Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Scheduled for Fall Release in Italy Despite Dispute (EXCLUSIVE)

Following its contentious world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been set for a fall release in Italy by M2 Pictures despite an ongoing dispute over rights to the disaster-plagued film. “Don Qui…

Following its contentious world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival, Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” has been set for a fall release in Italy by M2 Pictures despite an ongoing dispute over rights to the disaster-plagued film. “Don Quixote,” which stars Adam Driver, Jonathan Pryce, and Stellan Skarsgård, screened earlier this month as the […]

Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Victory Lap Couldn’t Be Stopped By Lawsuits, Health Scares Or The Loss Of Amazon – Cannes Q&A

At the start of Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. “And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film.” The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt M…

At the start of Terry Gilliam's The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a title card appears. "And now, after more than 25 years in the making… and unmaking… a Terry Gilliam film." The history behind the director’s tortured attempt to adapt Miguel de Cervantes' seminal novel is the stuff of legend, beginning in 1989. He first got it into production in 2000, when Jean Rochefort and Johnny Depp were cast as Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza. The derailing of that shoot…

Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Terry Gilliam has tried to make his film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” for two decades, and it’s finally completed and ready to be screened at this month’s Cannes Film Festival…if it doesn’t befall some other spectacular cursed bad luck.

It’s the quintessential production from hell, complete with on-set injuries, lost funding, natural disasters and outsize ambitions worthy of the hero of Cervantes’ classic novel. Now that the film is almost at the finish line, a lawsuit threatened to derail the film from screening at Cannes, and Amazon Studios pulled out of a deal to distribute the film in the U.S.

So the irony isn’t lost on anyone that Gilliam’s quest to make a movie about Don Quixote has been nothing if not quixotic. Here’s a not-so-brief timeline of every step on the road to Gilliam getting his film made.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

1997

Gilliam started thinking about an adaptation of Cervantes’ 1615 novel “Don Quixote” in the early ’90s, and in a 1997 interview with Neon Magazine, he revealed “Don Quixote” as one of the “10 movies they wouldn’t let me make.”

“The years I wasted on this one,” he lamented, hardly realizing how quaint that now sounds. He originally asked for $20 million in funding from Europe and found that still wasn’t enough for his vision.

Gilliam also revealed that the studio wanted Sean Connery for the title role, but the actor left the project to make “The Defective Detective” (another movie that never came to pass). The director was replaced by Fred Schepesi, with John Cleese and Robin Williams in the lead roles, though that version never panned out either. “That really hurts, that I let a project I’m convinced I’m the best director on the planet to do, slip by,” Gilliam said.

Also Read: Cannes Confirms ‘Don Quixote’ for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: ‘Cinema Has Regained Its Rights’

1998

After the U.K. premiere of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” in 1998, Gilliam said that “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” would be his next film. He had secured a $32 million budget and planned to begin production in Spain in September 2000.

In this version, Quixote would be played by French actor Jean Rochefort, who had learned English for the role, with the director’s “Fear and Loathing” star Johnny Depp as the Sancho Panza figure.

The script he wrote with Tony Grisoni was about a 21st-century ad executive (Depp) who travels back in time to the 17th century and gets mistaken for Sancho Panza. The story also drew inspiration from Mark Twain’s “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” another of the 10 movies Gilliam said he hoped to adapt for the screen in that Neon interview.

Also Read: Monty Python Lost ‘Holy Grail’ Animation Reveals Rectal Trumpeting (Video)

IFC Films

September 2000

The production appeared cursed from day one. As documented in the 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha,” production began north of Madrid near a Spanish military base and fighter planes flying overhead drowned out the sound recording.

On the second day of shooting, a flood washed through the area, causing the crew to lose equipment and for the landscape to be changed so drastically that it affected continuity. And after feeling pain from riding a horse, Rochefort was then sent to a doctor in Paris and was found to have a back issue.

He would not return, and production was canceled altogether in November. Nicola Pecorini, the film’s director of photography, said in the documentary, “Never in 22 years of being in this business have I seen such a sum of bad luck.”

Also Read: Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades

September 2005

Gilliam’s interest in “Don Quixote” perked up again in 2005, when “Tideland” producer Jeremy Thomas came on board the project and Gilliam hinted that he wanted Gerard Depardieu to play the lead role.

June 2009

Johnny Depp breathed new life into the project when he told Ain’t It Cool News that he loved Gilliam and was still on board — though he hedged about whether he would be available given his commitment to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.

“I’d hate to put him in a position — or ask to be in a position — where he’d have to wait for me. That would be wrong,” Depp said. “But also… I feel like we went there and tried something, and, whatever it was — the elements and all the things that got up underneath us – -were there and happened and were documented well in that film ‘Lost in La Mancha.’ So I don’t know if it’s right for me to go back there. I don’t know if it’s right for Terry to, but if he wants to…”

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Delayed Again Over Money Issues

December 2009

Collider reported that Gilliam wanted Robert Duvall for the lead role of Don Quixote, but only “if they get the money,” Duvall said.

May 2010

With Depp tied up, Gilliam turned to Ewan McGregor to play the Sancho Panza role opposite Duvall. He also said that he slashed the budget to a mere $20 million.

September 2010

Funding falls apart again for Gilliam’s film, despite having Robert Duvall and Ewan McGregor attached. “I shouldn’t be here. The plan was to be shooting ‘Quixote’ right now,” Gilliam told Variety.

November 2013

Shortly after releasing his sci-fi “The Zero Theorem,” Gilliam confirmed to ComingSoon.net that he had begun preproduction on a seventh version of on “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.”

“Lucky seven, maybe,” he said. “We’ll see if it happens. This is kind of my default position, going back to that. I actually just want to make it and get rid of it. Get it out of my life.”

August 2014

Gilliam told TheWrap that he secured funding for “Don Quixote” and planned to shoot it in early 2015 — with the film now set in the present day and revolving around a movie being made about Quixote. “I keep incorporating my own life into it and shifting it,” Gilliam said. “I’ve done it so many times — or not done it so many times — I’ll believe it when I see it.”

Also Read: Terry Gilliam Blasts ‘Mob Rule’ of #MeToo Movement in Hollywood: ‘It Is a World of Victims’

September-November 2014

After another casting “hiccup” that Gilliam described to Rolling Stone as a “Sisyphean rock,” John Hurt was confirmed to play the role of Don Quixote, with Jack O’Connell as Sancho Panza. He even sparked a renewed excitement by releasing concept art for the film on his Facebook page.

September 2015

Another major setback suspended production when star Hurt was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He eventually passed away in 2017, a sad reality Gilliam knew all too well after Heath Ledger passed away during production of “The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus.”

May 2016

Teaming with Portuguese producer Paulo Branco, Gilliam got “Don Quixote” back on track yet again with a new cast that this time includes Gilliam’s “Monty Python” co-hort Michael Palin, Adam Driver and Olga Kurylenko as the female lead.

Also Read: Monty Python Stars Reuniting for ‘Absolutely Anything’

September 2016

Branco failed to get together funds that he promised, stalling its planned production date in October. Branco clashed with Gilliam, demanded creative control over the film, slashed the budget, dramatically reduced the fee for Palin and even threatened legal action over the film.

“I was moving with caution,” Branco said in Le Monde. “In most of Gilliam’s films, budgets had exploded. But I quickly realized that he had a deep hatred towards producers. I started to have doubts even though I had a lot of funding.” 

But Gilliam persevered, telling BBC Radio 2, “We are still marching forward. It is not dead. I will be dead before the film is.”

June 2017

Production finally wrapped on “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” — this time with Jonathan Pryce as Quixote and Driver as Toby, a modern ad executive mistaken for Sancho Panza. The cast also included Stellan Skarsgard, Kurylenko, Joana Ribeiro, Jordi Molla, Sergi Lopez and Rossy de Palma.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades

 

April 2018

At long last, a trailer is released for “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” The film tells the story of a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby (Driver) who time jumps between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Then the film landed the closing-night slot at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, with a gala screening on May 19.

Within days, though, former producer Branco filed a lawsuit seeking an injunction to prevent Cannes from screening the film and claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film. Cannes organizers stood by Gilliam and defends the right to screen it, even taking a swipe at Branco.

May 2018

A Paris court dismissed Branco’s lawsuit, allowing the film to screen at Cannes’ closing night as planned.

But the troubles didn’t end. Gilliam suffered a minor stroke just days before the court ruling and Amazon Studios pulled out of its deal to release “Don Quixote” in North America, telling TheWrap they pulled out because producers failed to deliver it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Despite Producer’s Lawsuit to Block Screening

Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote,’ Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

Terry Gilliam Blasts ‘Mob Rule’ of #MeToo Movement in Hollywood: ‘It Is a World of Victims’

Terry Gilliam has tried to make his film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” for two decades, and it’s finally completed and ready to be screened at this month’s Cannes Film Festival…if it doesn’t befall some other spectacular cursed bad luck.

It’s the quintessential production from hell, complete with on-set injuries, lost funding, natural disasters and outsize ambitions worthy of the hero of Cervantes’ classic novel. Now that the film is almost at the finish line, a lawsuit threatened to derail the film from screening at Cannes, and Amazon Studios pulled out of a deal to distribute the film in the U.S.

So the irony isn’t lost on anyone that Gilliam’s quest to make a movie about Don Quixote has been nothing if not quixotic. Here’s a not-so-brief timeline of every step on the road to Gilliam getting his film made.

1997

Gilliam started thinking about an adaptation of Cervantes’ 1615 novel “Don Quixote” in the early ’90s, and in a 1997 interview with Neon Magazine, he revealed “Don Quixote” as one of the “10 movies they wouldn’t let me make.”

“The years I wasted on this one,” he lamented, hardly realizing how quaint that now sounds. He originally asked for $20 million in funding from Europe and found that still wasn’t enough for his vision.

Gilliam also revealed that the studio wanted Sean Connery for the title role, but the actor left the project to make “The Defective Detective” (another movie that never came to pass). The director was replaced by Fred Schepesi, with John Cleese and Robin Williams in the lead roles, though that version never panned out either. “That really hurts, that I let a project I’m convinced I’m the best director on the planet to do, slip by,” Gilliam said.

1998

After the U.K. premiere of “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” in 1998, Gilliam said that “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” would be his next film. He had secured a $32 million budget and planned to begin production in Spain in September 2000.

In this version, Quixote would be played by French actor Jean Rochefort, who had learned English for the role, with the director’s “Fear and Loathing” star Johnny Depp as the Sancho Panza figure.

The script he wrote with Tony Grisoni was about a 21st-century ad executive (Depp) who travels back in time to the 17th century and gets mistaken for Sancho Panza. The story also drew inspiration from Mark Twain’s “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court,” another of the 10 movies Gilliam said he hoped to adapt for the screen in that Neon interview.

IFC Films

September 2000

The production appeared cursed from day one. As documented in the 2002 documentary “Lost in La Mancha,” production began north of Madrid near a Spanish military base and fighter planes flying overhead drowned out the sound recording.

On the second day of shooting, a flood washed through the area, causing the crew to lose equipment and for the landscape to be changed so drastically that it affected continuity. And after feeling pain from riding a horse, Rochefort was then sent to a doctor in Paris and was found to have a back issue.

He would not return, and production was canceled altogether in November. Nicola Pecorini, the film’s director of photography, said in the documentary, “Never in 22 years of being in this business have I seen such a sum of bad luck.”

September 2005

Gilliam’s interest in “Don Quixote” perked up again in 2005, when “Tideland” producer Jeremy Thomas came on board the project and Gilliam hinted that he wanted Gerard Depardieu to play the lead role.

June 2009

Johnny Depp breathed new life into the project when he told Ain’t It Cool News that he loved Gilliam and was still on board — though he hedged about whether he would be available given his commitment to the “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.

“I’d hate to put him in a position — or ask to be in a position — where he’d have to wait for me. That would be wrong,” Depp said. “But also… I feel like we went there and tried something, and, whatever it was — the elements and all the things that got up underneath us – -were there and happened and were documented well in that film ‘Lost in La Mancha.’ So I don’t know if it’s right for me to go back there. I don’t know if it’s right for Terry to, but if he wants to…”

December 2009

Collider reported that Gilliam wanted Robert Duvall for the lead role of Don Quixote, but only “if they get the money,” Duvall said.

May 2010

With Depp tied up, Gilliam turned to Ewan McGregor to play the Sancho Panza role opposite Duvall. He also said that he slashed the budget to a mere $20 million.

September 2010

Funding falls apart again for Gilliam’s film, despite having Robert Duvall and Ewan McGregor attached. “I shouldn’t be here. The plan was to be shooting ‘Quixote’ right now,” Gilliam told Variety.

November 2013

Shortly after releasing his sci-fi “The Zero Theorem,” Gilliam confirmed to ComingSoon.net that he had begun preproduction on a seventh version of on “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.”

“Lucky seven, maybe,” he said. “We’ll see if it happens. This is kind of my default position, going back to that. I actually just want to make it and get rid of it. Get it out of my life.”

August 2014

Gilliam told TheWrap that he secured funding for “Don Quixote” and planned to shoot it in early 2015 — with the film now set in the present day and revolving around a movie being made about Quixote. “I keep incorporating my own life into it and shifting it,” Gilliam said. “I’ve done it so many times — or not done it so many times — I’ll believe it when I see it.”

September-November 2014

After another casting “hiccup” that Gilliam described to Rolling Stone as a “Sisyphean rock,” John Hurt was confirmed to play the role of Don Quixote, with Jack O’Connell as Sancho Panza. He even sparked a renewed excitement by releasing concept art for the film on his Facebook page.

September 2015

Another major setback suspended production when star Hurt was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He eventually passed away in 2017, a sad reality Gilliam knew all too well after Heath Ledger passed away during production of “The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus.”

May 2016

Teaming with Portuguese producer Paulo Branco, Gilliam got “Don Quixote” back on track yet again with a new cast that this time includes Gilliam’s “Monty Python” co-hort Michael Palin, Adam Driver and Olga Kurylenko as the female lead.

September 2016

Branco failed to get together funds that he promised, stalling its planned production date in October. Branco clashed with Gilliam, demanded creative control over the film, slashed the budget, dramatically reduced the fee for Palin and even threatened legal action over the film.

“I was moving with caution,” Branco said in Le Monde. “In most of Gilliam’s films, budgets had exploded. But I quickly realized that he had a deep hatred towards producers. I started to have doubts even though I had a lot of funding.” 

But Gilliam persevered, telling BBC Radio 2, “We are still marching forward. It is not dead. I will be dead before the film is.”

June 2017

Production finally wrapped on “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” — this time with Jonathan Pryce as Quixote and Driver as Toby, a modern ad executive mistaken for Sancho Panza. The cast also included Stellan Skarsgard, Kurylenko, Joana Ribeiro, Jordi Molla, Sergi Lopez and Rossy de Palma.

 

April 2018

At long last, a trailer is released for “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.” The film tells the story of a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby (Driver) who time jumps between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Then the film landed the closing-night slot at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, with a gala screening on May 19.

Within days, though, former producer Branco filed a lawsuit seeking an injunction to prevent Cannes from screening the film and claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film. Cannes organizers stood by Gilliam and defends the right to screen it, even taking a swipe at Branco.

May 2018

A Paris court dismissed Branco’s lawsuit, allowing the film to screen at Cannes’ closing night as planned.

But the troubles didn’t end. Gilliam suffered a minor stroke just days before the court ruling and Amazon Studios pulled out of its deal to release “Don Quixote” in North America, telling TheWrap they pulled out because producers failed to deliver it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam's 'Don Quixote' Despite Producer's Lawsuit to Block Screening

Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam's 'Don Quixote,' Lars von Trier's 'The House That Jack Built'

Terry Gilliam Blasts 'Mob Rule' of #MeToo Movement in Hollywood: 'It Is a World of Victims'

Cannes Confirms ‘Don Quixote’ for Closing Night, Praises Court Win: ‘Cinema Has Regained Its Rights’

Organizers for the 2018 Cannes Film Festival have confirmed that Terry Gilliam’s film, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” will screen during the festival’s closing night on May 19 — and praised the Paris court decision allowing it to happen.

“Since Tuesday, cinema has regained its rights,” organizers said in a statement. “The Festival is a unique forum for freedom of expression. It will remain so.”

Hours after Amazon Studios dropped “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a French court decided on Wednesday to dismiss a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at Cannes.

“The Festival de Cannes, which throughout the case has repeatedly expressed its loyalty and support for the creators, is pleased to see that justice will allow the presentation of this work, whose director surely deserves to see it finally presented to the public,” the statement said.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

Gilliam has been trying to make the film for decades with several failed attempts. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

“We are very pleased that this unique — and in some ways agonizing — work in the career of the great director Terry Gilliam will be unveiled for the first time to journalists, festival-goers and professionals from around the world, gathered together in the Grand Ampitheatre Lumiere,” added the statement.

The Festival has stood by the film in the past, saying, “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.’”

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 2: ‘Rafiki’ Makes History, ‘Don Quixote’ Scores Legal Victory

Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told TheWrap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

The film stars Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama ‘Everybody Knows’ in Cannes

‘Everybody Knows’ Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Organizers for the 2018 Cannes Film Festival have confirmed that Terry Gilliam’s film, “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” will screen during the festival’s closing night on May 19 — and praised the Paris court decision allowing it to happen.

“Since Tuesday, cinema has regained its rights,” organizers said in a statement. “The Festival is a unique forum for freedom of expression. It will remain so.”

Hours after Amazon Studios dropped “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a French court decided on Wednesday to dismiss a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at Cannes.

“The Festival de Cannes, which throughout the case has repeatedly expressed its loyalty and support for the creators, is pleased to see that justice will allow the presentation of this work, whose director surely deserves to see it finally presented to the public,” the statement said.

Gilliam has been trying to make the film for decades with several failed attempts. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

“We are very pleased that this unique — and in some ways agonizing — work in the career of the great director Terry Gilliam will be unveiled for the first time to journalists, festival-goers and professionals from around the world, gathered together in the Grand Ampitheatre Lumiere,” added the statement.

The Festival has stood by the film in the past, saying, “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.'”

Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told TheWrap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

The film stars Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 1: 'Everybody Knows' Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama 'Everybody Knows' in Cannes

'Everybody Knows' Film Review: Penélope Cruz, Javier Bardem in Strongest Cannes Opener in Years

Cannes Report, Day 2: ‘Rafiki’ Makes History, ‘Don Quixote’ Scores Legal Victory

Day 2 of the Cannes Film Festival was filled with screenings, most noteworthy being the showing of the Kenyan film “Rafiki,” but Terry Gilliam was the talk of the town when his film scored a huge legal victory on Wednesday.

A Paris court ruled that his long-in-the-works film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” could screen on the festival’s closing night despite a suit by a producer seeking to stop it. At the same time, however, the film lost its North American distributor, Amazon Studios, and Gilliam himself suffered a minor stroke over the weekend.

“Rafiki” made history on Wednesday when it became the first Kenyan film to screen at the festival. And Russia’s “Leto” also screened, but filmmaker Kirill Serebrennikov introduced it in absentia given that he is still under house arrest in his home country.

Also Read: Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Thursday sees competition films “Sorry Angel” and “Cold War” screening.

See below for Wednesday’s roundup:

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” Wins

Terry Gilliam was victorious on Wednesday, when a French judge decided to throw out a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film, which Gilliam has tried to make for decades with several failed attempts, can now screen during the festival’s closing night.

Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

But a court in Paris ruled Wednesday that the Cannes screening could proceed on May 19 as planned, so long as it’s preceded by a statement affirming Branco’s claims to the film rights. Branco will also be reimbursed for legal expenses.

Also Read: Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

However, Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told TheWrap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

The film stars Adam Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Jonathan Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Kenya’s “Rafiki” Debuts

The first-ever Kenyan film to be included in the festival, titled “Rafiki,” debuted at Cannes on Wednesday.

Many people were moved by its political storytelling. TheWrap’s Steve Pond wrote in his review, “Second-time director Wanuri Kahiu, one of a larger-than-usual contingent of female directors in the main selection, has crafted a modest, at times striking drama that is perhaps more notable for what it represents than what it is.”

The film was banned in its home country due to its LGBT love story, with the Kenya Film Classification Board saying that homosexual scenes were illegal in Kenya.

Also Read: ‘Rafiki’ Film Review: African Gay Romance Is a First for Cannes

#Rafiki is – in terms of filmmaking – somewhat conventional. But in terms of representation politics & storytelling it‘s an important & well made glimpse into Kenya, it‘s people and society. And the 2 protagonists are strong leads. Takes a lot of Chuzpe to make this film. #cannes

— Beatrice Behn (@DansLeCinema) May 9, 2018

Rafiki falls apart narratively but great style, talented director and liked one of the leads quite a bit. Important gay film for Kenya. #Cannes2018

— Gregory Ellwood (@TheGregoryE) May 9, 2018

RAFIKI: definitely a first film, but it’s got a vital political utility and these leads have chemistry out the wazoo. It’s not Cannes unless there’s a movie with blacklighting!

— Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse) May 9, 2018

“Black Panther” Lights Up the Beach at Night

“Black Panther” was screened at night at the Cinema de la Plage — and what a beautiful setting to see one of the most talked-about films of the year.

A Cannes crowd has gathered for a nighttime screening of BLACK PANTHER on the beach pic.twitter.com/BAX6Q575Yn

— Kyle Buchanan (@kylebuchanan) May 9, 2018

Yo @MarvelStudios made it to #Cannes2018 Outdoor beach screening of Black Panther. Overflow on public beach behind it. pic.twitter.com/64nX7yQ8Cl

— Gregory Ellwood (@TheGregoryE) May 9, 2018

Russia’s “Leto” Debuts

Kirill Serebrennikov’s film “Leto” screened at the festival while the director himself still remains under house arrest in Russia on charges of corruption.

The film received mixed early reviews. One viewer described the film as “cinematic brilliance,” while another called it “exceptional.”

TheWrap’s Steve Pond wrote in his review that “‘Leto’ is the wildest and most bracing film to screen in the main competition so far this year. Part fond remembrance of an early-’80s Leningrad rock scene and part glam-rock fever dream, ‘Leto’ asks an audience to surrender to excess and at times to silliness, and it richly rewards them for doing so.”

Also Read: ‘Leto’ Film Review: Musical Biopic Is a Rock ‘n’ Roll Fever Dream

Leto aka Summer (Serebrennikov ’18) is an exceptional, and exceptionally morose, movie about internal conflict amidst social upheaval. An urgent cry for the present moment. No way this isn’t winning something… #Cannes2018 #Cannes

— The Habitus (@habituspod) May 10, 2018

Cinematic brilliance @Festival_Cannes #Leto #KirillSerebrennikov #coupdecoeur https://t.co/JvOcDsDXdO

— Julia Effertz (@JuliaEffertz) May 10, 2018

Kirill Serebrennikov’s LETO is not a Jared Leto biopic, but it’s closer than you might think: an opaque, exhausting, sometimes impressive, often misjudged dive into the Leningrad rock scene. Not my favourite of his. https://t.co/KOzce3PNE1

— Guy Lodge (@GuyLodge) May 10, 2018

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Day 2 of the Cannes Film Festival was filled with screenings, most noteworthy being the showing of the Kenyan film “Rafiki,” but Terry Gilliam was the talk of the town when his film scored a huge legal victory on Wednesday.

A Paris court ruled that his long-in-the-works film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” could screen on the festival’s closing night despite a suit by a producer seeking to stop it. At the same time, however, the film lost its North American distributor, Amazon Studios, and Gilliam himself suffered a minor stroke over the weekend.

“Rafiki” made history on Wednesday when it became the first Kenyan film to screen at the festival. And Russia’s “Leto” also screened, but filmmaker Kirill Serebrennikov introduced it in absentia given that he is still under house arrest in his home country.

Thursday sees competition films “Sorry Angel” and “Cold War” screening.

See below for Wednesday’s roundup:

“The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” Wins

Terry Gilliam was victorious on Wednesday, when a French judge decided to throw out a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film, which Gilliam has tried to make for decades with several failed attempts, can now screen during the festival’s closing night.

Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

But a court in Paris ruled Wednesday that the Cannes screening could proceed on May 19 as planned, so long as it’s preceded by a statement affirming Branco’s claims to the film rights. Branco will also be reimbursed for legal expenses.

However, Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told TheWrap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

The film stars Adam Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Jonathan Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Kenya’s “Rafiki” Debuts

The first-ever Kenyan film to be included in the festival, titled “Rafiki,” debuted at Cannes on Wednesday.

Many people were moved by its political storytelling. TheWrap’s Steve Pond wrote in his review, “Second-time director Wanuri Kahiu, one of a larger-than-usual contingent of female directors in the main selection, has crafted a modest, at times striking drama that is perhaps more notable for what it represents than what it is.”

The film was banned in its home country due to its LGBT love story, with the Kenya Film Classification Board saying that homosexual scenes were illegal in Kenya.

“Black Panther” Lights Up the Beach at Night

“Black Panther” was screened at night at the Cinema de la Plage — and what a beautiful setting to see one of the most talked-about films of the year.

Russia’s “Leto” Debuts

Kirill Serebrennikov’s film “Leto” screened at the festival while the director himself still remains under house arrest in Russia on charges of corruption.

The film received mixed early reviews. One viewer described the film as “cinematic brilliance,” while another called it “exceptional.”

TheWrap’s Steve Pond wrote in his review that “‘Leto’ is the wildest and most bracing film to screen in the main competition so far this year. Part fond remembrance of an early-’80s Leningrad rock scene and part glam-rock fever dream, ‘Leto’ asks an audience to surrender to excess and at times to silliness, and it richly rewards them for doing so.”

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Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Loses Amazon as US Distributor, Wins Court Fight to Screen as Cannes Closer

Hours after Amazon Studios dropped Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a French court decided to dismiss a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at the Cannes Film Festival.

The long-delayed film, starring Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce, is now free to screen during the festival’s closing night. Gilliam has been trying to make the film for decades with several failed attempts.

Recently, it’s been involved in legal disputes over its rights. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

But a court in Paris ruled Wednesday that the Cannes screening could proceed on May 19 as planned, Variety reported, so long as it’s preceded by a statement affirming Branco’s claims to the film rights. Branco will also be reimbursed for legal expenses.

Also Read: Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Despite Producer’s Lawsuit to Block Screening

Cannes organizers have stood by the film, saying in a statement, “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.’”

Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told Therap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

Also Read: Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote,’ Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

The film stars Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

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Hours after Amazon Studios dropped Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” a French court decided to dismiss a producer’s bid to stop the film from screening at the Cannes Film Festival.

The long-delayed film, starring Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce, is now free to screen during the festival’s closing night. Gilliam has been trying to make the film for decades with several failed attempts.

Recently, it’s been involved in legal disputes over its rights. Producer Paulo Branco, who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after preproduction disputes, sought to block the Cannes closing-night screening. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

But a court in Paris ruled Wednesday that the Cannes screening could proceed on May 19 as planned, Variety reported, so long as it’s preceded by a statement affirming Branco’s claims to the film rights. Branco will also be reimbursed for legal expenses.

Cannes organizers have stood by the film, saying in a statement, “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.'”

Amazon Studios on Wednesday pulled out of its deal to distribute Gilliam’s film in North America because of producers’ failure to deliver it, an individual with knowledge of the situation told Therap. The distributor had been an eyeing a fall release.

The film stars Driver as a 21st-century marketing executive named Toby who toggles between modern times and 17th-century Spain, where Don Quixote (Pryce) mistakes him for his trusted squire, Sancho Panza.

Like Quixote, Toby becomes consumed by the illusory world and unable to distinguish his dreams from reality. The tale culminates in a phantasmagorical finale where Toby takes on the mantle of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 1: 'Everybody Knows' Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Focus Features Acquires Penelope Cruz Drama 'Everybody Knows' in Cannes

Cannes' Female Troubles: Women Directors Have Always Been Scarce

Paulo Branco: Amazon Pullout From ‘Don Quixote’ Caused by Rights Dispute

French-based producer Paulo Branco says he believes Amazon has withdrawn from U.S. distribution of Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” because sales agent Kinology did not have the right to sell the movie. At a news confe…

French-based producer Paulo Branco says he believes Amazon has withdrawn from U.S. distribution of Terry Gilliam’s “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” because sales agent Kinology did not have the right to sell the movie. At a news conference Wednesday afternoon in Cannes, Branco distributed a letter from Amazon’s lawyers, dated Feb. 14 saying that […]

‘Don Quixote’ Producers, Distributor Respond To Legal Dispute – Cannes

In the ongoing war of words and court filings over Terry Gilliam’s troubled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, comes a new, strongly-stated missive. On behalf of French distributor Océan Films and the movie’s producers, the communiqué released today is ti…

In the ongoing war of words and court filings over Terry Gilliam's troubled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, comes a new, strongly-stated missive. On behalf of French distributor Océan Films and the movie's producers, the communiqué released today is titled "Why Paulo Branco Was Never, Is Not And Never Will Be The Producer Of Terry Gilliam's Don Quixote." This is a response to the latest move by Branco who, as part of a rights dispute, is seeking an injunction against the…

Cannes Stands by Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ Despite Producer’s Lawsuit to Block Screening

The Cannes Film Festival reaffirmed its plans to screen Terry Gilliam’s long-delayed “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” despite a lawsuit by producer Paulo Branco seeking to block the closing-night screening at next month’s festival.

“We strongly affirm that we stand squarely on the side of filmmakers and in particular on the side of Terry Gilliam,” festival president Pierre Lescure and general delegate Thierry Frémaux said in a statement. “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.’”

Branco, a producer who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after pre-production disputes, filed suit last Wednesday seeking an injunction to prevent Cannes from screening the film. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

Also Read: Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote,’ Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

A judge is expected to rule on Branco’s suit on May 7, at the start of the festival. The film is currently scheduled to screen on the event’s closing night, May 19, timed to its release on 300 screens in France.

Festival organizers couldn’t resist taking a swipe at Branco himself. “As Mr Branco has so far been very prominent in the media and legal spheres it seems necessary to state the reasons which led us to choose the film and risk action by the producer, whose lawyer, Juan Branco, likes to point out that his image and his credibility are essentially built on his numerous appearances at Cannes and by his closeness to the great auteurs honoured by the Festival,” Lescure and Frémaux said. “The latter is true, which adds to our bemusement.”

Also Read: Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades

The festival organizers also framed the issue as one of free expression. “Defeat would be to succumb to threats,” they wrote, citing the fact that “two filmmakers invited to take part in the Official Selection are under house arrest in their own countries.”

“It is more important than ever to remember that artists need us to support them, not attack them,” they wrote. “That has always been the tradition of the Festival de Cannes and so it will remain.”

A rep for Amazon Studios, which is releasing the film domestically, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote,’ Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built’

Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ After Nearly 2 Decades

Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Delayed Again Over Money Issues

The Cannes Film Festival reaffirmed its plans to screen Terry Gilliam’s long-delayed “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” despite a lawsuit by producer Paulo Branco seeking to block the closing-night screening at next month’s festival.

“We strongly affirm that we stand squarely on the side of filmmakers and in particular on the side of Terry Gilliam,” festival president Pierre Lescure and general delegate Thierry Frémaux said in a statement. “The trouble were caused on this last occasion by the actions of a producer who has shown his true colours once and for all during this episode and who has threatened us, via his lawyer, with a ‘humiliating defeat.'”

Branco, a producer who was attached to “Don Quixote” but left after pre-production disputes, filed suit last Wednesday seeking an injunction to prevent Cannes from screening the film. His lawyer issued a statement claiming that Gilliam needs Branco’s permission to screen the film.

A judge is expected to rule on Branco’s suit on May 7, at the start of the festival. The film is currently scheduled to screen on the event’s closing night, May 19, timed to its release on 300 screens in France.

Festival organizers couldn’t resist taking a swipe at Branco himself. “As Mr Branco has so far been very prominent in the media and legal spheres it seems necessary to state the reasons which led us to choose the film and risk action by the producer, whose lawyer, Juan Branco, likes to point out that his image and his credibility are essentially built on his numerous appearances at Cannes and by his closeness to the great auteurs honoured by the Festival,” Lescure and Frémaux said. “The latter is true, which adds to our bemusement.”

The festival organizers also framed the issue as one of free expression. “Defeat would be to succumb to threats,” they wrote, citing the fact that “two filmmakers invited to take part in the Official Selection are under house arrest in their own countries.”

“It is more important than ever to remember that artists need us to support them, not attack them,” they wrote. “That has always been the tradition of the Festival de Cannes and so it will remain.”

A rep for Amazon Studios, which is releasing the film domestically, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

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Cannes Adds Terry Gilliam's 'Don Quixote,' Lars von Trier's 'The House That Jack Built'

Terry Gilliam Finally Wraps Production on 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' After Nearly 2 Decades

Terry Gilliam's 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Delayed Again Over Money Issues

Cannes Responds To Dispute Over Terry Gilliam’s ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ & Threat To Film’s Fest Debut

As Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote faces yet another hurdle on its way to the screen, the Cannes Film Festival has pledged itself firmly on the side of the filmmaker. Releasing a statement to that effect, Cannes has today addressed…

As Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote faces yet another hurdle on its way to the screen, the Cannes Film Festival has pledged itself firmly on the side of the filmmaker. Releasing a statement to that effect, Cannes has today addressed a legal challenge levied at the film last week by Paulo Branco and his Alfama Films Productions which seeks to have the movie pulled from its official May 19 closing night slot as part of a rights dispute. Cannes chiefs Pierre…

Doha Film Institute Recruits Lucrecia Martel and Paulo Branco for Qumra Event

The Doha Film Institute has recruited Argentinian director Lucrecia Martel and Portuguese producer Paulo Branco as masters for their 2017 Qumra event, which blends creative workshop and festival elements. Martel, whose works include “The Swamp,” “The Holy Girl,” and “The Headless Woman,” is considered one the most prominent Latin American film directors of the past… Read more »

The Doha Film Institute has recruited Argentinian director Lucrecia Martel and Portuguese producer Paulo Branco as masters for their 2017 Qumra event, which blends creative workshop and festival elements. Martel, whose works include “The Swamp,” “The Holy Girl,” and “The Headless Woman,” is considered one the most prominent Latin American film directors of the past... Read more »