The Actor’s Process In ‘A Star Is Born’ & ‘Crazy Rich Asians’: Bradley Cooper, Michelle Yeoh & Ken Jeong At The Contenders NY

Bradley Cooper had a shot some years ago to play the tortured country rock singer, Jack, in A Star Is Born. Clint Eastwood was then attached to direct.
But being a young actor, Cooper said, “I knew, deep down, I hadn’t lived enough and woul…

Bradley Cooper had a shot some years ago to play the tortured country rock singer, Jack, in A Star Is BornClint Eastwood was then attached to direct. But being a young actor, Cooper said, “I knew, deep down, I hadn’t lived enough and wouldn’t play that character.” But then he did – he played hardened NAVY S.E.A.L. sniper Chris Kyle in Eastwood’s American Sniper. Both Eastwood and Cooper were watching Annie Lennox perform I Put a Spell on You on TV, and Cooper was blown…

Can ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Strike It Rich at the China Box Office?

Three and a half months after its U.S. release, “Crazy Rich Asians” finally hits the ground in China on Friday. But it’s up in the air whether the movie can enjoy the same kind of success in the world’s second-biggest movie market. On the face of…

Three and a half months after its U.S. release, “Crazy Rich Asians” finally hits the ground in China on Friday. But it’s up in the air whether the movie can enjoy the same kind of success in the world’s second-biggest movie market. On the face of it, the Cinderella story of a Chinese-American academic who […]

Michelle Yeoh to Reunite With Henry Golding in Paul Feig’s ‘Last Christmas’

Michelle Yeoh is set to join the holiday comedy “Last Christmas,” reteaming with her “Crazy Rich Asians” co-star Henry Golding. Emilia Clarke will topline the film. Paul Feig is directing, with Emma Thompson and Bryony Kimmings …

Michelle Yeoh is set to join the holiday comedy “Last Christmas,” reteaming with her “Crazy Rich Asians” co-star Henry Golding. Emilia Clarke will topline the film. Paul Feig is directing, with Emma Thompson and Bryony Kimmings penning the screenplay. Feig will produce for his Feigco Entertainment alongside Jessie Henderson. David Livingstone and Thompson will also […]

New Hollywood Podcast: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Star Michelle Yeoh Continues Her Trailblazing Career

As soon as Michelle Yeoh enters a room, there is a regal, yet kind-hearted presence that fills the space. From Supercop to Tomorrow Never Dies to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon to Memoirs of a Geisha to Star Trek: Discovery, Yeoh has been a trailblazin…

As soon as Michelle Yeoh enters a room, there is a regal, yet kind-hearted presence that fills the space. From Supercop to Tomorrow Never Dies to Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon to Memoirs of a Geisha to Star Trek: Discovery, Yeoh has been a trailblazing pioneer in film and television — but she does it without fanfare. Instead, she lets her talent and choices in projects speak about her forward-thinking brilliance  — and her role in Crazy Rich Asians continues to blaze…

Michelle Yeoh Joins Paul Feig’s Rom-Com ‘Last Christmas’

Michelle Yeoh is reuniting with her “Crazy Rich Asians” costar Henry Golding in Paul Feig’s romantic comedy “Last Christmas,” an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Emilia Clarke also stars in the film, written by Bryony Kimmings and Emma Thompson. Feig will produce with his Feigco Entertainment, alongside Jessie Henderson, David Livingstone and Thompson.

Per the studio, the movie follows Kate (Clarke), an elf in a year-round Christmas shop. Soon, she meets Tom (Golding), who seems too good to be true when he walks into her life and starts to see through so many of Kate’s barriers.

Also Read: Emilia Clarke, Henry Golding to Star in Paul Feig’s ‘Last Christmas’

“Last Christmas” features the music of George Michael, including the bittersweet title song and some of Michael’s unreleased material. Michael is a Grammy-winning artist who has sold more than 115 million albums and recorded 10 No. 1 singles over the course of his iconic career.

Yeoh’s most recent credits include “Crazy Rich Asians,” as well as CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery.” Other notable credits include “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “Sunshine.”

Also Read: Michelle Yeoh Recalls Hollywood Quota System: ‘We Can’t Have Two Minorities’ in the Same Film

She is represented by David Unger at Artist International Group.

“Last Christmas” will be released on November 15, 2019.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Star Michelle Yeoh Signs Overall Deal With SK Global Labels

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: ‘No One Was Giving in’

First ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Photo Reveals Sonequa Martin-Green as Series Lead (Photo)

Michelle Yeoh is reuniting with her “Crazy Rich Asians” costar Henry Golding in Paul Feig’s romantic comedy “Last Christmas,” an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Emilia Clarke also stars in the film, written by Bryony Kimmings and Emma Thompson. Feig will produce with his Feigco Entertainment, alongside Jessie Henderson, David Livingstone and Thompson.

Per the studio, the movie follows Kate (Clarke), an elf in a year-round Christmas shop. Soon, she meets Tom (Golding), who seems too good to be true when he walks into her life and starts to see through so many of Kate’s barriers.

“Last Christmas” features the music of George Michael, including the bittersweet title song and some of Michael’s unreleased material. Michael is a Grammy-winning artist who has sold more than 115 million albums and recorded 10 No. 1 singles over the course of his iconic career.

Yeoh’s most recent credits include “Crazy Rich Asians,” as well as CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery.” Other notable credits include “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “Sunshine.”

She is represented by David Unger at Artist International Group.

“Last Christmas” will be released on November 15, 2019.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' Star Michelle Yeoh Signs Overall Deal With SK Global Labels

'Crazy Rich Asians' Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: 'No One Was Giving in'

First 'Star Trek: Discovery' Photo Reveals Sonequa Martin-Green as Series Lead (Photo)

Michelle Yeoh On How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Could Finally Shake Up Academy History

In the midst of a packed schedule in the run-up to Oscar voting, Michelle Yeoh is sipping two types of super-healthy juice at the Beverly Hills restaurant where we meet—green and lemon. After all, she has to keep up her strength, given the high s…

In the midst of a packed schedule in the run-up to Oscar voting, Michelle Yeoh is sipping two types of super-healthy juice at the Beverly Hills restaurant where we meet—green and lemon. After all, she has to keep up her strength, given the high stakes this season. Asian actors have had precious little Academy-centric opportunities—or just onscreen opportunities—and Yeoh's latest project, the box office-busting Warner Bros. hit Crazy Rich Asians, looks like it could upend…

Michelle Yeoh May Continue Her ‘Star Trek Discovery’ Journey in a New Spinoff

We haven’t seen the last of Emperor Georgiou.

It remains a continual disappointment that Michelle Yeoh isn’t in every movie and TV show, but at least she’ll be in this one: Deadline reports that the actress is in talks to continue hey journey as Captain Emperor Georgiou for a standalone “Star Trek” series for CBS All Access. She played the character in season one of “Star Trek Discovery” and is set to return for the second go-round. Yeoh, seen most recently in “Crazy Rich Asians” and “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” is acclaimed on both sides of the Pacific for her roles in films like “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and “Yes, Madam.”

Deadline notes that, though “still in the early planning stages, the spinoff looks likely to focus on a continuation of her Discovery Season 2 adventures in Starfleet’s Section 31 division. The semi-secret and autonomous organization has been a part of ‘Trek’ lore since it was first introduced in the 1990s on the ‘Star Trek: Deep Space Nine’ series.”

The potential spinoff isn’t the only new “Trek” project in the works, as it was announced this summer that Patrick Stewart will reprise his role as Captain Jean-Luc Picard in another CBS All Access series; last month, the network announced that it’s also developing an animated show called “Star Trek: Lower Decks.”

“Star Trek Discovery,” meanwhile, returns with Yeoh at the helm on January 17.

Instagram Photo

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Michelle Yeoh In Talks For ‘Star Trek’ Spinoff On CBS All Access

EXCLUSIVE: The return of Patrick Stewart’s Jean-Luc Picard was the first official series of the Trekverse expansion, and it looks like another Starfleet captain could be talking the helm in her own show too.
Crazy Rich Asians star Michelle Yeoh is in t…

EXCLUSIVE: The return of Patrick Stewart's Jean-Luc Picard was the first official series of the Trekverse expansion, and it looks like another Starfleet captain could be talking the helm in her own show too. Crazy Rich Asians star Michelle Yeoh is in talks to reprise her Star Trek Discovery role of Captain Emperor Georgiou for a stand-alone CBS All Access series, I've learned. There is a natural momentum here as Yeoh's once Captain Philippa Georgiou is already set to…

Billy Bob Thornton To Join Actor, Director And Producer Xu Zheng On Stage At U.S.-China Entertainment Summit

Actor and filmmaker Billy Bob Thornton has joined the line up of speakers at Asia Society Southern California’s U.S.-China Entertainment Summit, which takes place Tuesday at the Skirball Cultural Center.
Thornton will take the stage for a convers…

Actor and filmmaker Billy Bob Thornton has joined the line up of speakers at Asia Society Southern California’s U.S.-China Entertainment Summit, which takes place Tuesday at the Skirball Cultural Center. Thornton will take the stage for a conversation with this year's honoree, acclaimed Chinese actor, writer, director and producer Xu Zheng. Thornton is well-known to U.S. audiences for a body of work that includes his Academy Award-nominated performances in Sling Blade and

Michelle Yeoh’s Initial Concerns About ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ – The Contenders London

Michelle Yeoh was a big fan of Kevin Kwan’s novel for Crazy Rich Asians, but when she received Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim’s script, “I was very upset” the actress told the crowd at Deadline’s The Contenders London today…

Michelle Yeoh was a big fan of Kevin Kwan’s novel for Crazy Rich Asians, but when she received Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim’s script, “I was very upset” the actress told the crowd at Deadline’s The Contenders London today. “Eleanor (Young) was written as nasty, mean, mean, not nice at all. I don’t think that Eleanor comes from that motivation,” Yeoh said. In the movie, Eleanor makes waves for her son Nick Young (Henry Golding) and Rachel Chu (Constance Wu), both who are…

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Season 2 NY Comic-Con Trailer Delivers First Look at the New Spock (Video)

CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery” made its presence known at New York Comic-Con on Saturday, revealing the premiere date and official trailer of its second season, featuring the first look at its Spock.

The 13-episode second run of “Star Trek: Discovery” will kick off on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.

As for the new Spock, played by Ethan Peck, he’s sporting considerably more facial hair than we’ve traditionally seen on the Vulcan science officer.

Also Read: Did You Catch the ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Finale’s Deep Cut Callback to the Original Series?

In addition to the new Spock, the Season 2 trailer also features glimpses of Number One, played by guest-star Rebecca Romijn, and Section 31’s newest recruit, Philippa Georgiou, played by Michelle Yeoh.

Explore the strange new world of “Star Trek: Discovery” Season 2 in the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Finds Its Spock

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Trailer Teases Mr. Spock in Season 2 (Video)

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Fans Will Get More Harry Mudd, Three Other Standalone Stories

CBS All Access’ “Star Trek: Discovery” made its presence known at New York Comic-Con on Saturday, revealing the premiere date and official trailer of its second season, featuring the first look at its Spock.

The 13-episode second run of “Star Trek: Discovery” will kick off on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.

As for the new Spock, played by Ethan Peck, he’s sporting considerably more facial hair than we’ve traditionally seen on the Vulcan science officer.

In addition to the new Spock, the Season 2 trailer also features glimpses of Number One, played by guest-star Rebecca Romijn, and Section 31’s newest recruit, Philippa Georgiou, played by Michelle Yeoh.

Explore the strange new world of “Star Trek: Discovery” Season 2 in the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Star Trek: Discovery' Finds Its Spock

'Star Trek: Discovery' Trailer Teases Mr. Spock in Season 2 (Video)

'Star Trek: Discovery' Fans Will Get More Harry Mudd, Three Other Standalone Stories

Michelle Yeoh, Kevin Tsujihara to Be Honored at Asia Society U.S.-China Summit

Iconic actress Michelle Yeoh (“Crazy Rich Asians,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) is to be honored alongside Warner Bros. chairman and CEO Kevin Tsujihara at the U.S.-China Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles later this month. Elizabeth Daley and St…

Iconic actress Michelle Yeoh (“Crazy Rich Asians,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”) is to be honored alongside Warner Bros. chairman and CEO Kevin Tsujihara at the U.S.-China Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles later this month. Elizabeth Daley and Steven J. Ross, dean and Time Warner professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, respectively, will also be […]

Ivanhoe Pictures, Crazy Rich Asians’ Michelle Yeoh Team On Film Adaptation Of ‘Billion Dollar Whale’ Exposé

SK Global’s Ivanhoe Pictures, the company that co-financed and co-produced WB’s rom-com hit Crazy Rich Asians, has obtained the film rights to the recently released non-fiction exposé Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywoo…

SK Global's Ivanhoe Pictures, the company that co-financed and co-produced WB’s rom-com hit Crazy Rich Asians, has obtained the film rights to the recently released non-fiction exposé Billion Dollar Whale: The Man Who Fooled Wall Street, Hollywood, and the World, with CRA star Michelle Yeoh on board to produce under her recently inked deal with Ivanhoe. Written by Wall Street Journal reporters Tom Wright and Bradley Hope, the book center on Jho Low, the alleged mastermind…

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Star Michelle Yeoh Signs First-Look Deal With SK Global

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh has signed a first-look deal with SK Global Entertainment for her production company Mythical Films. The pact, announced Wednesday, includes SK Global’s international label Ivanhoe Pictures and i…

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh has signed a first-look deal with SK Global Entertainment for her production company Mythical Films. The pact, announced Wednesday, includes SK Global’s international label Ivanhoe Pictures and its domestic label Sidney Kimmel Entertainment. The deal includes producing, directing, and select acting opportunities for Yeoh. Yeoh recent collaborated with SK […]

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Star Michelle Yeoh Signs Overall Deal With SK Global Entertainment

Fresh off her success as the all-powerful matriarch in Crazy Rich Asians, actress Michelle Yeoh and her production company Mythical Films have entered an overall agreement with SK Global Entertainment and its international and domestic labels, Ivanhoe …

Fresh off her success as the all-powerful matriarch in Crazy Rich Asians, actress Michelle Yeoh and her production company Mythical Films have entered an overall agreement with SK Global Entertainment and its international and domestic labels, Ivanhoe Pictures and Sidney Kimmel Entertainment. SK Global president John Penotti made the announcement today. The first look deal includes producing, directing and select acting opportunities for Yeoh. The partnership grew out of…

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Star Michelle Yeoh Signs Overall Deal With SK Global Labels

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh has entered into an overall deal with SK Global Entertainment and her label Mythical Films , the companies announced Wednesday

SK’s international shop Ivanhoe Pictures was one of the producers on last weekend’s box office winner “Crazy Rich,” a landmark in Hollywood representation and a revival of the romantic comedy genre.

Ivanhoe and its domestic counterpart in the SK Global portfolio, Sidney Kimmel Entertainment, will work on “producing, directing and select acting opportunities” with Yeoh.

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Sequel in Development With Jon M Chu Planning to Return

“We are thrilled to be in business with such a versatile storyteller. One would be hard pressed to find a more universally loved and supremely talented global star,” SK Global president John Penotti said in a statement.

Yeoh said she’s excited to continue working with both companies  “to develop stories that bridge cultures. The success of ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ has shown us that there are many more wonderful stories to tell from around the globe and I am delighted to partner with this very creative and wonderful team.”

Yeoh has is the star of features like Ang Lee’s award-winning “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” winner of 4 Academy Awards, as well as the James Bond title “Tomorrow Never Dies.” She also appeared in Marvel’s recent “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.”

Upcoming SK content includes the psychological thriller “Greta” from Neil Jordan with starring Isabelle Huppert and Chloë Grace Moretz. Additionally, the Hindi-language television series “Ghoul” will debut on Netflix on August 24 and was developed via Ivanhoe Pictures.

Yeoh is represented by David Unger at Artist International Group.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Author Kevin Kwan Could Face Jail Time in Singapore for Draft-Dodging

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Sequel in Development With Jon M Chu Planning to Return

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Doesn’t Speak for the Entire Asian Experience (Guest Blog)

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh has entered into an overall deal with SK Global Entertainment and her label Mythical Films , the companies announced Wednesday

SK’s international shop Ivanhoe Pictures was one of the producers on last weekend’s box office winner “Crazy Rich,” a landmark in Hollywood representation and a revival of the romantic comedy genre.

Ivanhoe and its domestic counterpart in the SK Global portfolio, Sidney Kimmel Entertainment, will work on “producing, directing and select acting opportunities” with Yeoh.

“We are thrilled to be in business with such a versatile storyteller. One would be hard pressed to find a more universally loved and supremely talented global star,” SK Global president John Penotti said in a statement.

Yeoh said she’s excited to continue working with both companies  “to develop stories that bridge cultures. The success of ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ has shown us that there are many more wonderful stories to tell from around the globe and I am delighted to partner with this very creative and wonderful team.”

Yeoh has is the star of features like Ang Lee’s award-winning “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” winner of 4 Academy Awards, as well as the James Bond title “Tomorrow Never Dies.” She also appeared in Marvel’s recent “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.”

Upcoming SK content includes the psychological thriller “Greta” from Neil Jordan with starring Isabelle Huppert and Chloë Grace Moretz. Additionally, the Hindi-language television series “Ghoul” will debut on Netflix on August 24 and was developed via Ivanhoe Pictures.

Yeoh is represented by David Unger at Artist International Group.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' Author Kevin Kwan Could Face Jail Time in Singapore for Draft-Dodging

'Crazy Rich Asians' Sequel in Development With Jon M Chu Planning to Return

'Crazy Rich Asians' Doesn't Speak for the Entire Asian Experience (Guest Blog)

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Sequel in Development With Jon M Chu Planning to Return

A sequel to “Crazy Rich Asians” is in development, with plans for director Jon M. Chu to return, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Producers Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson of Color Force and John Penotti of Ivanhoe are planning to reunite for the follow-up, as well as screenwriters Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim.

Warner Bros., which hasn’t officially greenlighted the film, has the option for the entire trilogy written by Kevin Kwan, which includes “China Rich Girlfriend” and “Rich People Problems.” Henry Golding, Constance Wu and Michelle Yeoh also have options for the sequels.

Also Read: Ballin’ on a Budget: How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Made Mega-Rich World for $30 Million

Do not read on if you don’t want to read spoilers for “Crazy Rich Asians.”

Of course, the end of “Crazy Rich Asians,” which hit theaters last week, teases a follow-up film. The mid-credit scene focuses on Astrid Leong (Gemma Chan) and Charlie Wu (Harry Shum, Jr.), the latter being a big character in the second and third book.

When asked about a potential sequel, Chu told TheWrap, “We would love to, of course — we wouldn’t put that in if we didn’t have the intention [to make a sequel]. However, we don’t get to decide — the audience does.”

According to Thrillist, producer Nina Jacobson told reporters earlier this month, “We’ll just tease [it] a little bit at the end and hope that audiences ask for more movies so we can continue to tell the story.”

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Rolls Up No. 1 at Box Office With $34 Million 5-Day Opening

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: ‘No One Was Giving in’

Does ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

A sequel to “Crazy Rich Asians” is in development, with plans for director Jon M. Chu to return, an individual with knowledge of the project told TheWrap.

Producers Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson of Color Force and John Penotti of Ivanhoe are planning to reunite for the follow-up, as well as screenwriters Peter Chiarelli and Adele Lim.

Warner Bros., which hasn’t officially greenlighted the film, has the option for the entire trilogy written by Kevin Kwan, which includes “China Rich Girlfriend” and “Rich People Problems.” Henry Golding, Constance Wu and Michelle Yeoh also have options for the sequels.

Do not read on if you don’t want to read spoilers for “Crazy Rich Asians.”

Of course, the end of “Crazy Rich Asians,” which hit theaters last week, teases a follow-up film. The mid-credit scene focuses on Astrid Leong (Gemma Chan) and Charlie Wu (Harry Shum, Jr.), the latter being a big character in the second and third book.

When asked about a potential sequel, Chu told TheWrap, “We would love to, of course — we wouldn’t put that in if we didn’t have the intention [to make a sequel]. However, we don’t get to decide — the audience does.”

According to Thrillist, producer Nina Jacobson told reporters earlier this month, “We’ll just tease [it] a little bit at the end and hope that audiences ask for more movies so we can continue to tell the story.”

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' Rolls Up No. 1 at Box Office With $34 Million 5-Day Opening

'Crazy Rich Asians' Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: 'No One Was Giving in'

Does 'Crazy Rich Asians' Have a Post-Credits Scene?

This Is What ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Meant to Its Fans: ‘My Heart Is Bursting’

Though its box office opening wasn’t a record breaker like “Black Panther,” Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians” had the same impact on Asian-American moviegoers that the Marvel blockbuster had on African-Americans, filling a demand for representation that had long been ignored in Hollywood.

As the film steamed towards a strong $34 million five-day opening — among the best for a romantic comedy this decade — Asians who saw the film took to social media to express their gratitude to Chu, Constance Wu and the rest of the film’s cast and crew for finally giving them the chance to see characters that reflected themselves on-screen.

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Rolls Up No. 1 at Box Office With $34 Million 5-Day Opening

Among the most widely shared was a Twitter thread from Huffington Post editor Kimberly Yam, who talked about her lifelong struggle with her Chinese-American identity.

“You’re 8 years old. Your 3rd grade class orders Chinese food & your father delivers it. You are so excited to see your pops in school. He’s your hero,” Yam begins. “But apparently other kids don’t think he’s so cool. They laugh at him and mimic his accent. You don’t want to be Chinese anymore.”

You’re 9 years old.
You attend ballet camp. Someone tells you that another girl *hates* you. She thinks your eyes are an “ugly shape.” You don’t have the vocabulary to describe why that’s hurtful. But now, you hate your distinctly Asian face. You don’t want to be Chinese anymore.

– Kimberly Yam (@kimmythepooh) August 18, 2018

You don’t want people thinking you’re uptight. You laugh along with everyone else. You don’t want to be Chinese anymore.

– Kimberly Yam (@kimmythepooh) August 18, 2018

Also Read: Michelle Yeoh Recalls Hollywood Quota System: ‘We Can’t Have Two Minorities’ in the Same Film

Yam goes on to discuss how after she went to college, she began to fight back against the self-hatred that a childhood filled with classmates making fun of Asians instilled in her, and that watching “Crazy Rich Asians” just added to the pride she now feels as an adult.

“You’re 25 years old. You see a movie with an all-asian cast at a screening and for some reason you’re crying and you can’t stop. You’ve never seen a cast like this in Hollywood. Everyone is beautiful,” she concludes. “You’re so happy you’re Chinese.”

But you know you rejected your culture a long time ago. You know you refused to speak Chinese & you remember calling your mother’s food “disgusting.” It’s fucked. It clicks. It’s a race to reclaim everything you’ve hated about yourself. For the 1st time, you want to be Chinese.

– Kimberly Yam (@kimmythepooh) August 18, 2018

You’re 25 years old.
You see a movie with an all-asian cast at a screening and for some reason you’re crying and you can’t stop. You’ve never seen a cast like this in Hollywood. Everyone is beautiful.
You’re so happy you’re Chinese. #CrazyRichAsians #RepresentationMatters

– Kimberly Yam (@kimmythepooh) August 18, 2018

“Aquaman” director James Wan echoed Yam’s statement, saying he wish he had a film like “Crazy Rich Asians” growing up.

“I don’t think I’ve seen a mainstream Hollywood movie with an entire cast that looks like — well, me and my family — before, and my heart is bursting,” he tweeted.

Everyone, do yourself a favor, go see this superbly made romantic-comedy! With a stellar cast, headlined by the incredible & exquisitely talented @ConstanceWu, dashing & charming @henrygolding, and living-goddess Michelle Yeoh! THANK YOU, @jonmchu, you had me at laksa and durian!

– James Wan (@creepypuppet) August 19, 2018

Check out more tweets from people who saw the film this weekend below, as well as thanks from the cast.

Everyone, do yourself a favor, go see this superbly made romantic-comedy! With a stellar cast, headlined by the incredible & exquisitely talented @ConstanceWu, dashing & charming @henrygolding, and living-goddess Michelle Yeoh! THANK YOU, @jonmchu, you had me at laksa and durian!

– James Wan (@creepypuppet) August 19, 2018

in my #crazyrichasians feelings pic.twitter.com/vQdPet1Fs4

– mc jin (@iammcjin) August 18, 2018

Hearing the amount of 1st gens that are taking their parents & grandparents to the movies for the first time is the coolest thing about this. Never thought a rom-com could bring families together. #CrazyRichAsians

– Harry Shum Jr (@HarryShumJr) August 18, 2018

#Representation: when it’s been absent most of your life, sometimes you have to see it to realize just how much you needed it.
Adored #CrazyRichAsians. Made me proud and made me cry. Hilarious, touching, a total delight! Congrats to all.

– David Hwang (@DavidHenryHwang) August 19, 2018

The funny thing about #CrazyRichAsians is that asian people aren’t treating it like their Black Panther moment, we’re just happy to see other asian people on a screen not throwing roundhouse kicks at a white protagonist

– Noah B (@noahfloods) August 16, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Rolls Up No. 1 at Box Office With $34 Million 5-Day Opening

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: ‘No One Was Giving in’

How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Though its box office opening wasn’t a record breaker like “Black Panther,” Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians” had the same impact on Asian-American moviegoers that the Marvel blockbuster had on African-Americans, filling a demand for representation that had long been ignored in Hollywood.

As the film steamed towards a strong $34 million five-day opening — among the best for a romantic comedy this decade — Asians who saw the film took to social media to express their gratitude to Chu, Constance Wu and the rest of the film’s cast and crew for finally giving them the chance to see characters that reflected themselves on-screen.

Among the most widely shared was a Twitter thread from Huffington Post editor Kimberly Yam, who talked about her lifelong struggle with her Chinese-American identity.

“You’re 8 years old. Your 3rd grade class orders Chinese food & your father delivers it. You are so excited to see your pops in school. He’s your hero,” Yam begins. “But apparently other kids don’t think he’s so cool. They laugh at him and mimic his accent. You don’t want to be Chinese anymore.”

Yam goes on to discuss how after she went to college, she began to fight back against the self-hatred that a childhood filled with classmates making fun of Asians instilled in her, and that watching “Crazy Rich Asians” just added to the pride she now feels as an adult.

“You’re 25 years old. You see a movie with an all-asian cast at a screening and for some reason you’re crying and you can’t stop. You’ve never seen a cast like this in Hollywood. Everyone is beautiful,” she concludes. “You’re so happy you’re Chinese.”

“Aquaman” director James Wan echoed Yam’s statement, saying he wish he had a film like “Crazy Rich Asians” growing up.

“I don’t think I’ve seen a mainstream Hollywood movie with an entire cast that looks like — well, me and my family — before, and my heart is bursting,” he tweeted.

Check out more tweets from people who saw the film this weekend below, as well as thanks from the cast.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' Rolls Up No. 1 at Box Office With $34 Million 5-Day Opening

'Crazy Rich Asians' Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: 'No One Was Giving in'

How 'Crazy Rich Asians' Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Michelle Yeoh Recalls Hollywood Quota System: ‘We Can’t Have Two Minorities’ in the Same Film

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh recalled her challenges as an Asian actress starting out in Hollywood in the 1990s — including what she described as an apparent quota system for nonwhite performers.

“When I first came to do movies here, I remember very specifically someone said, ‘If we cast an African-American lead, there’s no way we can cast you, because we can’t have two minorities,’” Yeoh said in an interview with GQ.

The Malaysian Chinese actress also said she found herself turning down roles that continuously asked her to play “fragile Asian women” or the “Ming Wave” stereotype.

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: ‘No One Was Giving in’

Of course, Yeoh played several kick-ass heroines in films like “Supercop,” “Wing Chun” and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” and she often spent up to 11 hours in the gym per day to perform the martial arts stunts she wanted to do.

When she starred in the 1997 James Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies” alongside Pierce Brosnan, she said the production company hired a Hong Kong stunt coordinator so she could do her own combat scenes.

“She’s equal to Bond, so all the Asian girls are going, ‘Hey, I can be a spy too,’” Yeoh said. “What was amazing with Pierce, he was so confident a man that he goes, ‘Yeah, let her fight!’ Then he would just stand there like a proud dad.”

Also Read: Ballin’ on a Budget: How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Made Mega-Rich World for $30 Million

In the GQ interview, Yeoh said the “Hong Kong A-listers,” which include Jackie Chan and Chow Yun-Fat, often look out for each other while they make their way through the industry.

“Sometimes I wish that if I had a really strong mentor, maybe I could have done more,” Yeoh said. “When I wanted to do my first action movie, a few strong business women in film championed it and said, ‘Yeah let her try! You bring a very exotic girl from Malaysia. She’s not our usual Hong Kong girl. Why stick her in the same kind of roles?’ So it was the ladies in the company who stuck up for me… I’m very happy with the career that I’ve had. I don’t dwell on missed opportunities because that would be wasting time.”

Yeoh now co-stars in Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians,” playing what she calls a “dragon mom” to leading man Nick Young (Henry Golding).

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ on Track to Top ‘The Meg’ at Box Office

How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Does ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“Crazy Rich Asians” star Michelle Yeoh recalled her challenges as an Asian actress starting out in Hollywood in the 1990s — including what she described as an apparent quota system for nonwhite performers.

“When I first came to do movies here, I remember very specifically someone said, ‘If we cast an African-American lead, there’s no way we can cast you, because we can’t have two minorities,'” Yeoh said in an interview with GQ.

The Malaysian Chinese actress also said she found herself turning down roles that continuously asked her to play “fragile Asian women” or the “Ming Wave” stereotype.

Of course, Yeoh played several kick-ass heroines in films like “Supercop,” “Wing Chun” and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” and she often spent up to 11 hours in the gym per day to perform the martial arts stunts she wanted to do.

When she starred in the 1997 James Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies” alongside Pierce Brosnan, she said the production company hired a Hong Kong stunt coordinator so she could do her own combat scenes.

“She’s equal to Bond, so all the Asian girls are going, ‘Hey, I can be a spy too,'” Yeoh said. “What was amazing with Pierce, he was so confident a man that he goes, ‘Yeah, let her fight!’ Then he would just stand there like a proud dad.”

In the GQ interview, Yeoh said the “Hong Kong A-listers,” which include Jackie Chan and Chow Yun-Fat, often look out for each other while they make their way through the industry.

“Sometimes I wish that if I had a really strong mentor, maybe I could have done more,” Yeoh said. “When I wanted to do my first action movie, a few strong business women in film championed it and said, ‘Yeah let her try! You bring a very exotic girl from Malaysia. She’s not our usual Hong Kong girl. Why stick her in the same kind of roles?’ So it was the ladies in the company who stuck up for me… I’m very happy with the career that I’ve had. I don’t dwell on missed opportunities because that would be wasting time.”

Yeoh now co-stars in Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians,” playing what she calls a “dragon mom” to leading man Nick Young (Henry Golding).

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' on Track to Top 'The Meg' at Box Office

How 'Crazy Rich Asians' Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Does 'Crazy Rich Asians' Have a Post-Credits Scene?

Ballin’ on a Budget: How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Made Mega-Rich World for $30 Million

In the high-flying world of Kevin Kwan’s “Crazy Rich Asians” book trilogy, $30 million would barely cover the couture, jewels, private jet fuel and five-star menu for a ladies’ lunch in Singapore.

But $30 million was the budget for the Warner Bros. adaptation of the bestselling novel, about the competitive world of Asia’s super-rich thrust upon an unsuspecting Constance Wu when she flies from New York to meet her boyfriend’s family

Million-dollar diamonds, penthouses in the clouds, six-figure dinner tabs and more an orgy of brand names and labels. How’d they pull it off on a mid-range studio budget?

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Stars Dueled Over Epic Mahjong Showdown: ‘No One Was Giving in’

TheWrap assembled the “Crazy Rich” filmmaking team including director Jon M. Chu, producers Brad Simpson and Nina Jacobson, and production designer Nelson Coates for a lesson in balling on a budget.

Starting with …

Lockdown Diamonds

The expensive jewelry seen in the movie was borrowed from jewelers that came with security guards.

“Kevin [Kwan] was on par the whole time, saying, ‘People who know watches will know that that’s not an expensive watch,’” Chu told TheWrap. “I was like, ‘Kevin, that’s a $150,000 watch!’ And he’s like, ‘That’s not good enough, we have to get that $500,000 watch.’ We had to get the million-dollar earrings, that came with security guards, and I had never done a movie where you are bound by your time because a security guard needs to bring the jewelry back to the safe. I had never been dictated by the jewelry, the costumes, of how long you can shoot, so that was insane to go through. But totally worth it.”

Kwan, the author of the book on which the movie is based, added, “I also was able to help procure a vintage Rolex Paul Newman ‘Panda’ Daytona valued at $600,000 from a watch collector that we flew half-way around the world for a particular scene.”

However, renting the stellar pieces for the movie also came with complications, especially the ones worn by Gemma Chan’s Astrid Leong in the movie.

Also Read: Does ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Have a Post-Credits Scene?

“I was really angry when [the security guards] were like, ‘The earrings have to go back right now,’ and I said, ‘We’re not done shooting the scene,’ and they were like, ‘Well, make sure her ears aren’t seen then!’” Chu added. “I thought, ‘This is ridiculous.’”

“I think we had around $3 million worth of jewelry, with several guards, on set!” said Coates.

Yeoh’s Private Stash

Michelle Yeoh’s character, Eleanor Young, also wears a gorgeous ring at the end of the movie — and that particular piece of jewelry came from her own jewelry box.

“We had a ring made, and it didn’t look great. All the people I asked — my friends who love jewelry — said ‘Yeah, that doesn’t look great,’” Chu explained. “So Michelle was like, ‘Hey, I have a ring. I bought the ring as a gift to myself.’ So it’s hers! She said, ‘I buy myself a gift after every movie I do.’”

Brand Desertion

The world of “Crazy Rich” is nothing if not jet-setting, which gave an easy layup for product placement in the form of a major airline (deals like these happen all the time in studio films, like a recent Turkish Airlines partnership on “Batman v. Superman”).

But no one bit, producers Jacobson and Simpson said, specifically a natural partner in Singapore Airlines.

“We were shocked,” admitted Jacobson, whose Color Force Productions partner Simpson was equally gobsmacked.

“It was going to be an ad for Singapore Airlines!” Simpson said. “But they were not sure the movie would represent the airline and their customer in a good light. People want what Richard Curtis’ movies (“Love, Actually,” “Notting Hill”) do for England — they make you want to visit the country.”

They wound up creating a fictional airline, Pacific Asean Airlines.

Chu said, “People didn’t have faith in this movie. They didn’t know what this movie was. It seems obvious now, but when we were making it, everyone thought it was a little movie and they were very suspicious about what we were trying to do.”

Singapore Airlines did not respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Fashion Fears 

Designers were also reluctant to put their necks on the block, knowing how quickly trends change and how intensely competitive the world of “Crazy Rich Asians” is.

“We didn’t get the support of all designers — we were two years out from getting the movie out so they were like, ‘We have nothing to sell here; we don’t know where fashion is in two years,’” Chu explained.

Also Read: How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

“You can’t buy the dress on [character] Astrid Leong right now; it was on sale last year,” Simpson added.

Kwan told TheWrap, “To give authenticity to the production while staying on budget, I worked overtime to connect our costume designer Mary Vogt to designers and artisans I personally know that are favored by real ‘crazy rich Asians.’ Designers you wouldn’t even find in the fashion magazines because they cater exclusively to the 0.1 percent crowd and prize discretion over publicity. These include the jeweler Carnet by Michelle Ong, who lent us museum-quality jewels valued in the millions, and accessories designer Neil Felipp, who lent us some of his iconic, award-winning evening purses.”

He added, “So our actresses really looked like a million bucks because they were literally wearing millions of dollars worth of jewels and accessories.”

Jacobson credits Vogt with saving the day and creating a wardrobe for the 1 percent using local designers and vintage finds.

“She, basically, just had to deal. She bought it, found it, shopped it, shipped it,” Jacobson said.

Limited Wide Shots

A money saver (which sounds like it’s out of the Blumhouse playbook) was simply limiting wide shots.

“As a group, we decided where we wanted to throw our money,” said Chu. “In regards to wide shots, we thought, ‘What are the ones we could probably do without?’”

Old-Fashioned Movie Magic

Chu told TheWrap that working with experienced crew members who wouldn’t “take no for an answer” was an important part of making the movie work on a low budget.

“We needed experienced people who would know how to do it all strategically and budget-friendly, and we needed people who are passionate and loving of the subject matter so that they would give it their all,” Chu said.

Chu tapped Coates, a production designer who has worked on films like “Fifty Shades Darker” and “The Proposal,” to spin gold from dust — literally.

“It was such a labor of love and it was shockingly challenging to do — even the weather conditions alone,” Coates said. “It rained five out of every seven days, and Malaysia is the third highest lightning strike country in the world. Every set had to be earthed with lightning rods!”

In Kwan’s novel, Singapore society is largely unaware of the existence of Tyersall Park — a monolithic colonial mansion that sits on the grounds of the Eastern equivalent of Central Park. Coates wound up transforming a crumbling Malaysian government building, infested with feral dogs and bats, and littered with monkey poop, into a generations-old manor.

Adding the conservatory to the property that was basically constructed from scratch — Coates says there is basically just brick there — allowed the crew to “Gatsby it up.”

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Film Review: Constance Wu Stands Out in Culturally Rich Rom-Com

Kwan also said Coates “was able to borrow some of the rarest antiques from shops all over Singapore and Malaysia to decorate the set of Tyersall Park.”

Coates explained that all the jewelry stores in Singapore and Malaysia are in the malls, hence not a very glamorous exterior shot for a film that is supposed to boast the unachievable for — let’s just be frank — us poor people.

“When we were scouting for Astrid’s penthouse, we were walking into the St. Regis in Kuala Lumpur. They have a bar and we walked in, and I said, ‘It’s a jewelry store!’ Everyone looked at me like I was off my rocker. We built jewelry cases and we made them empty their wine cellar where we made velvet shelves — and it quickly became a private client area for their jewelry.”

Perhaps the most impressive, elaborate location the team worked with was the Gardens by the Bay, a location that was not secured until two weeks before filming began. However, the location was completely booked in exactly the place they wanted to shoot — but they found common ground when the crew agreed to break down every night and reassemble the set whenever it was free to use.

“We wanted a place for the reception that looked like mere mortals could not have arranged,” Coates said. “You are upping the visual ante throughout the whole movie. It took four months to get the Gardens by the Bay on board. They, basically, had planned all their festivities including a light show and fireworks in the exact spot where we wanted our reception.”

He added, “We worked with the Malaysian and Singapore governments to get access to these places — there was no way we could afford them otherwise.”

One of those places, of course, involved the Marina Bay Sands — in particular, the world famous rooftop with the stunning infinity pool that has graced the covers of countless travel magazines and the pages of bloggers.

“The rooftop actually has two restaurants that are separately leased and not run by the hotel, so we had to get them on board. We had help from the Marina Bay Sands because they knew this would be great for them,” said Coates. “Of course, we had to pay the location fee because in terms of the nightclub and restaurant, we were taking over their business.”

All in all, the crew shot for eight weeks — five weeks in Kuala Lumpur, two in Singapore for exteriors… and all the New York scenes were also shot in Singapore.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Opens to $5 Million Wednesday at Box Office

How ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Don’t Be Surprised If ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Blows Away Box Office Expectations

In the high-flying world of Kevin Kwan’s “Crazy Rich Asians” book trilogy, $30 million would barely cover the couture, jewels, private jet fuel and five-star menu for a ladies’ lunch in Singapore.

But $30 million was the budget for the Warner Bros. adaptation of the bestselling novel, about the competitive world of Asia’s super-rich thrust upon an unsuspecting Constance Wu when she flies from New York to meet her boyfriend’s family

Million-dollar diamonds, penthouses in the clouds, six-figure dinner tabs and more an orgy of brand names and labels. How’d they pull it off on a mid-range studio budget?

TheWrap assembled the “Crazy Rich” filmmaking team including director Jon M. Chu, producers Brad Simpson and Nina Jacobson, and production designer Nelson Coates for a lesson in balling on a budget.

Starting with …

Lockdown Diamonds

The expensive jewelry seen in the movie was borrowed from jewelers that came with security guards.

“Kevin [Kwan] was on par the whole time, saying, ‘People who know watches will know that that’s not an expensive watch,'” Chu told TheWrap. “I was like, ‘Kevin, that’s a $150,000 watch!’ And he’s like, ‘That’s not good enough, we have to get that $500,000 watch.’ We had to get the million-dollar earrings, that came with security guards, and I had never done a movie where you are bound by your time because a security guard needs to bring the jewelry back to the safe. I had never been dictated by the jewelry, the costumes, of how long you can shoot, so that was insane to go through. But totally worth it.”

Kwan, the author of the book on which the movie is based, added, “I also was able to help procure a vintage Rolex Paul Newman ‘Panda’ Daytona valued at $600,000 from a watch collector that we flew half-way around the world for a particular scene.”

However, renting the stellar pieces for the movie also came with complications, especially the ones worn by Gemma Chan’s Astrid Leong in the movie.

“I was really angry when [the security guards] were like, ‘The earrings have to go back right now,’ and I said, ‘We’re not done shooting the scene,’ and they were like, ‘Well, make sure her ears aren’t seen then!'” Chu added. “I thought, ‘This is ridiculous.'”

“I think we had around $3 million worth of jewelry, with several guards, on set!” said Coates.

Yeoh’s Private Stash

Michelle Yeoh’s character, Eleanor Young, also wears a gorgeous ring at the end of the movie — and that particular piece of jewelry came from her own jewelry box.

“We had a ring made, and it didn’t look great. All the people I asked — my friends who love jewelry — said ‘Yeah, that doesn’t look great,'” Chu explained. “So Michelle was like, ‘Hey, I have a ring. I bought the ring as a gift to myself.’ So it’s hers! She said, ‘I buy myself a gift after every movie I do.'”

Brand Desertion

The world of “Crazy Rich” is nothing if not jet-setting, which gave an easy layup for product placement in the form of a major airline (deals like these happen all the time in studio films, like a recent Turkish Airlines partnership on “Batman v. Superman”).

But no one bit, producers Jacobson and Simpson said, specifically a natural partner in Singapore Airlines.

“We were shocked,” admitted Jacobson, whose Color Force Productions partner Simpson was equally gobsmacked.

“It was going to be an ad for Singapore Airlines!” Simpson said. “But they were not sure the movie would represent the airline and their customer in a good light. People want what Richard Curtis’ movies (“Love, Actually,” “Notting Hill”) do for England — they make you want to visit the country.”

They wound up creating a fictional airline, Pacific Asean Airlines.

Chu said, “People didn’t have faith in this movie. They didn’t know what this movie was. It seems obvious now, but when we were making it, everyone thought it was a little movie and they were very suspicious about what we were trying to do.”

Singapore Airlines did not respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Fashion Fears 

Designers were also reluctant to put their necks on the block, knowing how quickly trends change and how intensely competitive the world of “Crazy Rich Asians” is.

“We didn’t get the support of all designers — we were two years out from getting the movie out so they were like, ‘We have nothing to sell here; we don’t know where fashion is in two years,'” Chu explained.

“You can’t buy the dress on [character] Astrid Leong right now; it was on sale last year,” Simpson added.

Kwan told TheWrap, “To give authenticity to the production while staying on budget, I worked overtime to connect our costume designer Mary Vogt to designers and artisans I personally know that are favored by real ‘crazy rich Asians.’ Designers you wouldn’t even find in the fashion magazines because they cater exclusively to the 0.1 percent crowd and prize discretion over publicity. These include the jeweler Carnet by Michelle Ong, who lent us museum-quality jewels valued in the millions, and accessories designer Neil Felipp, who lent us some of his iconic, award-winning evening purses.”

He added, “So our actresses really looked like a million bucks because they were literally wearing millions of dollars worth of jewels and accessories.”

Jacobson credits Vogt with saving the day and creating a wardrobe for the 1 percent using local designers and vintage finds.

“She, basically, just had to deal. She bought it, found it, shopped it, shipped it,” Jacobson said.

Limited Wide Shots

A money saver (which sounds like it’s out of the Blumhouse playbook) was simply limiting wide shots.

“As a group, we decided where we wanted to throw our money,” said Chu. “In regards to wide shots, we thought, ‘What are the ones we could probably do without?'”

Old-Fashioned Movie Magic

Chu told TheWrap that working with experienced crew members who wouldn’t “take no for an answer” was an important part of making the movie work on a low budget.

“We needed experienced people who would know how to do it all strategically and budget-friendly, and we needed people who are passionate and loving of the subject matter so that they would give it their all,” Chu said.

Chu tapped Coates, a production designer who has worked on films like “Fifty Shades Darker” and “The Proposal,” to spin gold from dust — literally.

“It was such a labor of love and it was shockingly challenging to do — even the weather conditions alone,” Coates said. “It rained five out of every seven days, and Malaysia is the third highest lightning strike country in the world. Every set had to be earthed with lightning rods!”

In Kwan’s novel, Singapore society is largely unaware of the existence of Tyersall Park — a monolithic colonial mansion that sits on the grounds of the Eastern equivalent of Central Park. Coates wound up transforming a crumbling Malaysian government building, infested with feral dogs and bats, and littered with monkey poop, into a generations-old manor.

Adding the conservatory to the property that was basically constructed from scratch — Coates says there is basically just brick there — allowed the crew to “Gatsby it up.”

Kwan also said Coates “was able to borrow some of the rarest antiques from shops all over Singapore and Malaysia to decorate the set of Tyersall Park.”

Coates explained that all the jewelry stores in Singapore and Malaysia are in the malls, hence not a very glamorous exterior shot for a film that is supposed to boast the unachievable for — let’s just be frank — us poor people.

“When we were scouting for Astrid’s penthouse, we were walking into the St. Regis in Kuala Lumpur. They have a bar and we walked in, and I said, ‘It’s a jewelry store!’ Everyone looked at me like I was off my rocker. We built jewelry cases and we made them empty their wine cellar where we made velvet shelves — and it quickly became a private client area for their jewelry.”

Perhaps the most impressive, elaborate location the team worked with was the Gardens by the Bay, a location that was not secured until two weeks before filming began. However, the location was completely booked in exactly the place they wanted to shoot — but they found common ground when the crew agreed to break down every night and reassemble the set whenever it was free to use.

“We wanted a place for the reception that looked like mere mortals could not have arranged,” Coates said. “You are upping the visual ante throughout the whole movie. It took four months to get the Gardens by the Bay on board. They, basically, had planned all their festivities including a light show and fireworks in the exact spot where we wanted our reception.”

He added, “We worked with the Malaysian and Singapore governments to get access to these places — there was no way we could afford them otherwise.”

One of those places, of course, involved the Marina Bay Sands — in particular, the world famous rooftop with the stunning infinity pool that has graced the covers of countless travel magazines and the pages of bloggers.

“The rooftop actually has two restaurants that are separately leased and not run by the hotel, so we had to get them on board. We had help from the Marina Bay Sands because they knew this would be great for them,” said Coates. “Of course, we had to pay the location fee because in terms of the nightclub and restaurant, we were taking over their business.”

All in all, the crew shot for eight weeks — five weeks in Kuala Lumpur, two in Singapore for exteriors… and all the New York scenes were also shot in Singapore.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Crazy Rich Asians' Opens to $5 Million Wednesday at Box Office

How 'Crazy Rich Asians' Director Reappropriated a Racial Slur With a Coldplay Song

Don't Be Surprised If 'Crazy Rich Asians' Blows Away Box Office Expectations

Mark Wahlberg’s ‘Mile 22’ Hunts Down $1 Million at Thursday Box Office

Mark Wahlberg’s “Mile 22” grossed $1 million at the Thursday box office from 2,600 locations.

Thursday’s preview gross is comparable to that of Tom Cruise’s “American Made,” which earned $960,000 in previews before opening to $16.8 million. “Mile 22” is expected to have a $17-$18 million weekend, contending with “The Meg” for the No. 2 spot, after “Crazy Rich Asians.”

This is the fourth collaboration between director Peter Berg and star Mark Wahlberg, and tells the story of an elite CIA team tasked with protecting a valuable asset being hunted by terrorists. John Malkovich, Lauren Cohan, Iko Uwais and Ronda Rousey also star.

Also Read: ‘Mile 22’ Film Review: Mark Wahlberg Shoots Off Weapons and His Mouth to Diminishing Results

The film is written by Lea Carpenter based on a story by Graham Roland and Carpenter. Berg for Film 44, Wahlberg for Closest to the Hole and Stephen Levinson for Leverage produced. John Logan Pierson executive produced.

“Mile 22” holds a score of 24 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Sony Pictures and Studio 8’s “Alpha” earned $525,000 in previews from 2,303 locations on Thursday night, looking at a $10 million weekend.

Also Read: ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ Opens to $5 Million Wednesday at Box Office

Telling the story of the earliest days of man’s relationship with canines, “Alpha” stars Kodi Smit-McPhee as Keda, a Paleolithic hunter left behind by his tribe after he is injured during a hunt. Struggling to survive on his own, he encounters a wolf who has been similarly abandoned by his pack, leading to the two bonding together to survive. Albert Hughes directed the film.

Meanwhile, Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians” is in full swing, grossing another $3.8 million on Thursday, bringing its cumulative to $8.7 million. The film, starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Michelle Yeoh, Gemma Chan and Awkwafina, is expected to have an five-day opening weekend total of $26-$27 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Mark Wahlberg Buys Chevrolet Dealership in Columbus: ‘With Hard Work, Dreams Come True’ (Video)

Mark Wahlberg Plans to Reboot ‘Captain Kangaroo’ (Video)

Why Mark Wahlberg Got ‘All the Money in the World’ for Reshoots and Michelle Williams Didn’t

Mark Wahlberg’s “Mile 22” grossed $1 million at the Thursday box office from 2,600 locations.

Thursday’s preview gross is comparable to that of Tom Cruise’s “American Made,” which earned $960,000 in previews before opening to $16.8 million. “Mile 22” is expected to have a $17-$18 million weekend, contending with “The Meg” for the No. 2 spot, after “Crazy Rich Asians.”

This is the fourth collaboration between director Peter Berg and star Mark Wahlberg, and tells the story of an elite CIA team tasked with protecting a valuable asset being hunted by terrorists. John Malkovich, Lauren Cohan, Iko Uwais and Ronda Rousey also star.

The film is written by Lea Carpenter based on a story by Graham Roland and Carpenter. Berg for Film 44, Wahlberg for Closest to the Hole and Stephen Levinson for Leverage produced. John Logan Pierson executive produced.

“Mile 22” holds a score of 24 percent on Rotten Tomatoes.

Sony Pictures and Studio 8’s “Alpha” earned $525,000 in previews from 2,303 locations on Thursday night, looking at a $10 million weekend.

Telling the story of the earliest days of man’s relationship with canines, “Alpha” stars Kodi Smit-McPhee as Keda, a Paleolithic hunter left behind by his tribe after he is injured during a hunt. Struggling to survive on his own, he encounters a wolf who has been similarly abandoned by his pack, leading to the two bonding together to survive. Albert Hughes directed the film.

Meanwhile, Jon M. Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians” is in full swing, grossing another $3.8 million on Thursday, bringing its cumulative to $8.7 million. The film, starring Constance Wu, Henry Golding, Michelle Yeoh, Gemma Chan and Awkwafina, is expected to have an five-day opening weekend total of $26-$27 million.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Mark Wahlberg Buys Chevrolet Dealership in Columbus: 'With Hard Work, Dreams Come True' (Video)

Mark Wahlberg Plans to Reboot 'Captain Kangaroo' (Video)

Why Mark Wahlberg Got 'All the Money in the World' for Reshoots and Michelle Williams Didn't