Cannes 1968: The Year Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut Led Protests That Shut Down The Festival

Saturday May 18. The 1968 Cannes Film Festival was about to enter its second week when a press conference was called for 10AM in the Jean Cocteau Theater at the old Palais Croisette. Just a few yards down the road, a budding starlet was preparing to ho…

Saturday May 18. The 1968 Cannes Film Festival was about to enter its second week when a press conference was called for 10AM in the Jean Cocteau Theater at the old Palais Croisette. Just a few yards down the road, a budding starlet was preparing to hold court on the beach, imagining she would make headlines with her saucy topless photo-call. No one came. Instead, on a bright, sunny day, the world's media was crammed into a small, stuffy screening room, watching the…

Milos Forman’s ‘Loves of a Blonde’ to Open Karlovy Vary Film Festival

Milos Forman’s 1965 comedy “Loves of a Blonde” will open the 53rd edition of the Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival as part of a tribute to the Oscar-winning director of “Amadeus” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” who d…

Milos Forman’s 1965 comedy “Loves of a Blonde” will open the 53rd edition of the Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival as part of a tribute to the Oscar-winning director of “Amadeus” and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” who died this month. In a statement, KVIFF’s president Jiri Bartoska said Forman was “not only an […]

Milos Forman Appreciation: A Civilized Filmmaker Who Loved Rebels

Milos Forman, who died last week at 86, directed only 12 dramatic features, a startlingly compact résumé when you consider that his career spanned 60 years and more than a few filmmaking epochs, from the Czech New Wave of the ’60s to the New Hollywood ’70s to the post-indie ’90s. Yet almost every one of […]

Milos Forman, who died last week at 86, directed only 12 dramatic features, a startlingly compact résumé when you consider that his career spanned 60 years and more than a few filmmaking epochs, from the Czech New Wave of the ’60s to the New Hollywood ’70s to the post-indie ’90s. Yet almost every one of […]

Milos Forman Remembered: A Rebel in His Time, and for the Future

Milos Forman, who died on April 14 at the age of 86, has left behind some of the most sharply observed portraits of human behavior in cinema.

When I think of Forman’s work, my mind doesn’t necessarily go first to his two Oscar-winning juggernauts — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) or “Amadeus” (1984) — or the Czech films that garnered him worldwide acclaim in the 1960s, such as “Loves of a Blonde” (1965) or “The Firemen’s Ball” (1967). Rather, I think of the opening scene from his lesser-known comedy, “Taking Off” (1971): a series of static shots of young women, one after the other, performing songs for an off-screen producer.

Most of the women are earnest and serious; some seem awkward or shy, dressed in contemporary hippy-ish clothes; their hair is often long and frizzy. Some of these audition singers include Carly Simon, Kathy Bates (credited as Bobo Bates) and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her Jessica Harper. What is remarkable about these relatively straightforward snippets is that Forman isn’t nudging the audience for what to make of these young people, or their songs. He’s not telling the audience how to react; he’s simply presenting these young people as they are.

Also Read: Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

The first 5-10 minutes of this film paints a picture of these flower children of the Woodstock era that feels authentic, admiring and compassionate. And kind. It’s a quality in Forman’s cinema I can see throughout his career.

Forman sprang forth from the extraordinary group of filmmakers known as the Czech New Wave, most of whom were trained at the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (including Věra Chytilová, Jaromil Jireš, Ján Kadár, Jan Němec and Ivan Passer), and, like his cinematic compatriots, Forman’s early films are often political in nature, portraying figures of authority as inept and corrupt. In “The Firemen’s Ball,” the volunteer fire department in a small town decides to organize a ball in honor of their recently retired chairman.

Also Read: Milos Forman Hailed as ‘Champion of Artists’ Rights’ by Directors Guild of America

At the event, the firefighters’ committee decide to host a beauty contest and proceed to procure some of the unsuspecting young women to pose for them. The women appear hesitant, guarded, and a few are even somewhat amused by the ramshackle way they are being put on display by these old men. (Most of the actors were local to the area of Vrchlabí, where it was filmed.) The spunkiest of the young women seems to have an awareness of how ridiculous and sexist this is. She laughs and then runs off halfway through her walk for the judges, triggering a mass exodus by the other contestants, and the scene ends in comedic chaos.

Clearly, the characters who buck the system, like the young woman in “The Firemen’s Ball,” are what hold director’s greatest interest. Forman is fixed on the idea of the outsider as being the true hero of his work: Jack Nicholson’s R.P. McMurphy, Treat Williams’ George Berger, Howard E. Rollins’ Coalhouse Walker Jr., Tom Hulce’s Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Woody Harrelson’s Larry Flynt and Jim Carrey’s Andy Kaufman are all individuals that won’t fit into society’s prescribed mold for them.

Also Read: Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: ‘Genius of Cinematography’

Forman’s rebels, though clearly stemming from his Czech roots, found fertile ground in America. His two most critically and financially successful films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (adapted by Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman from Ken Kesey’s novel) and “Amadeus” (Peter Shaffer adapting his own stage play), both impeccably produced by Saul Zaentz, together garnered 13 Oscars total, including two for Forman for directing.

At his best, Forman’s greatest work (I would include the woefully underrated musical adaptation of “Hair”) shows both compassion for his characters and wry humor in the predicaments in which these characters find themselves. His work with actors is exemplary, and his filmography is flooded with memorable performances and ensemble work: from Nicholson and Louise Fletcher in “Cuckoo’s Nest” to Rollins, Elizabeth McGovern and James Cagney in “Ragtime” (1981), F. Murray Abraham and Hulce in “Amadeus,” Harrelson and Courtney Love in “The People vs. Larry Flynt” (1996), and back to Hana Brejchová in “Loves of a Blonde” and Lynn Carlin, Buck Henry, Georgia Engel and Audra Lindley in “Taking Off,” to name a few.

Cinematically, I’m just so impressed with the way he and his cinematographers captured these actors’ faces and performances. This is filmmaking that is not trying to impress you with flashy editing and swirling cameras (though the camerawork in the opening “Aquarius” number in “Hair,” accompanied by Twyla Tharp’s wonderful choreography, is a wonderful exception), it’s focused on its characters and story.

Possibly because of his lack of flash and cutting-edge technique, there is a danger that Forman’s work may not be immediately appreciated by younger filmmakers — though in this current era where young people are rising up to stand for their beliefs to their schools, their City Halls, and the world at large, Forman’s filmography is ripe for rediscovery by a new generation of rebels.

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Milos Forman, who died on April 14 at the age of 86, has left behind some of the most sharply observed portraits of human behavior in cinema.

When I think of Forman’s work, my mind doesn’t necessarily go first to his two Oscar-winning juggernauts — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) or “Amadeus” (1984) — or the Czech films that garnered him worldwide acclaim in the 1960s, such as “Loves of a Blonde” (1965) or “The Firemen’s Ball” (1967). Rather, I think of the opening scene from his lesser-known comedy, “Taking Off” (1971): a series of static shots of young women, one after the other, performing songs for an off-screen producer.

Most of the women are earnest and serious; some seem awkward or shy, dressed in contemporary hippy-ish clothes; their hair is often long and frizzy. Some of these audition singers include Carly Simon, Kathy Bates (credited as Bobo Bates) and a blink-and-you’ll-miss-her Jessica Harper. What is remarkable about these relatively straightforward snippets is that Forman isn’t nudging the audience for what to make of these young people, or their songs. He’s not telling the audience how to react; he’s simply presenting these young people as they are.

The first 5-10 minutes of this film paints a picture of these flower children of the Woodstock era that feels authentic, admiring and compassionate. And kind. It’s a quality in Forman’s cinema I can see throughout his career.

Forman sprang forth from the extraordinary group of filmmakers known as the Czech New Wave, most of whom were trained at the Film and TV School of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (including Věra Chytilová, Jaromil Jireš, Ján Kadár, Jan Němec and Ivan Passer), and, like his cinematic compatriots, Forman’s early films are often political in nature, portraying figures of authority as inept and corrupt. In “The Firemen’s Ball,” the volunteer fire department in a small town decides to organize a ball in honor of their recently retired chairman.

At the event, the firefighters’ committee decide to host a beauty contest and proceed to procure some of the unsuspecting young women to pose for them. The women appear hesitant, guarded, and a few are even somewhat amused by the ramshackle way they are being put on display by these old men. (Most of the actors were local to the area of Vrchlabí, where it was filmed.) The spunkiest of the young women seems to have an awareness of how ridiculous and sexist this is. She laughs and then runs off halfway through her walk for the judges, triggering a mass exodus by the other contestants, and the scene ends in comedic chaos.

Clearly, the characters who buck the system, like the young woman in “The Firemen’s Ball,” are what hold director’s greatest interest. Forman is fixed on the idea of the outsider as being the true hero of his work: Jack Nicholson’s R.P. McMurphy, Treat Williams’ George Berger, Howard E. Rollins’ Coalhouse Walker Jr., Tom Hulce’s Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Woody Harrelson’s Larry Flynt and Jim Carrey’s Andy Kaufman are all individuals that won’t fit into society’s prescribed mold for them.

Forman’s rebels, though clearly stemming from his Czech roots, found fertile ground in America. His two most critically and financially successful films, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (adapted by Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman from Ken Kesey’s novel) and “Amadeus” (Peter Shaffer adapting his own stage play), both impeccably produced by Saul Zaentz, together garnered 13 Oscars total, including two for Forman for directing.

At his best, Forman’s greatest work (I would include the woefully underrated musical adaptation of “Hair”) shows both compassion for his characters and wry humor in the predicaments in which these characters find themselves. His work with actors is exemplary, and his filmography is flooded with memorable performances and ensemble work: from Nicholson and Louise Fletcher in “Cuckoo’s Nest” to Rollins, Elizabeth McGovern and James Cagney in “Ragtime” (1981), F. Murray Abraham and Hulce in “Amadeus,” Harrelson and Courtney Love in “The People vs. Larry Flynt” (1996), and back to Hana Brejchová in “Loves of a Blonde” and Lynn Carlin, Buck Henry, Georgia Engel and Audra Lindley in “Taking Off,” to name a few.

Cinematically, I’m just so impressed with the way he and his cinematographers captured these actors’ faces and performances. This is filmmaking that is not trying to impress you with flashy editing and swirling cameras (though the camerawork in the opening “Aquarius” number in “Hair,” accompanied by Twyla Tharp’s wonderful choreography, is a wonderful exception), it’s focused on its characters and story.

Possibly because of his lack of flash and cutting-edge technique, there is a danger that Forman’s work may not be immediately appreciated by younger filmmakers — though in this current era where young people are rising up to stand for their beliefs to their schools, their City Halls, and the world at large, Forman’s filmography is ripe for rediscovery by a new generation of rebels.

Related stories from TheWrap:

R Lee Ermey, 'Full Metal Jacket' Actor, Dies at 74

Mitzi Shore, Comedy Store Founder and Owner, Dies at 87

Animator Isao Takahata, Co-Founder of Studio Ghibli, Dies at 82

Susan Anspach, 'Five Easy Pieces' Actress, Dies at 75

Milos Forman, ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Celebrated Non-Conformists

Milos Forman celebrated the non-conformist, lionizing the likes of Randle McMurphy, Larry Flynt, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and others who just couldn’t be bothered to give a damn about convention. But what made the director’s films great was that he also showed the toll that kind of iconoclasm takes on revolutionaries. It was something that he […]

Milos Forman celebrated the non-conformist, lionizing the likes of Randle McMurphy, Larry Flynt, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and others who just couldn’t be bothered to give a damn about convention. But what made the director’s films great was that he also showed the toll that kind of iconoclasm takes on revolutionaries. It was something that he […]

Jim Carrey, Danny DeVito, and More Pay Tribute to Miloš Forman: ‘What a Force’

The two-time Academy Award winner was 86.

Following the news that Miloš Forman has passed away at 86, tributes are pouring in to the two-time Academy Winner. Danny DeVito, who worked with him on both “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Man on the Moon,” released a statement: “He was a dear friend and I will miss his. My thoughts go out to his family. May he Rest In Peace.”

Jim Carrey, Mia Farrow, Edgar Wright, and many others shared their remembrances on Twitter.

Milos Forman Beyond the ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’: His Early Czechoslovak Films Reveal a Master of Black Comedy

No appreciation of Forman’s talent is complete without an acknowledgement of the masterful black comedies he made during the first stage of his career.

Milos Forman only made eight English-language features in five decades, but many of his contributions became synonymous with the legacy of American movies. “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” have a powerful resonance in popular culture, while later efforts “The People vs. Larry Flynt” and “Man on the Moon” showed a resilient filmmaker keen on exploring iconoclastic figures by pushing the boundaries of commercial cinema. However, in the wake of his death, no appreciation of Forman’s talent is complete without an acknowledgement of the masterful black comedies he made in the first stage of his career.

Less prophet of doom than a chronicler of contemporary despair, Forman meshed satire with realism and wielded irony as a cultural weapon. In the early ‘60s, Forman was a leading figure of the Czechoslovak New Wave by transforming the pratfalls of disaffected youth into punchlines. The humor emerged as a natural reflex — nervous laughter over the uncertainties of strange times.

Forman’s first feature, “Black Peter” (1964), meshes offbeat situational humor with a conventional coming-of-age story. Soft-spoken teen Peter (Ladislav Jakim) lands a thankless job at the local grocery store, where he’s asked to apprehend thieving shoppers. Hardly the aggressive type, he prefers to wander the hills with newfound friends. The ongoing joke of his dead-end job clashes hard with the demands of nascent responsibilities. Forman’s use of non-professional actors and real settings give the movie a documentary-like resonance. With Peter, Forman explores the early stirrings of rebellious instincts among a new generation on the brink of the enlightenment known as the Prague Spring.

In “Loves of a Blonde” (1965), meek college student Andula (Hana Brejchova) deflects the propositions of unruly soldiers only to fall for a slick, carefree musician. The naive young woman mistakes his seductive advances for sincere affection, and after she follows the hustler to his parents’ house, the puzzled elders struggle to make her leave. (Think of it as the original “Meet the Parents” with no guarantee of a happy ending.) Andula’s situation is tragic — but the circumstances reach such a high pitch of frantic absurdity that the scenario winds up as a comedy of errors anyway.

Forman’s first two features could be combined as a three-hour riff on young adulthood. These early masterpieces emerged at the forefront of a cinematic renaissance that took place in tandem with the early days of the French New Wave. Whereas Godard’s “Breathless” mocked juvenile flights of fantasy by situating its rebels in exaggerated gangster tropes, Forman showed a greater degree of empathy for his forlorn young protagonists. In both “Black Peter” and “Loves of a Blonde,” older characters deliver whiny lectures to members of a younger generation that couldn’t care less. Forman took greater issue with didacticism than irresponsibility. (No wonder he later directed the big-screen adaptation of “Hair.”)

He moved beyond that focus with a broader satiric lens in his final Czech effort, the concise 1967 comedy “The Firemen’s Ball.” This brilliant tale of bureaucratic mismanagement was banned by the Czechoslovak government at the time of Soviet dominance for its blatant anti-Socialist perspective. Its slapdash story finds a group of firefighters throwing a bash for their dying colleague, as they attempt to blend their professionalism with good-natured cheer. They mean well, but the Keystone Cops-like scenario finds them careening toward catastophe. The group’s plans literally go up in smoke, leading to a tantalizing finale that’s at once absurd and melancholic.

“The Firemen’s Ball”

All three features set the stage for the tonal complexity of Forman’s American career. The quintessential Jack Nicholson zaniness in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” oozes with a contempt for institutional control even as Jack Nicholson radiates a comedic sensibility. By siding with the hospital inmates rather than the totalitarian staff, it positions Nicholson’s R.P. McMurphy as a crazed Moses leading his team of loonies to a non-existent promised land.

None of Forman’s movies can be reduced to a single genre: Drama bleeds into comedy; exuberance leads to solemn contemplation. Forman was a cinematic poet of social decay. That meant he was well-qualified to tackle an America divided against itself — indeed, the nation could use his voice today — but as his earlier works prove, Forman’s genius transcended the boundaries of one country’s problems. His movies spoke to all of us.

Milos Forman Hailed as ‘Champion of Artists’ Rights’ by Directors Guild of America

Milos Forman was an “undeniable source of inspiration,” Directors Guild of America President Thomas Schlamme said on Saturday, following the acclaimed filmmaker’s death at the age of 86.

“Milos was truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist, and champion of artists’ rights. His contribution to the craft of directing has been an undeniable source of inspiration for generations of filmmakers,” Schlamme said in a statement. “His directorial vision deftly brought together provocative subject matter, stellar performances and haunting images to tell the stories of the universal struggle for free expression and self-determination that informed so much of his work and his life.”

Forman directed classics like “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” — winning an Academy Award for Best Director for both films. He joined the DGA in 1970, shortly after coming to the USA from Czechoslovakia, where the communist regime was cracking down on artists. Forman became the 34th recipient of the DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Distinguished Achievement in Motion Picture Direction in 2013.

“A member of the DGA’s National Board and a recipient of the DGA’s highest honor, the Lifetime Achievement Award, Milos actively championed artist’s rights throughout his career, speaking multiple times before Congress and world audiences about the importance of creative rights and artists’ protections against the violation of those rights,” continued Schlamme. “He stood up on behalf of his beloved fellow filmmakers time and again, and he believed with all his heart that creativity and artistic freedom could make a difference in the world. Now it’s up to us to prove him right. We will miss him.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: ‘Genius of Cinematography’

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman Lands DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award

Milos Forman was an “undeniable source of inspiration,” Directors Guild of America President Thomas Schlamme said on Saturday, following the acclaimed filmmaker’s death at the age of 86.

“Milos was truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist, and champion of artists’ rights. His contribution to the craft of directing has been an undeniable source of inspiration for generations of filmmakers,” Schlamme said in a statement. “His directorial vision deftly brought together provocative subject matter, stellar performances and haunting images to tell the stories of the universal struggle for free expression and self-determination that informed so much of his work and his life.”

Forman directed classics like “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” — winning an Academy Award for Best Director for both films. He joined the DGA in 1970, shortly after coming to the USA from Czechoslovakia, where the communist regime was cracking down on artists. Forman became the 34th recipient of the DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Distinguished Achievement in Motion Picture Direction in 2013.

“A member of the DGA’s National Board and a recipient of the DGA’s highest honor, the Lifetime Achievement Award, Milos actively championed artist’s rights throughout his career, speaking multiple times before Congress and world audiences about the importance of creative rights and artists’ protections against the violation of those rights,” continued Schlamme. “He stood up on behalf of his beloved fellow filmmakers time and again, and he believed with all his heart that creativity and artistic freedom could make a difference in the world. Now it’s up to us to prove him right. We will miss him.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: 'Genius of Cinematography'

Milos Forman, 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest' Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman Lands DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award

Milos Forman Remembered by Larry Flynt, Judd Apatow and More: ‘Genius of Cinematography’

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman — best known for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” — passed away on Saturday at the age of 86, and the filmmaker was immediately championed on Twitter as the news spread.

Writer Larry Karaszewski, who worked with the director on “The People vs Larry Flynt,” said he will “miss his laughter.”

Also Read: Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman was our friend and our teacher. He was a master filmmaker – no one better at capturing small unrepeatable moments of human behavior. We made two movies together and every day spent with him was a unique adventure. Milos loved life. I will miss his laughter. pic.twitter.com/1ER5ExUUHx

— Larry Karaszewski (@Karaszewski) April 14, 2018

And speaking of Flynt, he said he’ll “always be grateful” the “remarkable” director told his story.

Film lost one of its great true visionaries yesterday – Milos Forman. I will always be grateful to him for telling my story in The People vs Larry Flynt. He was a remarkable man with extraordinary talent. I will miss his presence on this earth.

— Larry Flynt (@ImLarryFlynt) April 14, 2018

Also Read: Milos Forman Lands DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award

Ava DuVernay said she enjoyed many of Forman’s films, but that she’ll be watching “Ragtime” in his honor today.

I still remember the rare images of black life in the early 1900s offered in RAGTIME. Saw it as a teen and recall crying. Howard Rollins, Debbie Allen, Moses Gunn. Directed by Milos Forman. He made many films I enjoy. But I’ll be rewatching RAGTIME today. In appreciation. #RIP pic.twitter.com/QOC1lSvzX7

— Ava DuVernay (@ava) April 14, 2018

“Baby Driver” director Edgar Wright tweeted he’d seen “Cuckoo’s Nest” so many times he could “silently mouth along with the movie.”

Very sad to hear that the great director Miloš Forman has passed away. He had a tremendous filmography that documented the rebel heart and human spirit. I have seen ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ enough times to be able to silently mouth along with the movie. RIP. pic.twitter.com/4QwOHL7tS4

— edgarwright (@edgarwright) April 14, 2018

And Antonio Banderas called Forman a “genius of cinematography.”

Milos Forman has left us. Genius of cinematography and master in the portrayal of the human condition. RIP pic.twitter.com/pLcXIeEH9h

— Antonio Banderas (@antoniobanderas) April 14, 2018

Here are just a few others who paid tribute.

Two amazing movies. Sorry for your loss. It’s a big loss for the world. We were so lucky to have all experienced his brilliant work. https://t.co/cGssBdMhGW

— Judd Apatow (@JuddApatow) April 14, 2018

Just learned the sad new about #milosforman who’s movies are among some of my favorites of all time. A resume that produces both “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and “Amadeus” deserves to be up there alongside the greats. Good bye to an icon. And Bravo. pic.twitter.com/tnNHrEgw8H

— Josh Gad (@joshgad) April 14, 2018

Crushed tonight to learn of the passing of one of the great teachers in my life, Milos Foreman. He leaves behind a beautiful and moving and artistically daring collection of films and also many other students touched by his generosity, charm and brilliance. RIP.

— Mangold (@mang0ld) April 14, 2018

Proof that the most brilliant of filmmakers could also be unfailingly kind, generous, humble and loyal. Thank you Milos Forman pic.twitter.com/btUmryxjRr

— Mia Farrow (@MiaFarrow) April 14, 2018

RIP #MilosForman, a brilliant filmmaker. He directed my sister Meg Tilly in Valmont. She adored him. Here is Milos, Colin Firth, and Meg relaxing on the set between scenes. pic.twitter.com/p4Ex22pzjU

— Jennifer Tilly (@JenniferTilly) April 14, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman Lands DGA’s Lifetime Achievement Award

Ridley Scott to Receive DGA Lifetime Achievement Award

Oscar-winning director Milos Forman — best known for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” — passed away on Saturday at the age of 86, and the filmmaker was immediately championed on Twitter as the news spread.

Writer Larry Karaszewski, who worked with the director on “The People vs Larry Flynt,” said he will “miss his laughter.”

And speaking of Flynt, he said he’ll “always be grateful” the “remarkable” director told his story.

Ava DuVernay said she enjoyed many of Forman’s films, but that she’ll be watching “Ragtime” in his honor today.

“Baby Driver” director Edgar Wright tweeted he’d seen “Cuckoo’s Nest” so many times he could “silently mouth along with the movie.”

And Antonio Banderas called Forman a “genius of cinematography.”

Here are just a few others who paid tribute.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Milos Forman, 'Amadeus' and 'Cuckoo's Nest' Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman Lands DGA's Lifetime Achievement Award

Ridley Scott to Receive DGA Lifetime Achievement Award

Miloš Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86

He also directed “Amadeus,” “Man on the Moon,” and several others.

Miloš Forman, who rose to prominence as a key figure in the Czech New Wave before establishing himself as one of Hollywood’s most sought-after directors, has died at 86. A two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, the “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus” helmer also won three Golden Globes, the Cannes Film Festival’s Grand Prize of the Jury (for “Taking Off”), the Golden Bear at Berlin (“The People vs. Larry Flynt”), a BAFTA award, and numerous other accolades.

He died last night in Warren, Connecticut following a short illness.

“Miloš was truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist, and champion of artists’ rights,” Directors Guild of America President Thomas Schlamme said in a statement. “His contribution to the craft of directing has been an undeniable source of inspiration for generations of filmmakers. His directorial vision deftly brought together provocative subject matter, stellar performances and haunting images to tell the stories of the universal struggle for free expression and self-determination that informed so much of his work and his life.”

Born Jan Tomáš Forman on February 18, 1932 in Čáslav, Czechoslovakia, Forman began his career in his native country before moving to the United States following the Prague Spring in 1968. He became a naturalized American citizen nine years later. His two most acclaimed films from that early period, “Loves of a Blonde” (1965) and “The Firemen’s Ball” (1967), were both nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

Forman made his English-language debut with 1971’s “Taking Off,” and from there directed such films as “Hair,” “Ragtime,” and “Man on the Moon.” His final work as director was 2006’s “Goya’s Ghosts.”

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” is one of only three films to win what are considered the five most important Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Actor, and Best Screenplay (adapted, in this case); the other two are “It Happened One Night” and “The Silence of the Lambs.”

Forman is survived by his wife, Martina Zborilova-Forman, and four children. Two of them, twin sons named Jim and Andy, are named after Jim Carrey and Andy Kaufman; Forman directed Carrey in “Man on the Moon,” a biopic about Kaufman.

Update: Carrey has tweeted a tribute to Forman:

Milos Forman: Hollywood, Global Industry Pay Tribute To Oscar Winner

Refresh for latest: Hollywood and international industry figures and groups are reacting to the news that two-time Oscar winning Czech/American director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86. The helmer of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Amadeus, Hair, Valmont, The People Vs Larry Flynt, Ragtime, Man On The Moon and many more was “truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist and champion of artists’ rights,” said DGA President Thomas Schlamme on behalf of the guild this…

Refresh for latest: Hollywood and international industry figures and groups are reacting to the news that two-time Oscar winning Czech/American director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86. The helmer of One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest, Amadeus, Hair, Valmont, The People Vs Larry Flynt, Ragtime, Man On The Moon and many more was “truly one of ours. A filmmaker, artist and champion of artists' rights,” said DGA President Thomas Schlamme on behalf of the guild this…

Milos Forman, ‘Amadeus’ and ‘Cuckoo’s Nest’ Director, Dies at 86

Milos Forman, the Czech-born filmmaker who won two Oscars for directing classics such as “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” died on Friday at age 86.

His wife, Martina, broke the news to the Czech news agency CTK on Saturday, according to Reuters. After fleeing his homeland following a Communist crackdown in the late 1960s, Forman quickly established himself in Hollywood as a filmmaker gifted at telling stories of rebels and the burgeoning counterculture.

He won an Oscar for directing 1975’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” which starred Jack Nicholson as a criminal who ends up in a psychiatric facility after pleading insanity and rebels against an oppressive nurse played by Louise Fletcher.

A decade later, he directed the eight-fold Oscar winner “Amadeus,” which depicted the life of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the eyes of his rival Antonio Salieri.

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He earned a third nomination for 1996’s “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” a depiction of the porn magazine publisher’s protracted legal fight for First Amendment rights.

Other notable films include 1979’s “Hair,” based on the summer-of-love Broadway musical, 1981’s “Ragtime,” 1989’s “Valmont” and 1999’s “Man on the Moon,” a biopic of comedian Andy Kaufman starring Jim Carrey.

Born in the Czech town of Caslav in 1932, he was raised as an orphan because both of this parents were killed in concentration camps during World War II.

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After studying at the Prague Film Academy, he became a leading figure in the Czechoslovak New Wave film movement. Several of his early films, including 1964’s “Black Peter” and the 1967 satire “The Fireman’s Ball,” were banned by Czech authorities.

He moved to the U.S. following his native country’s “Prague Spring” uprising against the Communist regime in 1968; he became a U.S. citizen in the 1970s.

In 2007, he returned to Prague to direct a revival of the comic jazz opera “A Walk Worthwhile” that had first been staged in the 1960s. He also shot a film version, released internationally in 2009.

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Milos Forman, the Czech-born filmmaker who won two Oscars for directing classics such as “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” died on Friday at age 86.

His wife, Martina, broke the news to the Czech news agency CTK on Saturday, according to Reuters. After fleeing his homeland following a Communist crackdown in the late 1960s, Forman quickly established himself in Hollywood as a filmmaker gifted at telling stories of rebels and the burgeoning counterculture.

He won an Oscar for directing 1975’s “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” which starred Jack Nicholson as a criminal who ends up in a psychiatric facility after pleading insanity and rebels against an oppressive nurse played by Louise Fletcher.

A decade later, he directed the eight-fold Oscar winner “Amadeus,” which depicted the life of 18th-century composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart through the eyes of his rival Antonio Salieri.

He earned a third nomination for 1996’s “The People vs. Larry Flynt,” a depiction of the porn magazine publisher’s protracted legal fight for First Amendment rights.

Other notable films include 1979’s “Hair,” based on the summer-of-love Broadway musical, 1981’s “Ragtime,” 1989’s “Valmont” and 1999’s “Man on the Moon,” a biopic of comedian Andy Kaufman starring Jim Carrey.

Born in the Czech town of Caslav in 1932, he was raised as an orphan because both of this parents were killed in concentration camps during World War II.

After studying at the Prague Film Academy, he became a leading figure in the Czechoslovak New Wave film movement. Several of his early films, including 1964’s “Black Peter” and the 1967 satire “The Fireman’s Ball,” were banned by Czech authorities.

He moved to the U.S. following his native country’s “Prague Spring” uprising against the Communist regime in 1968; he became a U.S. citizen in the 1970s.

In 2007, he returned to Prague to direct a revival of the comic jazz opera “A Walk Worthwhile” that had first been staged in the 1960s. He also shot a film version, released internationally in 2009.

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International Tributes Pour In for Milos Forman

The death of Milos Forman has triggered tributes to the iconic two-time Oscar-winning director from the film community in many parts of the world. Homages to the Czech-born filmmaker, who won Academy Awards for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” in 1975 and “Amadeus” in 1984, began springing up on social media soon after Forman’s […]

The death of Milos Forman has triggered tributes to the iconic two-time Oscar-winning director from the film community in many parts of the world. Homages to the Czech-born filmmaker, who won Academy Awards for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” in 1975 and “Amadeus” in 1984, began springing up on social media soon after Forman’s […]

Milos Forman Two-Time Oscar Winning Director Of ‘Amadeus’ & ‘One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest’ Dead At 86

Two-time Oscar winning Czech director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86 according to Reuters and reports. Forman’s wife Martina informed Czech news agency CTK that the filmmaker passed after a brief illness in the U.S.
Part of the Czech new wave, Forman graduated from the Prague Film Faculty of the Academy of Dramatic Arts, and caught global attention with such titles as Black Peter (1964), The Loves of a Blonde (1965) and The Firemen’s Ball(1967), the latter two…

Two-time Oscar winning Czech director Milos Forman has died at the age of 86 according to Reuters and reports. Forman’s wife Martina informed Czech news agency CTK that the filmmaker passed after a brief illness in the U.S. Part of the Czech new wave, Forman graduated from the Prague Film Faculty of the Academy of Dramatic Arts, and caught global attention with such titles as Black Peter (1964), The Loves of a Blonde (1965) and The Firemen's Ball(1967), the latter two…

Milos Forman, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,’ Dies at 86

Czech-born director Milos Forman, who won best directing Oscars for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” has died. He was 86. Forman died Friday in the U.S. after a brief illness, Reuters reported, quoting the director’s wife, Martina, as telling the Czech news agency CTK that “his departure was calm, and he was […]

Czech-born director Milos Forman, who won best directing Oscars for “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Amadeus,” has died. He was 86. Forman died Friday in the U.S. after a brief illness, Reuters reported, quoting the director’s wife, Martina, as telling the Czech news agency CTK that “his departure was calm, and he was […]

‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’ Trailer: BFI Re-Releasing the Best Picture Winner for Jack Nicholson’s 80th Birthday — Watch

It’s the film’s first new trailer in more than 40 years.

For the first time in more than 40 years, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” has a new trailer. BFI is re-releasing the multiple Oscar winner to mark the occasion of Jack Nicholson’s 80th birthday, which the actor will celebrate on April 14. Watch the new trailer below.

READ MORE: Watch: 13 Minutes of Deleted Scenes From ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’

Miloš Forman’s adaptation of the best-selling novel by Ken Kesey belongs to an exclusive club: “Cuckoo’s Nest” is just one of three films to win the Academy Awards for Best Picture, Director, Actor, Actress and Screenplay, the other two being “It Happened One Night” and “The Silence of the Lambs.” Made for $3 million, it grossed more than $100 million.

READ MORE: Watch: Exploring the Set-Ups in ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’

Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, William Redfield, Brad Dourif, Christopher Lloyd and Danny DeVito co-star in the film. “Jack was not an actor but a miracle,” Forman has said of his leading man. “He is McMurphy in real life.” Nicholson is now set to make his first onscreen appearance since 2010 with the English-language remake of “Toni Erdmann.”

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Ridley Scott to Receive DGA Lifetime Achievement Award

Ridley Scott will receive the Directors Guild of America’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the guild announced Tuesday.

The top honor is not given annually, and was last handed to director Miloš Forman in 2013.

“Masterful in any genre, Ridley’s groundbreaking methods and peerless directing instincts have brought to life some of the most memorable films of our time,” said DGA President Paris Barclay in a statement.

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Scott’s body of work is expansive, with countless hits among the ranks, including Matt Damon’s “The Martian,” “Alien,” “Blade Runner,” “Thelma & Louise,” “Black Hawk Down” and “Gladiator.”

The prize is presented at the annual DGA Awards ceremony, which will take place on Feb. 4 in Beverly Hills.

Previous winners include Clint Eastwood (2006), Mike Nichols (2004), Martin Scorsese (2003) and Steven Spielberg (2000).

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Ridley Scott will receive the Directors Guild of America’s Lifetime Achievement Award, the guild announced Tuesday.

The top honor is not given annually, and was last handed to director Miloš Forman in 2013.

“Masterful in any genre, Ridley’s groundbreaking methods and peerless directing instincts have brought to life some of the most memorable films of our time,” said DGA President Paris Barclay in a statement.

Scott’s body of work is expansive, with countless hits among the ranks, including Matt Damon’s “The Martian,” “Alien,” “Blade Runner,” “Thelma & Louise,” “Black Hawk Down” and “Gladiator.”

The prize is presented at the annual DGA Awards ceremony, which will take place on Feb. 4 in Beverly Hills.

Previous winners include Clint Eastwood (2006), Mike Nichols (2004), Martin Scorsese (2003) and Steven Spielberg (2000).

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Paul Sylbert, ‘Heaven Can Wait’ Production Designer, Dies at 88

Production designer and art director Paul Sylbert, who won an Academy Award for “Heaven Can Wait,” has died. He was 88.

Sylbert died Saturday in a hospital near his home in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, producer Hawk Koch announced.

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In addition to “Heaven Can Wait” (1978), Sylbert also received an Oscar nomination for designing Barbra Streisand’s “The Prince of Tides” (1991).

Sylbert had recently served on the faculty of the Film & Media Arts Department at Temple University in Philadelphia.

He and his twin brother, the late Richard Sylbert who won Oscars for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Dick Tracy,” were two of the most sought-after production designers in Hollywood from the late 1950s through the 90s.

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They also designed “A Face in the Crowd “(1957) for director Elia Kazan, and Paul did “Bad Company” (1972), “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) and “Nadine” (1987) for Robert Benton and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) for Milos Forman.

In addition, Sylbert’s film résumé includes such notable works such as “Mikey and Nicky” (1976), “Gorky Park” (1983), “Blow Out” (1981), “The Pope of Greenwich Village” (1984), “Ishtar” (1987), “Biloxi Blues” (1988), “Rush” (1991) and “Rosewood” (1997).

Sylbert wrote and directed the 1971 feature “The Steagle,” starring Richard Benjamin, and wrote “Final Cut,” a 1974 book about his experiences on the set. Sylbert was given the Art Directors Guild Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Sylbert is survived by his wife, Jenny, and their two children.

A memorial service is being planned outside of Philadelphia.

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Production designer and art director Paul Sylbert, who won an Academy Award for “Heaven Can Wait,” has died. He was 88.

Sylbert died Saturday in a hospital near his home in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, producer Hawk Koch announced.

In addition to “Heaven Can Wait” (1978), Sylbert also received an Oscar nomination for designing Barbra Streisand’s “The Prince of Tides” (1991).

Sylbert had recently served on the faculty of the Film & Media Arts Department at Temple University in Philadelphia.

He and his twin brother, the late Richard Sylbert who won Oscars for “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “Dick Tracy,” were two of the most sought-after production designers in Hollywood from the late 1950s through the 90s.

They also designed “A Face in the Crowd “(1957) for director Elia Kazan, and Paul did “Bad Company” (1972), “Kramer vs. Kramer” (1979) and “Nadine” (1987) for Robert Benton and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975) for Milos Forman.

In addition, Sylbert’s film résumé includes such notable works such as “Mikey and Nicky” (1976), “Gorky Park” (1983), “Blow Out” (1981), “The Pope of Greenwich Village” (1984), “Ishtar” (1987), “Biloxi Blues” (1988), “Rush” (1991) and “Rosewood” (1997).

Sylbert wrote and directed the 1971 feature “The Steagle,” starring Richard Benjamin, and wrote “Final Cut,” a 1974 book about his experiences on the set. Sylbert was given the Art Directors Guild Lifetime Achievement Award in 2009.

Sylbert is survived by his wife, Jenny, and their two children.

A memorial service is being planned outside of Philadelphia.

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