New Neil Armstrong Doc Features Rare Home Video and NASA Footage (EXCLUSIVE)

A new documentary film about Neil Armstrong will use home videos shot by the man himself and unseen footage from NASA to tell the celebrated U.S. astronaut’s life story. “Armstrong” is in production and will launch in 2019 to coincide with the 50…

A new documentary film about Neil Armstrong will use home videos shot by the man himself and unseen footage from NASA to tell the celebrated U.S. astronaut’s life story. “Armstrong” is in production and will launch in 2019 to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the first moon landings. The producers of “Armstrong,” Tin Goose […]

‘First Man’: How Damien Chazelle Made That Terrifying Opening Scene

Millions of children say they want to be an astronaut when they grow up — but at what cost?

“First Man” shows just what fulfilling that dream entails, as it opens by recounting the first of many instances in which Neil Armstrong cheated death en route to set foot on the moon.

The film starts with a jolt, as we join Armstrong in the cockpit of an X-15 rocket plane, soaring to the highest layers of the Earth’s stratosphere as the plane’s metal rattles and the rushing air roars around him. The camera shakes violently, and the seats in the movie theater shake with it as the noise rumbles through the room. But then, suddenly, a moment of peace, as Armstrong reaches the point where he can se the vastness of space and the curvature of the Earth.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Fact Check: Did Neil Armstrong Really Leave That Bracelet on the Moon?

But that moment of peace is short-lived as Armstrong realizes something that will make your stomach drop. The engine’s off … and the altimeter says he’s still going up. He’s bouncing off the atmosphere, and he’s seconds away from falling out of gravity and into space. Yet, a few minutes later, Armstrong somehow finds a way to make it back to the ground, calmly walking away from the beaten-up aircraft while leaving everyone else shaken.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Fact Check: Was the Moon Landing Really That Close to Disaster?

When speaking to TheWrap, director Damien Chazelle and screenwriter Josh Singer both said that they knew they needed to get the opening scene absolutely right to send the message of what this film was about: the risks taken and the price paid by Armstrong to make history. Singer says that in addition to taking info from the James R. Hansen biography the film was adapting, he also looked into simulations and other records from NASA of the X-15 flight Armstrong did in 1962.

“In some respects, that X-15 flight is just as remarkable an achievement as the moon landing was. The plane still holds speed and altitude records for piloted flights 50 years later, and Neil’s flight was the longest of all the test flights done with that craft,” Singer said.

“We talked with people who worked on the test flights with Neil at Edwards Air Force Base, and they showed us diagrams and records from the test flight. I got to try out a simulator that really felt like a fancy video game but gave me a great idea of what it was like to try to land one of these planes,” he added.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Launches With $1.1 Million at Thursday Box Office

Once they had the information, Singer and Chazelle agreed that the best way to show the tension of the scene was to keep it entirely in the cockpit, an approach that also helped keep the film under its $60 million budget as it avoided having to depict the X-15’s flight with costly effects.

But keeping that tension also meant compressing a 12-minute test flight into a five-minute sequence that would put the audience practically inside Armstrong’s head as he flies the plane. To that end, Singer rewrote the scene four times before reaching the final draft used by Chazelle, with the drafts checked by Joe Engle, the last living pilot that took part in the X-15 program.

“Joe helped us make sure that we got the first-person perspective right, and it was more than the script,” Singer said. “He helped us when Damien was doing his prep with the storyboards and animatics. He guided us step-by-step through the process Neil would have done when flying the plane so we’d know what the cameras would focus on in the cockpit.”

Engle’s guidance and Singer’s research also helped production Nathan Crowley faithfully recreate the cockpits of the X-15 and NASA spacecrafts that Armstrong pilots in the film, with Mary Zophres designed the flight and space suits based off of archive photographs and footage from NASA and Edwards Air Force Base.

From there, Chazelle and cinematographer Linus Sandgren filmed the scene in 16mm camera to give it a feel similar to NASA test footage from the 1960s.

“We were able to devise a very efficient way to get everything we wanted for the test flight and for the space scenes as well,” said Chazelle.

“I remember the first time I saw some of the actual capsules and cockpits [Neil] used and thinking about how rickety they looked and how I wouldn’t feel the least bit assured if I flew up into space in one of them, so we all worked together from the production design to the sound team to create that sense of instability, and then we put LED screens in the windows to let the light playing off of Ryan’s face tell the story of how he was flying up into space.”

Armstrong’s 12-minute flight saw him ascend to 207,000 feet above Los Angeles and travel 350 miles, the farthest and longest flight recorded by the X-15 program. Of course, as we all know, he ended up traveling much farther than that a few years later.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘First Man’ Fact Check: Was the Moon Landing Really That Close to Disaster?

‘First Man’ Fact Check: Did Neil Armstrong Really Leave That Bracelet on the Moon?

‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Millions of children say they want to be an astronaut when they grow up — but at what cost?

“First Man” shows just what fulfilling that dream entails, as it opens by recounting the first of many instances in which Neil Armstrong cheated death en route to set foot on the moon.

The film starts with a jolt, as we join Armstrong in the cockpit of an X-15 rocket plane, soaring to the highest layers of the Earth’s stratosphere as the plane’s metal rattles and the rushing air roars around him. The camera shakes violently, and the seats in the movie theater shake with it as the noise rumbles through the room. But then, suddenly, a moment of peace, as Armstrong reaches the point where he can se the vastness of space and the curvature of the Earth.

But that moment of peace is short-lived as Armstrong realizes something that will make your stomach drop. The engine’s off … and the altimeter says he’s still going up. He’s bouncing off the atmosphere, and he’s seconds away from falling out of gravity and into space. Yet, a few minutes later, Armstrong somehow finds a way to make it back to the ground, calmly walking away from the beaten-up aircraft while leaving everyone else shaken.

When speaking to TheWrap, director Damien Chazelle and screenwriter Josh Singer both said that they knew they needed to get the opening scene absolutely right to send the message of what this film was about: the risks taken and the price paid by Armstrong to make history. Singer says that in addition to taking info from the James R. Hansen biography the film was adapting, he also looked into simulations and other records from NASA of the X-15 flight Armstrong did in 1962.

“In some respects, that X-15 flight is just as remarkable an achievement as the moon landing was. The plane still holds speed and altitude records for piloted flights 50 years later, and Neil’s flight was the longest of all the test flights done with that craft,” Singer said.

“We talked with people who worked on the test flights with Neil at Edwards Air Force Base, and they showed us diagrams and records from the test flight. I got to try out a simulator that really felt like a fancy video game but gave me a great idea of what it was like to try to land one of these planes,” he added.

Once they had the information, Singer and Chazelle agreed that the best way to show the tension of the scene was to keep it entirely in the cockpit, an approach that also helped keep the film under its $60 million budget as it avoided having to depict the X-15’s flight with costly effects.

But keeping that tension also meant compressing a 12-minute test flight into a five-minute sequence that would put the audience practically inside Armstrong’s head as he flies the plane. To that end, Singer rewrote the scene four times before reaching the final draft used by Chazelle, with the drafts checked by Joe Engle, the last living pilot that took part in the X-15 program.

“Joe helped us make sure that we got the first-person perspective right, and it was more than the script,” Singer said. “He helped us when Damien was doing his prep with the storyboards and animatics. He guided us step-by-step through the process Neil would have done when flying the plane so we’d know what the cameras would focus on in the cockpit.”

Engle’s guidance and Singer’s research also helped production Nathan Crowley faithfully recreate the cockpits of the X-15 and NASA spacecrafts that Armstrong pilots in the film, with Mary Zophres designed the flight and space suits based off of archive photographs and footage from NASA and Edwards Air Force Base.

From there, Chazelle and cinematographer Linus Sandgren filmed the scene in 16mm camera to give it a feel similar to NASA test footage from the 1960s.

“We were able to devise a very efficient way to get everything we wanted for the test flight and for the space scenes as well,” said Chazelle.

“I remember the first time I saw some of the actual capsules and cockpits [Neil] used and thinking about how rickety they looked and how I wouldn’t feel the least bit assured if I flew up into space in one of them, so we all worked together from the production design to the sound team to create that sense of instability, and then we put LED screens in the windows to let the light playing off of Ryan’s face tell the story of how he was flying up into space.”

Armstrong’s 12-minute flight saw him ascend to 207,000 feet above Los Angeles and travel 350 miles, the farthest and longest flight recorded by the X-15 program. Of course, as we all know, he ended up traveling much farther than that a few years later.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'First Man' Fact Check: Was the Moon Landing Really That Close to Disaster?

'First Man' Fact Check: Did Neil Armstrong Really Leave That Bracelet on the Moon?

'First Man' Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

‘First Man’ Launches With $1.1 Million at Thursday Box Office

Universal Pictures’ “First Man” grossed $1.1 million in previews on Thursday from 2,850 theaters.

The studio is projecting an opening weekend of $15-18 million, with independent trackers pushing their expectations up to $20 million. In comparison, Tom Hanks’ “Bridge of Spies” took in $600,000 before it grossed $15.4 million its opening weekend. “Deepwater Horizon” earned $860,000 and finished with $20.2 million. “Arrival” grossed $1.4 million in previews before earning $24 million its opening weekend.

“First Man” is the followup for director Damien Chazelle after winning the Oscar for Best Director for “La La Land” last year, with Ryan Gosling from his “La La Land” team joining him.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Fact Check: Did Neil Armstrong Really Leave That Bracelet on the Moon?

Based on James R. Hansen’s detailed recounting of the Apollo 11 lunar mission, “First Man” stars Gosling as Neil Armstrong and delves into the personal life and inner mind of the famous yet very reserved astronaut, particularly how the death of his infant daughter impacted him. Claire Foy also stars as Armstrong’s wife, Janet. Josh Singer, who co-wrote “Spotlight” and “The Post,” penned the screenplay.

Produced for $60 million, “First Man” holds a “fresh” score of 89 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

“First Man” will face off against Fox’s “Bad Times at the El Royale” and “Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween” this weekend. The former is set to open in the low-to-mid teens, while the latter is looking at a $14 million opening after taking in $750,000 from 2,993 locations.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Fact Check: Was the Moon Landing Really That Close to Disaster?

“El Royale” features an ensemble cast including Jeff Bridges, Dakota Johnson, Jon Hamm, Chris Hemsworth, and Nick Offerman as a group of individuals who check in to the seedy El Royale hotel on the border of California and Nevada. Soon, secrets are revealed and bullets fly as everything goes horribly wrong.

Drew Goddard wrote and directed the film. It is rated 75 percent “fresh” on Rotten Tomatoes.

“Goosebumps 2” has Jack Black return to reprise his role as a fictionalized version of Stine, with “It” star Jeremy Ray Taylor, Caleel Harris and Ken Jeong also starring. Produced for $35 million, “Goosebumps 2” was directed by Ari Sandel and holds a score of 39 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

‘First Man’ Lifts Off This Weekend to Steep Box Office Competition

Ryan Gosling Explains His ‘Mild’ Concussion Shooting ‘First Man’ Action Scenes

Universal Pictures’ “First Man” grossed $1.1 million in previews on Thursday from 2,850 theaters.

The studio is projecting an opening weekend of $15-18 million, with independent trackers pushing their expectations up to $20 million. In comparison, Tom Hanks’ “Bridge of Spies” took in $600,000 before it grossed $15.4 million its opening weekend. “Deepwater Horizon” earned $860,000 and finished with $20.2 million. “Arrival” grossed $1.4 million in previews before earning $24 million its opening weekend.

“First Man” is the followup for director Damien Chazelle after winning the Oscar for Best Director for “La La Land” last year, with Ryan Gosling from his “La La Land” team joining him.

Based on James R. Hansen’s detailed recounting of the Apollo 11 lunar mission, “First Man” stars Gosling as Neil Armstrong and delves into the personal life and inner mind of the famous yet very reserved astronaut, particularly how the death of his infant daughter impacted him. Claire Foy also stars as Armstrong’s wife, Janet. Josh Singer, who co-wrote “Spotlight” and “The Post,” penned the screenplay.

Produced for $60 million, “First Man” holds a “fresh” score of 89 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

“First Man” will face off against Fox’s “Bad Times at the El Royale” and “Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween” this weekend. The former is set to open in the low-to-mid teens, while the latter is looking at a $14 million opening after taking in $750,000 from 2,993 locations.

“El Royale” features an ensemble cast including Jeff Bridges, Dakota Johnson, Jon Hamm, Chris Hemsworth, and Nick Offerman as a group of individuals who check in to the seedy El Royale hotel on the border of California and Nevada. Soon, secrets are revealed and bullets fly as everything goes horribly wrong.

Drew Goddard wrote and directed the film. It is rated 75 percent “fresh” on Rotten Tomatoes.

“Goosebumps 2” has Jack Black return to reprise his role as a fictionalized version of Stine, with “It” star Jeremy Ray Taylor, Caleel Harris and Ken Jeong also starring. Produced for $35 million, “Goosebumps 2” was directed by Ari Sandel and holds a score of 39 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'First Man' Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

'First Man' Lifts Off This Weekend to Steep Box Office Competition

Ryan Gosling Explains His 'Mild' Concussion Shooting 'First Man' Action Scenes

‘First Man’ Fact Check: Was the Moon Landing Really That Close to Disaster?

If you’ve seen the footage of the Apollo 11 lunar landing taken by NASA, you might think that the final moments before the Eagle landed on the moon’s surface were pretty tranquil. Damien Chazelle’s new movie “First Man” suggests it was anything but.

In their cinematic retelling of NASA’s greatest mission ever, Chazelle and screenwriter Josh Singer turned the final descent to the Moon into a dramatic race against the clock.

With Justin Hurwitz’s dramatic score playing in the background, Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and Buzz Aldrin (Corey Stoll) grip the controls as they try to settle the Eagle spacecraft down on safe terrain while a fuel meter ticks down to zero. With the meter down to just two, the craft lands as the two astronauts exhale.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

But did the Apollo crew really make it to the moon while running on fumes? The truth is that Neil and Buzz weren’t actually low on fuel…but they and NASA thought they were.

According to James R. Hansen’s official Armstrong biography on which the movie is based, post-mission analysis showed that the Eagle had more fuel than the computers had told mission control during the landing sequence. But while Neil and Buzz were flying down to the moon, the computers indicated that they had less than a minute to either land the craft or abort the mission.

For mission control, the codeword signifying 15 seconds left of fuel was “bingo,” and as the lander touched the ground, mission control was holding its breath waiting for either that signal to be given to Neil and Buzz or for the pair to inform them that “the Eagle has landed.” Fortunately, it was the latter.

Also Read: Ryan Gosling Explains His ‘Mild’ Concussion Shooting ‘First Man’ Action Scenes

“You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot,” flight controller Charlie Duke told Armstrong after the landing succeeded.

When Singer sat down to write the moon landing for “First Man,” he knew he wanted to convey to the audience how nerve-wracking it really was, even as NASA made it sound to millions watching around the world that everything was going as expected. But when he showed his first draft to NASA experts, his pages were covered in red ink.

“I wrote a first draft with all these made up lines where they’re screaming about the fuel…and I got beat up!” Singer told TheWrap. “I like to show my drafts to NASA experts and I got a lot of pushback on that scene specifically, so I knew I had to really hunker down to show how it really happened.”

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Lifts Off This Weekend to Steep Box Office Competition

The fuel gauge seen in the film wasn’t actually in the Eagle, but was added in the film as a way to show the stress of the fuel situation without having to explain what the mission control jargon meant.

“In the final script, I just had the fuel gauge shown and Buzz says, ’94 seconds to bingo,’ and that was enough to show what ‘bingo’ meant,” Singer said. “It’s one of those scenes where you know how harrowing the situation is if you understand everything that’s going on. Once we did the explanation, the sheer visceral nature of seeing this craft land on the moon did the rest.”

It’s one last armrest-clenching scene in a movie full of them, but it makes the chilling serenity of Armstrong’s moonwalk — shown in high-definition rather than the rest of the film’s grainy film quality — all the more powerful.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Ryan Gosling Explains His ‘Mild’ Concussion Shooting ‘First Man’ Action Scenes

Damien Chazelle Aims to Show Neil Armstrong’s ‘Normalcy and Quotidian Reality’ in ‘First Man’ (Video)

If you’ve seen the footage of the Apollo 11 lunar landing taken by NASA, you might think that the final moments before the Eagle landed on the moon’s surface were pretty tranquil. Damien Chazelle’s new movie “First Man” suggests it was anything but.

In their cinematic retelling of NASA’s greatest mission ever, Chazelle and screenwriter Josh Singer turned the final descent to the Moon into a dramatic race against the clock.

With Justin Hurwitz’s dramatic score playing in the background, Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) and Buzz Aldrin (Corey Stoll) grip the controls as they try to settle the Eagle spacecraft down on safe terrain while a fuel meter ticks down to zero. With the meter down to just two, the craft lands as the two astronauts exhale.

But did the Apollo crew really make it to the moon while running on fumes? The truth is that Neil and Buzz weren’t actually low on fuel…but they and NASA thought they were.

According to James R. Hansen’s official Armstrong biography on which the movie is based, post-mission analysis showed that the Eagle had more fuel than the computers had told mission control during the landing sequence. But while Neil and Buzz were flying down to the moon, the computers indicated that they had less than a minute to either land the craft or abort the mission.

For mission control, the codeword signifying 15 seconds left of fuel was “bingo,” and as the lander touched the ground, mission control was holding its breath waiting for either that signal to be given to Neil and Buzz or for the pair to inform them that “the Eagle has landed.” Fortunately, it was the latter.

“You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue. We’re breathing again. Thanks a lot,” flight controller Charlie Duke told Armstrong after the landing succeeded.

When Singer sat down to write the moon landing for “First Man,” he knew he wanted to convey to the audience how nerve-wracking it really was, even as NASA made it sound to millions watching around the world that everything was going as expected. But when he showed his first draft to NASA experts, his pages were covered in red ink.

“I wrote a first draft with all these made up lines where they’re screaming about the fuel…and I got beat up!” Singer told TheWrap. “I like to show my drafts to NASA experts and I got a lot of pushback on that scene specifically, so I knew I had to really hunker down to show how it really happened.”

The fuel gauge seen in the film wasn’t actually in the Eagle, but was added in the film as a way to show the stress of the fuel situation without having to explain what the mission control jargon meant.

“In the final script, I just had the fuel gauge shown and Buzz says, ’94 seconds to bingo,’ and that was enough to show what ‘bingo’ meant,” Singer said. “It’s one of those scenes where you know how harrowing the situation is if you understand everything that’s going on. Once we did the explanation, the sheer visceral nature of seeing this craft land on the moon did the rest.”

It’s one last armrest-clenching scene in a movie full of them, but it makes the chilling serenity of Armstrong’s moonwalk — shown in high-definition rather than the rest of the film’s grainy film quality — all the more powerful.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'First Man' Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Ryan Gosling Explains His 'Mild' Concussion Shooting 'First Man' Action Scenes

Damien Chazelle Aims to Show Neil Armstrong's 'Normalcy and Quotidian Reality' in 'First Man' (Video)

‘First Man’ Fact Check: Did Neil Armstrong Really Leave That Bracelet on the Moon?

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen “First Man.”)

“First Man” is a retelling of one of the biggest moments in history, as well as a portrait of the reclusive man who became the first to walk on the moon.

Damien Chazelle’s drama starring Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong focuses more on the home life of the astronaut as he prepared for his dangerous missions into space.

That includes delving into the 1962 death of his daughter, Karen, of a malignant brain tumor at age 2. Throughout the movie, Armstrong is seen holding his daughter’s bracelet — and even takes it to the moon and throws it into a giant crater there before returning home.

But how factual is that part? Did Armstrong really throw his daughter’s bracelet into the crater?

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Lifts Off This Weekend to Steep Box Office Competition

Long story short, no one really knows. According to an individual with knowledge of the project, Armstrong never talked about it but his sister feels that he might have done so, given that he had 11 minutes alone on the moon — mostly exploring what is known as the East Crater — where no one knows exactly what he did.

Screenwriter Josh Singer told TheWrap that he included the scene based on a conjecture formed by James R. Hansen, who wrote the biography, “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong,” on which the movie is based.

“For Jim, after spending two years pursuing Armstrong and spending hours interviewing him and Janet [his wife] and his sister and everybody else, Jim started to get the idea that maybe Neil left something personal on the moon,” Singer said.

“Leaving tokens on the moon for loved ones or lost ones was something that was regularly done. So Jim started to wonder if Neil left anything that belonged to Karen behind and started looking through the manifest for Neil’s personal property kit and Neil said he had lost it,” Singer said. “That didn’t sound like Neil, and in fact he hadn’t lost it. It’s in the Purdue archives and it’s in fact being kept under seal until 2022 or something. But perhaps he had misplaced, and it still felt odd.”

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

“Did he take something of Karen with him to the Moon?” Armstrong’s sister June asked Hansen rhetorically in the book. “Oh, I dearly hope so.”

While he did take his wife Janet’s olive branch pin to the moon, there’s also no evidence he brought anything for his two sons.

“I assumed he had taken things to give to the boys later, but I don’t believe he has ever given them anything,” Janet told Hansen. “Neil can be thoughtful, but he does not give much time to being thoughtful, or at least to expressing it.”

Buzz Aldrin and Armstrong did take personal kits to the moon, although Armstrong “never released any information about the contents of his PPK.”

“More concerned about getting every necessary object inside the LM, the astronauts almost forgot to leave a small packet of memorial items on the lunar surface,” the book reads. “Aldrin recalls the near oversight: ‘We were so busy that I was halfway up the ladder before Neil asked me if I had remembered to leave the mementos we had brought along. I had completely forgotten. What we had hoped to make into a brief ceremony, had there been time, ended almost as an afterthought. I reached into my shoulder pocket, pulled the packet out and tossed it onto the surface.’ The packet contained two Soviet-made medals, in honor of deceases cosmonauts Yuri Gagarin, the first human to orbit the Earth, who died in a MiG-15 accident in March 1967; and Vladimir Komarov, killed a month after Gagarin at the conclusion of his Soyuz 1 flight when his spacecraft’s descent parachute failed to open. Also in the packet was an Apollo 1 patch commemorating Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee. Also inside was a small gold olive-branch pin, symbolic of the peaceful nature of the American Moon landing program. The token was identical to the pins that the three Apollo 11 astronauts were carrying as gifts from their wives.”

“I didn’t bring anything else for myself,” Armstrong said. “At least not that I can remember.” Janet Armstrong said her husband “didn’t ask” if she wanted to send anything.

Also Read: The Evolution of Ryan Gosling: From ‘Mickey Mouse Club’ to ‘First Man’ (Photos)

“I don’t think we really wanted to talk totally open about what it was,” Aldrin said in the book. “So it was sort of guarded.” He then said Armstrong straightened out the packet that had some dust on it after landing to Armstrong’s right.

Hansen noted that Armstrong said he would reveal the contents of his package for the biography, but was “unable to find the manifest among his many papers.” All he said was, “in my PPK I had some Apollo 11 medallions, some jewelry for my wife and mother [simply the gold olive branch pin for each], and some things for other people.”

What’s most clear, however, is that Armstrong took pieces of the Wright brothers’ historic flyer with him that he arranged with the U.S. Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio. The book also noted he took along his college fraternity pin from Purdue, which he later donated to the Phi Delta Theta headquarters in Oxford, Ohio.

Also Read: Ryan Gosling Explains His ‘Mild’ Concussion Shooting ‘First Man’ Action Scenes

Singer said that given Hansen’s conjecture and accounts from Janet Armstrong and Armstrong’s sister, they felt they could take the license to include Karen’s bracelet.

“We felt this responsibility to him and to the accuracy of the story to do this right because some of the things we put in the script were quite provocative,” he explained. “I never would have taken license and made up the bracelet from whole cloth.”

Armstrong died in 2012 due to complications after heart bypass surgery.

“First Man” also stars Claire Foy, Pablo Schreiber, Jason Clarke, Corey Stoll, Kyle Chandler and Christopher Abbott, and hits theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ryan Gosling’s ‘First Man’ Lands Early Raves: ‘Nobody Has Taken Us to Space This Way Before’

‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in ‘First Man’ Trailer (Video)

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen “First Man.”)

“First Man” is a retelling of one of the biggest moments in history, as well as a portrait of the reclusive man who became the first to walk on the moon.

Damien Chazelle’s drama starring Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong focuses more on the home life of the astronaut as he prepared for his dangerous missions into space.

That includes delving into the 1962 death of his daughter, Karen, of a malignant brain tumor at age 2. Throughout the movie, Armstrong is seen holding his daughter’s bracelet — and even takes it to the moon and throws it into a giant crater there before returning home.

But how factual is that part? Did Armstrong really throw his daughter’s bracelet into the crater?

Long story short, no one really knows. According to an individual with knowledge of the project, Armstrong never talked about it but his sister feels that he might have done so, given that he had 11 minutes alone on the moon — mostly exploring what is known as the East Crater — where no one knows exactly what he did.

Screenwriter Josh Singer told TheWrap that he included the scene based on a conjecture formed by James R. Hansen, who wrote the biography, “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong,” on which the movie is based.

“For Jim, after spending two years pursuing Armstrong and spending hours interviewing him and Janet [his wife] and his sister and everybody else, Jim started to get the idea that maybe Neil left something personal on the moon,” Singer said.

“Leaving tokens on the moon for loved ones or lost ones was something that was regularly done. So Jim started to wonder if Neil left anything that belonged to Karen behind and started looking through the manifest for Neil’s personal property kit and Neil said he had lost it,” Singer said. “That didn’t sound like Neil, and in fact he hadn’t lost it. It’s in the Purdue archives and it’s in fact being kept under seal until 2022 or something. But perhaps he had misplaced, and it still felt odd.”

“Did he take something of Karen with him to the Moon?” Armstrong’s sister June asked Hansen rhetorically in the book. “Oh, I dearly hope so.”

While he did take his wife Janet’s olive branch pin to the moon, there’s also no evidence he brought anything for his two sons.

“I assumed he had taken things to give to the boys later, but I don’t believe he has ever given them anything,” Janet told Hansen. “Neil can be thoughtful, but he does not give much time to being thoughtful, or at least to expressing it.”

Buzz Aldrin and Armstrong did take personal kits to the moon, although Armstrong “never released any information about the contents of his PPK.”

“More concerned about getting every necessary object inside the LM, the astronauts almost forgot to leave a small packet of memorial items on the lunar surface,” the book reads. “Aldrin recalls the near oversight: ‘We were so busy that I was halfway up the ladder before Neil asked me if I had remembered to leave the mementos we had brought along. I had completely forgotten. What we had hoped to make into a brief ceremony, had there been time, ended almost as an afterthought. I reached into my shoulder pocket, pulled the packet out and tossed it onto the surface.’ The packet contained two Soviet-made medals, in honor of deceases cosmonauts Yuri Gagarin, the first human to orbit the Earth, who died in a MiG-15 accident in March 1967; and Vladimir Komarov, killed a month after Gagarin at the conclusion of his Soyuz 1 flight when his spacecraft’s descent parachute failed to open. Also in the packet was an Apollo 1 patch commemorating Gus Grissom, Ed White and Roger Chaffee. Also inside was a small gold olive-branch pin, symbolic of the peaceful nature of the American Moon landing program. The token was identical to the pins that the three Apollo 11 astronauts were carrying as gifts from their wives.”

“I didn’t bring anything else for myself,” Armstrong said. “At least not that I can remember.” Janet Armstrong said her husband “didn’t ask” if she wanted to send anything.

“I don’t think we really wanted to talk totally open about what it was,” Aldrin said in the book. “So it was sort of guarded.” He then said Armstrong straightened out the packet that had some dust on it after landing to Armstrong’s right.

Hansen noted that Armstrong said he would reveal the contents of his package for the biography, but was “unable to find the manifest among his many papers.” All he said was, “in my PPK I had some Apollo 11 medallions, some jewelry for my wife and mother [simply the gold olive branch pin for each], and some things for other people.”

What’s most clear, however, is that Armstrong took pieces of the Wright brothers’ historic flyer with him that he arranged with the U.S. Air Force Museum in Dayton, Ohio. The book also noted he took along his college fraternity pin from Purdue, which he later donated to the Phi Delta Theta headquarters in Oxford, Ohio.

Singer said that given Hansen’s conjecture and accounts from Janet Armstrong and Armstrong’s sister, they felt they could take the license to include Karen’s bracelet.

“We felt this responsibility to him and to the accuracy of the story to do this right because some of the things we put in the script were quite provocative,” he explained. “I never would have taken license and made up the bracelet from whole cloth.”

Armstrong died in 2012 due to complications after heart bypass surgery.

“First Man” also stars Claire Foy, Pablo Schreiber, Jason Clarke, Corey Stoll, Kyle Chandler and Christopher Abbott, and hits theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ryan Gosling's 'First Man' Lands Early Raves: 'Nobody Has Taken Us to Space This Way Before'

'First Man' Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in 'First Man' Trailer (Video)

‘First Man’ Review: Damien Chazelle & Ryan Gosling Land Another Triumph

Damien Chazelle proves himself to be one of the more versatile directors around, following Oscar-nominated hits like Whiplash and La La Land by tackling a completely different genre — outer space — and succeeding admirably in bringing the s…

Damien Chazelle proves himself to be one of the more versatile directors around, following Oscar-nominated hits like Whiplash and La La Land by tackling a completely different genre — outer space — and succeeding admirably in bringing the story of Apollo 11’s first man on the moon, Neil Armstrong, to life in the appropriately titled First Man. As I say in my video review above, this area is not new to Hollywood and has been favorably filmed with such Best Picture nominees…

Damien Chazelle Aims to Show Neil Armstrong’s ‘Normalcy and Quotidian Reality’ in ‘First Man’ (Video)

With historical space drama “First Man,” Damien Chazelle said it was important to show Neil Armstrong’s down-to-earth, “quotidian reality” while still showcasing his stellar achievements of flying to the moon.

“I think the thing that interested me the most was finding out how difficult this period of Neil’s life was,” Chazelle told TheWrap at the Toronto International Film Festival. “Growing up, I thought of the moon landing as this great success story and I think the history of it has been cast in this glow that lives in the aftermath of the success. But when you unwind and look back… I got a sense of such sacrifice, such loss, such hardships, such trauma at times, that made me ask questions that I tried to ask in earlier movies as well: What the cost of a goal is and what the worth of a goal is, and there’s no more famous goal than landing someone on the moon.”

“First Man” stars Ryan Gosling as Armstrong, and also stars Claire Foy, Kyle Chandler, Jason Clarke, Corey Stoll and Pablo Schreiber.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Expected to Launch to $20 Million Box Office Opening

Josh Singer, who wrote the screenplay for the film that’s already gaining awards buzz, said that initially, a film about Neil Armstrong kind of sounded “bland,” but he soon realized otherwise.

“But when you get into the detail of what you had to deal with, I was just blown away,” said Singer. “The amount of loss, the amount of sacrifice, the amount of failure… seeing these failures in and out throughout this story just made it all the more inspiring.”

Ultimately, what the filmmakers wanted to achieve with the drama was portraying Armstrong’s family life while not taking away from his massive achievement of being the first man to walk on the moon.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Gets Bigger and Bolder in Toronto IMAX Premiere

“What fascinated us the most and what we wanted to keep getting at was again that sense of reality, that sense of bringing it all down to earth, creating family scenes and dynamic and show how terrifying and visceral these missions would be,” added Chazelle. “There was a normalcy and quotidian reality at the heart of this.”

Lastly, the filmmaker said that, for most of the people growing up in the Houston area near NASA, “their parents were just doing their jobs — they weren’t making history.”

Watch the video above.

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Toronto So Far: ‘First Man’ and ‘A Star Is Born’ Lead a Crop of Films With Heart and Dazzle

With historical space drama “First Man,” Damien Chazelle said it was important to show Neil Armstrong’s down-to-earth, “quotidian reality” while still showcasing his stellar achievements of flying to the moon.

“I think the thing that interested me the most was finding out how difficult this period of Neil’s life was,” Chazelle told TheWrap at the Toronto International Film Festival. “Growing up, I thought of the moon landing as this great success story and I think the history of it has been cast in this glow that lives in the aftermath of the success. But when you unwind and look back… I got a sense of such sacrifice, such loss, such hardships, such trauma at times, that made me ask questions that I tried to ask in earlier movies as well: What the cost of a goal is and what the worth of a goal is, and there’s no more famous goal than landing someone on the moon.”

“First Man” stars Ryan Gosling as Armstrong, and also stars Claire Foy, Kyle Chandler, Jason Clarke, Corey Stoll and Pablo Schreiber.

Josh Singer, who wrote the screenplay for the film that’s already gaining awards buzz, said that initially, a film about Neil Armstrong kind of sounded “bland,” but he soon realized otherwise.

“But when you get into the detail of what you had to deal with, I was just blown away,” said Singer. “The amount of loss, the amount of sacrifice, the amount of failure… seeing these failures in and out throughout this story just made it all the more inspiring.”

Ultimately, what the filmmakers wanted to achieve with the drama was portraying Armstrong’s family life while not taking away from his massive achievement of being the first man to walk on the moon.

“What fascinated us the most and what we wanted to keep getting at was again that sense of reality, that sense of bringing it all down to earth, creating family scenes and dynamic and show how terrifying and visceral these missions would be,” added Chazelle. “There was a normalcy and quotidian reality at the heart of this.”

Lastly, the filmmaker said that, for most of the people growing up in the Houston area near NASA, “their parents were just doing their jobs — they weren’t making history.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Green Book' Wins Toronto Film Festival's People's Choice Award

Toronto 2018: Here's Every Movie Sold So Far, From 'Wild Rose' to 'Stan & Ollie'

Toronto So Far: 'First Man' and 'A Star Is Born' Lead a Crop of Films With Heart and Dazzle

Neil Armstrong’s Sons, Director Damien Chazelle Defend Absence of Flag-Planting Scene in ‘First Man’

Neil Armstrong’s sons and director Damien Chazelle have defended the absence of a flag-planting scene in the movie “First Man,” which details the 1969 moon landing. Rick Armstrong and Mark Armstrong released a statement jointly with &…

Neil Armstrong’s sons and director Damien Chazelle have defended the absence of a flag-planting scene in the movie “First Man,” which details the 1969 moon landing. Rick Armstrong and Mark Armstrong released a statement jointly with “First Man” author James R. Hansen on Friday in the wake of claims that the lack of the flag […]

‘First Man’ Film Review: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle Slip the Surly Bonds of Earth

Those of us born in the late 1960s and beyond have always taken the Moon landing as a great accomplishment, yes, but also as something of a fait accompli. In his dynamic follow-up to “La La Land,” director Damien Chazelle reminds us that space exploration has always been risky and terrifying, with men closing themselves inside tiny metal machines that were created by other men, held together by rivets, and prone to a million mishaps.

From the heart-in-your-throat cold open, in which pilot Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) takes a craft above the atmosphere but then struggles to bring it back down to Earth, to Armstrong’s eventual “giant leap for mankind,” “First Man” depicts the great accomplishments of NASA as huge gambles; like the best historical dramas, “First Man” creates suspense over events whose outcome we already know. The U.S. government might have been driven by its desire not to let the Soviets win the space race, but the astronauts and the engineers who made these missions happen were far more interested in scientific progress and in their own survival.

Both screenwriter Josh Singer (“Spotlight”), adapting the book by James R. Hansen, and cinematographer Linus Sandgren (“Battle of the Sexes”) know when to tell this story in close-up, and when to pull out for a wider look. For much of the film, it’s an intimate portrait of Armstrong, a civilian engineer and pilot driven to join the Gemini space program even as he’s haunted by the death of his young daughter Karen from cancer. (After Mercury took us into space and before Apollo got us to the moon, Gemini helped perfect maneuvers that made Apollo possible.)

Watch Video: Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in ‘First Man’ Trailer

Getting inside the reticent Armstrong is certainly a challenge — per the film, he never talked about Karen, not even to wife Jan (Claire Foy) — but Gosling gives us glimpses into what drove this pioneer, whether it’s in his love of the math required to figure out thrust in space or in his relaxed moments around Jan and their sons. (It’s Jan who forces him to talk to the boys before he takes off on his moon mission; when they ask him questions, he answers them with the same reluctance he shows in press conferences.)

But “First Man” also acknowledges that the space program unfolded in a larger context: We see Vietnam on the news, talk-show footage of Kurt Vonnegut wondering if NASA’s budget might have been better spent on “a habitable New York,” and a montage set to Gil Scott-Heron’s epic track “Whitey’s on the Moon” (which wasn’t written until after the moon landing, granted, but it still works here).

The notion of how frightening it must have been inside those space capsules has been explored before, most notably in “The Right Stuff,” but Chazelle takes us further; when Armstrong climbs into Gemini 8 and it blasts off into the heavens, we’ve never felt this claustrophobia or listened to the creaking of the metal or felt the thrust of the rockets quite this way before in a movie. And no sooner do Armstrong and co-pilot Dave Scott (Christopher Abbott) feel the satisfaction of finding and docking with the Agena target vehicle than the two of them go hurtling through space, out of control, with Armstrong only just managing to stabilize the capsule before blacking out.

See Photos: Mickey Mouse Club: 10 Other Mouseketeers Who Made It Big, From Ryan Gosling to Britney Spears

Gosling is fine here, although Armstrong’s emotional armor mostly leaves the actor playing a variation on his character in “Drive,” and except for one moment in which her British accent comes peeking out, Foy brings emotional power to a woman who has been mostly sidelined by history, keeping a brave face at home for her children while constantly worrying that her husband, like so many of his peers, just won’t come home one day.

(Foy’s Oscar-clip moment is admittedly delectable; she dresses down Kyle Chandler as Deke Slayton, who cuts off Jan’s access to the Gemini 8 radio feed when it looks like they won’t make it back. She tells him that, for all of NASA’s procedures and protocols, they are ultimately just boys making models out of balsa wood.)

“First Man” gives a bevy of talented character actors (including Ciarán Hinds, Pablo Schreiber, Ethan Embry, Jason Clarke, Shea Whigham, Cory Michael Smith and Patrick Fugit) the opportunity to step into the buzz cuts and boxy suits of the era; Corey Stoll’s cynical, mouthy Buzz Aldrin makes for an interesting foil to the hero. (“I’m just saying what you’re thinking,” says Aldrin, to which Armstrong tersely replies, “Maybe you shouldn’t.”) Lukas Haas as Mike Collins, the third astronaut on the Apollo 11 mission, doesn’t get a lot of dialogue, but the actor is enough of an old pro to communicate volumes with just his face.

Also Read: Damien Chazelle Drama Picked Up to Series at Apple

Overall, it’s an impressively mounted film, from the seamless visual effects to the score by Justin Hurwitz, which is flexible enough to accentuate both the film’s tension and its earthbound humanity, to the always exquisite editing by Tom Cross (“Whiplash”), which plays a key role in establishing the characters, the stakes and even the passage of time.

Space nerds will swoon for the vintage tech, and for the re-creation of historic moments both large and small. And in the grander sense, “First Man” reminds us — in an era of “truth isn’t truth,” “alternative facts,” and established science being treated like an opinion — that there was a time not all that long ago in which we (the taxpaying public, not just some bored billionaire) were capable of sending people into space and to the moon and back again. And we did it, to quote JFK, “not because it was easy, but because it was hard.” In an era of widespread hopelessness, it’s a lesson worth remembering.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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NASA’s Job Listing for Planetary Protection Officer Draws Aww-some Response From 9-Year-Old

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Ryan Gosling, Donald Glover Screw Up Their Lines in ‘SNL’ Blooper Reel (Video)

Those of us born in the late 1960s and beyond have always taken the Moon landing as a great accomplishment, yes, but also as something of a fait accompli. In his dynamic follow-up to “La La Land,” director Damien Chazelle reminds us that space exploration has always been risky and terrifying, with men closing themselves inside tiny metal machines that were created by other men, held together by rivets, and prone to a million mishaps.

From the heart-in-your-throat cold open, in which pilot Neil Armstrong (Ryan Gosling) takes a craft above the atmosphere but then struggles to bring it back down to Earth, to Armstrong’s eventual “giant leap for mankind,” “First Man” depicts the great accomplishments of NASA as huge gambles; like the best historical dramas, “First Man” creates suspense over events whose outcome we already know. The U.S. government might have been driven by its desire not to let the Soviets win the space race, but the astronauts and the engineers who made these missions happen were far more interested in scientific progress and in their own survival.

Both screenwriter Josh Singer (“Spotlight”), adapting the book by James R. Hansen, and cinematographer Linus Sandgren (“Battle of the Sexes”) know when to tell this story in close-up, and when to pull out for a wider look. For much of the film, it’s an intimate portrait of Armstrong, a civilian engineer and pilot driven to join the Gemini space program even as he’s haunted by the death of his young daughter Karen from cancer. (After Mercury took us into space and before Apollo got us to the moon, Gemini helped perfect maneuvers that made Apollo possible.)

Getting inside the reticent Armstrong is certainly a challenge — per the film, he never talked about Karen, not even to wife Jan (Claire Foy) — but Gosling gives us glimpses into what drove this pioneer, whether it’s in his love of the math required to figure out thrust in space or in his relaxed moments around Jan and their sons. (It’s Jan who forces him to talk to the boys before he takes off on his moon mission; when they ask him questions, he answers them with the same reluctance he shows in press conferences.)

But “First Man” also acknowledges that the space program unfolded in a larger context: We see Vietnam on the news, talk-show footage of Kurt Vonnegut wondering if NASA’s budget might have been better spent on “a habitable New York,” and a montage set to Gil Scott-Heron’s epic track “Whitey’s on the Moon” (which wasn’t written until after the moon landing, granted, but it still works here).

The notion of how frightening it must have been inside those space capsules has been explored before, most notably in “The Right Stuff,” but Chazelle takes us further; when Armstrong climbs into Gemini 8 and it blasts off into the heavens, we’ve never felt this claustrophobia or listened to the creaking of the metal or felt the thrust of the rockets quite this way before in a movie. And no sooner do Armstrong and co-pilot Dave Scott (Christopher Abbott) feel the satisfaction of finding and docking with the Agena target vehicle than the two of them go hurtling through space, out of control, with Armstrong only just managing to stabilize the capsule before blacking out.

Gosling is fine here, although Armstrong’s emotional armor mostly leaves the actor playing a variation on his character in “Drive,” and except for one moment in which her British accent comes peeking out, Foy brings emotional power to a woman who has been mostly sidelined by history, keeping a brave face at home for her children while constantly worrying that her husband, like so many of his peers, just won’t come home one day.

(Foy’s Oscar-clip moment is admittedly delectable; she dresses down Kyle Chandler as Deke Slayton, who cuts off Jan’s access to the Gemini 8 radio feed when it looks like they won’t make it back. She tells him that, for all of NASA’s procedures and protocols, they are ultimately just boys making models out of balsa wood.)

“First Man” gives a bevy of talented character actors (including Ciarán Hinds, Pablo Schreiber, Ethan Embry, Jason Clarke, Shea Whigham, Cory Michael Smith and Patrick Fugit) the opportunity to step into the buzz cuts and boxy suits of the era; Corey Stoll’s cynical, mouthy Buzz Aldrin makes for an interesting foil to the hero. (“I’m just saying what you’re thinking,” says Aldrin, to which Armstrong tersely replies, “Maybe you shouldn’t.”) Lukas Haas as Mike Collins, the third astronaut on the Apollo 11 mission, doesn’t get a lot of dialogue, but the actor is enough of an old pro to communicate volumes with just his face.

Overall, it’s an impressively mounted film, from the seamless visual effects to the score by Justin Hurwitz, which is flexible enough to accentuate both the film’s tension and its earthbound humanity, to the always exquisite editing by Tom Cross (“Whiplash”), which plays a key role in establishing the characters, the stakes and even the passage of time.

Space nerds will swoon for the vintage tech, and for the re-creation of historic moments both large and small. And in the grander sense, “First Man” reminds us — in an era of “truth isn’t truth,” “alternative facts,” and established science being treated like an opinion — that there was a time not all that long ago in which we (the taxpaying public, not just some bored billionaire) were capable of sending people into space and to the moon and back again. And we did it, to quote JFK, “not because it was easy, but because it was hard.” In an era of widespread hopelessness, it’s a lesson worth remembering.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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NASA's Job Listing for Planetary Protection Officer Draws Aww-some Response From 9-Year-Old

NASA Responds to InfoWars Claim: We Don't Have Child Sex Slaves on Mars

Ryan Gosling, Donald Glover Screw Up Their Lines in 'SNL' Blooper Reel (Video)

Neil Armstrong Biopic ‘First Man’ to Open 2018 Venice Film Festival

Director Damien Chazelle’s “First Man” will be the opening-night film at the 2018 Venice International Film Festival, TheWrap has confirmed.

It will be the second consecutive Venice opening for Chazelle, whose 2016 Oscar nominee “La La Land” premiered in Venice.

“First Man” stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong, the U.S. astronaut who became the first man to walk on the moon. It is based on the Armstrong biography by James R. Hansen, with a script from Josh Singer. Universal has scheduled its theatrical release for October 12, in the thick of an awards season in which it is considered a strong contender sight unseen.

Also Read: Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in ‘First Man’ Trailer (Video)

The Venice premiere will take place on August 29, at the beginning of the 75th anniversary edition of the festival.

The rest of the Venice lineup will be announced on July 25, one day after the Toronto International Film Festival announces its 2018 lineup.

Variety first reported the news.

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Director Damien Chazelle’s “First Man” will be the opening-night film at the 2018 Venice International Film Festival, TheWrap has confirmed.

It will be the second consecutive Venice opening for Chazelle, whose 2016 Oscar nominee “La La Land” premiered in Venice.

“First Man” stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong, the U.S. astronaut who became the first man to walk on the moon. It is based on the Armstrong biography by James R. Hansen, with a script from Josh Singer. Universal has scheduled its theatrical release for October 12, in the thick of an awards season in which it is considered a strong contender sight unseen.

The Venice premiere will take place on August 29, at the beginning of the 75th anniversary edition of the festival.

The rest of the Venice lineup will be announced on July 25, one day after the Toronto International Film Festival announces its 2018 lineup.

Variety first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Netflix Orders Damien Chazelle's Musical Drama Series 'The Eddy'

How Damien Chazelle Pulled Off the Big, Bold Musical 'La La Land'

Ryan Gosling, Donald Glover Screw Up Their Lines in 'SNL' Blooper Reel (Video)

‘First Man’ Trailer: Ryan Gosling & Damien Chazelle Take One Giant Leap With Neil Armstrong Pic

“We’ve chosen a job so difficult, requiring so many technological developments, we’re gonna have to start from scratch.” So says Deke Slayton (Kyle Chandler), the original Mercury Seven astronaut who eventually had to pick who w…

“We’ve chosen a job so difficult, requiring so many technological developments, we’re gonna have to start from scratch.” So says Deke Slayton (Kyle Chandler), the original Mercury Seven astronaut who eventually had to pick who would be the first human being to walk on the moon. “Only after we’ve mastered these tasks do we consider trying to land on the moon.” Here’s the first trailer for First Man, starring Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong, who famously got that gig. Damien…

Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in ‘First Man’ Trailer (Video)

Ryan Gosling and “La La Land” director Damien Chazelle reteam in “First Man,” the riveting true story of astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon — or, as Universal calls it in its new trailer released Friday night, “one of the most dangerous missions in history.”

The clip features Gosling as Armstrong, battling the fear of what could happen if something goes wrong in the flight to the moon. “We need to fail down here so we don’t fail up there,” he says to his NASA colleagues.

As ominous music sets the mood, Armstrong and his wife (played by Claire Foy) tell their two sons about the Apollo 11 spaceflight. “Do you think you’re coming back?” asks one boy. “There are risks but we have every intention of coming back,” Gosling’s Armstrong reassures.

Also Read: Ryan Gosling Blasts Off as Neil Armstrong in ‘First Man’ Trailer (Video)

The Universal picture will specifically cover Armstrong’s life from 1961-1969, and is described as a “visceral, first-person account” that explores the sacrifices and the cost — on Neil and on the nation.”

The cast also includes Corey Stoll as Buzz Aldrin, Kyle Chandler as Deke Slayton and Pablo Schreiber as Jim Lovell, the commander of Apollo 13 who said the infamous “Houston, we’ve had a problem.”

“First Man” will hit theaters October 12.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ryan Gosling Boards Damien Chazelle’s Neil Armstrong Biopic ‘First Man’

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Ryan Gosling and “La La Land” director Damien Chazelle reteam in “First Man,” the riveting true story of astronaut Neil Armstrong, the first man to walk on the moon — or, as Universal calls it in its new trailer released Friday night, “one of the most dangerous missions in history.”

The clip features Gosling as Armstrong, battling the fear of what could happen if something goes wrong in the flight to the moon. “We need to fail down here so we don’t fail up there,” he says to his NASA colleagues.

As ominous music sets the mood, Armstrong and his wife (played by Claire Foy) tell their two sons about the Apollo 11 spaceflight. “Do you think you’re coming back?” asks one boy. “There are risks but we have every intention of coming back,” Gosling’s Armstrong reassures.

The Universal picture will specifically cover Armstrong’s life from 1961-1969, and is described as a “visceral, first-person account” that explores the sacrifices and the cost — on Neil and on the nation.”

The cast also includes Corey Stoll as Buzz Aldrin, Kyle Chandler as Deke Slayton and Pablo Schreiber as Jim Lovell, the commander of Apollo 13 who said the infamous “Houston, we’ve had a problem.”

“First Man” will hit theaters October 12.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ryan Gosling Boards Damien Chazelle's Neil Armstrong Biopic 'First Man'

Damien Chazelle Drama Picked Up to Series at Apple

Damien Chazelle on How Producers Guided Him Through an 'Arrogant' Phase To Make 'Whiplash'

7 Takeaways From CinemaCon 2018: Change Is Everywhere, Movies Endure

The movie exhibition business wrapped its annual CinemaCon

gathering in Las Vegas this week, and there was plenty to learn about the state of the entertainment industry and the change that is convulsing the entertainment business.

One studio had an entirely new executive team, another had to address the elephant in the room — its pending acquisition by another huge conglomerate — and the bar for entertaining the room was raised by a marching band, a video skit starring a studio mogul and … Cher.

One thing I’ll say for the movies overall — the ones coming down the pipeline about music and musicians and their journeys seem the ones with the most heart. Here are my takeaways

Also Read: Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and ‘Blindspotting,’ But Identity Crisis Looms

Marvel Studios

1. Disney is a monster.

There’s no denying the dominance of this content-creating, brand-defining machine led by Bob Iger and Alan Horn on the movie side. Never was the strategic brilliance of Iger in acquiring Marvel and Lucasfilm more clearly on display than at this year’s presentation (last year the studio barely bothered to show, it felt so confident).

Disney consistently leads the Hollywood pack in market share, has had 12 films hit $1 billion at the box office in the last six years, and looks poised to continue to do so with upcoming films including this weekend’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and the new Star Wars installment, “Solo.”

And while Marvel is a hit machine, spinning off one global superhero hit after another, the other pillars of the Disney palace are also incredibly strong – besides the “Star Wars” saga, Pixar with another “Incredibles” franchise coming, traditional animation and a whole lot of interesting realistic computer graphic-drawn movies. The one most intriguing to me is “The Lion King,” with real animals. Any excuse to bring that beloved title and music to the screen seems like a good idea. Things to worry about: what will happen to animation if John Lasseter doesn’t come back?

Also Read: ‘Mowgli’ Director Andy Serkis Promises a Darker, Bloodier ‘Jungle Book’ Sequel

Getty Images

2. Suddenly, Paramount has come back to life.

After years of moribund production and morale-sucking boardroom battles and family strife, this iconic studio finally seems to have some energy, direction and pulse. New CEO and chairman Jim Gianopulos got everybody’s attention by opening with a self-deprecating video skit, in which a “Vegas Air” flight attendant criticized the mogul for having too many vowels in his name and then did her own imitation of “A Quiet Place,” the studio’s stealth horror hit.

It was a savvy way to win over the crowd since a lot of the upcoming films on Paramount’s slate would not be out until 2019 and an entirely new executive team — Wyck Godfrey, Brian Robbins, Mireille Soria — was being introduced. The studio is counting on good will and a little patience but the overall message was clear — Paramount has a plan, is making movies at a steady clip once again and has its head back in the game.

My only real quibble: Tom Cruise spent waaaaay too much time on stage explaining his latest death-defying stunt jumping out of an airplane for “Mission: Impossible – Fallout,” but that’s because he’s Tom Cruise. At least he didn’t jump on a couch.

Also Read: ‘A Quiet Place’ Sequel in Development at Paramount Pictures

3. Universal brought the delight of movies to the room.

Universal offered a mix of drama (“First Man” is about Neil Armstrong’s journey to the moon), horror (“Halloween” with an irrepressible Jamie Lee Curtis), fantasy (Peter Jackson’s “Mortal Engine” is creating new worlds that, he promises, are like nothing we’ve ever seen) and thrillers (M. Night Shyamalan has a new one coming with Bruce Wiillis and Sam Jackson).

But even though he wasn’t in the room, it was Dwayne Johnson’s new action movie, “Skyscraper,” that seemed like something that you need to see on a massive screen, and that is likely to make your heart stop. That guy is a movie star, can we just say that?

Universal ended it all with a surprise live performance by Cher of “Fernando” by ABBA. She plays the grandmother in the sequel to “Mamma Mia.” The original was an unwatchable mess of a movie with the cheesiest performances on the planet that made a bajillion dollars. I’ll probably watch the sequel.

The great @Cher delights us all at #cinemacon with performance of Fernando by ABBA. Here’s a glimpse: @TheWrap pic.twitter.com/nKthcmHPpy

— Sharon Waxman (@sharonwaxman) April 26, 2018

Also Read: James Wan and ‘Aquaman’ Cast Offer First Look at Work-in-Progress Atlantis

4. Warner Bros. needed help, a lot of help.

The studio is in transition, now under former New Line head Toby Emmerich, and his newness showed. The presentation dragged on as one troupe of movie stars followed another, making small talk and pretending to be relaxed around stilted emcee Will Arnett. (Why bring Anne Hathaway on stage for “Ocean’s 8” if you’re not going to talk to her?)

And if “Life of the Party” with Melissa McCarthy seemed like one too many versions of the movie we’ve already seen her do (clueless fish out of water, this time she’s a mom going back to college), the ensemble film “Tag” — drama? comedy?  thriller? mystery? — about a group of friends who play a highly aggressive form of tag for a month every year was simply a hot mess.

“Crazy Rich Asians” looks like it could be a big winner, though the trailer made it hard to tell. But wait! There’s one huge redeeming movie on the Warner slate that made all of it worthwhile. Bradley Cooper brought “A Star Is Born,” his remake of the famed Barbara Streisand – Kris Kristofferson love story. And the trailer unveiled of Cooper and Lady Gaga was a revelation. The film promises a full-on love story with Gaga dropping all the makeup and pretense and bravada. Which brings us to…

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

5. Music movies rule. 

There are so many wonderful films this year about music and musicians that it’s worth pointing it out. As mentioned, “A Star Is Born” looks like it will deliver. Cooper learned to play an instrument well enough to perform.

But Fox’s upcoming “Bohemian Rhapsody” appears to be a similarly strong take on the legendary Freddy Mercury, an epic performer and rule-breaker, played by Rami Malek. And did I mention that the “Mamma Mia” sequel has Cher in it?

6. 3-D is dead.

Over four days and dozens of movies that were presented to the exhibitors in Vegas, only one movie — ONE — was in 3-D, a technology that was all the rage four or five years ago. The lone exception was “Alita,” a largely CG action movie by technology diehard James Cameron about a young female cyborg given a superhuman body. (I think that’s what it was about.)

Robert Rodriguez directed it, and I’m not entirely sure if the 3-D adds all that much to the story. But what was once supposed to be the salvation of movie theaters — adding a premium ticket price to their weekend box office haul — has mostly fizzled. Calling Jeffrey Katzenberg, who predicted otherwise.

Also Read: Enter a 3-D Jungle With ‘Jumanji’ in Virtual Reality This December

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7. And finally: Fox.

Who knows if the studio will be at CinemaCon next year? If the Disney acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox goes through, it won’t. So studio chief Stacey Snider wisely used the moment to remind the thousands of exhibitors in the room that she knew no more than they did about the future of her studio, but that she was committed to delivering great movies in the meantime.

And she backed it up with an emotional reel of Fox movies over the last 80 years, from “Titanic” to Shirley Temple to “12 Years a Slave,” reminding everyone what a contribution Fox has made to the culture. “Let’s wear our heart on our sleeves,” she urged the packed hall, choking up (and she wasn’t the only one). “Let’s celebrate the humanity that comes from discovering that we are more alike than different.”

Her words managed to overshadow the bravura, hilarious opening of the Fox presentation with Deadpool leading dancers to the song “One” from the Broadway classic “A Chorus Line.” And it was a fitting reminder that if Fox goes away, we may all be the poorer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘A Star Is Born’: Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: ‘We Face a New Transition’

Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and ‘Blindspotting,’ But Identity Crisis Looms

The movie exhibition business wrapped its annual CinemaCon

gathering in Las Vegas this week, and there was plenty to learn about the state of the entertainment industry and the change that is convulsing the entertainment business.

One studio had an entirely new executive team, another had to address the elephant in the room — its pending acquisition by another huge conglomerate — and the bar for entertaining the room was raised by a marching band, a video skit starring a studio mogul and … Cher.

One thing I’ll say for the movies overall — the ones coming down the pipeline about music and musicians and their journeys seem the ones with the most heart. Here are my takeaways

Marvel Studios

1. Disney is a monster.

There’s no denying the dominance of this content-creating, brand-defining machine led by Bob Iger and Alan Horn on the movie side. Never was the strategic brilliance of Iger in acquiring Marvel and Lucasfilm more clearly on display than at this year’s presentation (last year the studio barely bothered to show, it felt so confident).

Disney consistently leads the Hollywood pack in market share, has had 12 films hit $1 billion at the box office in the last six years, and looks poised to continue to do so with upcoming films including this weekend’s “Avengers: Infinity War” and the new Star Wars installment, “Solo.”

And while Marvel is a hit machine, spinning off one global superhero hit after another, the other pillars of the Disney palace are also incredibly strong – besides the “Star Wars” saga, Pixar with another “Incredibles” franchise coming, traditional animation and a whole lot of interesting realistic computer graphic-drawn movies. The one most intriguing to me is “The Lion King,” with real animals. Any excuse to bring that beloved title and music to the screen seems like a good idea. Things to worry about: what will happen to animation if John Lasseter doesn’t come back?

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2. Suddenly, Paramount has come back to life.

After years of moribund production and morale-sucking boardroom battles and family strife, this iconic studio finally seems to have some energy, direction and pulse. New CEO and chairman Jim Gianopulos got everybody’s attention by opening with a self-deprecating video skit, in which a “Vegas Air” flight attendant criticized the mogul for having too many vowels in his name and then did her own imitation of “A Quiet Place,” the studio’s stealth horror hit.

It was a savvy way to win over the crowd since a lot of the upcoming films on Paramount’s slate would not be out until 2019 and an entirely new executive team — Wyck Godfrey, Brian Robbins, Mireille Soria — was being introduced. The studio is counting on good will and a little patience but the overall message was clear — Paramount has a plan, is making movies at a steady clip once again and has its head back in the game.

My only real quibble: Tom Cruise spent waaaaay too much time on stage explaining his latest death-defying stunt jumping out of an airplane for “Mission: Impossible – Fallout,” but that’s because he’s Tom Cruise. At least he didn’t jump on a couch.

3. Universal brought the delight of movies to the room.

Universal offered a mix of drama (“First Man” is about Neil Armstrong’s journey to the moon), horror (“Halloween” with an irrepressible Jamie Lee Curtis), fantasy (Peter Jackson’s “Mortal Engine” is creating new worlds that, he promises, are like nothing we’ve ever seen) and thrillers (M. Night Shyamalan has a new one coming with Bruce Wiillis and Sam Jackson).

But even though he wasn’t in the room, it was Dwayne Johnson’s new action movie, “Skyscraper,” that seemed like something that you need to see on a massive screen, and that is likely to make your heart stop. That guy is a movie star, can we just say that?

Universal ended it all with a surprise live performance by Cher of “Fernando” by ABBA. She plays the grandmother in the sequel to “Mamma Mia.” The original was an unwatchable mess of a movie with the cheesiest performances on the planet that made a bajillion dollars. I’ll probably watch the sequel.

4. Warner Bros. needed help, a lot of help.

The studio is in transition, now under former New Line head Toby Emmerich, and his newness showed. The presentation dragged on as one troupe of movie stars followed another, making small talk and pretending to be relaxed around stilted emcee Will Arnett. (Why bring Anne Hathaway on stage for “Ocean’s 8” if you’re not going to talk to her?)

And if “Life of the Party” with Melissa McCarthy seemed like one too many versions of the movie we’ve already seen her do (clueless fish out of water, this time she’s a mom going back to college), the ensemble film “Tag” — drama? comedy?  thriller? mystery? — about a group of friends who play a highly aggressive form of tag for a month every year was simply a hot mess.

“Crazy Rich Asians” looks like it could be a big winner, though the trailer made it hard to tell. But wait! There’s one huge redeeming movie on the Warner slate that made all of it worthwhile. Bradley Cooper brought “A Star Is Born,” his remake of the famed Barbara Streisand – Kris Kristofferson love story. And the trailer unveiled of Cooper and Lady Gaga was a revelation. The film promises a full-on love story with Gaga dropping all the makeup and pretense and bravada. Which brings us to…

5. Music movies rule. 

There are so many wonderful films this year about music and musicians that it’s worth pointing it out. As mentioned, “A Star Is Born” looks like it will deliver. Cooper learned to play an instrument well enough to perform.

But Fox’s upcoming “Bohemian Rhapsody” appears to be a similarly strong take on the legendary Freddy Mercury, an epic performer and rule-breaker, played by Rami Malek. And did I mention that the “Mamma Mia” sequel has Cher in it?

6. 3-D is dead.

Over four days and dozens of movies that were presented to the exhibitors in Vegas, only one movie — ONE — was in 3-D, a technology that was all the rage four or five years ago. The lone exception was “Alita,” a largely CG action movie by technology diehard James Cameron about a young female cyborg given a superhuman body. (I think that’s what it was about.)

Robert Rodriguez directed it, and I’m not entirely sure if the 3-D adds all that much to the story. But what was once supposed to be the salvation of movie theaters — adding a premium ticket price to their weekend box office haul — has mostly fizzled. Calling Jeffrey Katzenberg, who predicted otherwise.

Getty Images

7. And finally: Fox.

Who knows if the studio will be at CinemaCon next year? If the Disney acquisition of most of 21st Century Fox goes through, it won’t. So studio chief Stacey Snider wisely used the moment to remind the thousands of exhibitors in the room that she knew no more than they did about the future of her studio, but that she was committed to delivering great movies in the meantime.

And she backed it up with an emotional reel of Fox movies over the last 80 years, from “Titanic” to Shirley Temple to “12 Years a Slave,” reminding everyone what a contribution Fox has made to the culture. “Let’s wear our heart on our sleeves,” she urged the packed hall, choking up (and she wasn’t the only one). “Let’s celebrate the humanity that comes from discovering that we are more alike than different.”

Her words managed to overshadow the bravura, hilarious opening of the Fox presentation with Deadpool leading dancers to the song “One” from the Broadway classic “A Chorus Line.” And it was a fitting reminder that if Fox goes away, we may all be the poorer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'A Star Is Born': Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga Nail High Notes With Trailer Debut

Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: 'We Face a New Transition'

Lionsgate Trots Out Blake Lively and 'Blindspotting,' But Identity Crisis Looms

Damien Chazelle Finds The “Fertile Terrain” Of An Industry In Upheaval – Deadline Disruptors

Damien Chazelle has never been one to take the path of least resistance. That was certainly the case when he was mounting La La Land, his ode to the musical’s golden age. At every turn he was told that a project like that, on the scale he wanted, would be an impossible sell. And yet he persevered, delivering to the fall festivals a movie that captured the hearts of all who saw it.
He was the youngest-ever winner of the Best Director Oscar in February when, at just 32, he…

Damien Chazelle has never been one to take the path of least resistance. That was certainly the case when he was mounting La La Land, his ode to the musical's golden age. At every turn he was told that a project like that, on the scale he wanted, would be an impossible sell. And yet he persevered, delivering to the fall festivals a movie that captured the hearts of all who saw it. He was the youngest-ever winner of the Best Director Oscar in February when, at just 32, he…

Ryan Gosling Boards Damien Chazelle’s Neil Armstrong Biopic ‘First Man’

Damien Chazelle and Ryan Gosling will dance again.

The “La La Land” director and star are set to reteam for “First Man,” about Neil Armstrong’s NASA mission to the moon.

The Universal picture will specifically cover Armstrong’s life from 1961-1969, and is described as a “visceral, first-person account” that explores “the sacrifices and the cost — on Neil and on the nation — of one of the most dangerous missions in history.”

Also Read: How Damien Chazelle Pulled Off the Big, Bold Musical ‘La La Land’

The script was adapted by Oscar winner Josh Singer (“Spotlight”), from James R. Hansen’s book “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong.” Hansen will serve as a co-producer.

Marty Bowen and Wyck Godfrey will produce through their Temple Hill Entertainment banner. Isaac Klausner will executive produce. Universal’s vice president of production, Sara Scott, will oversee on behalf of the studio. No production timetable has been set, an individual familiar with the project said.

Gosling and Chazelle will have plenty of quality time to prep for the undated shoot, as they make awards rounds with Gosling’s “La La” costar Emma Stone. The Lionsgate musical is Golden Globe-nominated for Best Actor Comedy for Gosling, Best Director for Chazelle, Best Actress Comedy for Stone and Best Picture Comedy or Musical.

Also Read: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Teaser Trailer: First Look at Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford Uniting (Video)

Chazelle is represented by WME, manager Gary Ungar of Exile Entertainment and attorney Don Steele of Hansen, Jacobson, Teller, Hoberman, Newman, Warren, Richman, Rush & Kaller, L.L.P.

Gosling is represented by UTA, managers Carolyn Govers of Anonymous Content and LBI Entertainment, as well as Sloane, Offer, Weber and Dern and Slate PR.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Critics Awards 2016: It’s a Tight Battle Between ‘Moonlight’ and ‘La La Land’

How Damien Chazelle Pulled Off the Big, Bold Musical ‘La La Land’

‘La La Land’ Theater Incident Sparks Audience Stampede in New York

After SAG and Golden Globes, ‘La La Land’ Is a Shakier Oscar Front-Runner

Damien Chazelle and Ryan Gosling will dance again.

The “La La Land” director and star are set to reteam for “First Man,” about Neil Armstrong’s NASA mission to the moon.

The Universal picture will specifically cover Armstrong’s life from 1961-1969, and is described as a “visceral, first-person account” that explores “the sacrifices and the cost — on Neil and on the nation — of one of the most dangerous missions in history.”

The script was adapted by Oscar winner Josh Singer (“Spotlight”), from James R. Hansen’s book “First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong.” Hansen will serve as a co-producer.

Marty Bowen and Wyck Godfrey will produce through their Temple Hill Entertainment banner. Isaac Klausner will executive produce. Universal’s vice president of production, Sara Scott, will oversee on behalf of the studio. No production timetable has been set, an individual familiar with the project said.

Gosling and Chazelle will have plenty of quality time to prep for the undated shoot, as they make awards rounds with Gosling’s “La La” costar Emma Stone. The Lionsgate musical is Golden Globe-nominated for Best Actor Comedy for Gosling, Best Director for Chazelle, Best Actress Comedy for Stone and Best Picture Comedy or Musical.

Chazelle is represented by WME, manager Gary Ungar of Exile Entertainment and attorney Don Steele of Hansen, Jacobson, Teller, Hoberman, Newman, Warren, Richman, Rush & Kaller, L.L.P.

Gosling is represented by UTA, managers Carolyn Govers of Anonymous Content and LBI Entertainment, as well as Sloane, Offer, Weber and Dern and Slate PR.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Critics Awards 2016: It's a Tight Battle Between 'Moonlight' and 'La La Land'

How Damien Chazelle Pulled Off the Big, Bold Musical 'La La Land'

'La La Land' Theater Incident Sparks Audience Stampede in New York

After SAG and Golden Globes, 'La La Land' Is a Shakier Oscar Front-Runner