Michael Keaton and Owen Wilson to Star in ‘Wild Wild Country’-Inspired Episode of Parody Series ‘Documentary Now!’

The episode in the IFC show’s upcoming third season will also draw in part from the 2012 doc “The Source Family.”

Just when you thought a “Company”-inspired episode starring John Mulaney, Taran Killam, and Renee Elise Goldsberry was the best trick “Documentary Now!” could pull for its upcoming third season, out comes Michael Keaton and Owen Wilson.

The pair of actors will star in an episode called “Batsh*t Valley,” the IFC doc parody series’ version of a story about a reclusive spiritual community, in the vein of “Wild Wild Country” and “The Source Family.” Wilson is set to star as the leader of this secluded group in the woodlands of Oregon, with Keaton playing the FBI agent bent on investigating and exposing the truth behind the entire operation.

Necar Zadegan will also star in the episode, written by Seth Meyers and directed by Alex Buono.

It’s the fourth announced installment for the forthcoming season, which debuts next year on February 20. Aside from the aforementioned Broadway reworking “Original Cast Album: Co-op,” the series will also feature Cate Blanchett as a Maria Abramovic-esque performance artist in “Waiting for the Artist” and Fred Armisen as a Chet Baker-reminiscent musician in “Long Gone.” Two more as-yet-unannounced episodes will join the Season 3 roster, with Helen Mirren also returning as the “host” of “Documentary Now!”

“Documentary Now!,” which was created by Meyers, Armisen, Bill Hader, and Rhys Thomas and debuted in 2015, has previously featured versions of many classic docs, including “The Thin Blue Line,” “Grey Gardens,” “Jiro Dreams of Sushi,” and “Salesman.”

Sylvester Stallone, ‘A Land Imagined’ Honored at El Gouna Film Festival

Egypt’s El Gouna Film Festival has wrapped its second edition, with Singaporean director Yeo Slew Hua’s noir title “A Land Imagined” winning the Golden Star, the fest’s top prize, awarded by a jury headed by Oscar-winning Croatian producer Cedomir Kola…

Egypt’s El Gouna Film Festival has wrapped its second edition, with Singaporean director Yeo Slew Hua’s noir title “A Land Imagined” winning the Golden Star, the fest’s top prize, awarded by a jury headed by Oscar-winning Croatian producer Cedomir Kolar (“No Man’s Land”). The genre pic, shot mostly at night, is about a jaded Singapore […]

All 9 Wes Anderson Features Ranked, Worst to Best (Photos)

Ranking the films of Wes Anderson might be a fool’s errand because, in some respects, his films are all closely related. He makes light comedies about melancholy characters, creating exceptionally detailed productions with, more often than not, incredibly breezy plots. Anderson’s storytelling sensibilities have come to practically define the word “quirky,” and fans of the filmmaker will find something to appreciate about all of his movies. But some are more entertaining than others, some are more dramatically satisfying, and a select few feel truly magical. With that in mind, let’s rank them from worst to best:

9. The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

Some might argue that Anderson has never made a “bad” movie, but even so, “The Darjeeling Limited” comes close. Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman and Adrien Brody star as estranged brothers who reunite for a spiritual journey in India, but of course they’re self-absorbed narcissists who bring chaos wherever they go. There are moments of real beauty in this movie — particular a bravura panning shot of every character in their own personalized train car, whether or not they’re actually on the train — but the protagonists are the last people you’d ever want to be seated next to on a long trip, so watching them in a movie isn’t much fun either.

8. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004)

Tries to do for marine biologists what “Raiders of the Lost Ark” did for archaeologists. Bill Murray stars as the title character, a scientist and documentary filmmaker whose latest voyage involves high-seas heists, deadly pirates, and all manner of fanciful undersea creatures, brought to life via stop-motion animation. It’s an endearing adventure when it focuses on the adventure, but the characters are mostly emotionally distant jerks who hide behind artifice, and the movie spends most of its time on their petty and largely insignificant personal dramas. Willem Dafoe brings this movie to life, however, as Zissou’s endearingly needy first mate.

7. Bottle Rocket (1996)

Wes Anderson’s first feature film, like pretty much all of his movies, is about starry-eyed dreamers desperately trying to rework the world into something that resembles their fantastical worldview. This time, however, it’s played for comic tragedy. Luke Wilson stars as a mild-mannered stooge whose best friend (played by Owen Wilson) dreams of becoming a master criminal. They embark on a career in very modest larceny, but although it may be entertaining for the audience, it brings them no happiness. There’s a subtle melancholy to “Bottle Rocket,” an unmistakable air of self-doubt that makes it very sweet and very relatable.

6. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

Might be Anderson’s most celebrated film, and it’s easy to see why. It’s an imaginative story about a hotel concierge who inherits a fortune and then gets framed for murder, which sends the story into — as we have come to expect from this filmmaker — unexpected directions. Every single character is a scene-stealer, even if they only have a few lines of dialogue, and Ralph Fiennes absolutely commands the screen in an all-time classic comic performance. “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is a superb comedy, but it still lacks the emotional heft of Anderson’s greatest work.

5. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

Anderson’s oddball sensibilities took on a richer, more literary quality in “The Royal Tenenbaums,” the story of a large family of geniuses who, later in life, collapse into a disappointing puddle of mediocrity. Gene Hackman stars as the estranged patriarch who returns home and tries to bring his family together with the news that he is dying. Unfortunately, he’s still a selfish sybarite who ruined everyone’s lives, so it’s not easy. The stink of failure is everywhere in “Tenenbaums” — but it’s a powerful stink, not unlike a fancy cheese, and it helps all these brilliant yet pathetic characters make a distinct and lasting impression.

4. Rushmore (1998)

Another striking piece of self-indictment, “Rushmore” stars Jason Schwartzman as Max Fischer, an overachieving student who gets terrible grades but otherwise can accomplish seemingly anything. He befriends a miserable millionaire played by Bill Murray, and together they sabotage each other, and themselves, as they woo a remarkable teacher played by Olivia Williams. “Rushmore” is an amusing film with an undeniably dark streak. The creativity that so often typifies Anderson’s characters becomes destructive and reveals unpleasant aspects of their personalities. But Anderson obviously has hope for these characters, and he really, really, loves staging Max’s absurdly elaborate high school plays.

3. Isle of Dogs (2018)

With time, “Isle of Dogs” might turn out to be Wes Anderson’s finest film. For now, it’s certainly his most imaginative. It’s a stop-motion animated adventure about a near future in which all dogs have been banished to a trash-strewn island, where a pack of mangy mutts help a brave young boy find his pet. Their path is filled with adventure, whimsical asides, political conspiracies, robots, you name it. It’s as fun and as fanciful an adventure as anyone could hope for, with genuinely thoughtful subtexts about xenophobia, propaganda, racism, and plenty of other lofty subjects that Anderson rarely tackles.

2. Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Two kids fall in love and run away together in “Moonrise Kingdom,” a deceptively simple set-up for a remarkably rich motion picture. Once again, Anderson populates his film with characters who remake the world around them, but we see how little pleasure it actually brings them, and how far they are willing to go to force others to conform to those expectations. That this takes the form of “Khaki Scouts” pursuing runaway dreamers with all the zeal of Tommy Lee Jones in “The Fugitive” transforms the story’s tragedy into thoroughly charming imagery. Anderson has never made a more emotionally rich movie.

1. Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)

Anderson has spent the majority of his career treating the art of filmmaking like the art of making elaborate dioramas, so it only makes sense that he’d fully blossom as a director in the medium of stop-motion animation. In his ingenious adaptation of Roald Dahl’s children’s book, a fox (voiced by George Clooney) undergoes a midlife crisis and risks the security of his family to resume his old career as a chicken thief. It explodes in his face and nearly dooms every animal in the forest. Everything in “Fantastic Mr. Fox” is fantastically particular, every detail is welcoming and funny, and all of it is in service of a satisfying and refreshingly zen story about finding a comfortable compromise between being an individual, and being part of a family and community. It’s mature, giddily amusing, exciting cinema.

Ranking the films of Wes Anderson might be a fool’s errand because, in some respects, his films are all closely related. He makes light comedies about melancholy characters, creating exceptionally detailed productions with, more often than not, incredibly breezy plots. Anderson’s storytelling sensibilities have come to practically define the word “quirky,” and fans of the filmmaker will find something to appreciate about all of his movies. But some are more entertaining than others, some are more dramatically satisfying, and a select few feel truly magical. With that in mind, let’s rank them from worst to best:

9. The Darjeeling Limited (2007)

Some might argue that Anderson has never made a “bad” movie, but even so, “The Darjeeling Limited” comes close. Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman and Adrien Brody star as estranged brothers who reunite for a spiritual journey in India, but of course they’re self-absorbed narcissists who bring chaos wherever they go. There are moments of real beauty in this movie — particular a bravura panning shot of every character in their own personalized train car, whether or not they’re actually on the train — but the protagonists are the last people you’d ever want to be seated next to on a long trip, so watching them in a movie isn’t much fun either.

8. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004)

Tries to do for marine biologists what “Raiders of the Lost Ark” did for archaeologists. Bill Murray stars as the title character, a scientist and documentary filmmaker whose latest voyage involves high-seas heists, deadly pirates, and all manner of fanciful undersea creatures, brought to life via stop-motion animation. It’s an endearing adventure when it focuses on the adventure, but the characters are mostly emotionally distant jerks who hide behind artifice, and the movie spends most of its time on their petty and largely insignificant personal dramas. Willem Dafoe brings this movie to life, however, as Zissou’s endearingly needy first mate.

7. Bottle Rocket (1996)

Wes Anderson’s first feature film, like pretty much all of his movies, is about starry-eyed dreamers desperately trying to rework the world into something that resembles their fantastical worldview. This time, however, it’s played for comic tragedy. Luke Wilson stars as a mild-mannered stooge whose best friend (played by Owen Wilson) dreams of becoming a master criminal. They embark on a career in very modest larceny, but although it may be entertaining for the audience, it brings them no happiness. There’s a subtle melancholy to “Bottle Rocket,” an unmistakable air of self-doubt that makes it very sweet and very relatable.

6. The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

Might be Anderson’s most celebrated film, and it’s easy to see why. It’s an imaginative story about a hotel concierge who inherits a fortune and then gets framed for murder, which sends the story into — as we have come to expect from this filmmaker — unexpected directions. Every single character is a scene-stealer, even if they only have a few lines of dialogue, and Ralph Fiennes absolutely commands the screen in an all-time classic comic performance. “The Grand Budapest Hotel” is a superb comedy, but it still lacks the emotional heft of Anderson’s greatest work.

5. The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)

Anderson’s oddball sensibilities took on a richer, more literary quality in “The Royal Tenenbaums,” the story of a large family of geniuses who, later in life, collapse into a disappointing puddle of mediocrity. Gene Hackman stars as the estranged patriarch who returns home and tries to bring his family together with the news that he is dying. Unfortunately, he’s still a selfish sybarite who ruined everyone’s lives, so it’s not easy. The stink of failure is everywhere in “Tenenbaums” — but it’s a powerful stink, not unlike a fancy cheese, and it helps all these brilliant yet pathetic characters make a distinct and lasting impression.

4. Rushmore (1998)

Another striking piece of self-indictment, “Rushmore” stars Jason Schwartzman as Max Fischer, an overachieving student who gets terrible grades but otherwise can accomplish seemingly anything. He befriends a miserable millionaire played by Bill Murray, and together they sabotage each other, and themselves, as they woo a remarkable teacher played by Olivia Williams. “Rushmore” is an amusing film with an undeniably dark streak. The creativity that so often typifies Anderson’s characters becomes destructive and reveals unpleasant aspects of their personalities. But Anderson obviously has hope for these characters, and he really, really, loves staging Max’s absurdly elaborate high school plays.

3. Isle of Dogs (2018)

With time, “Isle of Dogs” might turn out to be Wes Anderson’s finest film. For now, it’s certainly his most imaginative. It’s a stop-motion animated adventure about a near future in which all dogs have been banished to a trash-strewn island, where a pack of mangy mutts help a brave young boy find his pet. Their path is filled with adventure, whimsical asides, political conspiracies, robots, you name it. It’s as fun and as fanciful an adventure as anyone could hope for, with genuinely thoughtful subtexts about xenophobia, propaganda, racism, and plenty of other lofty subjects that Anderson rarely tackles.

2. Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Two kids fall in love and run away together in “Moonrise Kingdom,” a deceptively simple set-up for a remarkably rich motion picture. Once again, Anderson populates his film with characters who remake the world around them, but we see how little pleasure it actually brings them, and how far they are willing to go to force others to conform to those expectations. That this takes the form of “Khaki Scouts” pursuing runaway dreamers with all the zeal of Tommy Lee Jones in “The Fugitive” transforms the story’s tragedy into thoroughly charming imagery. Anderson has never made a more emotionally rich movie.

1. Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)

Anderson has spent the majority of his career treating the art of filmmaking like the art of making elaborate dioramas, so it only makes sense that he’d fully blossom as a director in the medium of stop-motion animation. In his ingenious adaptation of Roald Dahl’s children’s book, a fox (voiced by George Clooney) undergoes a midlife crisis and risks the security of his family to resume his old career as a chicken thief. It explodes in his face and nearly dooms every animal in the forest. Everything in “Fantastic Mr. Fox” is fantastically particular, every detail is welcoming and funny, and all of it is in service of a satisfying and refreshingly zen story about finding a comfortable compromise between being an individual, and being part of a family and community. It’s mature, giddily amusing, exciting cinema.

Thousands of people are planning to say “Wow” like Owen Wilson in unison

As an actor, all one can hope for is a legacy that resounds long after they’re gone. Charlie Chaplin and Peter Sellers’ mastery of transformation, for example, continues to inspire comics the world over, as does the boldness and range of an actress like Katharine Hepburn. Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep will no doubt be…

Read more…

As an actor, all one can hope for is a legacy that resounds long after they’re gone. Charlie Chaplin and Peter Sellers’ mastery of transformation, for example, continues to inspire comics the world over, as does the boldness and range of an actress like Katharine Hepburn. Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep will no doubt be…

Read more...

Why Owen Wilson Left TBS’ ‘Miracle Workers’

Steve Rich and God parted ways on the upcoming sitcom “Miracle Workers” over some creative differences. Well, Rich and the guy playing God, Owen Wilson, did.

Rich explained why Wilson was no longer involved with the TBS comedy at a panel during the Television Critics Association press tour on Thursday.

Well, after Steve Buscemi — who replaced Wilson as the Lord in the heaven-set workplace comedy — jokingly shouted “WHAT?” when a reporter asked about Wilson’s exit.

Also Read: ‘Father Figures’ Movie Review: Owen Wilson and Ed Helms Find No Laughs in Their Daddy Hunt

“Owen was attached really early in preproduction to this project and we just had different creative visions for the show and parted ways,” the executive producer said. “But obviously, I’m beyond ecstatic to work with this cast and really thrilled with the opportunity to work with Steve [Buscemi], who I’ve been a fan of for decades.”

The seven-episode anthology comedy series, based on Rich’s book “What in God’s Name,” stars Daniel Radcliffe as Craig, a low-level angel responsible for handling all of humanity’s prayers, and Buscemi as Craig’s boss, God, who has pretty much checked out to focus on his favorite hobbies, according to the show’s official synopsis.

To prevent Earth’s destruction, Craig must achieve his most impossible miracle to date.

Also Read: TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted ‘Joker’s Wild’ Reboot

The series is executive-produced by Rich, Radcliffe, Lorne Michaels, and Andrew Singer of Broadway Video, which will produce the series in association with Turner’s Studio.

“Miracle Workers” will premiere later this spring on TBS.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, Danny Pudi ‘Absolutely’ Still Wants to Do a ‘Community’ Movie

‘Father Figures’ Movie Review: Owen Wilson and Ed Helms Find No Laughs in Their Daddy Hunt

TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted ‘Joker’s Wild’ Reboot

Steve Rich and God parted ways on the upcoming sitcom “Miracle Workers” over some creative differences. Well, Rich and the guy playing God, Owen Wilson, did.

Rich explained why Wilson was no longer involved with the TBS comedy at a panel during the Television Critics Association press tour on Thursday.

Well, after Steve Buscemi — who replaced Wilson as the Lord in the heaven-set workplace comedy — jokingly shouted “WHAT?” when a reporter asked about Wilson’s exit.

“Owen was attached really early in preproduction to this project and we just had different creative visions for the show and parted ways,” the executive producer said. “But obviously, I’m beyond ecstatic to work with this cast and really thrilled with the opportunity to work with Steve [Buscemi], who I’ve been a fan of for decades.”

The seven-episode anthology comedy series, based on Rich’s book “What in God’s Name,” stars Daniel Radcliffe as Craig, a low-level angel responsible for handling all of humanity’s prayers, and Buscemi as Craig’s boss, God, who has pretty much checked out to focus on his favorite hobbies, according to the show’s official synopsis.

To prevent Earth’s destruction, Craig must achieve his most impossible miracle to date.

The series is executive-produced by Rich, Radcliffe, Lorne Michaels, and Andrew Singer of Broadway Video, which will produce the series in association with Turner’s Studio.

“Miracle Workers” will premiere later this spring on TBS.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, Danny Pudi 'Absolutely' Still Wants to Do a 'Community' Movie

'Father Figures' Movie Review: Owen Wilson and Ed Helms Find No Laughs in Their Daddy Hunt

TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted 'Joker's Wild' Reboot

‘Miracle Workers’ Creator On Owen Wilson’s Departure From The TBS Comedy Series – TCA

Last May when TBS gave the go-ahead to the seven episode anthology series Miracle WorkersOwen Wilson was set to star alongside Daniel Radcliffe in the adaptation of Simon Rich’s book What in God’s Name. 
Radcliffe was set as Craig, a low-level angel responsible for handling all of humanity’s prayers, while Wilson was set to play Craig’s boss, God, who has pretty much checked out to focus on his favorite hobbies. To prevent Earth’s destruction, Craig needs to achieve his…

Last May when TBS gave the go-ahead to the seven episode anthology series Miracle WorkersOwen Wilson was set to star alongside Daniel Radcliffe in the adaptation of Simon Rich’s book What in God’s Name.  Radcliffe was set as Craig, a low-level angel responsible for handling all of humanity's prayers, while Wilson was set to play Craig's boss, God, who has pretty much checked out to focus on his favorite hobbies. To prevent Earth's destruction, Craig needs to achieve his…

‘Father Figures’ Movie Review: Owen Wilson and Ed Helms Find No Laughs in Their Daddy Hunt

Watching “Father Figures” is like finding a piece of food in the back of your fridge that you barely recognize, but know right away it’s not worth eating. Ostensibly a comedy in which Ed Helms and Owen Wilson try to find the dad they never knew, it unfurls its stale scenarios of familial grievance, R-rated gags and white male anxiety with a breathtaking level of laziness.

The weird thing is, a couple of smart, funny dudes this year have done well mining the neurotic Caucasian dad world for prickly, insightful entertainment: Noah Baumbach with “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” and Mike White with “Brad’s Status.” But “Father Figures,” which marks the directorial debut of “Hangover” cinematographer Lawrence Sher, and was written by Justin Malen (“Office Christmas Party”), exhibits the faint aura of a fill-in-the-blanks Hollywood assignment (for example, “plug up a hole in Owen Wilson’s schedule”), after which someone drew dirty pictures in the margins.

Helms plays Peter, an embittered, divorced father of a teenage boy (Zachary Haven) who hates him, and twin brother to a chill layabout named Kyle (Wilson) whose moneyed life in Hawaii with a sexy young bride (Jessica Gomes) is the exact opposite of Pete’s: charmed and carefree. Reunited at the wedding of their mother Helen (Glenn Close), the brothers learn that their dad wasn’t a husband who died when they were young, but an unknown out of many possible sexual assignations their mother had in the swinging ’70s.

Also Read: Sony Pictures Classics Acquires North American Rights to Glenn Close’s ‘The Wife’

The revelation is enough to send Peter and Kyle on a road trip together to find their father, and because they don’t get along — well, it’s really Pete’s churlish negativity versus Kyle’s untroubled positivity — the movie practically guarantees a certain amount of bickering and infantilized behavior. As Yoda might say to the screen, “The jinks are high with this one.”

In Miami, the pair scope out Terry Bradshaw (playing himself, which he’s good at) as a potential parent, and then must endure highly graphic depictions of their mother’s sexual prowess from the ex-Steeler and a fellow NFL retiree (Ving Rhames) before the brothers’ quest is known to the footballers. (That this requires you to imagine Glenn Close in these pornographic reveries is more like a joke played on a great actress than an actual joke.)

Tipped off that their dad might have been a Wall Street wunderkind who once partied at Studio 54 with their mom, the brothers then head off to find Roland Hunt (an expectedly committed J.K. Simmons), who turns out to be a dragon-tattooed, gun-wielding hermit whose antics nearly get them killed.

Also Read: Comedy Central Sets ‘Fake News With Ted Nelms’ Special Starring Ed Helms

Certain scenes are simply headscratchers: a rest area stop that leads to Kyle urinating on a boy, and the picking up of a hitchhiker (Katt Williams, valiantly playing along) that involves tying him up because the brothers think he’s a serial killer. (Um, Peter’s the one with serial killer eyes, no?) On their way to Wooster, Massachusetts, to explore the possibility that their dad was a decorated cop, Peter successfully flirts with a woman at a hotel bar, and when I jotted down, guessing, a certain sexual taboo in my notes, I was right.

A movie that makes Peter a proctologist partly for the rectum humor, that is race-queasy and glibly sexist, isn’t too hard to figure out in other ways. Sher shows no special affinity for comic pacing or enlivening dialogue scenes, either, so the movie just plods from scene to scene, building no momentum.

Also Read: TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted ‘Joker’s Wild’ Reboot

The autopilot vibe extends to the stars, too. Helms is running on fumes here with his humiliated-dweeb shtick, the movies he’s making a far cry from the sad sack promise he showed in “Cedar Rapids” and “The Office.” Wilson is Wilson — he always at least tries to have chemistry with his buddy vehicles — and it’s safe to wonder if he’ll still be trying to pull off the same beach-kissed, holistic groove when the movies are about retirees pulling off heists. (Grandpa Owen has a free autumn: sign him up!)

At the end, after Christopher Walken and a terribly used Ali Wong share scene time with a cat’s enlarged testicles in a veterinarian’s office, “Father Figures” makes a hard swerve into emotionality for the big reveal about the brothers’ origins. What you’re left with isn’t a warm feeling about mothers and sacrifice; you’ll just wonder why this had to be a big secret in the first place.

Neither committed to forging new comic ground with its wackiness, or savvy enough to make us care about a family journey, “Father Figures” is its own dad stereotype: it’s never there for you.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Christmas Box Office Preview: Can New Movies Survive in ‘Star Wars’ Shadow?

Billy Joel, J.K. Simmons, Jimmy Fallon Belt Out Doo-Wop Version of ‘The Longest Time’ (Video)

Tina Fey, Robert Carlock to Receive Honorary Comedy Prize From WGA East

Beer and Boasting in Las Vegas: the Story of a Fox Comedy Premiere at 30,000 Feet

Watching “Father Figures” is like finding a piece of food in the back of your fridge that you barely recognize, but know right away it’s not worth eating. Ostensibly a comedy in which Ed Helms and Owen Wilson try to find the dad they never knew, it unfurls its stale scenarios of familial grievance, R-rated gags and white male anxiety with a breathtaking level of laziness.

The weird thing is, a couple of smart, funny dudes this year have done well mining the neurotic Caucasian dad world for prickly, insightful entertainment: Noah Baumbach with “The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected)” and Mike White with “Brad’s Status.” But “Father Figures,” which marks the directorial debut of “Hangover” cinematographer Lawrence Sher, and was written by Justin Malen (“Office Christmas Party”), exhibits the faint aura of a fill-in-the-blanks Hollywood assignment (for example, “plug up a hole in Owen Wilson’s schedule”), after which someone drew dirty pictures in the margins.

Helms plays Peter, an embittered, divorced father of a teenage boy (Zachary Haven) who hates him, and twin brother to a chill layabout named Kyle (Wilson) whose moneyed life in Hawaii with a sexy young bride (Jessica Gomes) is the exact opposite of Pete’s: charmed and carefree. Reunited at the wedding of their mother Helen (Glenn Close), the brothers learn that their dad wasn’t a husband who died when they were young, but an unknown out of many possible sexual assignations their mother had in the swinging ’70s.

The revelation is enough to send Peter and Kyle on a road trip together to find their father, and because they don’t get along — well, it’s really Pete’s churlish negativity versus Kyle’s untroubled positivity — the movie practically guarantees a certain amount of bickering and infantilized behavior. As Yoda might say to the screen, “The jinks are high with this one.”

In Miami, the pair scope out Terry Bradshaw (playing himself, which he’s good at) as a potential parent, and then must endure highly graphic depictions of their mother’s sexual prowess from the ex-Steeler and a fellow NFL retiree (Ving Rhames) before the brothers’ quest is known to the footballers. (That this requires you to imagine Glenn Close in these pornographic reveries is more like a joke played on a great actress than an actual joke.)

Tipped off that their dad might have been a Wall Street wunderkind who once partied at Studio 54 with their mom, the brothers then head off to find Roland Hunt (an expectedly committed J.K. Simmons), who turns out to be a dragon-tattooed, gun-wielding hermit whose antics nearly get them killed.

Certain scenes are simply headscratchers: a rest area stop that leads to Kyle urinating on a boy, and the picking up of a hitchhiker (Katt Williams, valiantly playing along) that involves tying him up because the brothers think he’s a serial killer. (Um, Peter’s the one with serial killer eyes, no?) On their way to Wooster, Massachusetts, to explore the possibility that their dad was a decorated cop, Peter successfully flirts with a woman at a hotel bar, and when I jotted down, guessing, a certain sexual taboo in my notes, I was right.

A movie that makes Peter a proctologist partly for the rectum humor, that is race-queasy and glibly sexist, isn’t too hard to figure out in other ways. Sher shows no special affinity for comic pacing or enlivening dialogue scenes, either, so the movie just plods from scene to scene, building no momentum.

The autopilot vibe extends to the stars, too. Helms is running on fumes here with his humiliated-dweeb shtick, the movies he’s making a far cry from the sad sack promise he showed in “Cedar Rapids” and “The Office.” Wilson is Wilson — he always at least tries to have chemistry with his buddy vehicles — and it’s safe to wonder if he’ll still be trying to pull off the same beach-kissed, holistic groove when the movies are about retirees pulling off heists. (Grandpa Owen has a free autumn: sign him up!)

At the end, after Christopher Walken and a terribly used Ali Wong share scene time with a cat’s enlarged testicles in a veterinarian’s office, “Father Figures” makes a hard swerve into emotionality for the big reveal about the brothers’ origins. What you’re left with isn’t a warm feeling about mothers and sacrifice; you’ll just wonder why this had to be a big secret in the first place.

Neither committed to forging new comic ground with its wackiness, or savvy enough to make us care about a family journey, “Father Figures” is its own dad stereotype: it’s never there for you.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Christmas Box Office Preview: Can New Movies Survive in 'Star Wars' Shadow?

Billy Joel, J.K. Simmons, Jimmy Fallon Belt Out Doo-Wop Version of 'The Longest Time' (Video)

Tina Fey, Robert Carlock to Receive Honorary Comedy Prize From WGA East

Beer and Boasting in Las Vegas: the Story of a Fox Comedy Premiere at 30,000 Feet

Film Review: ‘Father Figures’

Twins don’t have to look alike, but in the dithering and maladroit road comedy “Father Figures,” Ed Helms and Owen Wilson play bickering brothers who are fraternal twins, and the casting doesn’t sit right; the two actors never convince us that they were baptized in the same physical or spiritual DNA. Helms is Peter Reynolds, […]

Twins don’t have to look alike, but in the dithering and maladroit road comedy “Father Figures,” Ed Helms and Owen Wilson play bickering brothers who are fraternal twins, and the casting doesn’t sit right; the two actors never convince us that they were baptized in the same physical or spiritual DNA. Helms is Peter Reynolds, […]

Father Figures is an Owen Wilson/Ed Helms comedy that’s barely there at all

It doesn’t speak highly of a comedy when one of its lead actors declining to do much actual comic shtick counts as a respite. Father Figures may be largely unfunny, in that few of its jokes work and they are given a vast, 113-minute expanse in which to not work, but at least Ed Helms isn’t playing another…

Read more…

It doesn’t speak highly of a comedy when one of its lead actors declining to do much actual comic shtick counts as a respite. Father Figures may be largely unfunny, in that few of its jokes work and they are given a vast, 113-minute expanse in which to not work, but at least Ed Helms isn’t playing another…

Read more...

‘Wonder’ Star Jacob Tremblay on the Importance of Always Choosing Kind (Video)

Jacob Tremblay may only be 11 years old, but the “Wonder” actor has already learned an important life lesson: to always be kind.

Coincidentally, that’s also the message conveyed in his new film, “Wonder.” The touching story follows a young boy, Auggie Pullman, who suffers from Treacher Collins syndrome, which affects the development of bones and other facial tissue and therefore causes differences in his face.

“When I heard the message of the film, I was just like, ‘I gotta be a part of it,” Tremblay — who rose to fame in the 2015 thriller “Room” — told TheWrap. “If you are a parent, [it’s important] to show your kids to choose [to be] kind because bullying is a terrible thing, and bullying usually happens at school, a place where kids need to feel safe so they can learn and develop who they are, as well … and they can’t do that when they are being judged.”

See Photos: Wonder How to Tell All 5 of This Year’s ‘Wonder’ Films Apart?

“Wonder,” written and directed by Stephen Chbosky, stars Tremblay, Owen Wilson and Julia Roberts. In the film, Auggie was homeschooled for most of his life, until his mom, played by Roberts, decides it might be good for him to be around other kids his age. But he gets mocked for his appearance, until a couple of classmates look past the facial differences and discover the wonderful, smart and funny Auggie underneath it all.

It’s a heartbreaking yet uplifting tale about not judging a book by its cover, an idiom as old as time. And “Wonder” had a completely different tone to Tremblay’s previous film, “Room,” in which he starred as a young boy who is held captive for seven years with his mother, played by Brie Larson, and then experiences the world for the first time after their escape. The 2015 film received widespread critical acclaim and scored Larson the Academy Award for Best Actress.

“I think [these two movies] were completely different,” Tremblay said about “Room” and “Wonder.” “‘Room’ was a very dark movie, but ‘Wonder’ is a fun, light movie that sends out an important message. There is a big difference.”

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Treacher Collins syndrome affects an estimated 1 in 50,000 people – and Tremblay reached out to some of the patients at a Canadian hospital to prepare for the role.

Also Read: ‘Wonder’ Film Review: Anti-Bullying Tale Is a Tasteful Tear-Jerker

“When my parents were researching facial differences on line, we found a group of children from SickKids hospital in Toronto and we reached out to them and asked if they could send me letters of experiences or stories or stuff like that and we got a bunch back and I put them in a binder,” Tremblay explained. “All these letters were about experiences of being bullied. I would read that before I did the scene and it would help me think about how Auggie is thinking when he’s getting bullied and it would help me feel like Auggie.”

And getting Tremblay to look like Auggie was no easy feat — according to the actor, it took about two hours in the morning to put on the prosthetics, and about 30 minutes to take it off.

“We were filming in the summer time in Vancouver which means it was really hot, which means I got really sweaty … which means I got really itchy. You can’t itch on the prosthetic or else you will rip it and it’s really expensive. But it’s really interesting how they do it — there are a lot of pieces for the prosthetic. They have a neck piece, they have a helmet connected to a mechanism that pulls down my lower eye lids, the main face piece, a wig, contact lenses and dentures. [It was] a lot of work.”

“Wonder” was released on Nov. 17 and has since grossed over $100 million at the domestic box office. The critically-acclaimed film has also received Critics Choice Award nominations for Best Young Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Hair & Makeup.

“I definitely did learn a lot and I think so did a lot of people,” Tremblay said. “Go see ‘Wonder,’ it’s really fun and it will teach you a lot. I hope that everyone will choose kind as well.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jacob Tremblay Will Make You Cry in First ‘Wonder’ Trailer (Video)

Julia Roberts, Jacob Tremblay Tearjerker ‘Wonder’ Debuts Trailer in Vegas

‘Room’ Star Jacob Tremblay to Join Shane Black’s ‘Predator’

Jacob Tremblay may only be 11 years old, but the “Wonder” actor has already learned an important life lesson: to always be kind.

Coincidentally, that’s also the message conveyed in his new film, “Wonder.” The touching story follows a young boy, Auggie Pullman, who suffers from Treacher Collins syndrome, which affects the development of bones and other facial tissue and therefore causes differences in his face.

“When I heard the message of the film, I was just like, ‘I gotta be a part of it,” Tremblay — who rose to fame in the 2015 thriller “Room” — told TheWrap. “If you are a parent, [it’s important] to show your kids to choose [to be] kind because bullying is a terrible thing, and bullying usually happens at school, a place where kids need to feel safe so they can learn and develop who they are, as well … and they can’t do that when they are being judged.”

“Wonder,” written and directed by Stephen Chbosky, stars Tremblay, Owen Wilson and Julia Roberts. In the film, Auggie was homeschooled for most of his life, until his mom, played by Roberts, decides it might be good for him to be around other kids his age. But he gets mocked for his appearance, until a couple of classmates look past the facial differences and discover the wonderful, smart and funny Auggie underneath it all.

It’s a heartbreaking yet uplifting tale about not judging a book by its cover, an idiom as old as time. And “Wonder” had a completely different tone to Tremblay’s previous film, “Room,” in which he starred as a young boy who is held captive for seven years with his mother, played by Brie Larson, and then experiences the world for the first time after their escape. The 2015 film received widespread critical acclaim and scored Larson the Academy Award for Best Actress.

“I think [these two movies] were completely different,” Tremblay said about “Room” and “Wonder.” “‘Room’ was a very dark movie, but ‘Wonder’ is a fun, light movie that sends out an important message. There is a big difference.”

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Treacher Collins syndrome affects an estimated 1 in 50,000 people – and Tremblay reached out to some of the patients at a Canadian hospital to prepare for the role.

“When my parents were researching facial differences on line, we found a group of children from SickKids hospital in Toronto and we reached out to them and asked if they could send me letters of experiences or stories or stuff like that and we got a bunch back and I put them in a binder,” Tremblay explained. “All these letters were about experiences of being bullied. I would read that before I did the scene and it would help me think about how Auggie is thinking when he’s getting bullied and it would help me feel like Auggie.”

And getting Tremblay to look like Auggie was no easy feat — according to the actor, it took about two hours in the morning to put on the prosthetics, and about 30 minutes to take it off.

“We were filming in the summer time in Vancouver which means it was really hot, which means I got really sweaty … which means I got really itchy. You can’t itch on the prosthetic or else you will rip it and it’s really expensive. But it’s really interesting how they do it — there are a lot of pieces for the prosthetic. They have a neck piece, they have a helmet connected to a mechanism that pulls down my lower eye lids, the main face piece, a wig, contact lenses and dentures. [It was] a lot of work.”

“Wonder” was released on Nov. 17 and has since grossed over $100 million at the domestic box office. The critically-acclaimed film has also received Critics Choice Award nominations for Best Young Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Hair & Makeup.

“I definitely did learn a lot and I think so did a lot of people,” Tremblay said. “Go see ‘Wonder,’ it’s really fun and it will teach you a lot. I hope that everyone will choose kind as well.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jacob Tremblay Will Make You Cry in First 'Wonder' Trailer (Video)

Julia Roberts, Jacob Tremblay Tearjerker 'Wonder' Debuts Trailer in Vegas

'Room' Star Jacob Tremblay to Join Shane Black's 'Predator'

‘Father Figures’ Premiere Raises Funds for Southern California Wildfire Victims

The real world intruded a bit on the world premiere of “Father Figures” at the TCL Chinese in Hollywood on Wednesday. On the red carpet, producer Ivan Reitman made a pitch for funds to help victims of the Thomas Fire. Earlier in the week, he and his family were forced to evacuate their Montecito home. “I’m […]

The real world intruded a bit on the world premiere of “Father Figures” at the TCL Chinese in Hollywood on Wednesday. On the red carpet, producer Ivan Reitman made a pitch for funds to help victims of the Thomas Fire. Earlier in the week, he and his family were forced to evacuate their Montecito home. “I’m […]

‘Wonder’ Review: Heartwarming Julia Roberts-Jacob Tremblay Family Movie Puts Bullies In Their Place

When R.J. Palacio’s children’s book, Wondercame out a few years ago it started a craze for the phrase “choose kind.” That’s a beautiful sentiment that is carried over to this wondrous and heartwarming movie that is that rare feel-good live-action film for the whole family that is about who we are on the inside, a sweet story with a strong message about doing the right thing. Wonder is a film to cheer in these tough times.
As most kids fare is animated these days, Wonder …

When R.J. Palacio’s children’s book, Wondercame out a few years ago it started a craze for the phrase “choose kind.” That’s a beautiful sentiment that is carried over to this wondrous and heartwarming movie that is that rare feel-good live-action film for the whole family that is about who we are on the inside, a sweet story with a strong message about doing the right thing. Wonder is a film to cheer in these tough times. As most kids fare is animated these days, Wonder …

‘Wonder’ Premiere Celebrates Book’s Six-Year Journey to Big Screen, ‘Once-in-a-Lifetime Actor’ Jacob Tremblay

It was a world of “Wonder” at Tuesday night’s premiere of Stephen Chbosky‘s new film, adapted from the best-selling novel of the same name penned by R.J. Palacio. The “Wonder” story, which revolves around Auggie Pullman, a sensitive, spunky, and precocious intelligent 10-year-old boy with craniofacial disfigurement, is and inspiring and heartbreaking one, and drew […]

It was a world of “Wonder” at Tuesday night’s premiere of Stephen Chbosky‘s new film, adapted from the best-selling novel of the same name penned by R.J. Palacio. The “Wonder” story, which revolves around Auggie Pullman, a sensitive, spunky, and precocious intelligent 10-year-old boy with craniofacial disfigurement, is and inspiring and heartbreaking one, and drew […]

Film Review: ‘Wonder’

Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay), the central character in Stephen Chbosky’s “Wonder,” is a brainy 10-year-old boy with a sweet high voice and a congenital facial deformity, whom numerous corrective surgeries have left looking like a cherub after a car accident. His left eye tugs downward as if a teardrop were falling from it; his ears […]

Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay), the central character in Stephen Chbosky’s “Wonder,” is a brainy 10-year-old boy with a sweet high voice and a congenital facial deformity, whom numerous corrective surgeries have left looking like a cherub after a car accident. His left eye tugs downward as if a teardrop were falling from it; his ears […]

‘Wonder’ Film Review: Anti-Bullying Tale Is a Tasteful Tear-Jerker

When a comedy pulls out the stops to get laughs, or a horror film goes to extreme to frighten its audience, we accept and even applaud these tactics as an inherent part of these respective genres. So if “Wonder” wants to be a tear-jerker — and that desire is stamped into pretty much every scene of the film — we can’t fault its single-minded desire to provoke a response.

Giving the film credit where it’s due, “Wonder” never cheats in its pursuit of emotion. It’s never mawkish or manipulative, and its characters are so well-established both in the writing and in the performances that the movie ultimately does the hard work of earning those damp Kleenexes. As with horror and comedy, those who are resistant to this kind of film will definitely resist this one in particular.

Adapting the novel by R.J. Palacio, director Stephen Chbosky (“The Perks of Being a Wallflower”) and his co-writers Steve Conrad (“The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”) and Jack Thorne (“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”) throw out a wide net of compassion. “Wonder” is a story about a kid who’s different, yes, but it’s also about the people around him as well. Even the bullies get backstories and a shot at redemption.

Watch Video: Jacob Tremblay Will Make You Cry in First ‘Wonder’ Trailer

The different kid is Auggie (Jacob Tremblay, “Room”), born with a congenital disorder that has caused him to have 27 surgeries in his 10 years of life, allowing him to breathe and to hear and also to reshape his face. But it’s still an unusual face, one that he prefers to hide from the world in his astronaut helmet. He’s got a loving family — and one of the biggest New York brownstones ever, even by movie standards — but it’s time for Auggie to meet the world.

His mom Isabel (Julia Roberts) has home-schooled Auggie all his life, but since fifth grade is a year when all the students will be attending a new school, she’s decided it’s time for her boy to leave the nest. The school’s principal Mr. Tushman (Mandy Patinkin) is supportive, although Auggie’s classmates do a lot of staring and then looking away. He’s actively bullied by rich-kid Julian (Bryce Gheisar, “A Dog’s Purpose”) but may find a friend in scholarship student Jack Will (Noah Jupe).

See Photos: Julia Roberts Turns 50: Her Evolution From ‘Mystic Pizza’ to ‘Wonder’

“Wonder” isn’t just Auggie’s story, though; we learn what it’s been like for his older sister Via (Izabela Vidovic, “The Fosters”) to grow up in a family where her younger brother and his medical issues get all the parental attention; how Isabel put her thesis aside to become a full-time mom (it’s been so long since she worked on it that it’s still saved on a floppy disk); who’s raising Jack Will and Julian and how that impacts their actions and attitudes; and why Via’s best friend Miranda (Danielle Rose Russell, “The Last Tycoon”) put pink streaks in her hair and dumped her former BFF.

It could have been very easy for this to be the sort of film that merely allows audiences to take a good, long look at a character with facial defects (while encouraging us to judge characters who do likewise), but instead, this is a celebration of empathy, a reminder that even the people who might be making us miserable have their own problems and their own people who are making them miserable. Its secret weapon is Tremblay, whose big, Keane-painting eyes defy you not to melt over Auggie and his travails, but it’s a solid ensemble through and through.

Also Read: TBS Greenlights Daniel Radcliffe-Owen Wilson Sitcom, Snoop Dogg-Hosted ‘Joker’s Wild’ Reboot

Nobody pivots from tough-as-nails to quivering mass of tears like Roberts, and she and Owen Wilson make for dream parents. (What Wilson does for a living, and how it allows him to keep this gigantic house while also spending so much quality time with his son, is never explained.) The other kids are all great as well, particularly Jupe, who was the only notable facet of “Suburbicon”; there’s nothing actor-ish about his curious eyes, and when Jack Will stands up for Auggie, we know our hero is in good hands.

Auggie’s health issues represent the closest thing to uncomfortable reality that “Wonder” would care to address. Cinematographer Don Burgess (“Allied”) gives us a picture-postcard Manhattan, where all the seasons have luster and all the streets are tree-lined and filled with nice folks. If the film strays too far toward shamelessness, it’s in putting a beloved pet in danger as well as giving us not one but two scenes with that dreaded cliché of uplift, the standing ovation.

If you can get past those, though, “Wonder” deserves its own round of applause for its unabashed emotionalism and kindness. It’s hard to traverse this ground without turning into a greeting card, but this is that rare film that juggles sentimentality and restraint.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Party Report: Chris Martin Serenades Julia Roberts with ‘Pretty Woman’ (Video)

Julia Roberts Joins James Corden to Act Out Her Entire Film Career in 9 Minutes (Video)

George Clooney, Oprah, Beyonce, Julia Roberts to Headline Hurricane Harvey Relief TV Telethon

Julia Roberts’ ‘Homecoming’ Series Picked Up by Amazon for Two Seasons

When a comedy pulls out the stops to get laughs, or a horror film goes to extreme to frighten its audience, we accept and even applaud these tactics as an inherent part of these respective genres. So if “Wonder” wants to be a tear-jerker — and that desire is stamped into pretty much every scene of the film — we can’t fault its single-minded desire to provoke a response.

Giving the film credit where it’s due, “Wonder” never cheats in its pursuit of emotion. It’s never mawkish or manipulative, and its characters are so well-established both in the writing and in the performances that the movie ultimately does the hard work of earning those damp Kleenexes. As with horror and comedy, those who are resistant to this kind of film will definitely resist this one in particular.

Adapting the novel by R.J. Palacio, director Stephen Chbosky (“The Perks of Being a Wallflower”) and his co-writers Steve Conrad (“The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”) and Jack Thorne (“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child”) throw out a wide net of compassion. “Wonder” is a story about a kid who’s different, yes, but it’s also about the people around him as well. Even the bullies get backstories and a shot at redemption.

The different kid is Auggie (Jacob Tremblay, “Room”), born with a congenital disorder that has caused him to have 27 surgeries in his 10 years of life, allowing him to breathe and to hear and also to reshape his face. But it’s still an unusual face, one that he prefers to hide from the world in his astronaut helmet. He’s got a loving family — and one of the biggest New York brownstones ever, even by movie standards — but it’s time for Auggie to meet the world.

His mom Isabel (Julia Roberts) has home-schooled Auggie all his life, but since fifth grade is a year when all the students will be attending a new school, she’s decided it’s time for her boy to leave the nest. The school’s principal Mr. Tushman (Mandy Patinkin) is supportive, although Auggie’s classmates do a lot of staring and then looking away. He’s actively bullied by rich-kid Julian (Bryce Gheisar, “A Dog’s Purpose”) but may find a friend in scholarship student Jack Will (Noah Jupe).

“Wonder” isn’t just Auggie’s story, though; we learn what it’s been like for his older sister Via (Izabela Vidovic, “The Fosters”) to grow up in a family where her younger brother and his medical issues get all the parental attention; how Isabel put her thesis aside to become a full-time mom (it’s been so long since she worked on it that it’s still saved on a floppy disk); who’s raising Jack Will and Julian and how that impacts their actions and attitudes; and why Via’s best friend Miranda (Danielle Rose Russell, “The Last Tycoon”) put pink streaks in her hair and dumped her former BFF.

It could have been very easy for this to be the sort of film that merely allows audiences to take a good, long look at a character with facial defects (while encouraging us to judge characters who do likewise), but instead, this is a celebration of empathy, a reminder that even the people who might be making us miserable have their own problems and their own people who are making them miserable. Its secret weapon is Tremblay, whose big, Keane-painting eyes defy you not to melt over Auggie and his travails, but it’s a solid ensemble through and through.

Nobody pivots from tough-as-nails to quivering mass of tears like Roberts, and she and Owen Wilson make for dream parents. (What Wilson does for a living, and how it allows him to keep this gigantic house while also spending so much quality time with his son, is never explained.) The other kids are all great as well, particularly Jupe, who was the only notable facet of “Suburbicon”; there’s nothing actor-ish about his curious eyes, and when Jack Will stands up for Auggie, we know our hero is in good hands.

Auggie’s health issues represent the closest thing to uncomfortable reality that “Wonder” would care to address. Cinematographer Don Burgess (“Allied”) gives us a picture-postcard Manhattan, where all the seasons have luster and all the streets are tree-lined and filled with nice folks. If the film strays too far toward shamelessness, it’s in putting a beloved pet in danger as well as giving us not one but two scenes with that dreaded cliché of uplift, the standing ovation.

If you can get past those, though, “Wonder” deserves its own round of applause for its unabashed emotionalism and kindness. It’s hard to traverse this ground without turning into a greeting card, but this is that rare film that juggles sentimentality and restraint.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Party Report: Chris Martin Serenades Julia Roberts with 'Pretty Woman' (Video)

Julia Roberts Joins James Corden to Act Out Her Entire Film Career in 9 Minutes (Video)

George Clooney, Oprah, Beyonce, Julia Roberts to Headline Hurricane Harvey Relief TV Telethon

Julia Roberts' 'Homecoming' Series Picked Up by Amazon for Two Seasons

This “Bulls On Parade”-Owen Wilson mashup is still probably better than Prophets Of Rage

Did you know that Owen Wilson says “wow” a lot? Probably, considering not only did some genius make a supercut of it, but some other wiseasses worked that “wow” into things such as lightsaber duels. Now, Wilson’s slacker-chic rasp has leaped, inevitably some would say, from the corporeal world into the musical one,…

Read more…

Did you know that Owen Wilson says “wow” a lot? Probably, considering not only did some genius make a supercut of it, but some other wiseasses worked that “wow” into things such as lightsaber duels. Now, Wilson’s slacker-chic rasp has leaped, inevitably some would say, from the corporeal world into the musical one,…

Read more...

‘Blade Runner 2049’ and 31 Other Movie Sequels That Took Forever to Hit Screen (Photos)

Long-gestating followups include blockbusters like “Jurassic World” and famous flops like “Blues Brothers 2000”

George Miller took nearly 30 years to follow up “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” with the Tom HardyCharlize Theron thriller “Mad Max: Fury Road.”

“The Odd Couple II” is among the sequels with the biggest gaps between films. Twenty-nine years after the 1968 original, Jack Lemmon returned as Felix Unger and Walter Matthau was Oscar Madison in their last film together.

“Tron: Legacy” came 28 years after the original, and featured Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. Shot in 3D, the film featured extensive visual effects and a score by Daft Punk. It grossed more than $400 million worldwide in 2010.

“The Color of Money” featured Paul Newman reprising his role as “Fast Eddie” Felson alongside Tom Cruise. Newman won the Best Actor Oscar, 25 years after 1961’s “The Hustler.”

In “Psycho 2,” Meg Tilly played a traveler who encounters Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), 23 years after Alfred Hitchcock‘s 1960 horror classic.

Greed was still pretty good in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” which came 23 years after the original and returned Michael Douglas as Gordon Gecko and co-starred Shia LaBeouf.

Sly Stallone wrote, directed and starred in 2008’s “Rambo,” which came 20 years after “Rambo III.” It was dedicated to the memory of Richard Crenna, who played Col. Sam Trautman in the first three films.

A full 20 years after “Dumb and  Dumber,” Jeff Daniels and Jim Carrey reprised their roles as dim-witted pals in 2014’s “Dumb and Dumber To.”

“The Last Picture Show” stars Cybill Shepherd and Jeff Bridges returned after 19 years for 1990’s “Texasville,” which unlike the original drama about small-town America, was shot in color.

“Blues Brothers 2000” came 18 years after the 1980 original. John Goodman stepped in for the late John BelushiJohn Candy and Cab Calloway also died before the sequel – but the film bombed.

“Live Free or Die Hard” might have arrived sooner than 2007, 16 years after “Die Hard with a Vengeance,” but it was delayed after the events of 9/11. In this one, Bruce Willis‘ John McClane character battles cyber terrorists.

Sly Stallone wrote, directed and stars in 2006’ “Rocky Balboa,” the sixth film in the boxing franchise. It came 16 years after “Rocky V,” and featured the pugilist as widower, retired from the ring and running an Italian restaurant called “Adrian’s,” after his late wife.

Star Jack Nicholson and writer Robert Towne came back for 1990’s “The Two Jakes,” the followup to the 1974 noir classic “Chinatown.” Audiences didn’t however, and it flopped.

Francis Ford Coppola delivered 1990’s “The Godfather Part III” 16 years after the series’ previous installment and closed the book on Michael Corleone. The director’s casting of his daughter Sofia drew fire; Julia Roberts, Madonna and Winona Ryder were also considered for the role.

Sharon Stone reprised her role as Catherine Tramell in 2006’s “Basic Instinct 2,” the sequel to the 1992 erotic thriller. But moviegoers weren’t turned on and it bombed.

Writer-director Malcolm D. Lee waited 14 years before turning out “The Best Man Holiday,” a sequel to his 1999 ensemble comedy “The Best Man.” The timing was right: the sequel made $71 million on a $17 million budget.

2015’s “Jurassic World” starring Chris Pratt landed in theaters nearly 14 years after “Jurassic Park III.”

Paul Hogan and Linda Kozlowski returned for “Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles,” which followed the original by 13 years. But the sequel didn’t have many g’days at the box office.

Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson came back after 13 years for “Evening Star,” the followup to 1983’s Best Picture Oscar winner “Terms of Endearment.”

The 2003 action film “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” came 12 years after “Judgment Day” and was the last film for Arnold Schwarzenegger before he took over as California’s governor.

Writer-director Kevin Smith didn’t plan on making a sequel to his 1994 cult hit “Clerks.” But after 11 years — and “Jersey Girl” — he changed his mind.

Critics took director Tobe Hooper to task for infusing too much black humor into the cannibal saga “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2,” which came a decade after the original 1974 slasher film.

“Zoolander 2,” with Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson reprising their roles, came out 15 years after the original. Hoping to reel in fans of the first film, the sequel only managed to gross $28 million.

“My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” is opening in theaters on March 25, 14 years after the original hit the big screen. It will be opening against box office behemoth “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” starring Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill.

“Finding Dory” is the sequel to 2003’s “Finding Nemo,” meaning it took 13 years for our fishy friends to come back to the big screen. It is opening this Friday.

“Barbershop: The Next Cut” is the follow up to 2004’s “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” and the third movie in the franchise. The film was released on April 15 and grossed $54.6 million.

“Alice Through the Looking Glass,” the sequel to “Alice in Wonderland,” was released six years after the first. The follow-up bombed with only $77 million domestically, based on a reported $170 million budget.

“Bridget Jones’s Baby” is hitting theaters a full 12 years after the last in the franchise and 15 years after the first film, “Bridget Jones’s Diary.” The first film was a commercial and box office success, although the second scored measly reviews. The film has a score of 27 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

“xXx: Return of Xander Cage” came out 15 years after the original and 12 years after its sequel. The second film did not star Vin Diesel as Xander Cage, but he made his return in the third film, which grossed $20 million its opening weekend.

Long-gestating followups include blockbusters like “Jurassic World” and famous flops like “Blues Brothers 2000”

George Miller took nearly 30 years to follow up “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” with the Tom Hardy-Charlize Theron thriller “Mad Max: Fury Road.”

“The Odd Couple II” is among the sequels with the biggest gaps between films. Twenty-nine years after the 1968 original, Jack Lemmon returned as Felix Unger and Walter Matthau was Oscar Madison in their last film together.

“Tron: Legacy” came 28 years after the original, and featured Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. Shot in 3D, the film featured extensive visual effects and a score by Daft Punk. It grossed more than $400 million worldwide in 2010.

“The Color of Money” featured Paul Newman reprising his role as “Fast Eddie” Felson alongside Tom Cruise. Newman won the Best Actor Oscar, 25 years after 1961’s “The Hustler.”

In “Psycho 2,” Meg Tilly played a traveler who encounters Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), 23 years after Alfred Hitchcock‘s 1960 horror classic.

Greed was still pretty good in “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” which came 23 years after the original and returned Michael Douglas as Gordon Gecko and co-starred Shia LaBeouf.

Sly Stallone wrote, directed and starred in 2008’s “Rambo,” which came 20 years after “Rambo III.” It was dedicated to the memory of Richard Crenna, who played Col. Sam Trautman in the first three films.

A full 20 years after “Dumb and  Dumber,” Jeff Daniels and Jim Carrey reprised their roles as dim-witted pals in 2014’s “Dumb and Dumber To.”

“The Last Picture Show” stars Cybill Shepherd and Jeff Bridges returned after 19 years for 1990’s “Texasville,” which unlike the original drama about small-town America, was shot in color.

“Blues Brothers 2000” came 18 years after the 1980 original. John Goodman stepped in for the late John BelushiJohn Candy and Cab Calloway also died before the sequel – but the film bombed.

“Live Free or Die Hard” might have arrived sooner than 2007, 16 years after “Die Hard with a Vengeance,” but it was delayed after the events of 9/11. In this one, Bruce Willis‘ John McClane character battles cyber terrorists.

Sly Stallone wrote, directed and stars in 2006’ “Rocky Balboa,” the sixth film in the boxing franchise. It came 16 years after “Rocky V,” and featured the pugilist as widower, retired from the ring and running an Italian restaurant called “Adrian’s,” after his late wife.

Star Jack Nicholson and writer Robert Towne came back for 1990’s “The Two Jakes,” the followup to the 1974 noir classic “Chinatown.” Audiences didn’t however, and it flopped.

Francis Ford Coppola delivered 1990’s “The Godfather Part III” 16 years after the series’ previous installment and closed the book on Michael Corleone. The director’s casting of his daughter Sofia drew fire; Julia Roberts, Madonna and Winona Ryder were also considered for the role.

Sharon Stone reprised her role as Catherine Tramell in 2006’s “Basic Instinct 2,” the sequel to the 1992 erotic thriller. But moviegoers weren’t turned on and it bombed.

Writer-director Malcolm D. Lee waited 14 years before turning out “The Best Man Holiday,” a sequel to his 1999 ensemble comedy “The Best Man.” The timing was right: the sequel made $71 million on a $17 million budget.

2015’s “Jurassic World” starring Chris Pratt landed in theaters nearly 14 years after “Jurassic Park III.”

Paul Hogan and Linda Kozlowski returned for “Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles,” which followed the original by 13 years. But the sequel didn’t have many g’days at the box office.

Shirley MacLaine and Jack Nicholson came back after 13 years for “Evening Star,” the followup to 1983’s Best Picture Oscar winner “Terms of Endearment.”

The 2003 action film “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” came 12 years after “Judgment Day” and was the last film for Arnold Schwarzenegger before he took over as California’s governor.

Writer-director Kevin Smith didn’t plan on making a sequel to his 1994 cult hit “Clerks.” But after 11 years — and “Jersey Girl” — he changed his mind.

Critics took director Tobe Hooper to task for infusing too much black humor into the cannibal saga “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2,” which came a decade after the original 1974 slasher film.

“Zoolander 2,” with Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson reprising their roles, came out 15 years after the original. Hoping to reel in fans of the first film, the sequel only managed to gross $28 million.

“My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2” is opening in theaters on March 25, 14 years after the original hit the big screen. It will be opening against box office behemoth “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice” starring Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill.

“Finding Dory” is the sequel to 2003’s “Finding Nemo,” meaning it took 13 years for our fishy friends to come back to the big screen. It is opening this Friday.

“Barbershop: The Next Cut” is the follow up to 2004’s “Barbershop 2: Back in Business” and the third movie in the franchise. The film was released on April 15 and grossed $54.6 million.

“Alice Through the Looking Glass,” the sequel to “Alice in Wonderland,” was released six years after the first. The follow-up bombed with only $77 million domestically, based on a reported $170 million budget.

“Bridget Jones’s Baby” is hitting theaters a full 12 years after the last in the franchise and 15 years after the first film, “Bridget Jones’s Diary.” The first film was a commercial and box office success, although the second scored measly reviews. The film has a score of 27 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

“xXx: Return of Xander Cage” came out 15 years after the original and 12 years after its sequel. The second film did not star Vin Diesel as Xander Cage, but he made his return in the third film, which grossed $20 million its opening weekend.

‘Father Figures’ Trailer: Owen Wilson & Ed Helms Search For The Dad They Never Had

Brothers Kyle and Peter Reynolds grew up without a father. Turns out their mom raised them on the lie that Dad had checked out when they were little. But now they’re hip to the truth and set out to find their old man. Along the way, the guys learn a little more about their eccentric mother than they probably want to know.
Here is the first trailer for Father Figures, the comedy formerly known as Bastards that stars Owen Wilson and Ed Helms as Kyle and Peter and a quartet…

Brothers Kyle and Peter Reynolds grew up without a father. Turns out their mom raised them on the lie that Dad had checked out when they were little. But now they’re hip to the truth and set out to find their old man. Along the way, the guys learn a little more about their eccentric mother than they probably want to know. Here is the first trailer for Father Figures, the comedy formerly known as Bastards that stars Owen Wilson and Ed Helms as Kyle and Peter and a quartet…

Owen Wilson, Ed Helms Search for Their Dad in ‘Father Figures’ Trailer

Warner Bros. has issued an official trailer for its comedy “Father Figures,” after recently ditching the title “Bastards.” J.K. Simmons and former pro football player Terry Bradshaw, who is playing himself, are potential father figures to Owen Wilson and Ed Helms’ characters. Wilson and Helms play brothers whose eccentric mother raised them to believe their father […]

Warner Bros. has issued an official trailer for its comedy “Father Figures,” after recently ditching the title “Bastards.” J.K. Simmons and former pro football player Terry Bradshaw, who is playing himself, are potential father figures to Owen Wilson and Ed Helms’ characters. Wilson and Helms play brothers whose eccentric mother raised them to believe their father […]

Owen Wilson and Ed Helms try to find Father Figures in new trailer

The last time we heard anything about the movie where Owen Wilson and Ed Helms try to find out who their dad is, it was called Bastards and it was supposed to be released in January. Now, the movie has returned from the land of wind and ghosts with a new title and a slightly more cuss-filled trailer. Now called Father

Read more…

The last time we heard anything about the movie where Owen Wilson and Ed Helms try to find out who their dad is, it was called Bastards and it was supposed to be released in January. Now, the movie has returned from the land of wind and ghosts with a new title and a slightly more cuss-filled trailer. Now called Father

Read more...

Owen Wilson saying “wow” except it’s backwards now

Owen Wilson is a versatile actor—watch The Minus Man!—but that’s not to say he doesn’t have a few actorly wells to which he returns. We’ve seen time and again the many, many times he’s uttered his catchphrase—“wow”—and we’ve even seen it dubbed over other sounds, such as that of a lightsaber. Now, perhaps inspired by…

Read more…

Owen Wilson is a versatile actor—watch The Minus Man!—but that’s not to say he doesn’t have a few actorly wells to which he returns. We’ve seen time and again the many, many times he’s uttered his catchphrase—“wow”—and we’ve even seen it dubbed over other sounds, such as that of a lightsaber. Now, perhaps inspired by…

Read more...