‘Merry Happy Whatever’: Bridgit Mendler, Brent Morin, Ashley Tisdale, Adam Rose & Hayes MacArthur Cast In Netflix Series

Read on: Deadline.

EXCLUSIVE: Netflix has assembled the cast opposite Dennis Quaid in holiday-themed multi-camera comedy series Merry Happy Whatever. Former Undateable co-stars Bridgit Mendler and Brent Morin will play leads in the series, joined by Ashley Tisdale, Adam …

‘Unicorn Store’: Brie Larson’s Directing Debut Gets Trailer & Key Art From Netflix

Read on: Deadline.

“The most grownup thing you can do is fail at things you really care about.” “You need to learn to love yourself.” That’s two solid pieces of advice given to Brie Larson’s lead character in Unicorn Store, the Captain…

Brie Larson Buys a Unicorn From Samuel L Jackson in Trailer for Netflix’s ‘Unicorn Store’ (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Where would one hope to find a unicorn? At the Unicorn Store, of course.

That’s what Brie Larson says in the trailer for her upcoming Netflix film, “Unicorn Store,” which she also directed. And who better to purchase a unicorn from than Larson’s “Captain Marvel” co-star, Samuel L. Jackson, dressed all in pink and with a massive afro?

“You need to love yourself,” Jackson tells Larson’s character, Kit. “Get out there and show us what you can do.”

Also Read: Even Brie Larson Can’t Go on Samuel L Jackson and Magic Johnson’s Italy Vacation (Video)

Larson made her directorial debut on the comedy-fantasy about a lonely 20-something who is kicked out of school and forced to take a boring temp job and move back in with her parents. But her life changes when she discovers a mysterious store that offers to give her childlike heart its greatest desire. In her case, that’s a unicorn.

Samantha McIntyre wrote the screenplay, and “Unicorn Store” also stars Joan Cusack and Bradley Whitford. The film first premiered at Toronto in 2017, and it was acquired recently by Netflix, who will now release it globally on their streaming service on April 5.

Watch the first trailer for “Unicorn Store” above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here’s Why ‘Pulp Fiction’ Wasn’t Used When De-Aging Samuel L Jackson in ‘Captain Marvel’

Let’s Talk About Captain Marvel, Feminism and Fragile Fanboys’ Angst (Podcast)

‘Captain Marvel’: Marvel Studios Boss on Why Film Version of Mar-Vell Is a Woman

‘The Politician’: Ryan Murphy’s Netflix Series Starring Ben Platt Gets Premiere Date

Read on: Deadline.

With politics on so many people’s minds these days, Netflix has made a campaign promise: Its Ryan Murphy series The Politician will premiere on September 27. Check out the announcement poster below.
The darkly comic show stars Ben Platt as Payton…

Ryan Murphy’s ‘The Politician’ Sets Premiere Date at Netflix

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Ryan Murphy has just revealed when his first Netflix original series, “The Politician,” will premiere. Yeah, that’s the one with an insane A-list cast, including stars Ben Platt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jessica Lange, Zoey Deutch, and Lucy Boynton.

“My first Netflix show! So proud of this incredible project and the incredible cast. And I can’t wait for you to binge it in September,” Murphy captioned an Instagram post of the “The Politician’s” official poster, which noted its Sept. 27 launch date.

Along with Platt, Paltrow, Lange, Deutch and Boynton, the cast includes Bob Balaban, David Corenswet, Julia Schlaepfer, Laura Dreyfuss, Theo Germaine, Rahne Jones, and Benjamin Barrett.

Also Read: Ryan Murphy Sets ‘Hollywood’ as First Original Netflix Series

Here’s the official logline for the series: “Payton Hobart (Ben Platt), a wealthy student from Santa Barbara, California, has known since age seven that he’s going to be President of the United States. But first he’ll have to navigate the most treacherous political landscape of all: Saint Sebastian High School. To get elected Student Body President, secure a spot at Harvard, and stay on his singular path to success, Payton will have to outsmart his ruthless classmates without sacrificing his own morality and carefully crafted image. Full of dark comedy and sly satire, Ryan Murphy’s The Politician offers a rare glimpse into just what it takes to make a politician.”

See the poster below.

“The Politician” launches Sept. 27 on Netflix

‘This Isn’t Spinal Tap’: Dishing the Dirt on Motley Crue’s Surprisingly Dark Biopic

Read on: Variety.

The new, eagerly awaited Motley Crue biopic, based on Neil Strauss’ best-selling 2001 book, “The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band,” premieres today on Netflix after a seemingly endless 13 years in development hell. Those antici…

‘The Dirt’ Review: Netflix’s Mötley Crüe Memoir Pic Flaccid & Bleached Clean

Read on: Deadline.

SPOILER ALERT: This review contains details of the movie version of The Dirt
Having taken decades to make it to the screen, you kind of knew any adaptation of Mötley Crüe’s 2001 memoir The Dirt was going to be problematic, to put it politely.
Inf…

Studio Marketing Chiefs Discuss the Theatrical vs. Netflix Oscars Debate

Read on: Variety.

On a day where a large part of the Fox marketing department was wiped out in the aftermath of the Disney merger, a group of marketing chiefs from other studios and streamers sat down at the Variety Entertainment Marketing Summit presented by Deloitte &…

Stream Fatigue? Streaming Subscriptions Drop So Far This Year – Just as Apple, Disney Prepare to Enter Market

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Forget about cord-cutting — the new trend in 2019 might be TV fans cutting back on their streaming service budgets.

New research from Ampere Analysis shows that Americans are subscribing to fewer streaming services in the first three months of this year — and also paying less overall. Between January and March, the average U.S. household subscribed to 2.6 services and paid about $30 per month altogether, marking a slight dip from last June, when the average household paid about $33 per month for 2.8 services.

The decline is admittedly modest so far but it’s a notable drop that comes just as Apple, WarnerMedia, NBCUniversal and, oh yeah, Disney are poised to enter an increasingly crowded streaming market within the next year. “Streaming fatigue” could be setting in as customers balk at the idea of dropping their cable and satellite plans only to juggle a half dozen different streaming subscriptions.

“Cord cutters, like me, are realizing that skinnier bundles still add up, price-wise, and how many [streaming] monthly fees can one viewer afford and navigate?” said Neil Landau, screenwriter and author of “TV Writing On Demand: Creating Great Content in the Digital Era.” “We now live in a world with over 500 scripted series, so in addition to getting noticed and breaking through the noise in this glutted TV landscape, the technologically challenged may not even be able to find a desired new show.”

Also Read: Streaming Officially Bigger Than Cable and Satellite TV in US, Research Shows

Landau’s “too many choices” concern was echoed by Kevin Westcott, Deloitte’s vice chairman and head of U.S. Telecom and Media and Entertainment: “With more than 300 over-the-top video options in the U.S., coupled with multiple subscriptions and payments to track and justify, consumers may be entering a time of ‘subscription fatigue.’”

To be clear, this doesn’t mean streaming is falling out of style or that cable and satellite are poised to make a comeback. Indeed, new survey data from Deloitte this week showed that streaming has officially passed traditional pay TV in popularity in the U.S., with 69 percent of survey respondents subscribing to at least one streaming service, compared to 65 percent of respondents that pay for cable or satellite.

However, the new trends indicate that streamers are reticent to sign up for new subscriptions. Cord-cutting was intended to drop monthly expenses while still giving viewers content they desire. And the addition of more big-name services on the market doesn’t guarantee that customers will open their wallets.

Look at the prices of the already established streaming players: Netflix’s premium plan runs $16 per month; Hulu’s “no commercials” plan is $12 per month; HBO Now is $15 per month. Amazon Prime Video comes with a $120 annual Prime membership fee. And Live TV options from YouTube and Hulu hover between $40 and $45 each month. On their own, these prices don’t break the bank, but they quickly add up in combination.

Also Read: Inside Facebook, YouTube and Twitter’s Struggle to Purge Video of the New Zealand Mosque Attacks

“Soon we’ll all start looking at our credit card bills and start saying, ‘Why am I subscribing to all of these services? Something’s got to give,’” said Paul Hardart, former Warner Bros. and Turner executive and current head of the Entertainment, Media and Technology Program at New York University.

Making matters tougher for new streamers is Netflix’s overwhelming dominance in the market. The company has nearly 60 million U.S. customers and has built a devoted following behind trademark shows like “Narcos,” “Queer Eye” and “Stranger Things.”

The company’s first-mover advantage is real. New streamers will have a chance to carve out their share of the pie — Disney’s slew of top content, from “Star Wars” to its seemingly never-ending supply of Marvel movies, will bolster its Disney+ service, and Apple has more than $200 billion in cash to throw around if it chooses to bulk up its content offereings.

Still, it will be next to impossible for newcomers to bump Netflix from the select few services that Americans will pay for, Hardart said, leaving the rest of the field to battle for the remaining dollars customers are willing to shell out.

Also Read: Apple’s Streaming Service on Track to Have 100 Million Subscribers in 3-5 Years, Analyst Says

“There will be losers in this. Walmart basically abandoned their streaming service earlier this year,” Hardart noted, referring to the retail giant’s scrapped plans for an $8 per month service. “If a big player like Walmart is abandoning it, it’s a treacherous path.”

“We’ve almost reached a saturation point,” Ampere senior analyst Toby Holleran added of the streaming landscape. While he said the downturn in overall streaming subscriptions isn’t necessarily permanent — Holleran said the “sweet spot” for streaming subscriptions will likely land around three per household in the next year — customer loyalty will be difficult to secure. Instead, churn rates will increase, as a lack of contracts will allow viewers to nomadically bounce from service to service, binging a series or two before moving on to another service.

These key factors — price sensitivity, the ability to easily move from service to service and a finite amount of time for customers to watch all of the content that’s available — could hamper Apple, Disney and WarnerMedia’s fashionably late entrance to the streaming party.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Fox News, Ben Shapiro’s Daily Wire Dominate Facebook’s Most Popular Stories of 2019

Inside Facebook, YouTube and Twitter’s Struggle to Purge Video of the New Zealand Mosque Attacks

Facebook Loses Two Top Executives, Including Chief Product Officer Chris Cox

Anthony Mackie and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II to deal with scary computers on Black Mirror’s new season 

Read on: The A.V. Club.

According to Deadline, Anthony Mackie from the Marvel movies and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II from a DC movie have joined the cast of Black Mirror’s upcoming new season. We don’t know anything about what characters they might play, what sort of stories they m…