Rashida Jones Reveals What It Was Like to Make ‘Quincy,’ the Netflix Documentary About Her Dad

The film recently played as part of the IDA screening series.

Rashida Jones and her “Quincy” co-director Alan Hicks had unprecedented access to their documentary subject (and Rashida’s dad), Quincy Jones, but she said that he’s refreshingly unguarded no matter who you are.

“I think that’s he beauty of him. Whether you’re family or a fan…he gives you access,” Rashida told the audience at a Q&A following a screening of their Netflix film at the International Documentary Association’s annual screening series in Los Angeles.

Hicks and Jones shot 800 hours of footage over a period of nearly four years, but just as valuable as that intimate footage is the discovery of never-before-seen interviews and film from the artist’s own collection.

“We were working in Quincy’s archive in his basement and it took us nearly a year to get through the whole archive,” said Hicks, who met the elder Jones when he produced Hicks’ first documentary “Keep On Keepin’ On.” After Rashida and Hicks finished digitizing VHS tapes and scanning photos, they told Quincy they were done.

“We said, ‘Hey, we finished the archives,’ and he said, ‘That’s beautiful. Have you seen the vault?’ And then we went to the vault and it’s in freezing temperatures and he says, ‘That’s where you’re gonna find all the good shit.'”

Quincy was right. The vault contained Super 8 footage of his childhood and conversations with Ray Charles and Frank Sinatra.

“There’s all these things that people haven’t heard before, and he hadn’t heard before,” Hicks said. “He’s too busy to sit down and listen to the raw tapes of interviews through his career.”

Quincy Jones

Quincy Jones

Quincy Jones Archive

The film tells the story of his life from growing up in Chicago to the present day, and follows him as he organizes a concert for the opening of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture. Quincy tells his own story through archival footage from the vault, audio from his 2001 autobiography audiobook, and interviews from different periods.

“The way that he is able to confidently tell those hard truths about himself all the way through is something I noticed about him while filming for so many years,” Hicks said.

According to Jones, her father didn’t have any requests for the film — and didn’t even see it until it was finished.

“He loved it. He’s watched it several times now, but the first time he watched it he laughed, he cried, he participated like an audience member,” she said.

Said Hicks, “Our main focus was for people to be able to feel what it’s like to hang out with Quincy.”

“Quincy” is available to stream on Netflix, and its soundtrack — there were 725 contracts involved to secure the music for the film — is available to stream on Spotify.

The IDA Documentary Screening Series brings some of the year’s most acclaimed documentary films to the IDA community and members of industry guilds and organizations. Films selected for the Series receive exclusive access to an audience of tastemakers and doc lovers during the important Awards campaigning season from September through November. For more information about the series, and a complete schedule, visit IDA.

Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards: Michael Moore Finishes His 2003 Oscar Speech

Days after the White House press secretary shared doctored footage to justify restricting a journalist’s access, the annual Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards took on a more charged tenor than usual. “Remember truth? That little thing that’s the founda…

Days after the White House press secretary shared doctored footage to justify restricting a journalist’s access, the annual Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards took on a more charged tenor than usual. “Remember truth? That little thing that’s the foundation of civilization?” Robert De Niro asked wistfully, drawing laughs from the audience who’d gathered at the BRIC […]

‘Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch’ Film Review: Benedict Cumberbatch Helps Make Third Time Charming

While researching the history of Christmas movies, I watched 22 different adaptations of “A Christmas Carol,” and even that felt like just scratching the surface. So if Ebenezer Scrooge can be subject to myriad interpretations — even when some fans are convinced that one version or other is the “definitive” one — why shouldn’t the Grinch?

That’s an easier argument to make now that we have “Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch” as an example of how to revisit the material, particularly since the 2000 live-action take was such a grim and overblown piece of Yule-sploitation. That version no doubt led many to dread this latest one, from “Minions”-makers Illumination Entertainment, but this new animated feature is bright, both in its color palette and in the wit and liveliness of the storytelling.

You know the tale: the curmudgeonly Grinch (now voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) lives high atop Mount Crumpet with his devoted dog Max, hating the Whos down below in Whoville, and especially loathing their annual celebration of Christmas. This year he decides he’s going to steal the holiday by dressing up as Santa Claus and pilfering all their presents and trees and wreaths and decorations. (Alas, this version gives us no Who-Cardio-Shnook, although there are plenty of other visual representations of Seussian doodads.)

Watch Video: ‘The Grinch’ Trailer: Benedict Cumberbatch Is Mean, Green and Ready to Take Down Christmas

Unlike many other movies that stretch and warp a lovely children’s book beyond recognition by dragging it into a three-act structure — looking at you, “The Polar Express” — this “Grinch” builds on the source material without distending it past the point of the original’s charm. We get a tiny bit of Grinch back-story (he grew up alone in a Dickensian orphanage, and Christmas cheer and singing feels to him like a personal affront), but the script by Michael LeSieur (“Glory Daze”) and Tommy Swerdlow (“Snow Dogs”) doesn’t dwell on his origin story the way the Ron Howard version does. (They also very skillfully write Seussian rhyming couplets for narrator Pharrell.)

The other additions to the Seuss tale — hyper-friendly, decoration-loving Who Bricklebaum (Kenan Thompson); the reason why Cindy Lou Who (Cameron Seely, “The Greatest Showman”) desperately wants to meet Santa; even an actual reindeer who gets briefly drafted for sleigh-pulling service — all serve the plot and never feel like padding. And while this Grinch isn’t the complete misanthrope that Seuss created (and Boris Karloff cemented in the popular imagination), he’s still a mean one: a young Who who makes the mistake of building a snowman in the Grinch’s path sees his handiwork vandalized before getting a snowball in the face for good measure.

Watch Video: ‘The Grinch’ and His Pea-Sized Heart Turn 50

Cumberbatch isn’t trying to channel Karloff (or, thank goodness, Jim Carrey); his Grinch is snarly and embittered, but you see glimmers of kindness, even if they’re only directed occasionally at Max. That doesn’t make his eventual heart-grows-three-sizes redemption any less satisfying, though. He’s backed up by a talented voice ensemble that includes Rashida Jones and, in an all-too-brief cameo as the mayor of Whoville, Angela Lansbury.

Where “The Grinch” really shines, often literally, is in its presentation of Whoville itself. Directors Yarrow Cheney (“The Secret Life of Pets”) and Scott Mosier (Kevin Smith’s longtime producer) have created a lovely holiday bauble: the town is a glimmering pop-up croquembouche-cum-diorama festooned with lights and garlands and snow, and it’s a dream of a fantasy Christmas village. As characters sled through it (there’s lots of swooping going on here, no doubt to attract the 3D audience), it feels like visiting the inside of a magical snowglobe.

Also Read: Jake Gyllenhaal and Benedict Cumberbatch to Star in Edward Berger’s ‘Rio’

There are some missteps here, to be sure, having mostly to do with the music choices. Tyler, the Creator’s hip-hop-flavored take on “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” is bound to age badly, along with the film’s bag of adult-contemporary holiday chestnuts from the likes of Buster Poindexter and The Brian Setzer Orchestra. (Nat King Cole and Run DMC, however, fit nicely into this stocking.)

Purists may balk about revisiting this tale, but “The Grinch” earns its laughter and its sentiment, both of which are plentiful. It’s a full-throated Fah-Who-Foraze.



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While researching the history of Christmas movies, I watched 22 different adaptations of “A Christmas Carol,” and even that felt like just scratching the surface. So if Ebenezer Scrooge can be subject to myriad interpretations — even when some fans are convinced that one version or other is the “definitive” one — why shouldn’t the Grinch?

That’s an easier argument to make now that we have “Dr. Seuss’ The Grinch” as an example of how to revisit the material, particularly since the 2000 live-action take was such a grim and overblown piece of Yule-sploitation. That version no doubt led many to dread this latest one, from “Minions”-makers Illumination Entertainment, but this new animated feature is bright, both in its color palette and in the wit and liveliness of the storytelling.

You know the tale: the curmudgeonly Grinch (now voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) lives high atop Mount Crumpet with his devoted dog Max, hating the Whos down below in Whoville, and especially loathing their annual celebration of Christmas. This year he decides he’s going to steal the holiday by dressing up as Santa Claus and pilfering all their presents and trees and wreaths and decorations. (Alas, this version gives us no Who-Cardio-Shnook, although there are plenty of other visual representations of Seussian doodads.)

Unlike many other movies that stretch and warp a lovely children’s book beyond recognition by dragging it into a three-act structure — looking at you, “The Polar Express” — this “Grinch” builds on the source material without distending it past the point of the original’s charm. We get a tiny bit of Grinch back-story (he grew up alone in a Dickensian orphanage, and Christmas cheer and singing feels to him like a personal affront), but the script by Michael LeSieur (“Glory Daze”) and Tommy Swerdlow (“Snow Dogs”) doesn’t dwell on his origin story the way the Ron Howard version does. (They also very skillfully write Seussian rhyming couplets for narrator Pharrell.)

The other additions to the Seuss tale — hyper-friendly, decoration-loving Who Bricklebaum (Kenan Thompson); the reason why Cindy Lou Who (Cameron Seely, “The Greatest Showman”) desperately wants to meet Santa; even an actual reindeer who gets briefly drafted for sleigh-pulling service — all serve the plot and never feel like padding. And while this Grinch isn’t the complete misanthrope that Seuss created (and Boris Karloff cemented in the popular imagination), he’s still a mean one: a young Who who makes the mistake of building a snowman in the Grinch’s path sees his handiwork vandalized before getting a snowball in the face for good measure.

Cumberbatch isn’t trying to channel Karloff (or, thank goodness, Jim Carrey); his Grinch is snarly and embittered, but you see glimmers of kindness, even if they’re only directed occasionally at Max. That doesn’t make his eventual heart-grows-three-sizes redemption any less satisfying, though. He’s backed up by a talented voice ensemble that includes Rashida Jones and, in an all-too-brief cameo as the mayor of Whoville, Angela Lansbury.

Where “The Grinch” really shines, often literally, is in its presentation of Whoville itself. Directors Yarrow Cheney (“The Secret Life of Pets”) and Scott Mosier (Kevin Smith’s longtime producer) have created a lovely holiday bauble: the town is a glimmering pop-up croquembouche-cum-diorama festooned with lights and garlands and snow, and it’s a dream of a fantasy Christmas village. As characters sled through it (there’s lots of swooping going on here, no doubt to attract the 3D audience), it feels like visiting the inside of a magical snowglobe.

There are some missteps here, to be sure, having mostly to do with the music choices. Tyler, the Creator’s hip-hop-flavored take on “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” is bound to age badly, along with the film’s bag of adult-contemporary holiday chestnuts from the likes of Buster Poindexter and The Brian Setzer Orchestra. (Nat King Cole and Run DMC, however, fit nicely into this stocking.)

Purists may balk about revisiting this tale, but “The Grinch” earns its laughter and its sentiment, both of which are plentiful. It’s a full-throated Fah-Who-Foraze.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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AMC Opens Writers’ Rooms for Rashida Jones Comedy, Drama From ‘Better Call Saul’ EPs

AMC has opened writers’ rooms for two new potential series — one a comedy from Rashida Jones and another a drama from executive producers on “Better Call Saul” — the cable network announced Friday. Both projects will be considered for greenlights under the cabler’s “scripts-to-series” development model.

Jones’ project, with the working title “Kevin Can F*** Himself,” hails from creator Valerie Armstrong (“Lodge 49,” “SEAL Team”) and explores the secret life of a woman we all grew up watching: the sitcom wife.

Here’s the potential series logline, per AMC: A beauty paired with a less attractive, dismissive, caveman-like husband who gets to be a jerk because she’s a nag and he’s “funny.” Our series looks to break television convention and ask what does the world look like through her eyes? Alternating between single-camera realism and multi-camera zaniness, the formats will be constantly informing one another as we ask what happens when this supporting character is presented as a real person? And what if that person is pissed?

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Jones and Will McCormack executive produce “Kevin Can F*** Himself” under their Le Train Train banner.

The second writers’ room opening under the cabler’s “scripts-to-series” development model is for “Rainy Day People,” a workplace drama set in a wellness center-style mental health and rehab facility, from Chris Cantwell and Christopher C. Rogers (“Halt and Catch Fire”) and executive producers Melissa Bernstein and Mark Johnson through Gran Via (“Better Call Saul,” “Breaking Bad,” “Halt and Catch Fire” and “Rectify”).

Here’s the description for that series: “The series will focus on both the patients and the family and staff who have run the center in its various incarnations for the past 50 years. Through the lens of treatment, perhaps the last place left in our fractured modern society where all races, creeds and demographics intersect at their messiest and most raw, the series will examine the diversity and costs of the way we live now.”

Also Read: ‘The Walking Dead’: Norman Reedus on Why Daryl and Maggie Turned Away in Episode 3’s Final Scene

“These are two genuinely inventive pieces of material from terrific creative teams whom we’ve had great experiences with,” said David Madden, president of programming for AMC, SundanceTV and AMC Studios. “We like writers’ rooms. We like the opportunity to write multiple scripts, to explore the dynamics of how a season will work, to really figure out who the characters are and how their behavior guides story. We’re very much looking forward to opening these rooms and seeing what these talented creators produce.”

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AMC has opened writers’ rooms for two new potential series — one a comedy from Rashida Jones and another a drama from executive producers on “Better Call Saul” — the cable network announced Friday. Both projects will be considered for greenlights under the cabler’s “scripts-to-series” development model.

Jones’ project, with the working title “Kevin Can F*** Himself,” hails from creator Valerie Armstrong (“Lodge 49,” “SEAL Team”) and explores the secret life of a woman we all grew up watching: the sitcom wife.

Here’s the potential series logline, per AMC: A beauty paired with a less attractive, dismissive, caveman-like husband who gets to be a jerk because she’s a nag and he’s “funny.” Our series looks to break television convention and ask what does the world look like through her eyes? Alternating between single-camera realism and multi-camera zaniness, the formats will be constantly informing one another as we ask what happens when this supporting character is presented as a real person? And what if that person is pissed?

Jones and Will McCormack executive produce “Kevin Can F*** Himself” under their Le Train Train banner.

The second writers’ room opening under the cabler’s “scripts-to-series” development model is for “Rainy Day People,” a workplace drama set in a wellness center-style mental health and rehab facility, from Chris Cantwell and Christopher C. Rogers (“Halt and Catch Fire”) and executive producers Melissa Bernstein and Mark Johnson through Gran Via (“Better Call Saul,” “Breaking Bad,” “Halt and Catch Fire” and “Rectify”).

Here’s the description for that series: “The series will focus on both the patients and the family and staff who have run the center in its various incarnations for the past 50 years. Through the lens of treatment, perhaps the last place left in our fractured modern society where all races, creeds and demographics intersect at their messiest and most raw, the series will examine the diversity and costs of the way we live now.”

“These are two genuinely inventive pieces of material from terrific creative teams whom we’ve had great experiences with,” said David Madden, president of programming for AMC, SundanceTV and AMC Studios. “We like writers’ rooms. We like the opportunity to write multiple scripts, to explore the dynamics of how a season will work, to really figure out who the characters are and how their behavior guides story. We’re very much looking forward to opening these rooms and seeing what these talented creators produce.”

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DJ Khaled, Rashida Jones, Ben Mendelsohn, Karen Gillan, Masi Oka Join Fox Animations’ ‘Spies in Disguise’

Fox Animation has landed Ben Mendelsohn, Karen Gillan, Rashida Jones, Masi Oka and DJ Khaled as voices in its upcoming 2019 animated feature “Spies in Disguise.”

The actors join Will Smith and Tom Holland in the animated film about two spies, Lance and Walter. One is a super cool and charming spy, and the other invents the super cool gadgets Lance uses. When an event happens, they must learn to rely on each other like never before in order to save the world. It is based on Lucas Martell’s 2009 animated short “Pigeon: Impossible.”

The film is expected to have a ’60s spy flick feel and look but it will take place in a modern context. It will take place in a stylized version of Washington D.C.

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Nick Bruno, an animator who has worked on films such as “Epic” and 2015’s “The Peanuts Movie” is directing the film along with “Ferdinand” storyboard artist Troy Quane.

“Spies in Disguise” is being produced with Blue Sky Studios and Chernin Entertainment. The film is set for a September 2019 release date.

Michael J. Travers (“The Peanuts Movie”) is producing. Theodore Shapiro (“Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie”) has been tapped to score.

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Fox Animation has landed Ben Mendelsohn, Karen Gillan, Rashida Jones, Masi Oka and DJ Khaled as voices in its upcoming 2019 animated feature “Spies in Disguise.”

The actors join Will Smith and Tom Holland in the animated film about two spies, Lance and Walter. One is a super cool and charming spy, and the other invents the super cool gadgets Lance uses. When an event happens, they must learn to rely on each other like never before in order to save the world. It is based on Lucas Martell’s 2009 animated short “Pigeon: Impossible.”

The film is expected to have a ’60s spy flick feel and look but it will take place in a modern context. It will take place in a stylized version of Washington D.C.

Nick Bruno, an animator who has worked on films such as “Epic” and 2015’s “The Peanuts Movie” is directing the film along with “Ferdinand” storyboard artist Troy Quane.

“Spies in Disguise” is being produced with Blue Sky Studios and Chernin Entertainment. The film is set for a September 2019 release date.

Michael J. Travers (“The Peanuts Movie”) is producing. Theodore Shapiro (“Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie”) has been tapped to score.

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Ben Mendelsohn, Karen Gillan, Rashida Jones, DJ Khaled and Masi Oka Join Voice Cast Of Fox Animation ‘Spies In Disguise’

EXCLUSIVE: Ben Mendelsohn (Rogue One: A Star Wars Story), Karen Gillan (Doctor Who), Rashida Jones (Parks and Recreation), DJ and music producer DJ Khaled and Masi Oka (Hawaii Five-0) have joined Will Smith and Tom Holland in the voice cast of Fox&#821…

EXCLUSIVEBen Mendelsohn (Rogue One: A Star Wars Story), Karen Gillan (Doctor Who), Rashida Jones (Parks and Recreation), DJ and music producer DJ Khaled and Masi Oka (Hawaii Five-0) have joined Will Smith and Tom Holland in the voice cast of Fox’s animated film Spies In Disguise. Directed by Epic animator Nick Bruno and Ferdinand storyboard artist Troy Quane, the Fox Animation production is being made with Blue Sky Studios and Chernin Entertainment. The release is set…

Fox orders animated series with Amy Poehler, Rashida Jones, and Wiz Khalifa 

A few years after Parks And Recreation cruelly ripped apart the greatest pair of best friends in the history of Indiana, Amy Poehler and Rashida Jones are set to reunite for Duncanville, a new animated series for Fox created by Poehler and Simpsons pro…

A few years after Parks And Recreation cruelly ripped apart the greatest pair of best friends in the history of Indiana, Amy Poehler and Rashida Jones are set to reunite for Duncanville, a new animated series for Fox created by Poehler and Simpsons producers Mike and Julie Scully. Fox has already ordered 13 episodes,…

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Fox Orders Animated Comedy ‘Duncanville’ From Amy Poehler, Who Will Voice 2 Characters

Fox has ordered 13 episodes of animated family comedy “Duncanville” from Amy Poehler and married couple Mike and Julie Scully. The show is set to premiere during the 2019-20 TV season.

Poehler will voice two characters on the series, which also stars Rashida Jones and Wiz Khalifa.

The series centers on the life of Duncan, a spectacularly average 15-year-old boy, his family and friends, per Fox. Poehler will provide the voice of Duncan and his high-strung mom, Annie, who is constantly trying to prevent her son from ruining his life.

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“‘Duncanville’ is one of the freshest animated concepts we’ve seen, and has an insane pedigree of comedic talent across the board,” said Michael Thorn, president of entertainment, Fox Broadcasting Company. “We’ve enjoyed a long, incredible run with Mike and Julie, and everything Amy does is pure genius. Having the voice talents of Rashida and Wiz join her makes this show the complete package. I can’t wait to have them all together when we add ‘Duncanville’ to our growing animated slate.”

The Scullys are animated series veterans. They both wrote for “The Simpsons,” where he also served as executive producer and showrunner from 1997 to 2001.

Produced by 20th Century Fox Television and Universal Television, “Duncanville” was co-created by Mike and Julie Scully and Poehler, through her Paper Kite Productions, who executive-produce with Dave Becky of 3 Arts Entertainment.

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Fox has ordered 13 episodes of animated family comedy “Duncanville” from Amy Poehler and married couple Mike and Julie Scully. The show is set to premiere during the 2019-20 TV season.

Poehler will voice two characters on the series, which also stars Rashida Jones and Wiz Khalifa.

The series centers on the life of Duncan, a spectacularly average 15-year-old boy, his family and friends, per Fox. Poehler will provide the voice of Duncan and his high-strung mom, Annie, who is constantly trying to prevent her son from ruining his life.

“‘Duncanville’ is one of the freshest animated concepts we’ve seen, and has an insane pedigree of comedic talent across the board,” said Michael Thorn, president of entertainment, Fox Broadcasting Company. “We’ve enjoyed a long, incredible run with Mike and Julie, and everything Amy does is pure genius. Having the voice talents of Rashida and Wiz join her makes this show the complete package. I can’t wait to have them all together when we add ‘Duncanville’ to our growing animated slate.”

The Scullys are animated series veterans. They both wrote for “The Simpsons,” where he also served as executive producer and showrunner from 1997 to 2001.

Produced by 20th Century Fox Television and Universal Television, “Duncanville” was co-created by Mike and Julie Scully and Poehler, through her Paper Kite Productions, who executive-produce with Dave Becky of 3 Arts Entertainment.

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Toronto Film Review: ‘Quincy’

There’s a startling moment late in “Quincy,” Rashida Jones and Alan Hicks’ Netflix documentary about the octogenarian music man Quincy Jones, in which our subject takes an early tour of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American Histor…

There’s a startling moment late in “Quincy,” Rashida Jones and Alan Hicks’ Netflix documentary about the octogenarian music man Quincy Jones, in which our subject takes an early tour of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History & Culture, whose imminent grand opening ceremony he’s spent the last few months planning. Stepping out of his […]

‘Quincy’ Review: Music Icon, Film Producer, and Humanitarian Quincy Jones Gets an Inspiring Tribute Fit for a King — TIFF

“Quincy” is a jaunty stroll through the last half-century of music history, and a fitting tribute to a living legend.

Pick any critical cultural moment of the last six decades, and you’re likely to find Quincy Jones’ fingerprints somewhere on the tape. In those 60 years, he has toured with Ray Charles as a teenager, written chart-toppers for Lesley Gore, arranged music for Frank Sinatra, produced Michael Jackson’s “Thriller,” and launched the careers of Oprah Winfrey, Will Smith, and Whoopi Goldberg, to name a few. His name is synonymous with black culture, American music, and humanitarianism. But few have had the privilege to sit by Qunicy’s side holding his hand as he narrates one of countless stories stored away in his ever-sharp and creative mind. His daughter, the actress (now filmmaker) Rashida Jones, is one of them — and in the new documentary “Quincy,” she graciously shares the rarefied experience with the rest of the world.

Drawing on extraordinary archival footage and intimate moments shot over the last five years, Jones and co-director Alan Hicks paint a human portrait of this larger-than-life figure. It is utterly surreal to witness Quincy in the studio with a young Michael Jackson while recording “Off the Wall,” and painfully intimate to see him flooded with memories on a 1989 sojourn to the former family homestead in Chicago. With so much ground to cover and so much footage at their disposal, it is no small feat that the filmmakers were able to zero in on such richly specific moments.

Quincy Jones was born on the South Side of Chicago in 1933. One of his earliest memories, which plagued him all his life, is of his mother being strapped to the bed and taken away in a straitjacket. She suffered from schizophrenia, and would sometimes send him glowing magazine clippings about himself — with notes attached calling it all lies. He met Ray Charles when he was 14 years old, and the 16-year-old pianist became like an older brother. When he was 18, Jones was invited on tour in Europe with jazz bandleader Lionel Hampton, which began a lifelong affair with European music culture. In 1957, he would move to Paris to study classical music with Nadia Boulanger, who had taught Igor Stravinsky. “France made me feel free as an artist and as a black man,” recalls Jones.

Quincy Jones and Rashida Jones

Quincy Jones and Rashida Jones

Peggy Lipton Archive

He got his first big break from Dinah Washington, who persuaded Mercury Records to hire him to arrange her album in 1955. The album was a hit, and the offers came pouring in. Hoping to get out of debt after a failed tour, he took a job as an executive at Mercury Records, where he discovered “a 16-year-old kid from new Jersey named Lesley Gore.” 1963’s “It’s My Party” was Quincy’s first hit single, and the call from Frank Sinatra came a year later.

“Frank was just my style,” Jones recalls. Like with Ray Charles, he said, the two never had a contract: “Just a handshake.” It was through this fruitful and mutually beneficial partnership that an orchestration by Jones became the first music on the moon, when Buzz Aldrin blasted “Fly Me to the Moon” during Apollo 11.

Jones wrote the music for “The Wiz” in 1978, which is how he first became impressed by a young Michael Jackson. Seeing something in Jackson, he pitched him on making his first solo record. “We attacked that record,” Jones says of “Off the Wall.” In behind-the-scenes footage from the “Thriller” music-video shoot, Jackson appears innocently happy as Jones tells him they are making history. Walking offstage after their Grammy win in 1984, Jones wraps his arms around Jackson and lifts him up in a big bear hug. It is a remarkably ordinary gesture of love, and a rare image of Jackson in pure celebration.

“Quincy” concludes with the culmination of a little project Jones took on just after a stroke: organizing a show for the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. It is delightful to see him on the phone with Colin Powell, sweet-talking him into attending (“I love you, man. Tom Hanks will introduce you” seems to do the trick). Even more moving is seeing Jones wheeled through the exhibit for the first time, his name next to all of his illustrious friends, of which he is last standing. “All of ’em gone. That’s frightening. Beautiful people,” is all he manages to get out.

The younger Jones, as filmmaker, stays mainly off camera, equally attentive to her father’s health as to his style. His blue suede loafers catching her eye, she admits she’s just learning how to use the camera. The film is light on stylistic risks, preferring a straightforward approach that serves the wealth of material. “Quincy” is refreshingly devoid of talking-head interviews, relying instead on the measured ruminations of the man himself and the extensive archives Jones and Hicks had the difficult job of paring down. The result is a jaunty stroll through the last half-century of music history, and a fitting tribute to a living legend.

Grade: B+

Quincy” premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. Netflix will release it on September 21. 

Quincy Jones On Netflix’s ‘Quincy’ Doc & The Passion That Keeps Him Working – Toronto Studio

An entertainment tour-de-force placing his irreplaceable stamp on the worlds of music, film and television over the course of 70 years, Quincy Jones graced Deadline’s Toronto Studio last night, appearing with director Alan Hicks to discuss Netfli…

An entertainment tour-de-force placing his irreplaceable stamp on the worlds of music, film and television over the course of 70 years, Quincy Jones graced Deadline’s Toronto Studio last night, appearing with director Alan Hicks to discuss Netflix documentary Quincy. Co-directed by Jones’ daughter—quadruple threat Rashida Jones—this celebration of the artist’s life and work examines the challenging childhood, as well as the racial and cultural boundaries Jones transcended…

‘Quincy’ Trailer: Barack Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and More Praise the Music Icon’s Life and Legacy in Netflix Documentary

In the words of Lionel Richie: “Don’t try to do what he’s done, ’cause you can’t.”

Not too many people can count Oprah Winfrey, Barack Obama, and Paul McCartney among their admirers. All three make appearances in the new trailer for the Netflix documentary “Quincy,” praising the life and work of the inimitable Quincy Jones. A fully authorized portrait of the music icon, “Quincy” is directed by Jones’s daughter, the actress Rashida Jones, in collaboration with Alan Hicks. Weaving archival footage with intimate moments of daily life, the film is sure to be a revealing and fitting tribute.

Per the official synopsis: “A unique force of nature in music and popular culture for 70 years, Jones has transcended musical and racial boundaries; his story is inextricably woven into the fabric of Black America. Beyond his own acclaim as a trumpeter, producer, conductor, composer and arranger, Jones’s inimitable gift to discover the biggest talents of the past half of the century is unprecedented. He has mentored and cultivated the careers of young talents, from Lesley Gore and Michael Jackson to Oprah Winfrey and Will Smith. With his boundless energy, Jones has also awakened many generations to the significance of humanitarian issues.”

Rashida Jones previously directed an episode of the documentary series “Hot Girls Wanted,” which she executive produced. Hicks is best known for his feature on jazz musician Clark Terry, “Keep On Keepin’ On.”

A Netflix Original documentary, “Quincy” will premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 9, and launch globally on Netflix on September 21, along with a limited theatrical release.

Rashida Jones to Direct Netflix Documentary About Dad Quincy Jones

Rashida Jones is set to co-direct a Netflix documentary on her father Quincy Jones alongside Alan Hicks.

“Quincy” is produced by Paula DuPré Pesmen and executive produced by Jane Rosenthal and Berry Welsh from Tribeca Productions and Adam Fell from Quincy Jones Productions. The film will launch globally on Netflix on Sept. 21 and have a limited theatrical release.

“It’s rare that somebody who has lived as much life as my dad is still interested in growing and knowing the next generation,” Rashida Jones said in a statement. “He is such a man of action and accomplishments, but we were so lucky to spend real time with him, to let him reflect on life and the larger picture. I feel honored to be able to share that with audiences all over the world.”

Also Read: ‘Parks and Recreation’ Stars Amy Poehler, Rashida Jones, Aubrey Plaza Reunite for Galentine’s Day (Photo)

“Quincy” is described as an intimate look into the life of EGOT winner Quincy Jones. The film threads personal vérité moments with private archival footage. Beyond his own acclaim as a trumpeter, producer, conductor, composer and arranger, Jones has discovered and mentored some of entertainment’s biggest names, like Michael Jackson, Oprah Winfrey and Will Smith.

“There is really no one like Quincy, the sheer breadth of his work alone is unparalleled, but the story of him as a man has never been comprehensively told. It was a privilege to have his trust, allowing us to capture intimate moments giving insight into the fabric of the man,” said Hicks.

“It’s a rare opportunity to be able to present the definitive story of someone who has for over seven decades, not just influenced, but altered the course of culture. Combining his God-given creative gift with a near maniacal work ethic, Quincy Jones has done just that, marshalling every expression of the arts to their full potency resulting in everything from ‘Thriller’ to ‘The Color Purple,’” said Lisa Nishimura, VP of original documentaries for Netflix. “Told through the rare and intimate lens of Directors Alan Hicks and Quincy’s daughter Rashida Jones, Quincy provides a fresh and unexpected journey into this legendary life, still in the making.”

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Rashida Jones is set to co-direct a Netflix documentary on her father Quincy Jones alongside Alan Hicks.

“Quincy” is produced by Paula DuPré Pesmen and executive produced by Jane Rosenthal and Berry Welsh from Tribeca Productions and Adam Fell from Quincy Jones Productions. The film will launch globally on Netflix on Sept. 21 and have a limited theatrical release.

“It’s rare that somebody who has lived as much life as my dad is still interested in growing and knowing the next generation,” Rashida Jones said in a statement. “He is such a man of action and accomplishments, but we were so lucky to spend real time with him, to let him reflect on life and the larger picture. I feel honored to be able to share that with audiences all over the world.”

“Quincy” is described as an intimate look into the life of EGOT winner Quincy Jones. The film threads personal vérité moments with private archival footage. Beyond his own acclaim as a trumpeter, producer, conductor, composer and arranger, Jones has discovered and mentored some of entertainment’s biggest names, like Michael Jackson, Oprah Winfrey and Will Smith.

“There is really no one like Quincy, the sheer breadth of his work alone is unparalleled, but the story of him as a man has never been comprehensively told. It was a privilege to have his trust, allowing us to capture intimate moments giving insight into the fabric of the man,” said Hicks.

“It’s a rare opportunity to be able to present the definitive story of someone who has for over seven decades, not just influenced, but altered the course of culture. Combining his God-given creative gift with a near maniacal work ethic, Quincy Jones has done just that, marshalling every expression of the arts to their full potency resulting in everything from ‘Thriller’ to ‘The Color Purple,'” said Lisa Nishimura, VP of original documentaries for Netflix. “Told through the rare and intimate lens of Directors Alan Hicks and Quincy’s daughter Rashida Jones, Quincy provides a fresh and unexpected journey into this legendary life, still in the making.”

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Rashida Jones to Direct Quincy Jones Documentary for Netflix

Netflix is keeping it all in the family for its new documentary on Quincy Jones, directed by Alan Hicks and the jazz musician’s daughter Rashida Jones. The streaming giant announced Wednesday that the doc, titled “Quincy,” will debut …

Netflix is keeping it all in the family for its new documentary on Quincy Jones, directed by Alan Hicks and the jazz musician’s daughter Rashida Jones. The streaming giant announced Wednesday that the doc, titled “Quincy,” will debut on Netflix Sept. 21. “Quincy” will explore Quincy Jones’ life and career through a combination of modern […]

Donald Glover and Rashida Jones Made a Sexual Harassment PSA to Explain Appropriate Workplace Behavior — Watch

Rashida Jones directs and Donald Glover narrates this new video for Time’s Up.

Rashida Jones and Donald Glover have teamed up for an animated PSA video from Time’s Up that provides numerous examples of behavior that is considered sexual harassment in the workplace. Jones directed the video and recruited the “Atlanta” creator as her narrator.

“There’s been a lot of discussion about whether that’s even fair to link someone pinching an ass or something off-color at work to an actual assault,” Jones told Buzzfeed about the animated short. “I think a lot of people struggle with the connection, because they think it’s dramatic to connect the two. So the PSA is intended to explain that there are these nuanced dynamics that are happening when there’s a power imbalance.”

The video covers topics such as whether or not its appropriate to hug your co-worker or comment on his/her outfits. Jones said she sought out Glover to be her narrator because of his “cool, laid-back energy,” which she found made the spot more inviting and not threatening.

“This is not a mandate; we’re not telling people how to live their lives,” Jones said about the clip. “This is really just to incite self-reflection and for people to look at the way they behave in their workplaces.”

Watch the PSA in its entirety in the video below.

‘The Incredibles 2’ Soars to Record $18.5 Million at Thursday Box Office

“The Incredibles 2” earned $18.5 million at the Thursday box office, surpassing “Finding Dory’s” animation preview record of $9.2 million.

“Minions” earned $6.2 million in Thursday previews, while “The Secret Life of Pets” grossed $5.3 million. The preview gross for “Incredibles 2” is higher than those for “Beauty and the Beast” ($16.3 million), “Spider-Man: Homecoming” ($15.4 million) and “Justice League” ($13 million).

The sequel to “The Incredibles” is looking at a weekend opening of $120 million to $145 million.  The first “Incredibles” opened to $70 million in 2004, and “Incredibles 2” will still have a higher opening than its predecessor even after inflation adjustments are made.

Also Read: ‘Incredibles 2’ Film Review: Pixar’s Superhero Family Is Back, Baby – and What a Baby

Taking place right after the end of the first film, “The Incredibles 2” sees the Parr family face a new family dynamic after Elastigirl is recruited for a campaign to help bring superheroes back. While she fights the bad guys, Mr. Incredible is left to take care of his three kids, including the infant Jack-Jack, who begins to develop his own powers.

Brad Bird returns to write and direct, as well as provide the voice for fan favorite Edna Mode. Craig T. Nelson, Helen Hunt, and Samuel L. Jackson also return to the cast, being joined by “Better Call Saul” stars Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks. Critics have nearly unanimously praised the film, giving it a current Rotten Tomatoes score of 94 percent.

Warner Bros./New Line’s “Tag” earned $1.33 million in preshows, compared to “Game Night,” which grossed $1 million in February.

Also Read: Does ‘Incredibles 2’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“Tag” is based on the true story of a lifelong group of friends who played a game of tag for 23 years. The film stars Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Burress, and Jake Johnson as the crew of friends, with the cast completed by Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Leslie Bibb, Brian Dennehy, and Lil Rel Howrey. Jeff Tomsic directed from a script by Rob McKittrick and Mark Steilen.

Sony/Silver Pictures’ “Superfly” opened on Wednesday and is looking to earn $7 million to $12 million over the five days., with the film sporting a reported budget of $16 million.

“Superfly” stars Trevor Jackson as Youngblood Priest, a career criminal who wants out of the Atlanta drug business, only to get dragged into even deeper trouble after one bad deal. Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis, and Jennifer Morrison also star, with Director X helming the film. “Watchmen” co-writer Alex Tse penned the script, with Joel Silver producing with Atlanta rapper Future.

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“The Incredibles 2” earned $18.5 million at the Thursday box office, surpassing “Finding Dory’s” animation preview record of $9.2 million.

“Minions” earned $6.2 million in Thursday previews, while “The Secret Life of Pets” grossed $5.3 million. The preview gross for “Incredibles 2” is higher than those for “Beauty and the Beast” ($16.3 million), “Spider-Man: Homecoming” ($15.4 million) and “Justice League” ($13 million).

The sequel to “The Incredibles” is looking at a weekend opening of $120 million to $145 million.  The first “Incredibles” opened to $70 million in 2004, and “Incredibles 2” will still have a higher opening than its predecessor even after inflation adjustments are made.

Taking place right after the end of the first film, “The Incredibles 2” sees the Parr family face a new family dynamic after Elastigirl is recruited for a campaign to help bring superheroes back. While she fights the bad guys, Mr. Incredible is left to take care of his three kids, including the infant Jack-Jack, who begins to develop his own powers.

Brad Bird returns to write and direct, as well as provide the voice for fan favorite Edna Mode. Craig T. Nelson, Helen Hunt, and Samuel L. Jackson also return to the cast, being joined by “Better Call Saul” stars Bob Odenkirk and Jonathan Banks. Critics have nearly unanimously praised the film, giving it a current Rotten Tomatoes score of 94 percent.

Warner Bros./New Line’s “Tag” earned $1.33 million in preshows, compared to “Game Night,” which grossed $1 million in February.

“Tag” is based on the true story of a lifelong group of friends who played a game of tag for 23 years. The film stars Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner, Jon Hamm, Hannibal Burress, and Jake Johnson as the crew of friends, with the cast completed by Rashida Jones, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis, Leslie Bibb, Brian Dennehy, and Lil Rel Howrey. Jeff Tomsic directed from a script by Rob McKittrick and Mark Steilen.

Sony/Silver Pictures’ “Superfly” opened on Wednesday and is looking to earn $7 million to $12 million over the five days., with the film sporting a reported budget of $16 million.

“Superfly” stars Trevor Jackson as Youngblood Priest, a career criminal who wants out of the Atlanta drug business, only to get dragged into even deeper trouble after one bad deal. Jason Mitchell, Michael Kenneth Williams, Lex Scott Davis, and Jennifer Morrison also star, with Director X helming the film. “Watchmen” co-writer Alex Tse penned the script, with Joel Silver producing with Atlanta rapper Future.

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Rashida Jones Says ‘Toy Story 4’ Departure ‘Was Complicated,’ Cites Pixar’s Bad Track Record of Women Directors

The “Angie Tribeca” actress and her writing partner Will McCormack left “Toy Story 4” in November.

When Disney/Pixar’s “Toy Story 4” opens June 21, 2019, it will do so without its original writers Rashida Jones and Will McCormack. The duo behind “Celeste and Jesse Forever” made headlines last November for departing the film, and Pixar hired relative newcomer Stephany Folsom as their replacement in January. Jones and McCormack hinted last year that their departure had something to do with Pixar being a place where minorities “do not have equal creative voice,” and it’s a sentiment Jones echoed while talking about her “Toy Story 4” exit during a Net-A-Porter interview.

“That situation was complicated,” Jones said. “You look at [Pixar’s] track record and it was one woman directing one film in 25 years, and she was fired. But that doesn’t look different from most studios in Hollywood. All I can be is myself, and speak up and be honest when I feel things don’t reflect the world as it today. As a corporation, you will be held accountable.”

Jones is referencing Brenda Chapman when she mentions how Pixar’s one female director was fired. Chapman was the driving force behind the studio’s “Brave” for several years, but she was removed from the project over creative differences and replaced by Mark Andrews. Jones doesn’t elaborate further, but between her Net-A-Porter quote and the statement she issued with McCormack last fall, it’s being hinted at that Pixar wasn’t giving her the necessary creative control during the writing process.

“We parted ways because of creative and, more importantly, philosophical differences,” Jones and McCormack’s previous statement read. “There is so much talent at Pixar, and we remain enormous fans of their films. However, it is also a culture where women and people of color do not have an equal creative voice.”

The Net-A-Reporter interview mentions that Jones felt she had to hold herself accountable, implying that she couldn’t remain at Pixar when the studio was stifling minority voices. Jones told the publication that she similarly holds herself accountable when writing female characters.

“When I was writing ten years ago, I took what is typically considered a male character and would give it to the woman,” Jones said. “I’d get feedback saying, ‘She’s not likable.’ I would think, ‘So fucking what. Every guy isn’t likable, until he is.’ Women are taught to be nice. Men are taught to be powerful. I want to find a way to tell stories from a woman’s perspective that doesn’t feel like it’s been put in the mouth of a woman by a guy.”

“Toy Story 4” is being described as a romantic comedy involving the relationship between Woody and Bo-peep, which is the reason Pixar probably sought out Jones and McCormack in the first place. Jones is the star of the TBS comedy series “Angie Tribeca” and has appearances in the upcoming films “Zoe” and “Tag.”

Aubrey Plaza’s ‘An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn’ Acquired by UPHE Content Group

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment Content Group has acquired the North American rights to “An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn,” starring Aubrey Plaza and Emile Hirsch.

The feature made its world premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Jim Hosking directed the film that he also co-wrote with David Wike. Jemaine Clement, Matt Berry and Craig Robinson also star.

Sam Bisbee, Theodora Dunlap, Oliver Roskill, Emily Leo, Lucan Toh and Andy Starke served as producers on the film.

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UPHE Content Group is planning a release for the film later this year.

“An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn” follows Lulu Danger (Plaza), who is trapped in a dissatisfying marriage with her husband Shane (Hirsch). Fired from her job, Lulu sees a TV commercial for “An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn For One Magical Night Only” that reveals a mysterious man from her past, and Lulu sets out to find him.

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“I’m thrilled to be working with UPHE Content Group to fully unleash ‘An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn’ to the entire United States,” said director Jim Hosking. “We are going to have great fun working together and I intend to buy some luxuriously wide trousers and extra pointy boots for the premiere.”

International rights are handled by Protagonist Pictures. UTA Independent Film Group negotiated the deal on behalf of the filmmakers.

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Universal Pictures Home Entertainment Content Group has acquired the North American rights to “An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn,” starring Aubrey Plaza and Emile Hirsch.

The feature made its world premiere at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. Jim Hosking directed the film that he also co-wrote with David Wike. Jemaine Clement, Matt Berry and Craig Robinson also star.

Sam Bisbee, Theodora Dunlap, Oliver Roskill, Emily Leo, Lucan Toh and Andy Starke served as producers on the film.

UPHE Content Group is planning a release for the film later this year.

“An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn” follows Lulu Danger (Plaza), who is trapped in a dissatisfying marriage with her husband Shane (Hirsch). Fired from her job, Lulu sees a TV commercial for “An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn For One Magical Night Only” that reveals a mysterious man from her past, and Lulu sets out to find him.

“I’m thrilled to be working with UPHE Content Group to fully unleash ‘An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn’ to the entire United States,” said director Jim Hosking. “We are going to have great fun working together and I intend to buy some luxuriously wide trousers and extra pointy boots for the premiere.”

International rights are handled by Protagonist Pictures. UTA Independent Film Group negotiated the deal on behalf of the filmmakers.

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Amy Poehler to Direct, Star in ‘Wine Country’ for Netflix

Amy Poehler is set to make her feature film directorial debut with Netflix’s “Wine Country,” in which she will also star, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, Paula Pell, Maya Rudolph and Emily Spivey will star alongside her. “Wine Country” will be about a group of longtime friends who go to Napa, California, for a weekend getaway to celebrate a 50th birthday.

Spivey, who worked with Poehler on “Parks and Recreation” and “Saturday Night Live,” also wrote the script alongside “SNL’s” Liz Cackowski.

Also Read: ‘Parks and Recreation’ Stars Amy Poehler, Rashida Jones, Aubrey Plaza Reunite for Galentine’s Day (Photo)

Poehler is producing via her Paper Kite Productions. Paper Pictures’ Carla Hacken and Dunshire Productions’ Morgan Sackett are also producing.

Poehler has directed episodes of “Parks and Recreation” and “Broad City,” and has directed the TV movie “Dumb Prince.” Her other most recent credits include “The House” and “Inside Out.” She is represented by Kovert Creative, WME and 3 Arts Entertainment.

Netflix has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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Amy Poehler is set to make her feature film directorial debut with Netflix’s “Wine Country,” in which she will also star, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, Paula Pell, Maya Rudolph and Emily Spivey will star alongside her. “Wine Country” will be about a group of longtime friends who go to Napa, California, for a weekend getaway to celebrate a 50th birthday.

Spivey, who worked with Poehler on “Parks and Recreation” and “Saturday Night Live,” also wrote the script alongside “SNL’s” Liz Cackowski.

Poehler is producing via her Paper Kite Productions. Paper Pictures’ Carla Hacken and Dunshire Productions’ Morgan Sackett are also producing.

Poehler has directed episodes of “Parks and Recreation” and “Broad City,” and has directed the TV movie “Dumb Prince.” Her other most recent credits include “The House” and “Inside Out.” She is represented by Kovert Creative, WME and 3 Arts Entertainment.

Netflix has not yet responded to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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‘9 To 5’ Reboot Punching In: Rashida Jones To Script With Pat Resnick; Dolly Parton, Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin All Circling

EXCLUSIVE: When you look at the 1980 comedy 9 to 5 and ask what has changed from the male chauvinist premise of that film, the #MeToo movement proves the answer is, absolutely nothing. What better timing for a new version of that hit, especially when original stars Dolly Parton, Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin are eager for a reprise?
2oth Century Fox is in the early stages of a new version that would focus on three young women dealing with sexism and chauvinism in the…

EXCLUSIVE: When you look at the 1980 comedy 9 to 5 and ask what has changed from the male chauvinist premise of that film, the #MeToo movement proves the answer is, absolutely nothing. What better timing for a new version of that hit, especially when original stars Dolly Parton, Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin are eager for a reprise? 2oth Century Fox is in the early stages of a new version that would focus on three young women dealing with sexism and chauvinism in the…

Netflix Acquires Nick Offerman’s Animated Movie ‘White Fang’

Netflix has acquired the Sundance animated film “White Fang,” marking the first acquisition deal for the streaming platform out of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

The service is set to release the film later this year in territories including the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Southeast Asia, Japan, South Korea, U.K., Eastern Europe, India, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Academy Award winner Alexandre Espigares directed the film, with a voice cast of Nick Offerman, Rashida Jones, Paul Giamatti and Eddie Spears. Dominique Monfery, Philippe Lioret and Serge Frydman served as writers on the film.

Also Read: ‘White Fang’ Film Review: Jack London Classic Gets Sturdy, Simplistic Animated Retelling

“White Fang” is based on Jack London’s classic novel of the same name, which is an adventure-filled tale set during the Klondike Gold Rush of the 1890s. It follows White Fang, a wolf dog who was injured and abandoned who ends up dog-fighting in Fort Yukon. He develops a friendship with two humans who treat him with kindness and respect.

Producers on the film are Clément Calvet, Jérémie Fajner, Lilian Eche, Christel Henon, Marc Turtletaub and Peter Saraf. Superprod, Bidibul Productions and Big Beach’s “White Fang” is also a French/Luxembourg/USA co-production.

Also Read: Andrea Riseborough’s ‘Nancy’ Sells to Samuel Goldwyn Films

Netflix came to the Sundance Film Festival with titles to screen — it debuted the Gloria Allred documentary “Seeing Allred” and the comedy “A Futile and Stupid Gesture,” but this is the platform’s first acquisition from the festival.

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Netflix has acquired the Sundance animated film “White Fang,” marking the first acquisition deal for the streaming platform out of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

The service is set to release the film later this year in territories including the U.S., Canada, Latin America, Southeast Asia, Japan, South Korea, U.K., Eastern Europe, India, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

Academy Award winner Alexandre Espigares directed the film, with a voice cast of Nick Offerman, Rashida Jones, Paul Giamatti and Eddie Spears. Dominique Monfery, Philippe Lioret and Serge Frydman served as writers on the film.

“White Fang” is based on Jack London’s classic novel of the same name, which is an adventure-filled tale set during the Klondike Gold Rush of the 1890s. It follows White Fang, a wolf dog who was injured and abandoned who ends up dog-fighting in Fort Yukon. He develops a friendship with two humans who treat him with kindness and respect.

Producers on the film are Clément Calvet, Jérémie Fajner, Lilian Eche, Christel Henon, Marc Turtletaub and Peter Saraf. Superprod, Bidibul Productions and Big Beach’s “White Fang” is also a French/Luxembourg/USA co-production.

Netflix came to the Sundance Film Festival with titles to screen — it debuted the Gloria Allred documentary “Seeing Allred” and the comedy “A Futile and Stupid Gesture,” but this is the platform’s first acquisition from the festival.

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