Iranian Dissident Journalist Masih Alinejad on Jamal Khashoggi’s Fate: ‘What Is the West Going to Do?’

A chill must have gone down the spines of dissident journalists all over the world when the news about Jamal Khashoggi came out a week ago — that he had disappeared inside the Saudi consulate in Turkey and may have been killed and dismembered by Saudi government operatives.

Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad found it frightening and ominous. “My first reaction when I heard the news was I got goosebumps,” she told me last week on a visit to Los Angeles. “I said, ‘This could happen to me as well.’ We journalists of the Middle East — this is the fear we have in our hearts. We are not totally out of their reach.”

Like Khashoggi, the 42-year-old Alinejad is based in the United States, nominally beyond the reach of the regime that she relentlessly criticizes over her social media channels, in her recent book “The Wind In My Hair” and in her work for various outlets including the Voice of America Persian service.

Also Read: WME Parent Company Endeavor ‘Assessing’ Saudi Partnership After Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance (Exclusive)

How safe is she?

Alinejad leads a large and growing civil disobedience campaign against the compulsory hijab, encouraging women in Iran to remove their hijabs and posting photos and videos of them doing so on social media.

She encourages women to out their sexual harrassers by taking video and sending it to her, and she posts that as well.

Her Instagram videos typically draw millions of views, making her the voice of dissident Iranian women from her home base in Brooklyn and a constant thorn in the side of the Iranian regime.

Also Read: New York Times Cancels Hosted Saudi Arabia Trips After Khashoggi Disappearance

The parallels to another authoritarian regime, Saudi Arabia, are unmistakable for Alinejad. In March, she was threatened by a prominent member of the Basij — Iran’s feared paramilitary arm.

The official told BBC’s Persian Service “that he would hire someone in America to kill Masih — to cut her chest, cut her tongue and send it to her parents in Iran,” Alinejad recalled (she wrote about it in the Washington Post at the time).

When she tried to lodge a complaint at the Iranian interest section in the Pakistan embassy in Washington, she was told she could not enter unless she covered her hair. She refused.

Also Read: CNN Pulls Out of Saudi Arabia Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

That is not the only threat that Alinejad has faced. A year ago, the Iranian government prevailed on Alinejad’s parents to invite her to Turkey, saying that they wanted to “have a chat” with her. Alinejad smelled a trap and declined to go.

After that incident, her parents publicly denounced her and she said she no longer is in contact with them.

Recently came word that a senior official in the Iranian department that oversees public morals told the Iranian Fars News Agency that if Alinejad enters any embassy outside of Iran, she should be arrested. So far Alinejad has not gone abroad, but the still-unconfirmed fate of Jamal Khashoggi weighs heavily on her.

Also Read: Iranian Feminist on How Western Liberals Are Making Women’s Lives Worse in Her Country (Video)

“I have to be more careful, that’s it,” she said. “But I don’t want to live in fear. I don’t want to keep silent because of that.”

Alinejad spoke at a WrapWomen event earlier this year, talking about the responsibility of the West to support dissident voices — even when it made diplomatic relations more complicated. To fail to do so, she argues, betrays our democratic values.

“This story is beyond sad,” she said. “Being a journalist and living in fear all your life in your country — you leave your country for one dream — to be safe, to be the voice of the people who are suffering from lack of freedom. And then, in a safe country you get killed? It means they attacked your dreams. And it’s more sad if you see the West doesn’t take any action.”

Also Read: STX Entertainment CEO Robert Simonds Withdraws From Saudi Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

Alinejad had harsh words for those in America and Europe who welcomed Saudi Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman as a reformer without scrutinizing his other repressive actions, such as locking up his relatives and women who had challenged the driving ban.

“They are talking about bin Salman’s reform to let women drive, but they never ask where are the campaigners against the driving ban,” she observed. “They are in prison right now in Saudi Arabia, but they (the West) doesn’t care because the reform is the main issue… When we are fighting the dictatorship in the Middle East, and the West legitimizes them — that kills us.

“We try to stop living in paranoia,” she said. “I have only one life. If Khashoggi was alive he’d say the same thing, I’m sure. We have only one life. We dedicate ourselves to our goal, to our dream. What really kills me is that in a really free country, in the West, you can take action, but because of the political agenda they keep silent. They don’t force the Saudi government or Iranian government to pay the price. That’s what kills me.

“What is the West going to do?” she asked.

Watch Alinejad’s interview from last June above. She will also be appearing at WrapWomen’s Power Women Summit on November 1-2 in Los Angeles.

Related stories from TheWrap:

STX Entertainment CEO Robert Simonds Withdraws From Saudi Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

New York Times Cancels Hosted Saudi Arabia Trips After Khashoggi Disappearance

CNN Pulls Out of Saudi Arabia Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

WME Parent Company Endeavor ‘Assessing’ Saudi Partnership After Jamal Khashoggi’s Disappearance (Exclusive)

A chill must have gone down the spines of dissident journalists all over the world when the news about Jamal Khashoggi came out a week ago — that he had disappeared inside the Saudi consulate in Turkey and may have been killed and dismembered by Saudi government operatives.

Iranian journalist Masih Alinejad found it frightening and ominous. “My first reaction when I heard the news was I got goosebumps,” she told me last week on a visit to Los Angeles. “I said, ‘This could happen to me as well.’ We journalists of the Middle East — this is the fear we have in our hearts. We are not totally out of their reach.”

Like Khashoggi, the 42-year-old Alinejad is based in the United States, nominally beyond the reach of the regime that she relentlessly criticizes over her social media channels, in her recent book “The Wind In My Hair” and in her work for various outlets including the Voice of America Persian service.

How safe is she?

Alinejad leads a large and growing civil disobedience campaign against the compulsory hijab, encouraging women in Iran to remove their hijabs and posting photos and videos of them doing so on social media.

She encourages women to out their sexual harrassers by taking video and sending it to her, and she posts that as well.

Her Instagram videos typically draw millions of views, making her the voice of dissident Iranian women from her home base in Brooklyn and a constant thorn in the side of the Iranian regime.

The parallels to another authoritarian regime, Saudi Arabia, are unmistakable for Alinejad. In March, she was threatened by a prominent member of the Basij — Iran’s feared paramilitary arm.

The official told BBC’s Persian Service “that he would hire someone in America to kill Masih — to cut her chest, cut her tongue and send it to her parents in Iran,” Alinejad recalled (she wrote about it in the Washington Post at the time).

When she tried to lodge a complaint at the Iranian interest section in the Pakistan embassy in Washington, she was told she could not enter unless she covered her hair. She refused.

That is not the only threat that Alinejad has faced. A year ago, the Iranian government prevailed on Alinejad’s parents to invite her to Turkey, saying that they wanted to “have a chat” with her. Alinejad smelled a trap and declined to go.

After that incident, her parents publicly denounced her and she said she no longer is in contact with them.

Recently came word that a senior official in the Iranian department that oversees public morals told the Iranian Fars News Agency that if Alinejad enters any embassy outside of Iran, she should be arrested. So far Alinejad has not gone abroad, but the still-unconfirmed fate of Jamal Khashoggi weighs heavily on her.

“I have to be more careful, that’s it,” she said. “But I don’t want to live in fear. I don’t want to keep silent because of that.”

Alinejad spoke at a WrapWomen event earlier this year, talking about the responsibility of the West to support dissident voices — even when it made diplomatic relations more complicated. To fail to do so, she argues, betrays our democratic values.

“This story is beyond sad,” she said. “Being a journalist and living in fear all your life in your country — you leave your country for one dream — to be safe, to be the voice of the people who are suffering from lack of freedom. And then, in a safe country you get killed? It means they attacked your dreams. And it’s more sad if you see the West doesn’t take any action.”

Alinejad had harsh words for those in America and Europe who welcomed Saudi Crown Prince Mohamed bin Salman as a reformer without scrutinizing his other repressive actions, such as locking up his relatives and women who had challenged the driving ban.

“They are talking about bin Salman’s reform to let women drive, but they never ask where are the campaigners against the driving ban,” she observed. “They are in prison right now in Saudi Arabia, but they (the West) doesn’t care because the reform is the main issue… When we are fighting the dictatorship in the Middle East, and the West legitimizes them — that kills us.

“We try to stop living in paranoia,” she said. “I have only one life. If Khashoggi was alive he’d say the same thing, I’m sure. We have only one life. We dedicate ourselves to our goal, to our dream. What really kills me is that in a really free country, in the West, you can take action, but because of the political agenda they keep silent. They don’t force the Saudi government or Iranian government to pay the price. That’s what kills me.

“What is the West going to do?” she asked.

Watch Alinejad’s interview from last June above. She will also be appearing at WrapWomen’s Power Women Summit on November 1-2 in Los Angeles.

Related stories from TheWrap:

STX Entertainment CEO Robert Simonds Withdraws From Saudi Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

New York Times Cancels Hosted Saudi Arabia Trips After Khashoggi Disappearance

CNN Pulls Out of Saudi Arabia Conference Amid Khashoggi Disappearance

WME Parent Company Endeavor 'Assessing' Saudi Partnership After Jamal Khashoggi's Disappearance (Exclusive)

Pakistan Chooses ‘Cake’ for the Oscars

“Cake,” by first time feature director Asim Abbasi, has been named as Pakistan’s contender for the Oscars foreign-language category. It was released in its home territory to critical acclaim and box office success in March 2018. Set amidst the affluent…

“Cake,” by first time feature director Asim Abbasi, has been named as Pakistan’s contender for the Oscars foreign-language category. It was released in its home territory to critical acclaim and box office success in March 2018. Set amidst the affluent section of Karachi society, the film follows a family scattered all over the world that […]

Transgender Icon Rimal to Shatter Stereotypes in Conservative Pakistan (EXCLUSIVE)

Pakistani transgender icon Rimal Ali is set to make a cinematic debut as one of the leads in “Love in 7 Days” (“7 Din Mohabbat In”) over the upcoming Eid holiday. IMGC Global will release the film Friday in Pakistan. B4U Motion Pictures will release it…

Pakistani transgender icon Rimal Ali is set to make a cinematic debut as one of the leads in “Love in 7 Days” (“7 Din Mohabbat In”) over the upcoming Eid holiday. IMGC Global will release the film Friday in Pakistan. B4U Motion Pictures will release it in the United Arab Emirates, U.K., U.S., Canada, Germany, […]

‘Quantico’ Producers, ABC Studios Apologize for Episode in Which Indian Terrorists Frame Pakistan

ABC Studios and the producers of “Quantico” have apologized for a storyline in the drama’s June 1 episode. In “The Blood of Romeo,” Indian terrorists plot an attack on New York City with the ultimate goal of framing Pakistan for the mass-violence.

“ABC Studios and the executive producers of ‘Quantico’ would like to extend an apology to our audience who were offended by the most recent episode, ‘The Blood of Romeo,’” ABC Studios and the executive producers of “Quantico” said in a joint statement. “The episode has stirred a lot of emotion, much of which is unfairly aimed at Priyanka Chopra, who didn’t create the show, nor does she write or direct it. She has no involvement in the casting of the show or the storylines depicted in the series.”

“‘Quantico’ is a work of fiction,” they continued. “The show has featured antagonists of many different ethnicities and backgrounds, but in this case we inadvertently and regrettably stepped into a complex political issue. It was certainly not our intention to offend anyone.”

Also Read: Ratings: ‘Quantico’ Season 3 Premiere Finishes Dead Last Among Big 4 Networks

The canceled show’s latest episode depicts an MIT professor planning a uranium attack on an India-Pakistan summit. The plot upset many viewers on social media, which was first pointed out by Indian Express.

Here are some of the negative responses, as compiled by that publication:

What the hell was this episode of #Quantico .. they tried to show ‘Indian nationalists’ (their term) trying to blow up Manhattan to frame Pakistan.. I don’t even know what sort of ridiculous narrative was this episode trying to set.. nonsensical stuff..

— Aadit Kapadia (@ask0704) June 3, 2018

I work in Manhattan. Thousands of Indians work in Manhattan. Plotting a bomb blast in Manhattan is as good as plotting it in New Delhi.#Quantico writers mom dropped him/her on head or Pro-Pakistan/Islamic radical views have entered Hollywood.

And @priyankachopra how cud you?

— Abhishek Vaishampayan (@a_vaishampayan) June 5, 2018

What kind of stupid ass episode is this?? Indian nationals trying to frame Pakistan #Quantico pic.twitter.com/o097ecDETF

— Dawn Marissa (@DawnMarissa1) June 4, 2018

I can’t believe #Quantico brought up the Kashmir and relationship issues between India & Pakistan this way. Makes me laugh more than anything. Also they’re walking with a nuclear bomb in hand in the middle of Nyc and not scared it might blow up???

— J / (@quirkyresponse) June 4, 2018

ABC Studios and the producers of “Quantico” have apologized for a storyline in the drama’s June 1 episode. In “The Blood of Romeo,” Indian terrorists plot an attack on New York City with the ultimate goal of framing Pakistan for the mass-violence.

“ABC Studios and the executive producers of ‘Quantico’ would like to extend an apology to our audience who were offended by the most recent episode, ‘The Blood of Romeo,'” ABC Studios and the executive producers of “Quantico” said in a joint statement. “The episode has stirred a lot of emotion, much of which is unfairly aimed at Priyanka Chopra, who didn’t create the show, nor does she write or direct it. She has no involvement in the casting of the show or the storylines depicted in the series.”

“‘Quantico’ is a work of fiction,” they continued. “The show has featured antagonists of many different ethnicities and backgrounds, but in this case we inadvertently and regrettably stepped into a complex political issue. It was certainly not our intention to offend anyone.”

The canceled show’s latest episode depicts an MIT professor planning a uranium attack on an India-Pakistan summit. The plot upset many viewers on social media, which was first pointed out by Indian Express.

Here are some of the negative responses, as compiled by that publication:

Pakistan’s First Ever Transgender Anchor Makes Historic TV Debut

A model and journalism school graduate is making history as Pakistan’s first ever transgender anchor.

Marcia Malik told the BBC she was moved to tears when she was offered the job.

“The dream that I saw for myself, I was able to climb on the first stair to achieving it,” she said.

Also Read: ‘Inside Edition’ Hires First Transgender Television Reporter

Malik anchored her first news show on Kohenoor, a private broadcaster, on Friday after completing three months of training.

Transgender people face discrimination in Pakistan, as well as other South Asian nations such as India and Bangladesh, where they “are attacked, murdered, raped or forced to work as sex workers to support themselves. Others eke out a living by begging for alms on the streets,” Reuters reported in June 2017.

Malik told the BBC she hoped that her new-found visibility would help improve the lives of transgender people in Pakistan.

“Our community should be treated equally and there must not be any gender discrimination. We should be given equal rights and be considered ordinary citizens, instead of third-gender,” Malik said.

Also Read: ‘Inside Edition’ Transgender Reporter Zoey Tur Says She Was Told ‘I Would Never Work Again’

Pakistan’s Senate supported a bill earlier this month that would protect the rights of transgender people and allows them to determine their own gender identity.

In 2015, Zoey Tur made history as the first-ever transgender reporter on American national TV.

Before transition, Zoey Tur was known as Bob Tur, the acclaimed LA news chopper pilot who covered O.J. Simpson’s infamous 1994 slow-speed Bronco chase.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Cancels Book Tour After Spat With Transgender Woman: ‘I Have Given Enough’

Gigi Gorgeous Says Celebrating Transgender Awareness Week Is ‘Simpler Than People Think’ (Exclusive Video)

Danica Roem Becomes America’s First Openly Transgender State Legislator

A model and journalism school graduate is making history as Pakistan’s first ever transgender anchor.

Marcia Malik told the BBC she was moved to tears when she was offered the job.

“The dream that I saw for myself, I was able to climb on the first stair to achieving it,” she said.

Malik anchored her first news show on Kohenoor, a private broadcaster, on Friday after completing three months of training.

Transgender people face discrimination in Pakistan, as well as other South Asian nations such as India and Bangladesh, where they “are attacked, murdered, raped or forced to work as sex workers to support themselves. Others eke out a living by begging for alms on the streets,” Reuters reported in June 2017.

Malik told the BBC she hoped that her new-found visibility would help improve the lives of transgender people in Pakistan.

“Our community should be treated equally and there must not be any gender discrimination. We should be given equal rights and be considered ordinary citizens, instead of third-gender,” Malik said.

Pakistan’s Senate supported a bill earlier this month that would protect the rights of transgender people and allows them to determine their own gender identity.

In 2015, Zoey Tur made history as the first-ever transgender reporter on American national TV.

Before transition, Zoey Tur was known as Bob Tur, the acclaimed LA news chopper pilot who covered O.J. Simpson’s infamous 1994 slow-speed Bronco chase.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Rose McGowan Cancels Book Tour After Spat With Transgender Woman: 'I Have Given Enough'

Gigi Gorgeous Says Celebrating Transgender Awareness Week Is 'Simpler Than People Think' (Exclusive Video)

Danica Roem Becomes America's First Openly Transgender State Legislator

That Time Kumail Nanjiani Found His Full ‘The Big Sick’ Movie on PornHub (Video)

So Kumail Nanjiani was just browsing PornHub one day…

That is the (assumed) start to the comedian’s story about the time he found his movie “The Big Sick” posted in full on the popular adult film website.

The kicker to the whole thing?

“I swear it was under the category ‘Interracial,’” Nanjiani quipped to Conan O’Brien and Andy Richter.

Also Read: Kumail Nanjiani Gets Chopped in Half on Conan’s ‘Shadow of War’ Clueless Gamer (Video)

Not that he’s mad about any of it.

“I’m just like a little kid from Pakistan — and then to end up on PornHub?” he celebrated the good fortune. “That’s the American dream!”

Watch the “Conan” video above.

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So Kumail Nanjiani was just browsing PornHub one day…

That is the (assumed) start to the comedian’s story about the time he found his movie “The Big Sick” posted in full on the popular adult film website.

The kicker to the whole thing?

“I swear it was under the category ‘Interracial,'” Nanjiani quipped to Conan O’Brien and Andy Richter.

Not that he’s mad about any of it.

“I’m just like a little kid from Pakistan — and then to end up on PornHub?” he celebrated the good fortune. “That’s the American dream!”

Watch the “Conan” video above.

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Oscar Winner Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy Highlights Women of Pakistan in New VR Docuseries

Another acclaimed filmmaker is turning to virtual reality.

Academy Award-winning director Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy has released “Look but with Love,” a new VR docuseries highlighting the lives of people in rural Pakistan fighting the surge of Islamic extremism in a myriad of ways.

It’s a topic Obaid-Chinoy knows well. The native Pakistani has taken home two Oscars for short subject documentaries in the last five years, with painful stories shining a light on the country’s often brutal treatment of women. Her 2012 film, “Saving Face,” chronicled two women struggling with the aftermath of a gruesome acid attack, while 2016’s “A Girl in the River,” told the heartbreaking story of Saba, a young woman beaten and left for dead by her father and uncle. Saba’s crime? “Dishonoring” her family by falling in love with someone of whom they didn’t approve.

Also Read: Mark Zuckerberg Has an Ambitious Goal for Virtual Reality

Now, Obaid-Chinoy wants her latest project to give viewers an in-depth look at those making a positive impact on her home country.

“Pakistan is a diverse country. It cannot be painted with a single paint rush, as it normally is in headline news,” Obaid-Chinoy told TheWrap. “I wanted ‘Look But with Love’ to open up the eyes of how culturally diverse it is. There are people in Pakistan fighting everyday to transform the community far from the glaring headlines of the world. This is a look at Pakistan beyond the headlines.”

The five-part series, produced by Within VR CEO Chris Milk, features several of these stories, including one episode on a doctor saving children born in the slums of Karachi — where 10 percent of kids die before their first birthday. Obaid-Chinoy told TheWrap the first episode, looking at an anti-terrorism police unit bringing women into the fold, struck her the most.

Also Read: Here’s Every Harvey Weinstein Accusation of Sexual Harassment and Assault

“I filmed in one of the most conservative parts of Pakistan, where women seldom leave their homes. And in the heart of this area was a police academy where men and women were training together, where the women came from small towns and villages, where they were often the first women in their families to get an education or the first women in their families to join the police force,” she said. “And they had the support of their fathers and brothers to come to this academy and be part of this elite anti-terrorism squad that the government was putting together.”

Female anti-terrorism officers in Nowshera, Pakistan

Obaid-Chinoy said her first experience filming in VR was a “struggle” at times, also pointed to the budding medium as offering the audience an “immersive” look at her subjects.

“There is a moment where a young women wears a bomb disposal uniform because she’s being trained to go out and disarm bombs. And the camera takes you to where you’re literally looking into her eyes as she’s being suited up,” said Obaid-Chinoy. “Yo begin to think about what a role model this woman is going to be for future women in this country.”

Also Read: Bill Maher Says Trump Is Grosser ‘Creep’ Than Harvey Weinstein Due to Call to Gold Star Widow (Video)

The director told TheWrap she not only wants the series to open eyes in America to a different side of Pakistan, but for it to also foster difficult conversations in her homeland.

“There are people who may or may not agree with what I’m trying to show, but that starts healthy debates, and that’s the sign of a country that’s beginning to open itself up.”

Viewers can check out “Look but with Love” on the Within VR app.

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Another acclaimed filmmaker is turning to virtual reality.

Academy Award-winning director Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy has released “Look but with Love,” a new VR docuseries highlighting the lives of people in rural Pakistan fighting the surge of Islamic extremism in a myriad of ways.

It’s a topic Obaid-Chinoy knows well. The native Pakistani has taken home two Oscars for short subject documentaries in the last five years, with painful stories shining a light on the country’s often brutal treatment of women. Her 2012 film, “Saving Face,” chronicled two women struggling with the aftermath of a gruesome acid attack, while 2016’s “A Girl in the River,” told the heartbreaking story of Saba, a young woman beaten and left for dead by her father and uncle. Saba’s crime? “Dishonoring” her family by falling in love with someone of whom they didn’t approve.

Now, Obaid-Chinoy wants her latest project to give viewers an in-depth look at those making a positive impact on her home country.

“Pakistan is a diverse country. It cannot be painted with a single paint rush, as it normally is in headline news,” Obaid-Chinoy told TheWrap. “I wanted ‘Look But with Love’ to open up the eyes of how culturally diverse it is. There are people in Pakistan fighting everyday to transform the community far from the glaring headlines of the world. This is a look at Pakistan beyond the headlines.”

The five-part series, produced by Within VR CEO Chris Milk, features several of these stories, including one episode on a doctor saving children born in the slums of Karachi — where 10 percent of kids die before their first birthday. Obaid-Chinoy told TheWrap the first episode, looking at an anti-terrorism police unit bringing women into the fold, struck her the most.

“I filmed in one of the most conservative parts of Pakistan, where women seldom leave their homes. And in the heart of this area was a police academy where men and women were training together, where the women came from small towns and villages, where they were often the first women in their families to get an education or the first women in their families to join the police force,” she said. “And they had the support of their fathers and brothers to come to this academy and be part of this elite anti-terrorism squad that the government was putting together.”

Female anti-terrorism officers in Nowshera, Pakistan

Obaid-Chinoy said her first experience filming in VR was a “struggle” at times, also pointed to the budding medium as offering the audience an “immersive” look at her subjects.

“There is a moment where a young women wears a bomb disposal uniform because she’s being trained to go out and disarm bombs. And the camera takes you to where you’re literally looking into her eyes as she’s being suited up,” said Obaid-Chinoy. “Yo begin to think about what a role model this woman is going to be for future women in this country.”

The director told TheWrap she not only wants the series to open eyes in America to a different side of Pakistan, but for it to also foster difficult conversations in her homeland.

“There are people who may or may not agree with what I’m trying to show, but that starts healthy debates, and that’s the sign of a country that’s beginning to open itself up.”

Viewers can check out “Look but with Love” on the Within VR app.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Gerard Butler's 'Geostorm' Could Lose as Much as $100 Million

BuzzFeed Memo Addresses Sexual Harassment After 'Sh–ty Media Men' Report

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Watch ‘Morning Joe’ Break Down Trump’s Primetime Afghanistan Speech (Video)

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” namesake Joe Scarborough broke down President Trump’s Monday night address to the nation regarding the future of U.S. policy in Afghanistan this morning.

“There are a lot of us … a lot of conservatives that saw the withdrawal from Iraq as a good thing,” Scarborough said. “After a decade of war, a lot of us, and I include myself here, said, ‘Hey enough is enough. Are we going to be an occupying force in two countries for the next 30 years?’”

Scarborough continued: “And a lot of us learned a valuable lesson after Iraq. That suddenly, I stopped saying, when I went out giving speeches ‘we’re spending two billion dollars a week in Afghanistan lets spend that money rebuilding America.’ Well guess what? Sometimes we don’t have easy options and Donald Trump ran head-on into that last night.”

Also Read: Inside ‘Morning Joe’ Co-Hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski’s Rise to Fame (Exclusive)

Trump’s speech was praised by many conservatives and foreign policy experts, but ripped by critics who didn’t think he actually said anything.

“Morning Joe” guest Noah Rothman noted that the last three presidents have run on “retrenchment” but abandoned the strategy after some time in the Oval Office.

“It’s not easy to tell the American people that we are obligated just about everywhere in the world,” Rothman said.

Scarborough went on to say that America might need to keep troops in Afghanistan to “stabilize” the situation. Rothman believes that Trump was “very honest” regarding the nature of the threat posed by Pakistan, but didn’t talk about Iran or Russia.

“We have a great game in Afghanistan that we are only just beginning to acknowledge that we’re playing,” he said.

Check out the video above.

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‘Morning Joe’ Blasts Trump as ‘President of the White Nationalist Movement’ (Video)

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” namesake Joe Scarborough broke down President Trump’s Monday night address to the nation regarding the future of U.S. policy in Afghanistan this morning.

“There are a lot of us … a lot of conservatives that saw the withdrawal from Iraq as a good thing,” Scarborough said. “After a decade of war, a lot of us, and I include myself here, said, ‘Hey enough is enough. Are we going to be an occupying force in two countries for the next 30 years?'”

Scarborough continued: “And a lot of us learned a valuable lesson after Iraq. That suddenly, I stopped saying, when I went out giving speeches ‘we’re spending two billion dollars a week in Afghanistan lets spend that money rebuilding America.’ Well guess what? Sometimes we don’t have easy options and Donald Trump ran head-on into that last night.”

Trump’s speech was praised by many conservatives and foreign policy experts, but ripped by critics who didn’t think he actually said anything.

“Morning Joe” guest Noah Rothman noted that the last three presidents have run on “retrenchment” but abandoned the strategy after some time in the Oval Office.

“It’s not easy to tell the American people that we are obligated just about everywhere in the world,” Rothman said.

Scarborough went on to say that America might need to keep troops in Afghanistan to “stabilize” the situation. Rothman believes that Trump was “very honest” regarding the nature of the threat posed by Pakistan, but didn’t talk about Iran or Russia.

“We have a great game in Afghanistan that we are only just beginning to acknowledge that we’re playing,” he said.

Check out the video above.

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Terror Threat Blamed for Cancellation of Indian Film Festival in Australia

The inaugural edition of the Indian Film Festival and Awards of Australia, which was due to run next week in Sydney, has been canceled. Organizers blamed the threat of terrorism. The series of screenings, events and a finale that combined awards and a Bollywood-style variety show was scheduled to run May 7-13. Indian celebrities including… Read more »

The inaugural edition of the Indian Film Festival and Awards of Australia, which was due to run next week in Sydney, has been canceled. Organizers blamed the threat of terrorism. The series of screenings, events and a finale that combined awards and a Bollywood-style variety show was scheduled to run May 7-13. Indian celebrities including... Read more »

CNN’s Kayleigh McEnany Apologizes for False Obama Slam

CNN contributor Kayleigh McEnany apologized on Twitter Tuesday for falsely claiming that President Barack Obama “rushed off to a golf game” after the beheading of American journalist Daniel Pearl.

Terrorists in Pakistan beheaded Pearl, who worked for the Wall Street Journal, in 2002. Obama was a state senator in Illinois at the time.

 

“You have President Obama, who after the, I believe it was the beheading of Daniel Pearl, spoke to how upset he was about that, then rushed off to a golf game,” McEnany said during a CNN appearance on Monday. “I think when we’re in a state of war, when we’re in a state of mourning, you should take time off from the golf course.”

Also Read: Sean Hannity Blasts CBS, Ted Koppel as ‘Total Waste of My Time’ (Video)

McEnany addressed the error via Twitter early Tuesday, writing: “I apologize for using the wrong name. Both James Foley and Daniel Pearl lost their lives to terrorism & should be honored by our leaders.”

Foley was an American war correspondent, who was beheaded by ISIS in Syria in 2014.

I apologize for using the wrong name. Both James Foley and Daniel Pearl lost their lives to terrorism & should be honored by our leaders.

— Kayleigh McEnany (@kayleighmcenany) March 28, 2017

In fairness to McEnany, Obama did play golf after issuing his statement about Foley and eventually admitted it was a mistake.

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CNN contributor Kayleigh McEnany apologized on Twitter Tuesday for falsely claiming that President Barack Obama “rushed off to a golf game” after the beheading of American journalist Daniel Pearl.

Terrorists in Pakistan beheaded Pearl, who worked for the Wall Street Journal, in 2002. Obama was a state senator in Illinois at the time.

 

“You have President Obama, who after the, I believe it was the beheading of Daniel Pearl, spoke to how upset he was about that, then rushed off to a golf game,” McEnany said during a CNN appearance on Monday. “I think when we’re in a state of war, when we’re in a state of mourning, you should take time off from the golf course.”

McEnany addressed the error via Twitter early Tuesday, writing: “I apologize for using the wrong name. Both James Foley and Daniel Pearl lost their lives to terrorism & should be honored by our leaders.”

Foley was an American war correspondent, who was beheaded by ISIS in Syria in 2014.

In fairness to McEnany, Obama did play golf after issuing his statement about Foley and eventually admitted it was a mistake.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Obama Speechwriter Calls Out CNN for Picking 'Bulls–t Factory' Panelists

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Pakistan Is Still Banning Indian Cinema, and All Movie Lovers Should Be Concerned About It

Although Pakistan technically ended its ban in January, the country’s government continues to censor Indian films.

At the end of January, Pakistan lifted a ban placed in 2016 on the import of Indian films into the country. In a step welcomed by supporters of cinema, cultural exchange, and freedom of expression on both sides of the border, the Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif sanctioned the move on January 26, which is India’s Republic Day.

However, as with most things involving the neighboring countries, there have been some complications with the deal — and there is no long-term happy ending in sight. On Monday, February 6, the second Bollywood film scheduled to be released in Pakistan following this rollback — superstar Shah Rukh Khan’s crime drama “Raees” — has been banned in the country, due to its supposedly negative portrayal of Muslims.

The move reignites a level of censorship that had seemed to be a part of history only days earlier. As a major example of creative freedom hitting a wall, it deserved more attention from the global film community.

A Natural Exchange

Cinema has always played an important part in the Indo-Pak diplomatic relationship due to multiple factors. Films are an intrinsic element in the national psyches of both countries, and Bollywood is arguably India’s most reliable and beloved export to Pakistan. Not only do spoken Urdu and Hindi sound extremely similar but also centuries of shared societal values enable subcontinental audiences to identify with a film regardless of its country of origin.

Urdu has also exerted a strong linguistic influence on Bollywood over the years. For decades, it was one of three languages most Bollywood films displayed their title in, the others being English and Hindi. Some of the industry’s most celebrated lyricists and scriptwriters were fluent in Urdu, and the language is prominent in some of Bollywood’s most beloved dialogues or songs. The diminishing presence of Urdu’s poetic cadence in Bollywood films – discarded in favor of an increasingly cosmopolitan mix of Hindi and English – has been lamented by people both inside and outside the industry.

READ MORE: Why India Continues to Censor New Movies

Pakistani cinema-goers look at photos displayed at a local cinema in Karachi, Pakistan.

Fareed Khan/AP/REX/Shutterstock

After the India-Pakistan war of 1965, Pakistan initiated a partial ban on the domestic release of Indian films. In 1971, when India and Pakistan fought again while East Pakistan seceded to form the country known today as Bangladesh, this curtailment was turned into a complete ban. In hindsight, the Pakistani government’s actions seem like an act of self-sabotage, given the fact that Indian films account for around 70% of Pakistan’s box office. Movie theaters in Pakistan possessed little to attract audiences with and started shutting down, hurting the country’s thriving film culture. By the time the restriction was lifted in 2007, it was too little too late. In its statement lifting the most recent incarnation of the ban last week, Pakistan’s Ministry of Information statement acknowledged this outcome, saying that the move would help with the “revival of the Pakistani film industry.”

Why the Ban Happened

It’s instructive to look closely at the language of this latest ban to understand why cinema is treated as a jingoistic weapon to be wielded in this terse neighborly relationship. Last September, following a cross-border militant attack on an Indian military installation, the Indian Motion Picture Producers’ Association (IMPPA) announced that Pakistani actors were banned from Indian film projects, effective immediately. In retaliation, the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority blocked all Indian content from releasing in the country.

The IMPPA’s action is the kind of grandstanding behavior that helps no one while hurting everyone. Not only is it morally repugnant, it also makes no logical sense. In a film-crazy country that frequently reaches across the border for artistic talent ranging from music composers to singers, why attack only actors? Under the World Trade Organization’s charter, the Indian government still treats Pakistan as the Most Favored Nation for trade. What is the legality of such an aggressive move?

This sudden announcement also endangered projects that were already in production or had finished shooting. Filmmaker Karan Johar’s romantic drama “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil” rounded out its starry cast of Aishwarya Rai (“Pink Panther 2”) and Ranbir Kapoor with Pakistani heartthrob Fawad Khan. It was due for release just a month after this announcement and was one of 2016’s biggest titles in both India and Pakistan.

However, its release in Pakistan was indefinitely delayed with the ban. Meanwhile in India, an extremist right-wing political party threatened to block the film’s release because it featured Pakistani talent. In a shameful chapter for artistic expression in India, the Chief Minister of Maharashtra — of which cinema hub Mumbai is the capital — acted as an informal mediator between the film’s producers and this political party. The film’s release went ahead only after the producers agreed to pay 50 million rupees ($750,000) to a fund for army welfare. (The fund later refused the donation, rightly aghast at the circumstances.)

All of this is to point out that while India consistently went low, with its lifting of the ban, Pakistan went high. It was depressing that as soon as the trailer of “Raees” released, Shah Rukh Khan, who also produced the film, had to meet with leaders of the same political party and essentially apologize for its Pakistani lead actress. He had to pledge to not work with any Pakistani actors in the future. As self-censorship in India kept hitting new lows and the government, with its tacit silence, kept enabling extremist elements to twist humanitarian issues into a nationalistic discourse, the Pakistani government’s actions showed us the way ahead and an example worthy of emulation.

Shah Rukh Khan in Mumbai

Shutterstock

However, with the ban on “Raees,” a lot of that has been undone. An official from Pakistan’s censor board said to the BBC that the film “depicts Muslims as criminals and terrorists” and is offensive to members of a particular sect, presumably Shia Muslims. Apart from the obvious flaw in equating depiction with endorsement (a criticism that also plagued Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty”), this ruling seems to imply that any work of art that isn’t supportive of Muslims will not find favor with the censor board. This is likely to induce some self-censorship among artists inside Pakistan as well.

Bad PR

Finally, how this ban will be perceived in India is also a cause for worry. The Constitution of India enshrines it as a secular country, but numerous right-wing political forces seek to project a Hindu vision of India and marginalize minorities such as Muslims. They will almost definitely leap upon the Pakistani censor board’s reason behind banning “Raees” and equate Muslims with Pakistan, the neighbor to be despised and fought and vanquished.

A move that started out as a show of virtue by one neighbor may end up reinforcing a vice in the other. That’s why this relationship is so perennially fraught. Anyone who cares about issues of censorship should be concerned.

Shah Rukh Khan’s ‘Raees’ Eyes Pakistan Release As Ban On Indian Films Lifts

Pakistan has lifted a so-called ban on the import and screening of films from India which stemmed from political and military tensions between the neighboring countries. Bollywood titles and stars are very popular in Pakistan and a clarification of rules by the Information and Broadcasting Ministry means that there’s likely to be a rush of pics entering the market. Chief among them is Shah Rukh Khan‘s latest Raees which has grossed $16.4M in its first week at home and…

Pakistan has lifted a so-called ban on the import and screening of films from India which stemmed from political and military tensions between the neighboring countries. Bollywood titles and stars are very popular in Pakistan and a clarification of rules by the Information and Broadcasting Ministry means that there's likely to be a rush of pics entering the market. Chief among them is Shah Rukh Khan's latest Raees which has grossed $16.4M in its first week at home and…

Pakistan Ends Ban On Indian Films  

Pakistan has finally lifted a ban on Indian films screening in the country. On January 26, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif gave his go ahead. That was followed some days later by notification from the Ministry of Information, Broadcasting and National Heritage. “The Federal Government is pleased to continue the existing open policy to display… Read more »

Pakistan has finally lifted a ban on Indian films screening in the country. On January 26, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif gave his go ahead. That was followed some days later by notification from the Ministry of Information, Broadcasting and National Heritage. “The Federal Government is pleased to continue the existing open policy to display... Read more »

Piers Morgan Says Trump’s Travel Ban Is ‘Making America Hate’

Piers Morgan, previously a prominent Donald Trump supporter, has penned an op-ed for the Daily Mail in which he slammed Trump’s recent travel ban as “cruel” and “grotesquely unfair.”

The TV personality began his letter by stating that Trump isn’t “throwing all Muslims out of America, nor is he banning all Muslims from coming in as he once, shockingly, threatened to do.” According to Morgan, Trump is trying to strengthen immigration rules to “prevent people with nefarious intent from entering the US,” something that Barack Obama tried to do while in office.

However, Morgan said that the way Trump is trying to justify his reasoning for banning immigrants and refugees from seven countries “makes no sense,” given that nobody from the countries, including Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, has committed a terror attack on US mainland. Instead, he wrote, the perpetrators on 9/11 and the San Bernardino attacks came from Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt and Pakistan — countries NOT on the banned list.

Also Read: Not My America: The Trump Travel Ban

“There is no good reason why people with perfectly valid permanent resident green cards have been rounded up at airports, handcuffed, and threatened with deportation,” wrote Morgan. “We have a moral duty to help those innocent people whose lives have been ruined by our unjustified warfare. To now subject them to even more oppression, heartache and despair seems cruel.”

He added, “It cannot be right that they are now being victimized for something they haven’t done.”

Morgan continued to speak about the myth that “Muslin terrorists are the biggest violent threat to American lives” although since Trump’s inauguration nine days ago, more than “750 people have been killed by guns in America.” According to a statistic in his letter, more Americans were shot by toddlers than by terrorists in 2016.

Also Read: Judge Blocks Deportation of Detained Travelers From ‘Muslim-Majority’ Countries

“How can you ban people from countries that have so far committed zero terror attacks on US mainland to ‘keep America safe’, but do nothing about the domestic deadly gun-related terror being waged on the streets every day by Americans of all color and creed?” Morgan wrote.

Morgan also wrote that Trump’s new executive order, which will “simply service to empower ISIS,” is “grotesquely unfair because it punishes many decent, law-abiding people who have every right to be in the country.”

As examples, Morgan listed Olympic Gold medal champion runner Sir Mo Farah, who has a dual UK/Somali citizenship and would be banned from America. And Steve Jobs’ father was a Syrian refugee to the United States, who would’ve been banned entry under this new order.

“This executive order is not making America great,” concluded Morgan. “It’s making America hate. Think again, Mr President.”

Read his entire letter here.

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Piers Morgan, previously a prominent Donald Trump supporter, has penned an op-ed for the Daily Mail in which he slammed Trump’s recent travel ban as “cruel” and “grotesquely unfair.”

The TV personality began his letter by stating that Trump isn’t “throwing all Muslims out of America, nor is he banning all Muslims from coming in as he once, shockingly, threatened to do.” According to Morgan, Trump is trying to strengthen immigration rules to “prevent people with nefarious intent from entering the US,” something that Barack Obama tried to do while in office.

However, Morgan said that the way Trump is trying to justify his reasoning for banning immigrants and refugees from seven countries “makes no sense,” given that nobody from the countries, including Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen, has committed a terror attack on US mainland. Instead, he wrote, the perpetrators on 9/11 and the San Bernardino attacks came from Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Egypt and Pakistan — countries NOT on the banned list.

“There is no good reason why people with perfectly valid permanent resident green cards have been rounded up at airports, handcuffed, and threatened with deportation,” wrote Morgan. “We have a moral duty to help those innocent people whose lives have been ruined by our unjustified warfare. To now subject them to even more oppression, heartache and despair seems cruel.”

He added, “It cannot be right that they are now being victimized for something they haven’t done.”

Morgan continued to speak about the myth that “Muslin terrorists are the biggest violent threat to American lives” although since Trump’s inauguration nine days ago, more than “750 people have been killed by guns in America.” According to a statistic in his letter, more Americans were shot by toddlers than by terrorists in 2016.

“How can you ban people from countries that have so far committed zero terror attacks on US mainland to ‘keep America safe’, but do nothing about the domestic deadly gun-related terror being waged on the streets every day by Americans of all color and creed?” Morgan wrote.

Morgan also wrote that Trump’s new executive order, which will “simply service to empower ISIS,” is “grotesquely unfair because it punishes many decent, law-abiding people who have every right to be in the country.”

As examples, Morgan listed Olympic Gold medal champion runner Sir Mo Farah, who has a dual UK/Somali citizenship and would be banned from America. And Steve Jobs’ father was a Syrian refugee to the United States, who would’ve been banned entry under this new order.

“This executive order is not making America great,” concluded Morgan. “It’s making America hate. Think again, Mr President.”

Read his entire letter here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Asghar Farhadi's 'The Salesman' Debuts Strongly Amid Donald Trump's Travel Ban

Hollywood Slams Donald Trump's #MuslimBan as 'Disgusting,' 'Disturbing'

Seth Rogen Spreads Word of LA #Muslimban Protest Today

Amazon Studios Coughs Up $12 Million for ‘The Big Sick’ at Sundance

Amazon Studios has landed Sundance breakout “The Big Sick” in a $12 million dollar deal, TheWrap has learned.

Considered one of the most commercial films at this year’s festival, the deal for “The Big Sick” was brokered late Saturday night. Other bidders included Sony, Focus Features and Netflix.

Director Michael Showalter’s indie is based on the real-life courtship between Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, who co-wrote the film. “The Big Sick” tells the story of Pakistan-born aspiring comedian Kumail (played by Nanjiani himself), who connects with grad student Emily (Zoe Kazan) after one of his standup sets.

Also Read: ‘The Big Sick’ Is a Hilarious Remedy for Trump-Distracted Sundance

However, what they thought would be just a one-night stand blossoms into the real thing, which complicates the life that is expected of Kumail by his traditional Muslim parents.

When Emily is beset with a mystery illness, it forces Kumail to navigate the medical crisis with her parents, Beth and Terry (Holly Hunter and Ray Romano) who he’s never met, while dealing with the emotional tug-of-war between his family and his heart.

Also Read: Sundance Cyber Attack: Festival Box Office Shut Down

“The Big Sick” was directed by Michael Showalter. Judd Apatow and Barry Mendel produced. The film also co-stars Bo Burnham, Aidy Bryant, and Kurt Braunohler.

The deal was negotiated by UTA Independent Film Group

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Amazon Studios has landed Sundance breakout “The Big Sick” in a $12 million dollar deal, TheWrap has learned.

Considered one of the most commercial films at this year’s festival, the deal for “The Big Sick” was brokered late Saturday night. Other bidders included Sony, Focus Features and Netflix.

Director Michael Showalter’s indie is based on the real-life courtship between Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, who co-wrote the film. “The Big Sick” tells the story of Pakistan-born aspiring comedian Kumail (played by Nanjiani himself), who connects with grad student Emily (Zoe Kazan) after one of his standup sets.

However, what they thought would be just a one-night stand blossoms into the real thing, which complicates the life that is expected of Kumail by his traditional Muslim parents.

When Emily is beset with a mystery illness, it forces Kumail to navigate the medical crisis with her parents, Beth and Terry (Holly Hunter and Ray Romano) who he’s never met, while dealing with the emotional tug-of-war between his family and his heart.

“The Big Sick” was directed by Michael Showalter. Judd Apatow and Barry Mendel produced. The film also co-stars Bo Burnham, Aidy Bryant, and Kurt Braunohler.

The deal was negotiated by UTA Independent Film Group

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Wind River' Sundance Review: Jeremy Renner Shines in Taylor Sheridan's Directorial Debut

'The Hero' Sundance Review: Sam Elliott Vehicle Doesn't Do Its Star Justice

'Dolores' Sundance Review: Activist Dolores Huerta Gets Her Props in Stirring Doc

Streaming Service Iflix Launches in Pakistan

Asia-based video streaming firm Iflix has begun operations in Pakistan. The launch lifts its operating footprint to eight countries. “We are hyper-focused on localization,” said Farees Shah, iflix Pakistan GM. “With the largest library of Pakistan’s favourite TV shows and movies available from all over the world, iflix is primed to revolutionize the way Pakistanis… Read more »

Asia-based video streaming firm Iflix has begun operations in Pakistan. The launch lifts its operating footprint to eight countries. “We are hyper-focused on localization,” said Farees Shah, iflix Pakistan GM. “With the largest library of Pakistan’s favourite TV shows and movies available from all over the world, iflix is primed to revolutionize the way Pakistanis... Read more »

Karan Johar’s ‘Ae Dil Hai Mushkil’ to get Release After Political Compromise

MUMBAI — The release of Karan Johar’s “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil” will go ahead this week (Oct. 28,) during the Diwali holiday, following a high-level political compromise. The film is co-produced by Johar’s Dharma Productions with Fox Star Studios India. Starring Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Anushka Sharma and Ranbir Kapoor, the film’s release was opposed by… Read more »

MUMBAI — The release of Karan Johar’s “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil” will go ahead this week (Oct. 28,) during the Diwali holiday, following a high-level political compromise. The film is co-produced by Johar’s Dharma Productions with Fox Star Studios India. Starring Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Anushka Sharma and Ranbir Kapoor, the film’s release was opposed by... Read more »

Pakistan Imposes Blanket Ban on Indian Media

Pakistan’s media regulator Friday imposed a complete ban on the broadcast of Indian film, TV and music. Broadcasters which breach the ruling risk losing their license. The move comes after weeks of growing political and social tensions between the two South Asian countries sparked by a border incident in mid-September in the disputed Kashmir region…. Read more »

Pakistan’s media regulator Friday imposed a complete ban on the broadcast of Indian film, TV and music. Broadcasters which breach the ruling risk losing their license. The move comes after weeks of growing political and social tensions between the two South Asian countries sparked by a border incident in mid-September in the disputed Kashmir region.... Read more »

Indian Government Promises To Counter Violent Threats Over Upcoming Film Release

The release of Karan Johar’s new film “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil,” starring Pakistani actor Fawad Khan, has been swept up in nationalist fervor.

Last month, an Indian army base was attacked by militants who are potentially from Pakistan, and as a result, Indian-Pakistan relations have been especially strained over the past month. This has affected many aspects of each country’s cultural infrastructure, especially the Bollywood film industry in India.

READ MORE: ‘Akira’ Review: Female-Centric Bollywood Action Drama Suffers From Lazy Filmmaking

On September 28, the India Motion Picture Producers’ Association announced a ban on employing Pakistanis in Bollywood, which sparked waves of proclamations and threats on both sides. Now this week, according to the New York Times, one of India’s biggest cinema groups, the Cinema Owners and Exhibitors Association of India, has promised not to screen any films featuring Pakistani actors or technicians. This action threatens the upcoming release of Karan Johar’s new film, “Ae Dil Hai Mushkil,” starring famous Pakistani actor Fawad Khan.

Johar recently released a video promising to no longer employ Pakistani actors in his films and pleaded for support for his new film, but that hasn’t stopped the film’s release from being swept up in nationalist fervor, especially after far-right Indian political party Maharashtra Navnirman Sena issued a warning to all Pakistani performers to leave India or risk violent attack.

READ MORE: ‘Mohenjo Daro’ Review: Hrithik Roshan’s Star Power Can’t Save This Bollywood Misfire

Today, Indian minister of home affairs Rajnath Singh promised that steps would be taken to ensure Johar’s film would not be plagued with violence. Mukesh Bhatt, the president of Film & Television Producers Guild of India, said that Singh gave “his assurance, his 100 percent assurance, that he will speak to every single chief minister, of every state, to see that law and order is maintained.”

“Ae Dil Hai Mushkil” will be released in Indian theaters on October 28.

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Mumbai Festival Bows to Pressure, Drops Pakistan Film Classic

The Mumbai Film Festival has scrapped its planned screenings of “Day Shall Dawn” (aka “Jago Hua Savera”,) a 1958 Pakistan-made movie that it had previously selected and announced in its retrospectives section. “Given the current situation, the JIO MAMI 18th Mumbai Film Festival with Star has decided not to programme ‘Jago Hua Savera’ as part… Read more »

The Mumbai Film Festival has scrapped its planned screenings of “Day Shall Dawn” (aka “Jago Hua Savera”,) a 1958 Pakistan-made movie that it had previously selected and announced in its retrospectives section. “Given the current situation, the JIO MAMI 18th Mumbai Film Festival with Star has decided not to programme ‘Jago Hua Savera’ as part... Read more »