American Cinematheque Puts on a Giant Bradley Cooper Love Fest

There was a lot of talk about how handsome Bradley Cooper is on Thursday night at the Beverly Hilton, where the director and star of “A Star Is Born” became the 32nd recipient of the American Cinematheque Award at a black-tie fundraising dinner and ceremony.

And there was a lot of talk about how hard-working he is and how talented he is, lots of the kind of plaudits that are the currency of the realm at Hollywood awards shows.

But something felt different about the tribute to Cooper. “Most of us have been to nights like this many times before,” actor Sean Penn said when he presented the award to Cooper after a couple of hours of speeches and film clips. “But we’ve never been at one where so many generous and moving things have been said with such extemporaneous spirit.”

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’ Film Review: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Reinvigorate a Classic

And he was right. The Cinematheque’s tribute to Cooper felt like the love fest to end all love fests, with a string of friends and colleagues – among them Jennifer Garner, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Patricia Clarkson, Vince Vaughan, David O. Russell, Sam Elliott and Lady Gaga – declaring undying affection for the three-time Oscar nominee who is currently riding high with the success of his new version of “A Star Is Born.”

“It’s beyond overwhelming to feel the love I had showered on me tonight,” a clearly touched Cooper, who was reduced to tears several times during the course of the ceremony, said when he took the stage at the end of the night.

And just as surprising as the fact that Cooper took a thrice-told story and turned it into an Oscar frontrunner was the realization that despite all that love being flung around the Beverly Hilton ballroom, things never quite got maudlin or corny.

(Well, maybe just a little when Lady Gaga quoted her “Star Is Born” song “I’ll Never Love Again” and said, “I’ll never love again a director the way I loved you, Bradley Cooper – truly, a director star was born.” But by that point, everybody in the room was ready to go with it.)

Also Read: Bradley Cooper to Receive Director of the Year Award at Palm Springs Film Festival

On a night when Dolby Laboratories’ Doug Darrow also accepted the Cinematheque’s 4th annual Sid Grauman Award, which is presented to a person or company who has made an impact of the exhibition of motion pictures, the Cooper tribute was a more-or-less chronological trip through his career.

It started with Jennifer Garner, who introduced a clip package devoted to what she said was “the finest work of Bradley’s career: the TV years.” The clips from “Alias,” “Law & Order: Trial by Jury,” “Sex and the City” and “Kitchen Confidential” and his speedo-clad appearance in “Nip and Tuck” argued otherwise.

Vince Vaughan made fun of the brightly-colored workout clothes Cooper wore when he wasn’t working on “Wedding Crashers” (“he was like a child dressed by [his] parents to not get hit by a car when he goes outside”) but then cut the jokes, got downright serious and called Cooper a genius.

Ed Helms and Zach Galifiakanis followed the same pattern: They made plenty of jokes (“When we were making ‘Hangover 3,’ all Bradley wanted to talk about was what mobile plan was best to phone in his performance,” said Galifiakanis) but then showered Cooper with praise, especially when Galifiakanis talked about he and Cooper bonded over how much they loved their parents.

Also Read: Lady Gaga Calls Kavanaugh Debate ‘One of the Most Upsetting Things I Have Ever Witnessed’ (Videos)

Brian Klugman, who has been friends with Cooper since they were 10, answered one burning question: “In case you were wondering, he was always handsome. He could come over when he was 11, and my grandmother would say, ‘He’s so good-looking!’”

But then he told a story about how in the sixth grade, Cooper won an award that was basically “the best person in the school award,” and then went to a dance and immediately went up to the girl that all the boys had been making fun of and asked her to dance. At the end of the story, Cooper wiped his eyes and lowered his head.

David O. Russell, who directed Cooper in “Silver Linings Playbook,” “American Hustle” and “Joy,” summed the actor up by saying, “it is his heart that makes something unforgettable, that makes something alive, that makes something human … He is the greatest collaborator an artist could ask for.”

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’ Cinematographer Arrested, Charged With Assaulting First Responders in Poland

After brief tributes from former U.S. Marine Jacob Schick, who appeared in “American Sniper,” and Taya Kyle, wife of the late soldier played by Cooper in that film, Patricia Clarkson took things in a different direction.

Clarkson told of appearing with Cooper in a stage production of “The Elephant Man,” where she had to perform a nude scene. “He cast me in that role, and I am not an ingénue,” she said. “I am an ingen-not-so-f—ing-new … Every night in the wings I was frightened, but every night when we did that scene, he made it so that it was simply Mrs. Kendal and John Merrick alone in a room.

“Bradley, it was the honor of my life to stand beside you onstage.” When she finished, Cooper once again lowered his head and wiped away tears.

And he cried again when Lady Gaga, fighting back tears of her own, said, “When we do Q&As for this film, sometimes you call me Gaga. But we both know that you call me Stefani. [Her real name is Stefani Germanotta.] I ran from Stefani for a long time, and I put on a superhero cape and called myself Lady Gaga. And you challenged me to deep dive into a place where I had to be Stefani again.”

Sam Elliott, who plays Cooper’s brother in “A Star Is Born,” summed it up near the end of the evening: “Its clear that everyone in this room is in love with you, my friend, and for all the right reasons,” he said.

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’: How Bradley Cooper Worked for 6 Months to Become Country Singer Jackson Maine

And then Penn came out, talked about what a moving night it had been and quickly punctured the mood. “Full disclosure,” he said. “I don’t like handsome or young men.”

But he makes an exception for Cooper – so after a modest diatribe about how he’s bored by “movies [about] men and women who wear their underwear on the outside of their tights,” he began lavishing praise on “A Star Is Born.” The film “shows that human stories of scale can still be told by artists of such amazing honesty,” he said.

“I told you before,” he added, “I don’t know how you did it, but we’re all just so grateful that you did, you handsome mother—er.”

Cooper, for his part, seemed at a loss for words by the time he got to the stage. He mentioned that the room had seemed cavernous when he first went there for the Golden Globes while he was on “Alias,” but now it seemed far more intimate. And he thanked Michael Mann, who was in the crowd, for writing him a thank-you note after an early audition for a small role he didn’t get.

“Michael f—ing Mann wrote me a note thanking me for auditioning after I didn’t get the job,” he said, still incredulous.

“Tonight,” he said to the room before walking off stage, “you have given me so much inspiration.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Listen to Bradley Cooper, Lady Gaga Sing ‘Shallow’ From ‘A Star Is Born’ (Video)

Eddie Vedder Inspired Bradley Cooper’s ‘Star Is Born’ Character: ‘He Was Like, What? Bro, Don’t Do That’

‘Green Book’ Named 2018’s Top Film by National Board of Review

There was a lot of talk about how handsome Bradley Cooper is on Thursday night at the Beverly Hilton, where the director and star of “A Star Is Born” became the 32nd recipient of the American Cinematheque Award at a black-tie fundraising dinner and ceremony.

And there was a lot of talk about how hard-working he is and how talented he is, lots of the kind of plaudits that are the currency of the realm at Hollywood awards shows.

But something felt different about the tribute to Cooper. “Most of us have been to nights like this many times before,” actor Sean Penn said when he presented the award to Cooper after a couple of hours of speeches and film clips. “But we’ve never been at one where so many generous and moving things have been said with such extemporaneous spirit.”

And he was right. The Cinematheque’s tribute to Cooper felt like the love fest to end all love fests, with a string of friends and colleagues – among them Jennifer Garner, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Patricia Clarkson, Vince Vaughan, David O. Russell, Sam Elliott and Lady Gaga – declaring undying affection for the three-time Oscar nominee who is currently riding high with the success of his new version of “A Star Is Born.”

“It’s beyond overwhelming to feel the love I had showered on me tonight,” a clearly touched Cooper, who was reduced to tears several times during the course of the ceremony, said when he took the stage at the end of the night.

And just as surprising as the fact that Cooper took a thrice-told story and turned it into an Oscar frontrunner was the realization that despite all that love being flung around the Beverly Hilton ballroom, things never quite got maudlin or corny.

(Well, maybe just a little when Lady Gaga quoted her “Star Is Born” song “I’ll Never Love Again” and said, “I’ll never love again a director the way I loved you, Bradley Cooper – truly, a director star was born.” But by that point, everybody in the room was ready to go with it.)

On a night when Dolby Laboratories’ Doug Darrow also accepted the Cinematheque’s 4th annual Sid Grauman Award, which is presented to a person or company who has made an impact of the exhibition of motion pictures, the Cooper tribute was a more-or-less chronological trip through his career.

It started with Jennifer Garner, who introduced a clip package devoted to what she said was “the finest work of Bradley’s career: the TV years.” The clips from “Alias,” “Law & Order: Trial by Jury,” “Sex and the City” and “Kitchen Confidential” and his speedo-clad appearance in “Nip and Tuck” argued otherwise.

Vince Vaughan made fun of the brightly-colored workout clothes Cooper wore when he wasn’t working on “Wedding Crashers” (“he was like a child dressed by [his] parents to not get hit by a car when he goes outside”) but then cut the jokes, got downright serious and called Cooper a genius.

Ed Helms and Zach Galifiakanis followed the same pattern: They made plenty of jokes (“When we were making ‘Hangover 3,’ all Bradley wanted to talk about was what mobile plan was best to phone in his performance,” said Galifiakanis) but then showered Cooper with praise, especially when Galifiakanis talked about he and Cooper bonded over how much they loved their parents.

Brian Klugman, who has been friends with Cooper since they were 10, answered one burning question: “In case you were wondering, he was always handsome. He could come over when he was 11, and my grandmother would say, ‘He’s so good-looking!'”

But then he told a story about how in the sixth grade, Cooper won an award that was basically “the best person in the school award,” and then went to a dance and immediately went up to the girl that all the boys had been making fun of and asked her to dance. At the end of the story, Cooper wiped his eyes and lowered his head.

David O. Russell, who directed Cooper in “Silver Linings Playbook,” “American Hustle” and “Joy,” summed the actor up by saying, “it is his heart that makes something unforgettable, that makes something alive, that makes something human … He is the greatest collaborator an artist could ask for.”

After brief tributes from former U.S. Marine Jacob Schick, who appeared in “American Sniper,” and Taya Kyle, wife of the late soldier played by Cooper in that film, Patricia Clarkson took things in a different direction.

Clarkson told of appearing with Cooper in a stage production of “The Elephant Man,” where she had to perform a nude scene. “He cast me in that role, and I am not an ingénue,” she said. “I am an ingen-not-so-f—ing-new … Every night in the wings I was frightened, but every night when we did that scene, he made it so that it was simply Mrs. Kendal and John Merrick alone in a room.

“Bradley, it was the honor of my life to stand beside you onstage.” When she finished, Cooper once again lowered his head and wiped away tears.

And he cried again when Lady Gaga, fighting back tears of her own, said, “When we do Q&As for this film, sometimes you call me Gaga. But we both know that you call me Stefani. [Her real name is Stefani Germanotta.] I ran from Stefani for a long time, and I put on a superhero cape and called myself Lady Gaga. And you challenged me to deep dive into a place where I had to be Stefani again.”

Sam Elliott, who plays Cooper’s brother in “A Star Is Born,” summed it up near the end of the evening: “Its clear that everyone in this room is in love with you, my friend, and for all the right reasons,” he said.

And then Penn came out, talked about what a moving night it had been and quickly punctured the mood. “Full disclosure,” he said. “I don’t like handsome or young men.”

But he makes an exception for Cooper – so after a modest diatribe about how he’s bored by “movies [about] men and women who wear their underwear on the outside of their tights,” he began lavishing praise on “A Star Is Born.” The film “shows that human stories of scale can still be told by artists of such amazing honesty,” he said.

“I told you before,” he added, “I don’t know how you did it, but we’re all just so grateful that you did, you handsome mother—er.”

Cooper, for his part, seemed at a loss for words by the time he got to the stage. He mentioned that the room had seemed cavernous when he first went there for the Golden Globes while he was on “Alias,” but now it seemed far more intimate. And he thanked Michael Mann, who was in the crowd, for writing him a thank-you note after an early audition for a small role he didn’t get.

“Michael f—ing Mann wrote me a note thanking me for auditioning after I didn’t get the job,” he said, still incredulous.

“Tonight,” he said to the room before walking off stage, “you have given me so much inspiration.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Listen to Bradley Cooper, Lady Gaga Sing 'Shallow' From 'A Star Is Born' (Video)

Eddie Vedder Inspired Bradley Cooper's 'Star Is Born' Character: 'He Was Like, What? Bro, Don't Do That'

'Green Book' Named 2018's Top Film by National Board of Review

Patricia Clarkson Looks for Sharp Buyer in NYC (EXCLUSIVE)

Stage and screen veteran Patricia Clarkson has listed her loft-style apartment in the historic, tree-lined heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village for $2.5 million. The honey-voiced two-time Emmy winning Oscar, Golden Globe and Tony nominated actres…

Stage and screen veteran Patricia Clarkson has listed her loft-style apartment in the historic, tree-lined heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village for $2.5 million. The honey-voiced two-time Emmy winning Oscar, Golden Globe and Tony nominated actress, who starred in HBO miniseries “Sharp Objects,” purchased the apartment about 11 years ago for not quite $1.6 […]

IFC Films Acquires TIFF Drama ‘Out Of Blue’

EXCLUSIVE: IFC Films has picked up the U.S. distribution rights to Out Of Blue. The Carol Morley written and directed crime drama had its premiere at this year’s Toronto Film Festival and will be released in theaters sometime next year. Patricia …

EXCLUSIVE: IFC Films has picked up the U.S. distribution rights to Out Of Blue. The Carol Morley written and directed crime drama had its premiere at this year’s Toronto Film Festival and will be released in theaters sometime next year. Patricia Clarkson (The Green Mile), Jacki Weaver (Animal Kingdom), James Caan (Misery), Toby Jones (Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), and Mamie Gummer (End Of Tour) star. Based on the novel by Martin Amis, the story follows a New Orleans…

‘Sharp Objects’ Finale: Patricia Clarkson Reveals What She Would Have Added to That Shocking Twist

It involves dancing, because why not?

[Editor’s note: This article contains spoilers for the final episode of “Sharp Objects.”]

The “Sharp Objects” finale was a corker, making inventive use of its final moments — and even the end credits — to reveal who really killed those girls in Wind Gap. Patricia Clarkson, whose Adora ultimately goes to prison for the murders despite not committing them, has revealed how she would have liked her character to be sent off in that instant-classic end-credits sequence: “I would’ve had [Adora] dancing in her jail cell,” she tells Entertainment Weekly. “That would’ve been my end-credit [scene].”

Clarkson is in Toronto with her new film “Out of Blue.” Speaking of going from one project to the other, she calls it “the most radical chance I had to make — internally externally, emotionally, physically. I had five articles of clothing [for Mike] and Adora I had four closetfuls [laughs]. I had trousers and a shirt and a jacket, and hair and makeup that was so simple. The beauty of Mike is the character has to really live from deep within, whereas Adora, well, she’s such a wild ride.”

Not that her movie is the only thing being discussed at TIFF. “It’s interesting to be here now, post-‘Sharp Objects.’ Last night I was out in a restaurant and this man — he was sitting quietly all night, and then he leans over and goes, ‘Good thing you got out of jail.’” Read her full interview here.

‘Out Of Blue’ Star Patricia Clarkson On Playing A Strong Female Character “Defined By Herself” – Toronto Studio

With her third narrative feature, the Patricia Clarkson-starring Out of Blue, Carol Morley brought Martin Amis’s 1997 novel Night Trainto the screen, doing so entirely on her own terms.
Early on, Morley’s decision to do so left those close to her scrat…

With her third narrative feature, the Patricia Clarkson-starring Out of Blue, Carol Morley brought Martin Amis's 1997 novel Night Trainto the screen, doing so entirely on her own terms. Early on, Morley's decision to do so left those close to her scratching their heads. "When I told people—before I did it, when I was writing it—they were like, 'You, doing Martin Amis?' They were saying, 'Why don't you do a female author?' And I'm like, 'But I'm really interested in this…

‘Sharp Objects’ Finale: Breaking Down Those Chilling Post-Credits Scenes

(Spoiler alert: Don’t read ahead unless you’ve watched the “Sharp Objects” finale… all the way to the end of the credits!)

Deep breaths, people, deep breaths.

“Sharp Objects” went out Sunday with the big reveal that Amma (Eliza Scanlen) is the one who murdered Ann Nash and Natalie Keene, with the HBO limited series’ finale cutting off right at the moment Camille (Amy Adams) realizes the truth about her devious little sister. Amma says, “Don’t tell mama,” then the screen cuts to black and Led Zepplin’s “In the Evening” kicks into high gear as the final credits roll.

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’ Finale: Marti Noxon Explains the Final Line and Why They Cut the Ending Off Early

But if you stick around to watch all the way through till the very end of the small-screen adaptation’s final episode, “Milk,” you’ll catch a few glimpses of Amma that reveal more of the murderous story from Gillian Flynn’s debut novel. And that are sure to send chills down your spine.

The first, which comes mid-credits, is a chaotic shot of Amma doing the deed — strangling the girls in the woods as they fight back. (They don’t show Amma pulling out their teeth, which are to be used as the ivory floor in her coveted dollhouse, but she did that, too). It even gives a few glimpses of her offing her new friend in the city, Mae.

While the Adams-led drama doesn’t give you more details about how Amma carried out the crimes than those jagged shots, Flynn’s book fleshes it out in its final few pages. You can read more about the differences between the book and the limited series here.

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’: Eliza Scanlen on Playing Amy Adams’ ‘Rebellious’ Little Sister With ‘Balls’ (Video)

The final scene of the series comes at the very end of the credits, and is a blink-and-you’ll-almost-miss-it shot of Amma in a long white dress, gazing at the camera before turning to walk into the woods. The vision is significant because, if you remember back in Episode 2, “Dirt,” the only eyewitness to Natalie’s capture was a little boy who described to Camille a woman dressed in white as Natalie’s kidnapper.

The short scene is also a call back to Amma and Camille’s mother Adora (Patricia Clarkson), who is often depicted in white (see below), has that ivory floor in her bedroom, and who killed Camille’s other little sister, Marian.

Read our conversation about the gut-punch finale with showrunner Marti Noxon over here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Sharp Objects’: Showrunner Marti Noxon Says Calhoun Day Started Out as a Joke

‘Sharp Objects’: Eliza Scanlen on Playing Amy Adams’ ‘Rebellious’ Little Sister With ‘Balls’ (Video)

‘Sharp Objects’ Star Eliza Scanlen Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner Says No to Season 2: ‘This Is It’

(Spoiler alert: Don’t read ahead unless you’ve watched the “Sharp Objects” finale… all the way to the end of the credits!)

Deep breaths, people, deep breaths.

“Sharp Objects” went out Sunday with the big reveal that Amma (Eliza Scanlen) is the one who murdered Ann Nash and Natalie Keene, with the HBO limited series’ finale cutting off right at the moment Camille (Amy Adams) realizes the truth about her devious little sister. Amma says, “Don’t tell mama,” then the screen cuts to black and Led Zepplin’s “In the Evening” kicks into high gear as the final credits roll.

But if you stick around to watch all the way through till the very end of the small-screen adaptation’s final episode, “Milk,” you’ll catch a few glimpses of Amma that reveal more of the murderous story from Gillian Flynn’s debut novel. And that are sure to send chills down your spine.

The first, which comes mid-credits, is a chaotic shot of Amma doing the deed — strangling the girls in the woods as they fight back. (They don’t show Amma pulling out their teeth, which are to be used as the ivory floor in her coveted dollhouse, but she did that, too). It even gives a few glimpses of her offing her new friend in the city, Mae.

While the Adams-led drama doesn’t give you more details about how Amma carried out the crimes than those jagged shots, Flynn’s book fleshes it out in its final few pages. You can read more about the differences between the book and the limited series here.

The final scene of the series comes at the very end of the credits, and is a blink-and-you’ll-almost-miss-it shot of Amma in a long white dress, gazing at the camera before turning to walk into the woods. The vision is significant because, if you remember back in Episode 2, “Dirt,” the only eyewitness to Natalie’s capture was a little boy who described to Camille a woman dressed in white as Natalie’s kidnapper.

The short scene is also a call back to Amma and Camille’s mother Adora (Patricia Clarkson), who is often depicted in white (see below), has that ivory floor in her bedroom, and who killed Camille’s other little sister, Marian.

Read our conversation about the gut-punch finale with showrunner Marti Noxon over here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sharp Objects': Showrunner Marti Noxon Says Calhoun Day Started Out as a Joke

'Sharp Objects': Eliza Scanlen on Playing Amy Adams' 'Rebellious' Little Sister With 'Balls' (Video)

'Sharp Objects' Star Eliza Scanlen Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

'Sharp Objects' Showrunner Says No to Season 2: 'This Is It'

‘Sharp Objects’ Season Finale: A Semi-Satisfying, Twisted Ending To A Slow Burn Mystery

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details about the season finale of Sharp Objects.
Sunday night answered the lingering question: “Who killed all these young girls in Wind Gap?” Based on the creepiness and overall shadiness of this small…

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details about the season finale of Sharp Objects. Sunday night answered the lingering question: “Who killed all these young girls in Wind Gap?” Based on the creepiness and overall shadiness of this small town, anyone and everyone could have been responsible for these murders — including Amy Adams’ broken Camille Preaker. My money was on the Southern belle beast of a matriarch Adora (a delightfully viciousness and delusional Patricia Cla…

Toronto Film Festival Books Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss Films for Platform Section

The Platform section of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will include adventurous films starring Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss, Frank Grillo and Patricia Clarkson, TIFF organizers announced on Wednesday.

Films in the section will include Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell,” with Moss and Amber Heard; Carol Morley’s Martin Amis adaptation “Out of Blue,” with Patricia Clarkson and Toby Jones; and Emmanuel Mouret’s period piece “Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” starring Cecile de France.

Tim Sutton’s “Donnybrook,” which stars Frank Grillo and James Badge Dale in the story of a down-on-his-luck veteran who gets involved in brutal bare-knuckle boxing, will serve as the opening-night film for Platform, while Caroline Poggi and Jonathan Vinel’s “Jessica Forever,” a directorial debut, will close it.

Also Read: ‘Beautiful Boy,’ ‘A Star Is Born’ Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

All of the films except Emir Baigazin’s “The River” and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” a crime thriller starring Nicole Kidman, are world premieres.

Four of the 12 films are directed or co-directed by women.

Platform is a four-year-old section of the festival devoted to a dozen films “with high artistic merit and a bold directorial vision,” according to a TIFF release. Barry Jenkins’ Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight” played in the section in 2016, while Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” and Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin” appeared in Platform lineups in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Platform is also a competitive section of the festival, with a three-person jury awarding a prize of $25,000 Canadian to the director of the winning film.

Also Read: Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6 through Sept. 16. Additional bookings will be announced throughout most of August.

The Platform lineup:

“Angelo,” Markus Schleinzer | Austria/Luxembourg
“Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding | Taiwan/China/USA/France
“Destroyer,” Karyn Kusama | USA
“Donnybrook,” Tim Sutton | USA
“The Good Girls,” (Las niñas bien) Alejandra Márquez Abella | Mexico
“Her Smell,” Alex Ross Perry | USA
“The Innocent,” Simon Jaquemet | Switzerland/Germany x
“Jessica Forever,” Caroline Poggi, Jonathan Vinel | France
“Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” Emmanuel Mouret | France
“Out of Blue,” Carol Morley | UK
“The River,” Emir Baigazin | Kazakhstan/Poland/Norway
“Rojo,” Benjamín Naishtat | Argentina/Brazil/France/Netherlands/Germany

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

‘Beautiful Boy,’ ‘A Star Is Born’ Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

Coen Brothers, Barry Jenkins’ New Films to Play at New York Film Festival

John DeLorean Biopic ‘Driven’ to Close Venice Film Festival

The Platform section of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will include adventurous films starring Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss, Frank Grillo and Patricia Clarkson, TIFF organizers announced on Wednesday.

Films in the section will include Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell,” with Moss and Amber Heard; Carol Morley’s Martin Amis adaptation “Out of Blue,” with Patricia Clarkson and Toby Jones; and Emmanuel Mouret’s period piece “Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” starring Cecile de France.

Tim Sutton’s “Donnybrook,” which stars Frank Grillo and James Badge Dale in the story of a down-on-his-luck veteran who gets involved in brutal bare-knuckle boxing, will serve as the opening-night film for Platform, while Caroline Poggi and Jonathan Vinel’s “Jessica Forever,” a directorial debut, will close it.

All of the films except Emir Baigazin’s “The River” and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” a crime thriller starring Nicole Kidman, are world premieres.

Four of the 12 films are directed or co-directed by women.

Platform is a four-year-old section of the festival devoted to a dozen films “with high artistic merit and a bold directorial vision,” according to a TIFF release. Barry Jenkins’ Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight” played in the section in 2016, while Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” and Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin” appeared in Platform lineups in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Platform is also a competitive section of the festival, with a three-person jury awarding a prize of $25,000 Canadian to the director of the winning film.

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6 through Sept. 16. Additional bookings will be announced throughout most of August.

The Platform lineup:

“Angelo,” Markus Schleinzer | Austria/Luxembourg
“Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding | Taiwan/China/USA/France
“Destroyer,” Karyn Kusama | USA
“Donnybrook,” Tim Sutton | USA
“The Good Girls,” (Las niñas bien) Alejandra Márquez Abella | Mexico
“Her Smell,” Alex Ross Perry | USA
“The Innocent,” Simon Jaquemet | Switzerland/Germany x
“Jessica Forever,” Caroline Poggi, Jonathan Vinel | France
“Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” Emmanuel Mouret | France
“Out of Blue,” Carol Morley | UK
“The River,” Emir Baigazin | Kazakhstan/Poland/Norway
“Rojo,” Benjamín Naishtat | Argentina/Brazil/France/Netherlands/Germany

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

'Beautiful Boy,' 'A Star Is Born' Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

Coen Brothers, Barry Jenkins' New Films to Play at New York Film Festival

John DeLorean Biopic 'Driven' to Close Venice Film Festival

‘Sharp Objects’: Showrunner Marti Noxon Says Calhoun Day Started Out as a Joke

Warning: Spoilers ahead for “Sharp Objects” Episode 5, “Closer”

In the latest episode of “Sharp Objects,” the residents of Wind Gap, Missouri, convene at Adora Preaker’s (Patricia Clarkson) estate to celebrate the town’s founder with Calhoun Day — an idea that showrunner Marti Noxon told TheWrap began as a joke.

“It started as a joke, to be honest,” Noxon said with a laugh of the made-up holiday (Calhoun Day isn’t part of the Gillian Flynn novel on which the show is based). “Well… the kind of joke that in a [writer’s] room takes on its own life.”

Noxon said that she and the “Sharp Objects” writers were “fascinated” with the way the residents of Wind Gap “seemed to really identify with the South and the kind of Dixie flag flying and the story of Calhoun, the town’s founder.” 

Also Read: Why ‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner Named Each Episode After a Word on Camille’s Body

The story goes that Zeke Calhoun — who Camille (Amy Adams) refers to as “our founding pedophile” — fought for the South in the Civil War while betrothed to Millie, a young girl from a Union family who Camille refers to as her “great-great-great-grand victim.” According to the tale, some Union soldiers traveled South to capture Calhoun “dead or alive.” But Millie, who at this point was pregnant, refused to give up her husband.

Camille says in the episode that it’s how Millie resists the soldiers that the townspeople love. The story ends with Millie refusing to reveal to the Union soldiers where Zeke is hiding, prompting them to tie her to a tree and do horrible things to her — “violations,” as Camille says — to the point of Millie losing her baby.

When Richard (Chris Messina) questions why this dark story merits a holiday, Camille counters, “We don’t have a lot of happy stories around here.”

Also Read: Here’s How ‘Sharp Objects’ Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

There’s a lot of talk about myth and fantasy and how that can influence towns, and your story versus your truth,” Noxon said. That idea bleeds into Camille’s own mythos: “The [Preaker] family has myths, the family has things that aren’t necessarily true on the surface.”

Camille tries to distance herself from her mother’s small town celebrations and conservative beliefs. She tells Adora that she’s not really part of Calhoun Day (and back in the pilot we saw a Barack Obama poster in her apartment). But when Adora forces her to reveal to Amma (Eliza Scanlen) her scars, Camille is forced to remember where she truly comes from. 

Noxon said this line between what is real and what we tell ourselves is real reminds her of “fake news” as we know it today.

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner on Premiere’s ‘Aha Moment,’ What Those ‘Sharp Objects’ Have Done to Camille

The more we talked about the fake news of the town, the things that they told each other that just weren’t true, the more we kept focusing on the founder’s story, and the joke was that we were going to do Calhoun Day the musical,” she said, laughing again. 

But then we just started to realize there was something in bringing everybody in the town [together],” she added. “Like, it’s this life of Wind Gap, and the dynamics of the haves and the have nots, and Adora and the Preaker family as the kind of royalty of that family who controls the narrative being very juicy. And so eventually it was like, we’re doing Calhoun Day. We’re doing it.” 

“Sharp Objects” airs on HBO Sundays at 9/8c. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why ‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner Named Each Episode After a Word on Camille’s Body

Here’s How ‘Sharp Objects’ Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

Amy Adams’ ‘Sharp Objects’ Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner on Premiere’s ‘Aha Moment,’ What Those ‘Sharp Objects’ Have Done to Camille

Warning: Spoilers ahead for “Sharp Objects” Episode 5, “Closer”

In the latest episode of “Sharp Objects,” the residents of Wind Gap, Missouri, convene at Adora Preaker’s (Patricia Clarkson) estate to celebrate the town’s founder with Calhoun Day — an idea that showrunner Marti Noxon told TheWrap began as a joke.

“It started as a joke, to be honest,” Noxon said with a laugh of the made-up holiday (Calhoun Day isn’t part of the Gillian Flynn novel on which the show is based). “Well… the kind of joke that in a [writer’s] room takes on its own life.”

Noxon said that she and the “Sharp Objects” writers were “fascinated” with the way the residents of Wind Gap “seemed to really identify with the South and the kind of Dixie flag flying and the story of Calhoun, the town’s founder.” 

The story goes that Zeke Calhoun — who Camille (Amy Adams) refers to as “our founding pedophile” — fought for the South in the Civil War while betrothed to Millie, a young girl from a Union family who Camille refers to as her “great-great-great-grand victim.” According to the tale, some Union soldiers traveled South to capture Calhoun “dead or alive.” But Millie, who at this point was pregnant, refused to give up her husband.

Camille says in the episode that it’s how Millie resists the soldiers that the townspeople love. The story ends with Millie refusing to reveal to the Union soldiers where Zeke is hiding, prompting them to tie her to a tree and do horrible things to her — “violations,” as Camille says — to the point of Millie losing her baby.

When Richard (Chris Messina) questions why this dark story merits a holiday, Camille counters, “We don’t have a lot of happy stories around here.”

There’s a lot of talk about myth and fantasy and how that can influence towns, and your story versus your truth,” Noxon said. That idea bleeds into Camille’s own mythos: “The [Preaker] family has myths, the family has things that aren’t necessarily true on the surface.”

Camille tries to distance herself from her mother’s small town celebrations and conservative beliefs. She tells Adora that she’s not really part of Calhoun Day (and back in the pilot we saw a Barack Obama poster in her apartment). But when Adora forces her to reveal to Amma (Eliza Scanlen) her scars, Camille is forced to remember where she truly comes from. 

Noxon said this line between what is real and what we tell ourselves is real reminds her of “fake news” as we know it today.

The more we talked about the fake news of the town, the things that they told each other that just weren’t true, the more we kept focusing on the founder’s story, and the joke was that we were going to do Calhoun Day the musical,” she said, laughing again. 

But then we just started to realize there was something in bringing everybody in the town [together],” she added. “Like, it’s this life of Wind Gap, and the dynamics of the haves and the have nots, and Adora and the Preaker family as the kind of royalty of that family who controls the narrative being very juicy. And so eventually it was like, we’re doing Calhoun Day. We’re doing it.” 

“Sharp Objects” airs on HBO Sundays at 9/8c. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why 'Sharp Objects' Showrunner Named Each Episode After a Word on Camille's Body

Here's How 'Sharp Objects' Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

Amy Adams' 'Sharp Objects' Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

'Sharp Objects' Showrunner on Premiere's 'Aha Moment,' What Those 'Sharp Objects' Have Done to Camille

Why ‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner Named Each Episode After a Word on Camille’s Body

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Episode 102 of “Sharp Objects,” “Dirt.”)

It’s a well-known fact that writers have a love-hate relationship with words. But on “Sharp Objects,” journalist Camille Preaker (Amy Adams) takes that dynamic to a whole new level, as she has a history of carving them into her skin.

While the new HBO limited series — based on “Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn’s debut novel — is taking great care with how it’s approaching the cutting storyline, it is still prominently featured, as it is a pivotal part of Adams’ character. And without those words on Camille’s body, showrunner Marti Noxon wouldn’t have had the perfect title for each episode ready to go.

Also Read: Here’s How ‘Sharp Objects’ Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

“I went through the book and just took out every single word Gillian mentions. And then would look at what I was trying to do in the episode, and I don’t think we invented any, we might have, but I don’t think we did,” Noxon told TheWrap in a recent interview.

“Vanish” is the first word we see on Camille’s body — and the title of the pilot — when it is exposed as the lead character disrobes to get into a bathtub at the end of the July 8 premiere.

“So for ‘Vanish,’ you know for me, I felt like for her to go home was…like disappearing back into her past,” she said. “I had written it into the script [that] the present and the past get so entwined in the visual that [director Jean-Marc Vallee] obviously took that and made it even more incredible. So I felt like vanishing into your past was kind of a theme of the first episode and is she going to survive it?”

Also Read: Amy Adams’ ‘Sharp Objects’ Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

Noxon then explained why she selected “Dirt” for the title of the second episode, which aired Sunday: “For me, that represented the funeral of Natalie Keene and also the gossip in the town and the way people sling dirt and how you kind of can metaphorically kill someone with your words. And certainly Adora (Patricia Clarkson) is the type of person to use words to almost kill; they’re so painful sometimes. So I was like, that’s a great word!”

The “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” alum explained the importance of words when it comes to holding onto memories — both good and bad — through a personal story about a friend whose father had advanced Alzheimer’s and “started to have his favorite things and places and memories tattooed on his body.”

“And that was so moving, because it was his children, his history; it was the opposite of Camille,” she continued. “It was all these good things. But when I got to that part in the book about how she was, you know, a ‘cutting linguist’ — I think is what Gillian wrote — I was moved by the idea that these memories were so painful that she recorded them so she would never forget what it was really like. So each word encompasses the theme of the episode.”

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner on Premiere’s ‘Aha Moment,’ What Those ‘Sharp Objects’ Have Done to Camille

“Sharp Objects” airs Sundays at 9/8c on HBO.

Ashley Boucher contributed to this story.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here’s How ‘Sharp Objects’ Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

Amy Adams’ ‘Sharp Objects’ Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

‘Sharp Objects’ Showrunner on Premiere’s ‘Aha Moment,’ What Those ‘Sharp Objects’ Have Done to Camille

‘Sharp Objects’: Patricia Clarkson Knows You Love Adora – and She’s Trying Not to Judge You for It

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Episode 102 of “Sharp Objects,” “Dirt.”)

It’s a well-known fact that writers have a love-hate relationship with words. But on “Sharp Objects,” journalist Camille Preaker (Amy Adams) takes that dynamic to a whole new level, as she has a history of carving them into her skin.

While the new HBO limited series — based on “Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn’s debut novel — is taking great care with how it’s approaching the cutting storyline, it is still prominently featured, as it is a pivotal part of Adams’ character. And without those words on Camille’s body, showrunner Marti Noxon wouldn’t have had the perfect title for each episode ready to go.

“I went through the book and just took out every single word Gillian mentions. And then would look at what I was trying to do in the episode, and I don’t think we invented any, we might have, but I don’t think we did,” Noxon told TheWrap in a recent interview.

“Vanish” is the first word we see on Camille’s body — and the title of the pilot — when it is exposed as the lead character disrobes to get into a bathtub at the end of the July 8 premiere.

“So for ‘Vanish,’ you know for me, I felt like for her to go home was…like disappearing back into her past,” she said. “I had written it into the script [that] the present and the past get so entwined in the visual that [director Jean-Marc Vallee] obviously took that and made it even more incredible. So I felt like vanishing into your past was kind of a theme of the first episode and is she going to survive it?”

Noxon then explained why she selected “Dirt” for the title of the second episode, which aired Sunday: “For me, that represented the funeral of Natalie Keene and also the gossip in the town and the way people sling dirt and how you kind of can metaphorically kill someone with your words. And certainly Adora (Patricia Clarkson) is the type of person to use words to almost kill; they’re so painful sometimes. So I was like, that’s a great word!”

The “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” alum explained the importance of words when it comes to holding onto memories — both good and bad — through a personal story about a friend whose father had advanced Alzheimer’s and “started to have his favorite things and places and memories tattooed on his body.”

“And that was so moving, because it was his children, his history; it was the opposite of Camille,” she continued. “It was all these good things. But when I got to that part in the book about how she was, you know, a ‘cutting linguist’ — I think is what Gillian wrote — I was moved by the idea that these memories were so painful that she recorded them so she would never forget what it was really like. So each word encompasses the theme of the episode.”

“Sharp Objects” airs Sundays at 9/8c on HBO.

Ashley Boucher contributed to this story.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here's How 'Sharp Objects' Is Not Hiding Its Cuts and Looking Out for Triggers at the Same Time

Amy Adams' 'Sharp Objects' Scores 1.5 Million Viewers in HBO Debut

'Sharp Objects' Showrunner on Premiere's 'Aha Moment,' What Those 'Sharp Objects' Have Done to Camille

'Sharp Objects': Patricia Clarkson Knows You Love Adora – and She's Trying Not to Judge You for It

‘Sharp Objects’ Reveals the Simmering Power of Women’s Anger (Column)

Calling something a “slow burn” usually means emphasizing the “slow.” But “Sharp Objects” proves that the real trick to a masterful slow burn is tapping into a story’s underlying heat and fanning it until the moment when it can finally go up in flames….

Calling something a “slow burn” usually means emphasizing the “slow.” But “Sharp Objects” proves that the real trick to a masterful slow burn is tapping into a story’s underlying heat and fanning it until the moment when it can finally go up in flames. Every frame crackles with a barely (and expertly) restrained tension — […]

‘Sharp Objects’ Star Patricia Clarkson on the Challenge of Playing a ‘Brutal’ Woman

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched the premiere episode of “Sharp Objects,” which premiered on HBO July 8. At a time when so many stories both in the news and the scripted space are focusing on how men can harm women, HB…

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched the premiere episode of “Sharp Objects,” which premiered on HBO July 8. At a time when so many stories both in the news and the scripted space are focusing on how men can harm women, HBO’s limited series “Sharp Objects,” focuses on the damage women […]

Robin Wright Saved ‘House of Cards’ After Kevin Spacey Was Fired, Patricia Clarkson Says

Madam President has been busy lately.

We’ve known for some time now that “House of Cards” will continue without Kevin Spacey, who was fired from the Netflix drama following multiple accusations of sexual misconduct. Robin Wright will step into the lead, and co-star Patricia Clarkson says that we have the fictional First Lady to thank for the show continuing at all.

“Robin led all of this charge so that people would save their livelihoods, because when the show goes away, some people don’t get paid,” Clarkson said during an appearance on The Talk this week, according to Vulture. “I think it’s going to be a stunning, stunning new season and I’m thankful for it.” Wright, whose Claire Underwood will now be POTUS rather than FLOTUS, has co-starred in the political drama since it began in 2013.

We have beautiful showrunners, Frank [Pugliese] and Melissa [Gibson], and they killed themselves to rethink the whole show,” Clarkson added. As teased in a 4th of July message shared on the series’ Twitter account, “House of Cards” will return for a shortened eight-episode season later this year.

Robin Wright Led Charge To Save ‘House Of Cards’ After Kevin Spacey Scandal, Patricia Clarkson Says

When Netflix was on the verge on impeaching House of Cards amid the Kevin Spacey scandal last year, it was the new president who rallied the base to save it.
So says Patricia Clarkson, who was on CBS’ The Talk today. She told the panel that Robin…

When Netflix was on the verge on impeaching House of Cards amid the Kevin Spacey scandal last year, it was the new president who rallied the base to save it. So says Patricia Clarkson, who was on CBS’ The Talk today. She told the panel that Robin Wright — who plays Veep-turned-President Claire Underwood on the veteran D.C. drama — lobbied hard to keep it going. “Robin led all of this charge so that people would save their livelihoods, because when the show goes away, some…

‘Sharp Objects’: Patricia Clarkson on Playing Amy Adams’ ‘Brutal’ But ‘Beloved’ Mentally Ill Mother

To say that Patricia Clarkson and Amy Adams have some mother-daughter issues on HBO’s new limited series “Sharp Objects” would be an understatement and insulting to Gillian Flynn’s debut novel. Of course, Clarkson wouldn’t know that firsthand, seeing as she didn’t actually read the book while working on the project, at the author’s request.

Instead, she came at the character of Adora Preaker with an “open heart” and an “open mind” and was ready to play the controlling, manipulative, self-centered mommy who just doesn’t understand why her daughter Camille (Adams) came back to her small hometown in Missouri to report on the brutal murders of two little girls.

“I knew the story, I knew who Adora was,” Clarkson told TheWrap ahead of the premiere of Marti Noxon and Jean-Marc Valle’s TV adaptation of the novel. “You know, she’s quite, oddly, a very well known character and quite beloved [laughs]. People love Adora. I don’t know why but, whatever that’s not for me to judge [laughs]. But many people know of this character. And I knew the story but I didn’t know details. And so I kinda came at this, as cliche as it sounds, I came at it with an open mind and a very open heart to this character.”

Also Read: Amy Adams Chases a Killer and Hates Her Hometown in ‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer (Video)

“And whatever you want to come away with from Adora — ‘She’s harsh. She’s brutal’ — well yes, she’s all of those things, but to me she’s a woman who has been forsaken by a daughter with, in her mind, this exemplary life,” Clarkson continued. “She’s a good mother to her other daughters, she is a good wife, she has a house, she has a life, even though it’s this very small town life. So I came at her with a good feeling, so to speak. I didn’t have preconceived notions and I loved the beautiful writing of Gillian Flynn.”

Clarkson says she and Adams “forged a relationship that could echo the better parts, if there are any, of Adora and Camille” while shooting. But the warm and fuzzy feelings were left off screen, as Adams’ character is hardly Adora’s favorite daughter. The matriarch has two others: Marian (who died due to illness when she was a child) and the secretly wild 13-year-old, Amma, both of whom she smothers with love and likes to tend to in an extremely aggressive way. And then there is Camille, who doesn’t want to be babied or let her mother love her in the only way she seems to know how.

“I don’t think you can play controlling. I don’t think you can play manipulative,” Clarkson said. “It has to come from an emotional life in the character. It has to be a character who is struggling to feel love for a child and how does that come out. A mother who is disappointed in the way her daughter looks and acts and behaves, because why isn’t she this beautiful daughter that she was supposed to be? And how does that manifest itself in that it’s reflecting back on me?”

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’: First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Debut Novel

“These are all very true real emotions that mothers that are not as ill and complicated as Adora, but there is not a daughter on this earth who didn’t feel at times that they were disappointing there mother, they weren’t living up to their mother ideals,” she added.

Clarkson doesn’t want to give anything away, but it’s hard to talk about her character with out revealing she is “suffering from some mental illness.”

“You know, she has issues,” she said. “So she’s not really capable of viewing a child the way a normal mother would. And so it dictates a certain behavior that she sees as not abnormal, but normal. So for her it is about taking care. It is an obsession.”

“Sharp Objects” premieres Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Party Report: Amy Adams, Gillian Flynn and HBO Celebrate the Premiere of ‘Sharp Objects’ (Photos)

Amy Adams Chases a Killer and Hates Her Hometown in ‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer (Video)

‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer: An Unstable Amy Adams Returns to Her Creepy Southern Roots (Video)

‘Sharp Objects’: First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Debut Novel

To say that Patricia Clarkson and Amy Adams have some mother-daughter issues on HBO’s new limited series “Sharp Objects” would be an understatement and insulting to Gillian Flynn’s debut novel. Of course, Clarkson wouldn’t know that firsthand, seeing as she didn’t actually read the book while working on the project, at the author’s request.

Instead, she came at the character of Adora Preaker with an “open heart” and an “open mind” and was ready to play the controlling, manipulative, self-centered mommy who just doesn’t understand why her daughter Camille (Adams) came back to her small hometown in Missouri to report on the brutal murders of two little girls.

“I knew the story, I knew who Adora was,” Clarkson told TheWrap ahead of the premiere of Marti Noxon and Jean-Marc Valle’s TV adaptation of the novel. “You know, she’s quite, oddly, a very well known character and quite beloved [laughs]. People love Adora. I don’t know why but, whatever that’s not for me to judge [laughs]. But many people know of this character. And I knew the story but I didn’t know details. And so I kinda came at this, as cliche as it sounds, I came at it with an open mind and a very open heart to this character.”

“And whatever you want to come away with from Adora — ‘She’s harsh. She’s brutal’ — well yes, she’s all of those things, but to me she’s a woman who has been forsaken by a daughter with, in her mind, this exemplary life,” Clarkson continued. “She’s a good mother to her other daughters, she is a good wife, she has a house, she has a life, even though it’s this very small town life. So I came at her with a good feeling, so to speak. I didn’t have preconceived notions and I loved the beautiful writing of Gillian Flynn.”

Clarkson says she and Adams “forged a relationship that could echo the better parts, if there are any, of Adora and Camille” while shooting. But the warm and fuzzy feelings were left off screen, as Adams’ character is hardly Adora’s favorite daughter. The matriarch has two others: Marian (who died due to illness when she was a child) and the secretly wild 13-year-old, Amma, both of whom she smothers with love and likes to tend to in an extremely aggressive way. And then there is Camille, who doesn’t want to be babied or let her mother love her in the only way she seems to know how.

“I don’t think you can play controlling. I don’t think you can play manipulative,” Clarkson said. “It has to come from an emotional life in the character. It has to be a character who is struggling to feel love for a child and how does that come out. A mother who is disappointed in the way her daughter looks and acts and behaves, because why isn’t she this beautiful daughter that she was supposed to be? And how does that manifest itself in that it’s reflecting back on me?”

“These are all very true real emotions that mothers that are not as ill and complicated as Adora, but there is not a daughter on this earth who didn’t feel at times that they were disappointing there mother, they weren’t living up to their mother ideals,” she added.

Clarkson doesn’t want to give anything away, but it’s hard to talk about her character with out revealing she is “suffering from some mental illness.”

“You know, she has issues,” she said. “So she’s not really capable of viewing a child the way a normal mother would. And so it dictates a certain behavior that she sees as not abnormal, but normal. So for her it is about taking care. It is an obsession.”

“Sharp Objects” premieres Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Party Report: Amy Adams, Gillian Flynn and HBO Celebrate the Premiere of 'Sharp Objects' (Photos)

Amy Adams Chases a Killer and Hates Her Hometown in 'Sharp Objects' Trailer (Video)

'Sharp Objects' Trailer: An Unstable Amy Adams Returns to Her Creepy Southern Roots (Video)

'Sharp Objects': First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn's Debut Novel

‘Sharp Objects’: Amy Adams and Patricia Clarkson on Female Rage in the #MeToo Era: We’ve ‘Got to Explode Now’

If you’re a woman, and you’re angry at the world, just know that the cast and creator of HBO’s bold new drama understand.

Near the end of a long day of interviews, Amy Adams asked me how I handle my anger.

This was within the context of “Sharp Objects,” the HBO limited series premiering this Sunday, which follows the story of Camille (Adams), a reporter sent from St. Louis to her hometown of Wind Gap, Missouri to investigate the disappearance of a local girl. The mystery of the missing girl is almost an afterthought, though, to Camille’s incredibly complex psychology, which Adams felt had a universal connection to all women, these days.

“A lot of the female rage that Camille has, which is very common for women, is we turn inward and we sort of direct that rage inwardly. And that comes through self-destructive behaviors, be it cutting or drinking or hypersexualization,” she said. “A lot of those behaviors start to be inwardly directed, and I think that’s something that I understood about Camille… Camille is somebody who directs it inward, and I think that’s pretty common. We bottle it up, and it comes out somewhere, so you’re either somebody who explodes or implodes… Are you an exploder or an imploder?”

Read More: ‘Sharp Objects’ Review: Amy Adams Is Straight Fire in HBO’s Exquisite Slow-Burn of a Horror Show (Spoiler-Free)

The fact that Adams was interested in how others felt on the issue was almost as interesting as her own answer to the question: “I’m a little of both… But I sometimes feel,” she said, “if I implode anymore, I will cease to exist. I have got to explode now. Now is the time. I can’t take any more of this on. I can’t go any further in. There’s nothing left.”

It reflects the energy which surrounds “Sharp Objects,” a show which could have been just another murder mystery, except for the deep investment it has in the psychology of its characters, specifically its women.

Sharp Objects HBO Amy Adams

Amy Adams in “Sharp Objects.”

Anne Marie Fox/HBO

The main characters of “Sharp Objects,” from Camille to her mother Adora (Patricia Clarkson) to her half-sister Amma (Eliza Scanlen), keep the story centered on the depths of those feelings, which do not exist in a vacuum from the rest of the world. “It is a female-driven story, and I think that’s what’s great,” Clarkson said. “It’s about three generations of women, and it’s a story about very, very complex women. We don’t always have to tell stories of women who are heroes and do-gooders. We love that. We don’t always have to be warriors because I think our imperfections are also what make great stories, maybe the best stories, and we just need people to tell them.”

This was something which spoke directly to showrunner Marti Noxon, who led the adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2006 novel. “I felt like one of the powerful things about the book, and then hopefully that we brought to the show, is looking at it a little bit closer. What is it that’s forbidden?” Noxon said. “We’ve been historically so denied those feelings.”

Yes, this message has an even greater resonance in the post-#MeToo era, especially when you consider that following the exposure of so much awfulness that women had been experiencing for decades, the question has become “What happens next?”

After all, there is still plenty of good reason to still be angry, as Clarkson noted. “We also have to remember that there were women in this business whose lives and careers were destroyed,” Clarkson said. “I think we can never forget the criminal behavior that also occurred. We must remember that, yes, we want things to be better for women in this industry, but we have to remember there were people whose lives were destroyed. So it’s a bittersweet rise because so many women had to suffer in order for us to get to this place. We just can’t forget that. As we celebrate, we must remember.”

Noxon said that for her entire life, she’d been living with a certain level of acceptance as to what women deal with on a regular basis, but that she’s noticing a change in herself. “The scales have fallen from my eyes. And then what?” Noxon said. “I think that one of the things that I’ve been aware of is that I lived the same way for a long time. There were things that I accepted as normal and now look at and go like, ‘Oh, that was wrong, or unfair,’ or, ‘I’m actually a human, I shouldn’t have put up with all that.’ Sometimes I feel like I don’t know what to do with the anger. No one ever taught me, you know, how to let it out.”

Adams noted that this inspiration came from Flynn, in words written and spoken. “Gillian was talking about it like maybe it is time to explore women’s rage, and how do women express anger, and how does that come across?” Adams said. “It’s not really encouraged.”

Sharp Objects HBO Patricia Clarkson

This concept of female rage was something Clarkson felt was “important and true and real and present. We so often have had to compromise in our lives, especially women at a certain age. We’ve often had to swallow. We’ve often had to compromise and make amends and sometimes we just rage against anything. And that it’s powerful. It’s a powerful side of us. I think it’s good for our rage to be on display.”

Adams agreed, going on to say that “I think that one of the things that’s so important is women helping women and women supporting women. So if I hear a woman say ‘This is bullshit,’ and I agree with her, I’m going to stand next to her. I’m going to say one person can be difficult, but five people with the same opinion are a voice, and you’re going to hear it, because it needs to be heard.”

As she added, “I think that’s what’s really important, for women to hear each other’s truths and to hear each other’s stories, to start listening, really understanding each other’s experiences. Not discounting them.”

Read More:  July TV Premieres: 12 New Shows to Look Out for This Month

It was a sentiment Clarkson echoed: “I think it’s important to remember that it’s glorious that women are rising and that it’s actually really, finally starting from the top down and that we won’t tolerate inequality or abuse or all of those things that we did. We did accept a lot of things in this industry that we no longer will ever again. And that’s very important and I think things are shifting. It’s a major shift that has taken place in our industry with the awakening. The curtain has been torn back.”

Adams, who was a producer on “Sharp Objects,” noted that she hopes to use her behind-the-scenes efforts to bring forward more stories that expose all the complexities of the female soul. “One of the things I’m looking for is to create atypical heroines, because I think it’s important,” she said. “I think women need to see themselves — we need to tell the stories of people who aren’t… photogenic, call it that. Exclusively photogenic.”

Which is to say, stories which let women reveal their ugly sides. Though there’s sometimes beauty to be found in our rage.

Party Report: Amy Adams, Gillian Flynn and HBO Celebrate the Premiere of ‘Sharp Objects’ (Photos)

Before the Sunday night premiere, HBO and the “Sharp Objects” creative ensemble celebrated the television adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s novel at the Arclight and an after party at Boulevard3 on Sunset.  Pictured here: Executive Produc…

Before the Sunday night premiere, HBO and the “Sharp Objects” creative ensemble celebrated the television adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s novel at the Arclight and an after party at Boulevard3 on Sunset.  Pictured here: Executive Producer/Author Gillian Flynn, Amy Adams, Patricia Clarkson, and Executive Producer/Creator Marti Noxon.

“Power” Executive Producer 50 Cent knows that a new season of the Starz show means it’s time to party “like it’s your birthday.” The celebration in New York on Thursday night (June 28) included a choir, fog machine, and the G-Unit main man entertaining the guests.

At the after party, 50 huddled with Creator and fellow- Executive Producer Courtney A. Kemp.

Veteran actor Tim Matheson, “Breaking Bad” creator Vince Gilligan and “Game of Thrones” producer Carolyn Strauss gathered at the Paley Center to lead CNN’s celebration of its new recent-history series “The 2000s”. Because the series focuses on the rise of the contemporary golden age of TV, these TV bigshots were appropriate guests. Fun fact: Tom Hanks produces the series.

“Downton Abbey” belongs in the conversation of the current golden age. Here, the former “Mrs. Patmore” (Lesley Nicol) hugs BAFTA L.A. CEO Chantal CEO at the group’s Student Film Awards. The trophy handout took place at the Ace Hotel downtown on June 29.

 

Music fans and Bally recently celebrated 30 years of seminal rap artist Slick Rick.  Beverly Hills is traditionally a snoozefest at night, especially on a Saturday night, but not on June 23 when hip hop pioneers gathered in the 90210. Pictured here with the guest of honor are Mandy Aragones and En Vogue’s Terry Ellis.

 

LL Cool J was in the building, here greeting “Love & Hip Hop” Executive Producer Mari Lopez. (It may be hard to remember that before his now formidable TV career, that LL was the youngster in hip-hop’s founding generation and a Slick Rick peer.)

 

Snoop Dogg came to DJ, spinning Slick Rick classics “La Di Da Di (We like to Party)” and “Mona Lisa”.  It’s a long but refreshing leap to have the Bronx on Rodeo Drive.

 

Giorgio’s, the understated Saturday night party for in-the-know industry figures who wouldn’t be out anywhere else on a Saturday night on the Sunset Strip celebrated it’s five year anniversary. Here, founders Adam Bravin (aka DJ Adam 12) and Bryan Rabin at the decks.

 

For the anniversary party, the crowd spilled out of its usual confines of the club at the Standard to colonize the pool deck. The Party Report salutes what many of the ’90s and 2000’s “scene” regard as the L.A.’s last cool nightlife brand for friends-of-friends only. (Photos rarely emerge from this crowd that appreciates the phone-free era of nightlife.)

 

Celebrants included (from left): Stylist Elizabeth Stewart, fashion expert George Kotsiopoulos, Rabin, designer Brian Wolk, stylist Yana Kamps, and designer Claude Morais.

 

The pet-friendly Standard took it one step further, welcoming music producer Nick Launay and his pet to the festivities.

 

I never see industry types ever dance at parties, with Giorgio’s being the exception. The party is named for electronic music pioneer Giorgio Moroder (the “Scarface” and “Midnight Express” soundtracks, and Donna Summer’s hits “Hot Stuff” and “On the Radio”.)

Bravin behind the decks with writer Jason Sugars.

 

A few blocks west down Sunset to the west at the new Jeremy hotel, “The Arrangement’s” Josh Henderson (right) made the scene at Karma International’s “The Creux Automatiq Affair.”

 

Jaime King came to celebrate pal Lucy Hale’s cover of Haute Living at the new Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills, the hotel anchoring the corner of Wilshire and Santa Monica that has opened up the party palette on Golden Globes night.

 

ICM Partners client Jeremy O. Harris, vintner Jim Obergefuell, “Queer Eye’s” Kamaro Brown, and ICM Politics’ Caroline Edwards attended ICM’s Pride Month event.

 

The celebration in ICM’s NY Offices highlighted Obergefell’s wine company, Equality Vines, which benefits a variety of LGBTQ charities.

 

New York finished up pride month strong.  “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills” star Erika Jayne hosted Ketel One’s Pride celebration at the Blond.

 

Atlantic City got a taste of Vegas with Kaskade spinning at the opening of the Ocean Resort Casino. Shanina Shaik and Heidi Klum flanked the producer at the pool party in the space that was formerly known as the Revel casino earlier this decade.

 

Niall Horan and pro golfer Justin Rose teamed up for a co-branded “Horan and Rose” golf outing and gala benefit in Watford, England as a fundraiser for cancer research for kids and teens in the UK.  That night, Horan performed hit “Slow Hands” with fellow “X Factor” alum Olly Murs after the two chipped in $85,000 to win the auction for a trip to South Africa that they said they’ll take together.

 

For more from the party scene, including TheWrap’s Power Women Breakfast in New York, click here:

Patricia Clarkson Has Seen Justin Timberlake’s Manhood and Comments on Size (Video)

Jessica Biel is apparently a lucky woman.

When Patricia Clarkson appeared on “Watch What Happens Live” Thursday night to promote her new HBO limited series “Sharp Objects,” the two talked all things large in honor of her co-star, Elizabeth Perkins, who starred in the 1988 hit movie “Big.” And what came up organically during a game of “How Big Was it?” was Biel’s husband Justin Timberlake’s, um, bigness.

Host Andy Cohen asked Clarkson which of her co-stars on “Friends With Benefits” she would have picked to be her own friend with benefits, to which she replied, “Hands down Justin Timberlake,” almost too quickly. “‘Cause if we wanna talk about ‘big.’”

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer: An Unstable Amy Adams Returns to Her Creepy Southern Roots (Video)

“I had the good fortune to get to see him, uh, all there, because they were shooting a scene where they couldn’t keep anything on,” she explained. “He is a gorgeous man,” she said, laughing.

“He’s gifted below the waist?” Cohen asked, intrigued. “Oh, yes!” she added.

“We’ve been doing this show for nine years, that’s maybe the best scoop ever,” Cohen said, in awe.

Also Read: ‘Sharp Objects’: First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Debut Novel

“His mother’s going to kill me!” Clarkson added. That may be the case, but Cohen is pretty sure Timberlake would enjoy the compliment.

Watch the clip above.

“Sharp Objects” premieres July 8 a 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Adams Chases a Killer and Hates Her Hometown in ‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer (Video)

‘Sharp Objects’ Trailer: An Unstable Amy Adams Returns to Her Creepy Southern Roots (Video)

‘Sharp Objects’: First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s Debut Novel

Latest HBO Leak Includes Scripts for Unaired Episodes of ‘Divorce,’ ‘Vice Principals,’ ‘Sharp Objects’

Jessica Biel is apparently a lucky woman.

When Patricia Clarkson appeared on “Watch What Happens Live” Thursday night to promote her new HBO limited series “Sharp Objects,” the two talked all things large in honor of her co-star, Elizabeth Perkins, who starred in the 1988 hit movie “Big.” And what came up organically during a game of “How Big Was it?” was Biel’s husband Justin Timberlake’s, um, bigness.

Host Andy Cohen asked Clarkson which of her co-stars on “Friends With Benefits” she would have picked to be her own friend with benefits, to which she replied, “Hands down Justin Timberlake,” almost too quickly. “‘Cause if we wanna talk about ‘big.'”

“I had the good fortune to get to see him, uh, all there, because they were shooting a scene where they couldn’t keep anything on,” she explained. “He is a gorgeous man,” she said, laughing.

“He’s gifted below the waist?” Cohen asked, intrigued. “Oh, yes!” she added.

“We’ve been doing this show for nine years, that’s maybe the best scoop ever,” Cohen said, in awe.

“His mother’s going to kill me!” Clarkson added. That may be the case, but Cohen is pretty sure Timberlake would enjoy the compliment.

Watch the clip above.

“Sharp Objects” premieres July 8 a 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Adams Chases a Killer and Hates Her Hometown in 'Sharp Objects' Trailer (Video)

'Sharp Objects' Trailer: An Unstable Amy Adams Returns to Her Creepy Southern Roots (Video)

'Sharp Objects': First Look at Amy Adams in HBO Adaptation of Gillian Flynn's Debut Novel

Latest HBO Leak Includes Scripts for Unaired Episodes of 'Divorce,' 'Vice Principals,' 'Sharp Objects'

Patricia Clarkson, Gillian Flynn on Looking Beyond the Darkness of ‘Sharp Objects’

Though Patricia Clarkson takes on one of her darkest roles yet in HBO miniseries “Sharp Objects,” she still sees a bright light in the character as an empowered leading woman. As Adora Crellin, the manipulative and abusive mother to Amy Ada…

Though Patricia Clarkson takes on one of her darkest roles yet in HBO miniseries “Sharp Objects,” she still sees a bright light in the character as an empowered leading woman. As Adora Crellin, the manipulative and abusive mother to Amy Adams‘ character in the show, Clarkson said it was a challenge “just keeping upright, not losing […]

Watch ‘Maze Runner: The Death Cure’ Cast Honor Trilogy Director Wes Ball (Exclusive Video)

The “Maze Runer” trilogy of movies may not be your bag, but it’s certainly mine. And for the past four years, I’ve had a blast experiencing this tale of a horrible post-apocalyptic conservative dystopia taken down by children. In the present age, these stories somehow seem to gain more and more relevance, and that certainly was the case with “The Death Cure,” the third and final installment released in January.

TheWrap has exclusively obtained a clip from the special features on the home video release of “Maze Runner: The Death Cure” in which cast members Patricia Clarkson, Kaya Scodelario and Rosa Salazar honor director Wes Ball’s dedication to bringing these stories to life on the big screen, and Ball himself reflects on the experience.

The “Maze Runner” films are Ball’s first three gigs directing feature films, and he calls himself “lucky” for having been blessed with having the chance to work with this team on these particular projects.

Also Read: ‘Maze Runner’ Author James Dashner Dropped by Publisher, Agent After Sexual Misconduct Accusations

You can watch the exclusive clip at the top of this post.

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” is out now on digital home video from every major digital retailer, and lands on DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Blu-ray on Tuesday, April 24.

Also Read: ‘Maze Runner’ Star Kaya Scodelario to Portay Ted Bundy’s Ex-Wife in ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil And Vile’

In addition to the featurette from which this clip was pulled, the disc includes audio commentary with Ball, writer T.S. Nowlin and producer Joe Hartwick Jr., as well as deleted scenes and a gag reel.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Maze Runner’ Star Kaya Scodelario to Portay Ted Bundy’s Ex-Wife in ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil And Vile’

‘Maze Runner’ Author James Dashner Dropped by Publisher, Agent After Sexual Misconduct Accusations

The “Maze Runer” trilogy of movies may not be your bag, but it’s certainly mine. And for the past four years, I’ve had a blast experiencing this tale of a horrible post-apocalyptic conservative dystopia taken down by children. In the present age, these stories somehow seem to gain more and more relevance, and that certainly was the case with “The Death Cure,” the third and final installment released in January.

TheWrap has exclusively obtained a clip from the special features on the home video release of “Maze Runner: The Death Cure” in which cast members Patricia Clarkson, Kaya Scodelario and Rosa Salazar honor director Wes Ball’s dedication to bringing these stories to life on the big screen, and Ball himself reflects on the experience.

The “Maze Runner” films are Ball’s first three gigs directing feature films, and he calls himself “lucky” for having been blessed with having the chance to work with this team on these particular projects.

You can watch the exclusive clip at the top of this post.

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” is out now on digital home video from every major digital retailer, and lands on DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Blu-ray on Tuesday, April 24.

In addition to the featurette from which this clip was pulled, the disc includes audio commentary with Ball, writer T.S. Nowlin and producer Joe Hartwick Jr., as well as deleted scenes and a gag reel.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Maze Runner' Star Kaya Scodelario to Portay Ted Bundy's Ex-Wife in 'Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil And Vile'

'Maze Runner' Author James Dashner Dropped by Publisher, Agent After Sexual Misconduct Accusations

‘Jonathan’ Film Review: Ansel Elgort’s a Dud Ringer in Tedious Twin Tale

Ansel Elgort plays a dual role in “Jonathan,” but it takes quite a while before we learn just what the parameters of that dual role are. Every day, Elgort’s Jonathan watches a video message that was recorded by a guy who looks just like him. It would seem that these two are twin brothers, but the plot of this movie is much more convoluted than that.

“Jonathan” is a first narrative feature from director Bill Oliver, who co-wrote the script with Gregory Davis and Peter Nickowitz. It is filmed in a precise and organized and deliberately sterile way, with repeated shots of Elgort’s Jonathan preparing food in his Patrick Bateman-like apartment and going to work at an architecture firm, where he can only stay a set period of time.

Elgort’s Jonathan is a fussbudget in dorky clothes who wears his hair in an unflattering part, and he holds himself stiffly and disapprovingly. This is a contrast to his brother, who is not seen outside of a TV screen where Jonathan watches the messages they record for each other. It turns out that this brother’s name is John, and John is a much looser guy, more of a people person, and popular with women.

Watch Video: Ansel Elgort, Timothée Chalamet Weigh in on Who Was More Popular at LaGuardia High School

Oliver seems to be trying to get at an intriguing subject here: the way that personality and charisma can make someone socially successful regardless of looks. But this theme gets buried under a premise that proves very unwieldy. The first third of “Jonathan” goes by without any specific explanation about what is going on with these brothers and why they can only live during certain parts of the day. (Jonathan gets the daylight hours while John has to be the night owl.) This wait gets frustrating, and this frustration is not alleviated when the explanation finally comes.

John has been seeing a girl named Elena (Suki Waterhouse), even though the brothers have a rule that they are not supposed to have girlfriends. Jonathan is so curious about Elena that he makes contact with her during the day, and he finally tells her the full details of his situation.

It turns out that Jonathan and John share the same body, and there was even a third brother inside this one body when this three-personality baby was abandoned by its mother, but this third brother was terminated by Dr. Mina Nariman (Patricia Clarkson), who took charge of their development as children and still controls the situation via a chip she installed in their neck to keep their lives separate. By the time that Elgort explains the chip in his neck, “Jonathan” has gone from needlessly complicated to absurd.

Also Read: Matt Smith to Play Charles Manson in ‘Charlie Says’ From ‘American Psycho’ Director

Jonathan has sex for the first time with Elena, and at this point “Jonathan” feels like David Cronenberg’s “Dead Ringers” (1988) as performed by cute young high-school kids. “Dead Ringers” is a masterpiece, and so any film treading in the same territory is probably going to suffer by comparison, especially a movie like this, which is so scrupulously lacking in perversity and psychological detail.

Oliver makes sure that every scene in “Jonathan” is slow, earnest, tidy, and very cautious, and he pulls back from anything that might be too dramatic. In a crucial confrontation scene between Elgort and Clarkson, Oliver moves the camera steadily away from them, and this epitomizes his method here.

Also Read: Patricia Clarkson to Star in Gillian Flynn’s HBO Drama ‘Sharp Objects’

Clarkson can make just about any dialogue touching and believable just by lingering over it with that earthy voice of hers, but even she is tested by scenes where she is made to comfort Jonathan while seeming to pine for John. The direction this material should go is fairly obvious, but Oliver is too careful to really embrace the implications of what this story seems to want to be about.

“Jonathan” would be immeasurably improved if Oliver had really entered more wholeheartedly into “Dead Ringers” terrain and jettisoned Waterhouse’s sweet young Elena so that he could make Clarkson’s Dr. Mina the one who is sleeping with and toying with both brothers. (Just imagine the Freudian charge of that, and the way that the ever-naughty Clarkson might have carried it.) Instead, Oliver has opted for a very conventional film that relies far too much on its concept and far too little on character.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Diane’ Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away

‘In a Relationship’ Film Review: Emma Roberts and Michael Angarano Try to Liven Up Underwritten Characters

‘Back Roads’ Film Review: Alex Pettyfer’s Directorial Debut Follows a Twisty Path

‘Love, Gilda’ Film Review: Gilda Radner Lives Again in Touching Documentary

Ansel Elgort plays a dual role in “Jonathan,” but it takes quite a while before we learn just what the parameters of that dual role are. Every day, Elgort’s Jonathan watches a video message that was recorded by a guy who looks just like him. It would seem that these two are twin brothers, but the plot of this movie is much more convoluted than that.

“Jonathan” is a first narrative feature from director Bill Oliver, who co-wrote the script with Gregory Davis and Peter Nickowitz. It is filmed in a precise and organized and deliberately sterile way, with repeated shots of Elgort’s Jonathan preparing food in his Patrick Bateman-like apartment and going to work at an architecture firm, where he can only stay a set period of time.

Elgort’s Jonathan is a fussbudget in dorky clothes who wears his hair in an unflattering part, and he holds himself stiffly and disapprovingly. This is a contrast to his brother, who is not seen outside of a TV screen where Jonathan watches the messages they record for each other. It turns out that this brother’s name is John, and John is a much looser guy, more of a people person, and popular with women.

Oliver seems to be trying to get at an intriguing subject here: the way that personality and charisma can make someone socially successful regardless of looks. But this theme gets buried under a premise that proves very unwieldy. The first third of “Jonathan” goes by without any specific explanation about what is going on with these brothers and why they can only live during certain parts of the day. (Jonathan gets the daylight hours while John has to be the night owl.) This wait gets frustrating, and this frustration is not alleviated when the explanation finally comes.

John has been seeing a girl named Elena (Suki Waterhouse), even though the brothers have a rule that they are not supposed to have girlfriends. Jonathan is so curious about Elena that he makes contact with her during the day, and he finally tells her the full details of his situation.

It turns out that Jonathan and John share the same body, and there was even a third brother inside this one body when this three-personality baby was abandoned by its mother, but this third brother was terminated by Dr. Mina Nariman (Patricia Clarkson), who took charge of their development as children and still controls the situation via a chip she installed in their neck to keep their lives separate. By the time that Elgort explains the chip in his neck, “Jonathan” has gone from needlessly complicated to absurd.

Jonathan has sex for the first time with Elena, and at this point “Jonathan” feels like David Cronenberg’s “Dead Ringers” (1988) as performed by cute young high-school kids. “Dead Ringers” is a masterpiece, and so any film treading in the same territory is probably going to suffer by comparison, especially a movie like this, which is so scrupulously lacking in perversity and psychological detail.

Oliver makes sure that every scene in “Jonathan” is slow, earnest, tidy, and very cautious, and he pulls back from anything that might be too dramatic. In a crucial confrontation scene between Elgort and Clarkson, Oliver moves the camera steadily away from them, and this epitomizes his method here.

Clarkson can make just about any dialogue touching and believable just by lingering over it with that earthy voice of hers, but even she is tested by scenes where she is made to comfort Jonathan while seeming to pine for John. The direction this material should go is fairly obvious, but Oliver is too careful to really embrace the implications of what this story seems to want to be about.

“Jonathan” would be immeasurably improved if Oliver had really entered more wholeheartedly into “Dead Ringers” terrain and jettisoned Waterhouse’s sweet young Elena so that he could make Clarkson’s Dr. Mina the one who is sleeping with and toying with both brothers. (Just imagine the Freudian charge of that, and the way that the ever-naughty Clarkson might have carried it.) Instead, Oliver has opted for a very conventional film that relies far too much on its concept and far too little on character.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Diane' Film Review: Mary Kay Place Is Spellbinding as a Woman Whose Life Has Slipped Away

'In a Relationship' Film Review: Emma Roberts and Michael Angarano Try to Liven Up Underwritten Characters

'Back Roads' Film Review: Alex Pettyfer's Directorial Debut Follows a Twisty Path

'Love, Gilda' Film Review: Gilda Radner Lives Again in Touching Documentary