saul’ Ass Tattoo (Photo)

Rhea Seehorn says the fact that her “Better Call Saul” character Kim Wexler didn’t appear on “Breaking Bad” has her terrified about her eventual fate. So terrified, in fact, that she flips through every script immediately to check if she makes it through the episode intact.

“Patrick Fabian [who plays Howard Hamlin] and I, every time we get the scripts, we flip through them as fast as possible and then we call each other: ‘I’m not dead! You’re not dead!,'” Seehorn told Seth Meyers on his “Late Night” show on Tuesday. “And then we get back to doing the work. But yea, you always have to check.”

Set prior to the events of “Breaking Bad,” “Better Call Saul” focuses on the transformation of Bob Odenkirk’s Jimmy McGill into the criminal lawyer Saul Goodman that advises Bryan Cranston’s Walter White. A popular theory for any “Better Call Saul” character that didn’t first show up in “Breaking Bad” is that they’re living on borrowed time. We already saw that with one character: Michael McKean’s Charles McGill.

As Meyers so aptly put it: “It’s a universe where people die a lot.”

Since Kim is arguably the last character that’s keeping Jimmy from turning fully into the smarmy lawyer we meet in “Breaking Bad,” it would appear that something tragic is going to happen.

“In the end if it’s better to kill Kim, [showrunners Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould] would kill Kim, but at this point I’m not even sure that’s the most tragic end for her,” Seehorn said.

However, Seehorn said she’s been pitching Gilligan and Gould on a future that includes Kim, referencing the black-and-white flash-forwards of Jimmy/Saul’s life after the events of “Breaking Bad,” where he’s essentially in witness protection as a Cinnabon manager named “Gene.”

“We do the Gene-Cinnabon scenes that are black and white, but you just slowly pull back and Kim works next door at Claire’s accessories… with her own comb-over,” she said. “She could be selling ponytail holders.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of 'Better Call Saul' (Video)

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New 'Better Call Saul' Ass Tattoo (Photo)

Jon Hamm, Rhea Seehorn, and more talk “science” in this Stinker Lets Loose audiobook exclusive

A stellar cast gathers to narrate Stinker Lets Loose, the purportedly resurfaced novelization of a supposedly beloved ’70s trucker film of the same name. The story is part Smokey And The Bandit trilogy, part Every Which Way But Loose; the titular Stinker leads lawmen on a wild chase that apparently includes a chimp.…

Read more…

A stellar cast gathers to narrate Stinker Lets Loose, the purportedly resurfaced novelization of a supposedly beloved ’70s trucker film of the same name. The story is part Smokey And The Bandit trilogy, part Every Which Way But Loose; the titular Stinker leads lawmen on a wild chase that apparently includes a chimp.…

Read more...

‘Better Call Saul’s Giancarlo Esposito Promises “A Gus You’ve Never Seen Before” – The Contenders Emmys Video

“I’m honored to be coming back to a cast, a new cast and some older cast of really stellar actors, but primarily I’m back thinking in a new way of a Gus you’ve never seen before,” Giancarlo Esposito says of his ruthless Breaking Bad drug lord character that is joining Better Call Saul for the prequel’s third season.
Along with a surprise onstage visit from Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston, Esposito was speaking during Deadline’s The Contenders Emmys event last month at…

"I'm honored to be coming back to a cast, a new cast and some older cast of really stellar actors, but primarily I'm back thinking in a new way of a Gus you've never seen before," Giancarlo Esposito says of his ruthless Breaking Bad drug lord character that is joining Better Call Saul for the prequel’s third season. Along with a surprise onstage visit from Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston, Esposito was speaking during Deadline's The Contenders Emmys event last month at…

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 3: In ‘Off-Brand,’ an Alter-Ego Is Born — and Jimmy’s Fate is Sealed

This column contains significant plot details for May 15’s episode of “Better Call Saul,” “Off Brand.” Do not read if you haven’t seen the episode. More important than the long-awaited unveiling of Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk)’s alter-ego Saul Goodman in Monday night’s episode of “Better Call Saul” is Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn)’s muted, incredulous reaction to… Read more »

This column contains significant plot details for May 15’s episode of “Better Call Saul,” “Off Brand.” Do not read if you haven’t seen the episode. More important than the long-awaited unveiling of Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk)’s alter-ego Saul Goodman in Monday night’s episode of “Better Call Saul” is Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn)’s muted, incredulous reaction to... Read more »

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 3: What We Know So Far (Photos)

“Better Call Saul” Season 3 returns April 10 to AMC. Here’s what we know about the new season so far.

The Chuck Problem remains

Season 2 ended with Chuck McGill (Michael McKean) catching his brother on tape admitting to an ethical transgression that could cost him his law license. In a preview of Season 3, we saw Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) and new law partner Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn) discussing the Chuck Problem. “Crisis averted, I guess,” says Jimmy. “He’s back to being the same old Chuck.” It sounds like he doesn’t know Chuck has the goods on him… yet.

Jimmy and Kim’s partnership seems tense

Kim is taking on a lot of the workload in their new partnerships for reasons that remain unclear (are they related to The Chuck Problem?). She’s taking on more of the workload. “How ’bout we call it a day? I’ll… buy you some dinner?” he asks. She replies: “You’re kidding, right? You realize how far behind I am?” She references taking on some of his clients: “Don’t act like I wanted this.”

“Innocence gets torn away”

In an interview, Odenkirk gave TheWrap some insight into his character’s transformation from Jummy McGill into criminal lawyer Saul Goodman: “This season is gonna be about how innocence gets torn away. We learn that Saul is just who he’s pretending to be to get back at the world… Season 3 is when things will really explode.”

The Chicken Man is back

AMC announced Gus Fring’s return to the Breaking Bad Universe by having the actor who plays him, Giancarlo Esposito, hand out chicken to reporters at a press conference. It’s a safe bet that he was also the one who stopped Mike Ehrmantraut (Jonathan Banks) from carrying out an assassination at the end of Season 2.

Gus will be “a little fresher”

Esposito said in a recent interview that since “Better Call Saul” takes place before “Breaking Bad,” Fring will be “a different guy. He’s a little fresher, a little less jaded. … I wanted him to be little more hopeful, a little more energetic, maybe not as definitive in some of his actions because he’s a Gus that we’ve never met before.” But don’t worry. He added: “He is still terrifying, there is no doubt about it.” 

Another mystery man will show up, too

Odenkirk appeared on Twitter alongside a man with his face blocked by a picture of… Bob Odenkirk. Who is this mystery man? Is this the long-awaited Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) cameo we’ve all dreamed of? We’re trying not to read too much into the mystery man’s Pink Floyd shirt.

Paul recently seemed to hint on “Ellen” that he may pop up on Season 3. She asked him: “‘Breaking Bad,’ that was such a great show, so the question is: Will you be on ‘Better Call Saul’?”

“God, I hope so,” Paul said. “Maybe I already shot the… We — They just wrapped the last season.”

 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Gus Fring Returns in ‘Better Call Saul’ Season 3 Teaser (Video)

TV Shows You Should Binge-Watch Right Now, From ‘OITNB’ to ‘Better Call Saul’ (Photos)

‘Better Call Saul’ Star Bob Odenkirk Teases Season 3: ‘Innocence Gets Torn Away’ (Video)

“Better Call Saul” Season 3 returns April 10 to AMC. Here’s what we know about the new season so far.

The Chuck Problem remains

Season 2 ended with Chuck McGill (Michael McKean) catching his brother on tape admitting to an ethical transgression that could cost him his law license. In a preview of Season 3, we saw Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) and new law partner Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn) discussing the Chuck Problem. “Crisis averted, I guess,” says Jimmy. “He’s back to being the same old Chuck.” It sounds like he doesn’t know Chuck has the goods on him… yet.

Jimmy and Kim’s partnership seems tense

Kim is taking on a lot of the workload in their new partnerships for reasons that remain unclear (are they related to The Chuck Problem?). She’s taking on more of the workload. “How ’bout we call it a day? I’ll… buy you some dinner?” he asks. She replies: “You’re kidding, right? You realize how far behind I am?” She references taking on some of his clients: “Don’t act like I wanted this.”

“Innocence gets torn away”

In an interview, Odenkirk gave TheWrap some insight into his character’s transformation from Jummy McGill into criminal lawyer Saul Goodman: “This season is gonna be about how innocence gets torn away. We learn that Saul is just who he’s pretending to be to get back at the world… Season 3 is when things will really explode.”

The Chicken Man is back

AMC announced Gus Fring’s return to the Breaking Bad Universe by having the actor who plays him, Giancarlo Esposito, hand out chicken to reporters at a press conference. It’s a safe bet that he was also the one who stopped Mike Ehrmantraut (Jonathan Banks) from carrying out an assassination at the end of Season 2.

Gus will be “a little fresher”

Esposito said in a recent interview that since “Better Call Saul” takes place before “Breaking Bad,” Fring will be “a different guy. He’s a little fresher, a little less jaded. … I wanted him to be little more hopeful, a little more energetic, maybe not as definitive in some of his actions because he’s a Gus that we’ve never met before.” But don’t worry. He added: “He is still terrifying, there is no doubt about it.” 

Another mystery man will show up, too

Odenkirk appeared on Twitter alongside a man with his face blocked by a picture of… Bob Odenkirk. Who is this mystery man? Is this the long-awaited Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) cameo we’ve all dreamed of? We’re trying not to read too much into the mystery man’s Pink Floyd shirt.

Paul recently seemed to hint on “Ellen” that he may pop up on Season 3. She asked him: “‘Breaking Bad,’ that was such a great show, so the question is: Will you be on ‘Better Call Saul’?”

“God, I hope so,” Paul said. “Maybe I already shot the… We — They just wrapped the last season.”

 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Gus Fring Returns in 'Better Call Saul' Season 3 Teaser (Video)

TV Shows You Should Binge-Watch Right Now, From 'OITNB' to 'Better Call Saul' (Photos)

'Better Call Saul' Star Bob Odenkirk Teases Season 3: 'Innocence Gets Torn Away' (Video)