‘Halloween’ 40th Anniversary: John Carpenter Says Why One Scary Scene Made Jamie Lee Curtis Laugh

John Carpenter’s breakout horror film “Halloween” came out 40 years ago today, but the filmmaker told us he remembers making it as if it was yesterday.

One moment has stayed with him for years: the culminating scene when Michael Myers tries to get to Jamie Lee Curtis in the closet where she’s hiding. And his account of what really happened behind the scenes is probably not what diehard “Halloween” fans might expect.

“I remember directing Jamie Lee inside the closet, and I was sitting in there with the camera and she was in there, and I remember directing her,” Carpenter told TheWrap. “This was happening and this was happening and I said, ‘Pick up the knife and stab the son of a bitch!’  So we had to do the take again. She said, ‘Can you please not say that? I am going to laugh!’ I remember the look on her face — we had a great time.”

Also Read: From Blogger to ‘Halloween’ Producer: How Ryan Turek Got a Stab at This Year’s Biggest Horror Hit

In David Gordon Green’s new “Halloween,” Curtis steps into the role of Laurie Strode 40 years after she first took on the role of the 17-year-old babysitter who was viciously attacked by serial killer Michael Myers. Since the new film’s announcement, many wondered why the it bears the same title as the original, when it’s clearly a movie about Laurie seeking revenge on Michael — and vice versa.

“It’s odd,” Carpenter said. “I backed David’s decision to name it something different but the absolute geniuses at Universal decided to name it ‘Halloween.’ And I don’t know. I guess it’s OK. Everyone seems to be happy. That’s all that matters. There are powers above me that move in mysterious ways that I don’t understand.”

Carpenter just had one piece of advice for Green.

“It has to be simple — simple and relentless,” he said. “That’s it. That’s the secret to really getting to an audience.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Producer Jason Blum Is Down for a Sequel: ‘We’re Dying to’ Make One

Forty years ago, that’s exactly what Carpenter did. “When I made the movie in 1978, I was just trying to make a low budget exploitation movie where I could show off my stuff and maybe get another job. It was always about getting another job. I threw in everything I wanted to see in a horror movie. I never ever expected it to be anything like this.”

Carpenter weighed in on the new sequel: “I really like the movie. I think it’s terrific. I think that the new ‘Halloween’ is a standalone fabulous slasher film, and I love that about it. I haven’t seen one like it. I was hungry for it and I didn’t even realize it.”

“Halloween” opened to $76 million last weekend, breaking multiple box office records. The film also stars Judy Greer, Anti Matichak, James Jude Courtney, Nick Castle and Will Patton.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look (Photo)

John Carpenter’s breakout horror film “Halloween” came out 40 years ago today, but the filmmaker told us he remembers making it as if it was yesterday.

One moment has stayed with him for years: the culminating scene when Michael Myers tries to get to Jamie Lee Curtis in the closet where she’s hiding. And his account of what really happened behind the scenes is probably not what diehard “Halloween” fans might expect.

“I remember directing Jamie Lee inside the closet, and I was sitting in there with the camera and she was in there, and I remember directing her,” Carpenter told TheWrap. “This was happening and this was happening and I said, ‘Pick up the knife and stab the son of a bitch!’  So we had to do the take again. She said, ‘Can you please not say that? I am going to laugh!’ I remember the look on her face — we had a great time.”

In David Gordon Green’s new “Halloween,” Curtis steps into the role of Laurie Strode 40 years after she first took on the role of the 17-year-old babysitter who was viciously attacked by serial killer Michael Myers. Since the new film’s announcement, many wondered why the it bears the same title as the original, when it’s clearly a movie about Laurie seeking revenge on Michael — and vice versa.

“It’s odd,” Carpenter said. “I backed David’s decision to name it something different but the absolute geniuses at Universal decided to name it ‘Halloween.’ And I don’t know. I guess it’s OK. Everyone seems to be happy. That’s all that matters. There are powers above me that move in mysterious ways that I don’t understand.”

Carpenter just had one piece of advice for Green.

“It has to be simple — simple and relentless,” he said. “That’s it. That’s the secret to really getting to an audience.”

Forty years ago, that’s exactly what Carpenter did. “When I made the movie in 1978, I was just trying to make a low budget exploitation movie where I could show off my stuff and maybe get another job. It was always about getting another job. I threw in everything I wanted to see in a horror movie. I never ever expected it to be anything like this.”

Carpenter weighed in on the new sequel: “I really like the movie. I think it’s terrific. I think that the new ‘Halloween’ is a standalone fabulous slasher film, and I love that about it. I haven’t seen one like it. I was hungry for it and I didn’t even realize it.”

“Halloween” opened to $76 million last weekend, breaking multiple box office records. The film also stars Judy Greer, Anti Matichak, James Jude Courtney, Nick Castle and Will Patton.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her 'Halloween' Character Saved His Life (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' First Look (Photo)

‘Halloween’ Posts Biggest Opening Weekend for a Film With a 55+ Woman as Lead

Jamie Lee Curtis has broken new ground for women at the box office thanks to the role that first made her famous: Laurie Strode, the protagonist of “Halloween” and one of horror’s most famous heroines.

This weekend, David Gordon Green’s sequel to the 1978 slasher earned an opening of $77.5 million, making it the largest box office opening for a film with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role.

“Jamie Lee Curtis is an absolute force of nature in this film,” said Universal Domestic Distribution President Jim Orr. “We knew that we had something special with this actress and this role in a film that’s decades in the making.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

And Curtis certainly has bragging rights.

OK. I’m going for one BOAST post. Biggest horror movie opening with a female lead.
Biggest movie opening with a female lead over 55.
Second biggest October movie opening ever.
Biggest Halloween opening ever #womengetthingsdone @halloweenmovie pic.twitter.com/DhUBy82z3U

— Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) October 21, 2018

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists — Freddy Krueger for “Nightmare on Elm Street,” Jason Voorhees for “Friday the 13th” — “Halloween” has more than just the cold emotionless serial killer Michael Myers. It has the Golden Globe-winning Curtis playing Laurie, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror.

The “Halloween” franchise has indeed gone to Curtis to drive interest, as this 2018 sequel is her fifth appearance in the franchise. Along with the original, she also starred in “Halloween II” in 1981, “Halloween H20” in 1998 and “Halloween: Resurrection” in 2002, the last of which opened with Laurie finally meeting her demise at the hands of Michael. All three sequels have been widely regarded as inferior to the original, and the new film retcons them all out of the franchise’s timeline.

Also Read: Andi Matichak on ‘Halloween’ Co-Star Jamie Lee Curtis: ‘She Really Took Me Under Her Wing’ (Video)

But this “Halloween” treats Laurie differently, both in Green’s story and in Universal’s marketing. For decades, “Halloween” has been the subject of feminist criticism, pinning it as the film that popularized the use of the “final girl” (the one survivor of the slasher film who is often a virgin while more sexually promiscuous women are killed off). Critics have also noted that while Laurie fights off Michael, he survives, and it ultimately takes several gunshots from Michael’s psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis, to save her.

“The movie has bred 1000 PhDs, but… in retrospect, I know that was not the intention here. It was not a feminist statement. It had nothing to do with the fact that promiscuous girls died and the virgin lived, none of it,” Curtis said in an interview with Bustle. “It was written as an emotional journey of a very vulnerable girl being chosen as the centerpoint of this story, where this vulnerable creature is in collision with pure evil, and she’s somewhat an archetype of this young vulnerable dreamer.”

But despite this, Laurie Strode has grown over the years to become an icon as a survivor who withstood the attacks of a cold, violent man, and one whom Curtis has said she is fond of for “her resilience and her strength.”

Now, 40 years later, the new “Halloween” and its marketing have completely embraced the image of Laurie as the ultimate survivor. The trailers for the film show her preparing for the day Michael breaks out of the psych ward and comes hunting for her again, arming her house with guns and a security system. And when Michael escapes, it’s treated as the horror rematch of the century, with Laurie as the hunter.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Film Review: Jamie Lee Curtis Confronts Michael Myers in Stylish Sequel

Both critics and “Halloween” fans have responded positively to this new portrayal. Critics have given the film an 80 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, the highest for any sequel in the series, while fans gave it a B+ on CinemaScore. Even before the film was released, Strode’s legacy led to a touching moment at San Diego Comic-Con, when a fan told Curtis that her performance was a source of strength for him when his home was broken into by a person with a knife.

“I was scared out of my mind, and out of nowhere this thought inside of me went, ‘Well, what would Jamie Lee Curtis do?’” the fan told her. “To make a long story short, I’m here today because of the way that you portrayed Laurie Strode. I’m a victor today instead of a victim.”

Prior to the film’s release, comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian noted that now was a better time than ever to bring “Halloween” back. As actors are returning to iconic roles decades after they first played them — see Harrison Ford in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Blade Runner 2049” — it’s the right time to try that nostalgia appeal with one of horror’s staple franchises.

“At a time when horror is more popular with moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, [‘Halloween’] is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

‘Halloween’ Nears October Box Office Record With $77 Million Opening

Jamie Lee Curtis has broken new ground for women at the box office thanks to the role that first made her famous: Laurie Strode, the protagonist of “Halloween” and one of horror’s most famous heroines.

This weekend, David Gordon Green’s sequel to the 1978 slasher earned an opening of $77.5 million, making it the largest box office opening for a film with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role.

“Jamie Lee Curtis is an absolute force of nature in this film,” said Universal Domestic Distribution President Jim Orr. “We knew that we had something special with this actress and this role in a film that’s decades in the making.”

And Curtis certainly has bragging rights.

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists — Freddy Krueger for “Nightmare on Elm Street,” Jason Voorhees for “Friday the 13th” — “Halloween” has more than just the cold emotionless serial killer Michael Myers. It has the Golden Globe-winning Curtis playing Laurie, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror.

The “Halloween” franchise has indeed gone to Curtis to drive interest, as this 2018 sequel is her fifth appearance in the franchise. Along with the original, she also starred in “Halloween II” in 1981, “Halloween H20” in 1998 and “Halloween: Resurrection” in 2002, the last of which opened with Laurie finally meeting her demise at the hands of Michael. All three sequels have been widely regarded as inferior to the original, and the new film retcons them all out of the franchise’s timeline.

But this “Halloween” treats Laurie differently, both in Green’s story and in Universal’s marketing. For decades, “Halloween” has been the subject of feminist criticism, pinning it as the film that popularized the use of the “final girl” (the one survivor of the slasher film who is often a virgin while more sexually promiscuous women are killed off). Critics have also noted that while Laurie fights off Michael, he survives, and it ultimately takes several gunshots from Michael’s psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis, to save her.

“The movie has bred 1000 PhDs, but… in retrospect, I know that was not the intention here. It was not a feminist statement. It had nothing to do with the fact that promiscuous girls died and the virgin lived, none of it,” Curtis said in an interview with Bustle. “It was written as an emotional journey of a very vulnerable girl being chosen as the centerpoint of this story, where this vulnerable creature is in collision with pure evil, and she’s somewhat an archetype of this young vulnerable dreamer.”

But despite this, Laurie Strode has grown over the years to become an icon as a survivor who withstood the attacks of a cold, violent man, and one whom Curtis has said she is fond of for “her resilience and her strength.”

Now, 40 years later, the new “Halloween” and its marketing have completely embraced the image of Laurie as the ultimate survivor. The trailers for the film show her preparing for the day Michael breaks out of the psych ward and comes hunting for her again, arming her house with guns and a security system. And when Michael escapes, it’s treated as the horror rematch of the century, with Laurie as the hunter.

Both critics and “Halloween” fans have responded positively to this new portrayal. Critics have given the film an 80 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, the highest for any sequel in the series, while fans gave it a B+ on CinemaScore. Even before the film was released, Strode’s legacy led to a touching moment at San Diego Comic-Con, when a fan told Curtis that her performance was a source of strength for him when his home was broken into by a person with a knife.

“I was scared out of my mind, and out of nowhere this thought inside of me went, ‘Well, what would Jamie Lee Curtis do?'” the fan told her. “To make a long story short, I’m here today because of the way that you portrayed Laurie Strode. I’m a victor today instead of a victim.”

Prior to the film’s release, comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian noted that now was a better time than ever to bring “Halloween” back. As actors are returning to iconic roles decades after they first played them — see Harrison Ford in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Blade Runner 2049” — it’s the right time to try that nostalgia appeal with one of horror’s staple franchises.

“At a time when horror is more popular with moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, [‘Halloween’] is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween' Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers' One-Shot Murder Scene

'Halloween' Nears October Box Office Record With $77 Million Opening

‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen the new “Halloween” movie yet.)

Michael Myers is back to wreak havoc in “Halloween,” and perhaps one of the scariest scenes is when Michael goes from house to house on trick-or-treat night leaving a trail of dead bodies in various houses along a suburban street — all in one long horrifying shot.

“We were prepared to fail,” director David Gordon Green told TheWrap about the scene (that yes, is shown in the trailer too). “We had all these exit strategies: He could exit here, we could seam two shots here, or put a clever wipe there.”

The logistical challenge was so great that the crew spent extra time to prepare. “We spent half a day with camera operators talking through it,” Green said. “When we got to the day and all the background is running around, I didn’t want to be scientifically concerned with the precision of matching and getting a clever wipe behind a tree or things like that — that can be useful in these types of ambitions.”

See Video: Andi Matichak on ‘Halloween’ Co-Star Jamie Lee Curtis: ‘She Really Took Me Under Her Wing’

In the end, and after multiple tries, it all came together. “We did 11 takes, and it worked,” he said. “We used the 11th take, all one shot.”

But on the previous takes, he said, “there was always something that went wrong. In one version, the woman in the kitchen was thrown, and we thought, ‘We are running out of time.’”

But necessity really can be the mother of invention. “We’re trying to do this scene in four hours and we’ve got one more take and we’re like, well, ‘Let’s just put her at a table and squirt some blood on it,’ and then in the last minute we added a baby crib and the sound of a baby crying,” he said. “It was originally a husband sleeping on a couch but then we thought, ‘Why wouldn’t Michael just stab him on the way out?’

“We were scrambling and every take was a little different, and the last one worked,” he said. “That’s the crazy part about making a horror movie… success is when something horrible happens in a realistic way so your brain is altered to think it’s a positive thing.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

Adding to the horror factor is the fact that we don’t see Michael’s real face with his mask off at any point in the movie. And Green said that was intentional so the audience doesn’t feel empathy for the psychopathic killer.

“In Carpenter’s film, you see his face briefly when his mask is removed — you see the wound on his eye,” he said. “If we were going to go there, you start to humanize him in a way. … Even if they aren’t relatable or identifiable, something connects you when you make eye contact with a character, so I was really suspicious of that.”

Green added, “At the same time, I was afraid it would be a gimmick to avoid it too much.”

The director admitted he was unsettled when the cameras stopped rolling: “It was also weird to see the actor take his mask off and eating a celery stick on set.” (James Jude Courtney and Nick Castle are both credited with playing the role.) 

Also Read: ‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

The new “Halloween” picks up 40 years after Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Michael Myers faced off on Halloween night when she was just 17 years old.

Green, who co-wrote the script with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley, said he jumped at the chance to revisit the characters who had so affected him as a young movie fan. “It was a great opportunity to get in the ring with iconic characters that meant a lot to me as a kid,” he said.

“How often do you have that opportunity to cast people you’ve already admired and work in the genre?” said Green, who previously shot last year’s Boston Marathon bombing victim story “Stronger” with Jake Gyllenhaal.

Also Read: Here Are 12 of TV’s Best Halloween-Themed Episodes (Photos)

“A lot of [‘Stronger’] dealt with randomness of violence, and in a way, that was a horror film, so it wasn’t such a huge narrative leap,” he said. “In some ways, that project informed our approach to Michael’s narrative drive. What’s scary in the real world is what you don’t know, and random acts of violence get under my skin rather than something that is motivated or supernatural.”

“Halloween” also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Nick Castle, James Jude Courtney and Haluk Bilginer. It hit theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Halloween’ Billboard Sabotaged to Show Maxine Waters as Michael Myers

‘Halloween’ Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

‘Halloween’ Star Andi Matichak StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen the new “Halloween” movie yet.)

Michael Myers is back to wreak havoc in “Halloween,” and perhaps one of the scariest scenes is when Michael goes from house to house on trick-or-treat night leaving a trail of dead bodies in various houses along a suburban street — all in one long horrifying shot.

“We were prepared to fail,” director David Gordon Green told TheWrap about the scene (that yes, is shown in the trailer too). “We had all these exit strategies: He could exit here, we could seam two shots here, or put a clever wipe there.”

The logistical challenge was so great that the crew spent extra time to prepare. “We spent half a day with camera operators talking through it,” Green said. “When we got to the day and all the background is running around, I didn’t want to be scientifically concerned with the precision of matching and getting a clever wipe behind a tree or things like that — that can be useful in these types of ambitions.”

In the end, and after multiple tries, it all came together. “We did 11 takes, and it worked,” he said. “We used the 11th take, all one shot.”

But on the previous takes, he said, “there was always something that went wrong. In one version, the woman in the kitchen was thrown, and we thought, ‘We are running out of time.'”

But necessity really can be the mother of invention. “We’re trying to do this scene in four hours and we’ve got one more take and we’re like, well, ‘Let’s just put her at a table and squirt some blood on it,’ and then in the last minute we added a baby crib and the sound of a baby crying,” he said. “It was originally a husband sleeping on a couch but then we thought, ‘Why wouldn’t Michael just stab him on the way out?’

“We were scrambling and every take was a little different, and the last one worked,” he said. “That’s the crazy part about making a horror movie… success is when something horrible happens in a realistic way so your brain is altered to think it’s a positive thing.”

Adding to the horror factor is the fact that we don’t see Michael’s real face with his mask off at any point in the movie. And Green said that was intentional so the audience doesn’t feel empathy for the psychopathic killer.

“In Carpenter’s film, you see his face briefly when his mask is removed — you see the wound on his eye,” he said. “If we were going to go there, you start to humanize him in a way. … Even if they aren’t relatable or identifiable, something connects you when you make eye contact with a character, so I was really suspicious of that.”

Green added, “At the same time, I was afraid it would be a gimmick to avoid it too much.”

The director admitted he was unsettled when the cameras stopped rolling: “It was also weird to see the actor take his mask off and eating a celery stick on set.” (James Jude Courtney and Nick Castle are both credited with playing the role.) 

The new “Halloween” picks up 40 years after Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Michael Myers faced off on Halloween night when she was just 17 years old.

Green, who co-wrote the script with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley, said he jumped at the chance to revisit the characters who had so affected him as a young movie fan. “It was a great opportunity to get in the ring with iconic characters that meant a lot to me as a kid,” he said.

“How often do you have that opportunity to cast people you’ve already admired and work in the genre?” said Green, who previously shot last year’s Boston Marathon bombing victim story “Stronger” with Jake Gyllenhaal.

“A lot of [‘Stronger’] dealt with randomness of violence, and in a way, that was a horror film, so it wasn’t such a huge narrative leap,” he said. “In some ways, that project informed our approach to Michael’s narrative drive. What’s scary in the real world is what you don’t know, and random acts of violence get under my skin rather than something that is motivated or supernatural.”

“Halloween” also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Nick Castle, James Jude Courtney and Haluk Bilginer. It hit theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween' Billboard Sabotaged to Show Maxine Waters as Michael Myers

'Halloween' Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

'Halloween' Star Andi Matichak StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘Halloween’ Billboard Sabotaged to Show Maxine Waters as Michael Myers

It appears that the only thing scarier than Michael Myers for California conservatives is Rep. Maxine Waters.

A giant “Halloween” billboard in West Hollywood has been altered on Friday to show the longtime Democratic representative in the slasher movie’s starring role. The latest work from conservative street artist Sabo shows Waters, mouth agape, wielding a knife, with the tagline #UncivilDemocrats” added for good measure.

“It seems the Democrats don’t want to be civil anymore,” Sabo told TheWrap. “Not that they ever were. Michael Myers doesn’t scare me, crazy nutbags like Maxine do because monsters like her are real.”

Also Read: ‘Watergate’ Director Says John McCain Used His Film to Send a Message About Trump

Waters drew the ire of Republicans earlier this year, saying there should be “no peace, no sleep” for Trump cabinet members who supported his immigration policies. Waters — who represents several South Los Angeles neighborhoods — said at an LA rally in June to “push back” against cabinet members when they’re out in public.

This wasn’t the first time Sabo has gone after Waters. He created an “impeach Maxine” poster last year after she went after the president. “Important issues,” for Waters, Sabo wrote on his poster, include “blame whitey for everything.”

Sabo, since being kicked off Twitter in April, has been showcasing his anti-liberal artwork on his unsavoryagents.com site. The sabotaged “Halloween” billboard is located along West Pico Boulevard in West Hollywood, if you’re driving by.

Also Read: President Trump Has Already Raised $100 Million for 2020 Campaign

“Halloween,” starring Jamie Lee Curtis, opens in theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

LA Street Artist Sabo Explains Why He Trolled Sacha Baron Cohen With Hijacked Billboard (Exclusive)

Right-Wing LA Street Artist Sabo Banned From Twitter

‘Black Panther’ Director on Anti-Disney Sabotage Plan: I Welcome Fans ‘Regardless of… Political Views’

It appears that the only thing scarier than Michael Myers for California conservatives is Rep. Maxine Waters.

A giant “Halloween” billboard in West Hollywood has been altered on Friday to show the longtime Democratic representative in the slasher movie’s starring role. The latest work from conservative street artist Sabo shows Waters, mouth agape, wielding a knife, with the tagline #UncivilDemocrats” added for good measure.

“It seems the Democrats don’t want to be civil anymore,” Sabo told TheWrap. “Not that they ever were. Michael Myers doesn’t scare me, crazy nutbags like Maxine do because monsters like her are real.”

Waters drew the ire of Republicans earlier this year, saying there should be “no peace, no sleep” for Trump cabinet members who supported his immigration policies. Waters — who represents several South Los Angeles neighborhoods — said at an LA rally in June to “push back” against cabinet members when they’re out in public.

This wasn’t the first time Sabo has gone after Waters. He created an “impeach Maxine” poster last year after she went after the president. “Important issues,” for Waters, Sabo wrote on his poster, include “blame whitey for everything.”

Sabo, since being kicked off Twitter in April, has been showcasing his anti-liberal artwork on his unsavoryagents.com site. The sabotaged “Halloween” billboard is located along West Pico Boulevard in West Hollywood, if you’re driving by.

“Halloween,” starring Jamie Lee Curtis, opens in theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

LA Street Artist Sabo Explains Why He Trolled Sacha Baron Cohen With Hijacked Billboard (Exclusive)

Right-Wing LA Street Artist Sabo Banned From Twitter

'Black Panther' Director on Anti-Disney Sabotage Plan: I Welcome Fans 'Regardless of… Political Views'

‘Late Late Show’ Makes A ‘Halloween’ Murderer Out Of James Corden

Halloween’s Michael Myers finally speaks – and sounds a lot like James Corden. On CBS’ The Late Late Show last night, host Corden donned the old William Shatner rubber mask and sat for some very candid jailhouse interviews, a la Netfl…

Halloween’s Michael Myers finally speaks – and sounds a lot like James Corden. On CBS’ The Late Late Show last night, host Corden donned the old William Shatner rubber mask and sat for some very candid jailhouse interviews, a la Netflix’s Making a Murderer. Breaking his “eerie silence” (as one seen-it-all sheriff describes it), Corden’s chatty killer launches in with, "Yeah, uhh, I don't know where this whole he doesn't talk thing came from." Like Murderer‘s Steven Avery…

James Corden Combines ‘Making a Murderer’ and ‘Halloween’ So You Don’t Have to Choose Today (Video)

Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” Season 2 and Blumhouse’s “Halloween” both came out Friday, so how does one choose which to watch? Well, James Corden just combined the two into one true-crime series/horror flick crossover, “Making a Halloween Murderer,” so maybe start with that.

In the Thursday “Late Late Show” sketch, Corden’s Michael Myers has been locked up four 40 years when he implores a group of documentarians to shed light on his appeal, and to seek out some of his buddies as character witnesses. Cut to: Jason Voorhees, who totally vouches for the guy.

“The only thing Mike ever killed is on the dance floor,” the “Friday the 13th” baddie says. “The guy can move.”

Also Read: ‘Making a Murderer’ Season 2: Brendan Dassey’s Favorite TV Show Is ‘Lethal Weapon’

Later, when presented with some violent film footage from the (alleged) crime, Myers admits that video of him attacking Jamie Lee Curtis with a knife in an earlier “Halloween” movie does “look bad.”

Fortunately for the masked man who is definitely not a killer, newly discovered DNA evidence eventual springs him from the clink. And on the outside, he meets a lady — but his freedom and newfound relationship don’t last once the cops sit down and watch all of the other “Halloween” movies.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’: Peanuts Creator’s Daughter Recalls Giving Real Halloween Rocks

‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

Jason Blum Apologizes for ‘Dumb Comments’ About Lack of Female Directors

Netflix’s “Making a Murderer” Season 2 and Blumhouse’s “Halloween” both came out Friday, so how does one choose which to watch? Well, James Corden just combined the two into one true-crime series/horror flick crossover, “Making a Halloween Murderer,” so maybe start with that.

In the Thursday “Late Late Show” sketch, Corden’s Michael Myers has been locked up four 40 years when he implores a group of documentarians to shed light on his appeal, and to seek out some of his buddies as character witnesses. Cut to: Jason Voorhees, who totally vouches for the guy.

“The only thing Mike ever killed is on the dance floor,” the “Friday the 13th” baddie says. “The guy can move.”

Later, when presented with some violent film footage from the (alleged) crime, Myers admits that video of him attacking Jamie Lee Curtis with a knife in an earlier “Halloween” movie does “look bad.”

Fortunately for the masked man who is definitely not a killer, newly discovered DNA evidence eventual springs him from the clink. And on the outside, he meets a lady — but his freedom and newfound relationship don’t last once the cops sit down and watch all of the other “Halloween” movies.

Watch the video above.

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Andi Matichak on ‘Halloween’ Co-Star Jamie Lee Curtis: ‘She Really Took Me Under Her Wing’ (Video)

Andi Matichak plays Jamie Lee Curtis’ granddaughter in the new “Halloween” film, and Matichak says that the famous actress started mentoring her before they started filming.

“She has been an incredible mentor to me this entire process,” Matichak said in an interview with TheWrap’s Beatrice Verhoeven. “Before I even got down to set, she sent me a message to welcome me to the family and introduce herself, saying, ‘we’re so excited to have you here.’ The second I got down to set, she took me dinner and gave me a full history lesson of ‘Halloween,’ like start to finish, which was the best thing in the world and then from there, she really took me under her wing.”

While Curtis is the “scream queen” and one of the most famous actresses in the world, Matichak was really excited to meet Judy Greer, who would play her mother in the David Gordon Greer-directed horror film.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Film Review: Jamie Lee Curtis Confronts Michael Myers in Stylish Sequel

“Judy Greer is somebody I was really nervous to meet because I love her so much,” she said. “I had loved her for so so long, I was like, what if she doesn’t live up to what [I expect]? I met her, and she completely shattered all expectations — she’s just as lovely and bubbly and kind and funny as you’d think.”

Matichak joined a franchise that has been around for 40 years and 10 previous films, and Michael Myers has become synonymous with the horror genre. And Myers is the definition of what scares Matichak, personally.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ to Pour Gasoline on an Already Exploding October Box Office

“The main thing that scares me is random acts of violence and that’s exactly what I find so terrifying about Michael Myers in the original and this one, is that there is really no motive, there’s really no reason, he’s going house to house and he’ll decide who he kills and he’ll decide who he spares,” Matichak said. “There really is no cause and that randomness is really scary and the facelessness of Michael [as well].”

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Watch the video above.

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‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

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Andi Matichak plays Jamie Lee Curtis’ granddaughter in the new “Halloween” film, and Matichak says that the famous actress started mentoring her before they started filming.

“She has been an incredible mentor to me this entire process,” Matichak said in an interview with TheWrap’s Beatrice Verhoeven. “Before I even got down to set, she sent me a message to welcome me to the family and introduce herself, saying, ‘we’re so excited to have you here.’ The second I got down to set, she took me dinner and gave me a full history lesson of ‘Halloween,’ like start to finish, which was the best thing in the world and then from there, she really took me under her wing.”

While Curtis is the “scream queen” and one of the most famous actresses in the world, Matichak was really excited to meet Judy Greer, who would play her mother in the David Gordon Greer-directed horror film.

“Judy Greer is somebody I was really nervous to meet because I love her so much,” she said. “I had loved her for so so long, I was like, what if she doesn’t live up to what [I expect]? I met her, and she completely shattered all expectations — she’s just as lovely and bubbly and kind and funny as you’d think.”

Matichak joined a franchise that has been around for 40 years and 10 previous films, and Michael Myers has become synonymous with the horror genre. And Myers is the definition of what scares Matichak, personally.

“The main thing that scares me is random acts of violence and that’s exactly what I find so terrifying about Michael Myers in the original and this one, is that there is really no motive, there’s really no reason, he’s going house to house and he’ll decide who he kills and he’ll decide who he spares,” Matichak said. “There really is no cause and that randomness is really scary and the facelessness of Michael [as well].”

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween:' Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

Here Are 12 of TV's Best Halloween-Themed Episodes (Photos)

All the 'Halloween' Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you don’t want to know what happens in the new “Halloween” movie.)

Bonus, or post-credit scenes, have become staples of big blockbuster films, and with the highly-anticipated “Halloween” scaring up moviegoers, you might wonder whether it has a post-credits scene.

The answer: It sort of has a post-credits scene. If you stay until the very end —  past all of the credits — you will continue to hear Michael Myers’ breathing. If you’re a fan of the franchise, you’ll know Myers’ breathing is somewhat labored due to his famous mask. And sometimes, that’s all you can hear after one of his gruesome kills.

So, while there isn’t an actual post-credits scene in the visual sense, fans are left haunted by a sound that has become synonymous with the “Halloween” franchise. And maybe — just maybe — it means Michael Myers might always find a way to come back to us (in another film?).

See Video: Michael Myers Is Back to Kill in New ‘Halloween’ Trailer

“Halloween” sees Jamie Lee Curtis reprising her role as Laurie Strode, 40 years after the Halloween night when she was 17, when Michael Myers killed her friends and came after her as well. She has prepared to face Myers again since then, and when the killer escapes from prison, she finds herself fighting for revenge.

Directed by David Gordon Green, who also wrote the screenplay alongside Danny McBride, also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, and Nick Castle, who reprises his role as The Shape alongside James Jude Courtney.

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life (Video)

Actor Kidnapped With ‘Halloween: Resurrection’ Actress Details Ordeal: ‘A Pretty Good Beating’

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you don’t want to know what happens in the new “Halloween” movie.)

Bonus, or post-credit scenes, have become staples of big blockbuster films, and with the highly-anticipated “Halloween” scaring up moviegoers, you might wonder whether it has a post-credits scene.

The answer: It sort of has a post-credits scene. If you stay until the very end —  past all of the credits — you will continue to hear Michael Myers’ breathing. If you’re a fan of the franchise, you’ll know Myers’ breathing is somewhat labored due to his famous mask. And sometimes, that’s all you can hear after one of his gruesome kills.

So, while there isn’t an actual post-credits scene in the visual sense, fans are left haunted by a sound that has become synonymous with the “Halloween” franchise. And maybe — just maybe — it means Michael Myers might always find a way to come back to us (in another film?).

“Halloween” sees Jamie Lee Curtis reprising her role as Laurie Strode, 40 years after the Halloween night when she was 17, when Michael Myers killed her friends and came after her as well. She has prepared to face Myers again since then, and when the killer escapes from prison, she finds herself fighting for revenge.

Directed by David Gordon Green, who also wrote the screenplay alongside Danny McBride, also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, and Nick Castle, who reprises his role as The Shape alongside James Jude Courtney.

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her 'Halloween' Character Saved His Life (Video)

Actor Kidnapped With 'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress Details Ordeal: 'A Pretty Good Beating'

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

All the ‘Halloween’ Movies, Ranked From Worst to Best (Photos)

When John Carpenter made the original “Halloween” in 1978, it was just another horror movie in a long line of horror movies. But the blockbuster success of this low-budget movie, about a masked killer murdering babysitters, made “Hall…

When John Carpenter made the original “Halloween” in 1978, it was just another horror movie in a long line of horror movies. But the blockbuster success of this low-budget movie, about a masked killer murdering babysitters, made “Halloween” a cultural institution. The film spawned legions of imitators and codified the slasher genre as we still know it. And yet the official “Halloween” franchise has often struggled to meet the standard of the movie that inspired the craze.

Let’s look back at all of these classic (and not so classic) horror movies, and see how they stack up:

12. “Halloween: Resurrection” (2002)

The worst “Halloween” movie commits two cardinal sins. First, it nullifies the intense and satisfying finale of “Halloween H20” by striking Laurie Strode’s personal victory from the record; now, not only did she kill an innocent man instead of Michael Myers, but Myers destroys her instead. Second, and perhaps more laughably, the eighth film in the series desperately tries to be “hip” and “now” by building a limp narrative around an online reality TV series set in Myers’ actual house. “Resurrection” isn’t smart enough to be meta, nor is it scary enough to be engaging. (But it does have Busta Rhymes roundhouse kicking Michael Myers in the face, so it’s not a total waste.)

11. “Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers” (1995)

The sixth “Halloween” film is where the franchise completely flew off the rails by introducing the Cult of Thorne, a supernatural organization that needs Michael Myers to kill every member of his family in order to stave off the apocalypse. Paul Rudd stars as Tommy Doyle, the little boy who survived Myers’ attacks in the original “Halloween,” and Donald Pleasance returns for one last film as Dr. Loomis — only to be killed confusingly off-camera during the closing credits. “The Curse of Michael Myers” is confusing, choppy, and utterly absurd.

10. “Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers” (Producer’s Cut)

The original, substantially different “Producer’s Cut” of “The Curse of Michael Myers” was a bootleg cult commodity for many years, and it was finally officially released on home video in 2014. It’s still a fundamentally strange motion picture, but at least this version makes more sense, revealing more disturbing truths about the Cult of Thorne and giving Dr. Loomis an interesting cliffhanger to go out on, as opposed to the frustrating anti-death of the theatrical release. The “Producer’s Cut” still isn’t good, per se, but it’s a lot more effective and entertaining.

9. “Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myers” (1989)

Michael Myers returns to finish the job he started in “Halloween 4,” by killing his niece, Jamie, once again played by Danielle Harris. This time, Jamie is trapped in a mental hospital, and she’s got psychic powers, which don’t always help her friends survive Myers’ latest murder spree. The scene with young Jamie trapped in a laundry chute is genuinely terrifying, and Pleasance adds some real emotion to his climactic confrontation with Myers. It’s an eccentric, somewhat enjoyable slasher sequel, but the goofiness ultimately bogs it down.

8. “Halloween” (2007)

Rob Zombie rebooted the whole “Halloween” franchise with a remake that tried, for better or worse, to finally get inside Michael Myers’ head. The remake shows Myers growing up in an abusive household, showing early warning signs of becoming a serial killer, and then relegates the majority of John Carpenter’s original film to a third-act murder spree. It can be argued that Zombie completely missed the point by trying to explain the unexplained, thus making Myers just another serial killer. But perhaps, by not repeating what had been produced before, he was actually preserving the original film’s integrity. Taken on its own, Zombie’s “Halloween” is a satisfying, albeit cynical and depressing horror movie. But for fans of the originals, it’s hard to accept, let alone appreciate.

7. “Halloween II” (1981)

The first “Halloween” sequel picks right up where the original left off, with Michael Myers skulking into the shadows and resuming his murder spree. It’s a lean, mean slasher, but it’s also where the franchise’s problems started to develop. The revelation that Laurie Strode was Michael’s sister had the same impact as Zombie’s “Halloween,” revealing too much about the killer’s motives and telling the audience that they’re basically safe unless they’re either related to the killer or standing near someone who is. Throw in some frustrating pacing issues, and you’ve got a sporadically satisfying but flawed follow-up.

6. “Halloween III: Season of the Witch” (1982)

John Carpenter envisioned “Halloween” as a series of unrelated horror movies set on or around October 31, and if they’d released “Season of the Witch” instead of “Halloween II,” he might have gotten away with it. But after two Myers movies, fans balked at Tommy Lee Wallace’s unusual flick, about evil Halloween masks designed to murder people in a mass pagan sacrifice. And yet time has been relatively kind to “Season of the Witch,” a highly entertaining and spectacularly weird motion picture with a killer ending, oddball performances and memorable murders. It’s nowhere near as well crafted as the original “Halloween,” and it’s exceptionally hard to take seriously, but it’s nevertheless a hoot.

5. “Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers” (1988)

Michael Myers returns after taking a season (of the witch) off in “Halloween 4,” an impressively scary, rock-solid slasher. Myers is back to kill the rest of his family, specifically Jamie, the daughter of Laurie Strode (who died between films), and it’s up to her babysitter to save her. Creepy cinematography and suspenseful set pieces help bolster a film that builds to a terrifying finale… which “Halloween 5” almost completely ignored. But taken on its own, “Halloween 4” is one of the best and scariest films in the series. It sticks to the fundamentals of the franchise and reaps all the rewards.

4. “Halloween II” (2009)

Rob Zombie played with fire by remaking John Carpenter’s “Halloween,” one of the most celebrated horror movies ever made. But the “Halloween” sequels were always a hodgepodge of disjointed ideas, and his Zombie’s to condense all those weird elements into one single film is actually a major improvement. “Halloween II” shoves the hospital attacks, psychic connections, scary evolutions of innocent characters, and Dr. Loomis’s strange post-Myers adventures together and creates a hypnotic, trippy, disturbing motion picture that could have sent the whole rebooted franchise into a fascinating new direction. (Even though it didn’t.)

3. “Halloween” (2018)

David Gordon Green’s “Halloween” isn’t the first film to ignore the majority of the franchise’s continuity, and it’s not the best either. But it’s an impeccably stylish slasher thriller, in which Myers returns to Haddonfield 40 years after the massacre, where Laurie Strode is waiting for him along with her estranged daughter, played by Judy Greer, and her loving granddaughter, played by Andi Matichak. The scares are freaky, the dynamic between all three generations of the Strode family is honest and mature, the cinematography and score are absolutely spectacular. If only the story weren’t so incredibly contrived, and if the film’s themes were actually explored instead of just awkwardly spoken aloud, it might have been the second best film in the series.

2. “Halloween: H20” (1998)

The first “Halloween” film to completely reset the franchise continuity (and to depict Laurie Strode as a traumatized woman living in fear of Michael’s return) is a slick and emotionally satisfying finale to the franchise — even though it turned out not to be the finale. Myers finally tracks down Laurie, living under a new name and working at a private school, where her son (Josh Harnett) and his girlfriend (Michelle Williams) are hiding out for Halloween when they should be on a field trip. Myers attacks and gets a few bloody kills in before Laurie rescues the kids and walks right back inside, with the sinister “Halloween” orchestral theme now playing as her empowering ballad. The slasher elements are above average, but it’s Curtis who brings “H20” to life by delivering one of the finest performances of her career.

1. “Halloween” (1978)

Turn off the background noise of the sequels, reboots and retcons, and just watch John Carpenter’s “Halloween” for what it always was: a terrifying urban legend come to life. Carpenter films the hell out of “Halloween,” with eerie Panaglide shots from Myers’ point of view, giving him a wraithlike quality, and masterful editing that builds and builds and builds the suspense until Myers’ wrath finally, brutally breaks the tension. It’s a smart, earnest, believable horror movie, the sort of tale that could easily happen anywhere. “Halloween” has always been terrifying. It probably always will.

All 11 ‘Halloween’ Movies in the Franchise, Ranked

Proving that you can’t kill pure evil, Michael Myers returns once again to pierce fresh victims with an assortment of cutlery in Universal’s “Halloween” reboot. Though this latest entry in the franchise ignores the events of the last nine films, enough…

Proving that you can’t kill pure evil, Michael Myers returns once again to pierce fresh victims with an assortment of cutlery in Universal’s “Halloween” reboot. Though this latest entry in the franchise ignores the events of the last nine films, enough references are included throughout it to make several of the sequels well worth revisiting. […]

Jamie Lee Curtis Fires Back at Fox News After Accusation of Being Hypocritical on Gun Control

Jamie Lee Curtis struck back at a Fox News article that claimed her advocacy for gun control is hypocritical given her character in the upcoming “Halloween” film uses firearms.

The article said Curtis was “one of several Hollywood actors who use firearms in their films while preaching against them away from the set.”

“It was just silly, because they were trying to make a point without ever asking me what I really think,” the actress told USA Today on Wednesday. “And what I think might surprise them.”

See Video: Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life

“I am vocal about common-sense gun safety and gun laws,” she explained. “For instance, I fully support an assault weapon ban, I fully support a bump stock ban.”

However, the actress said her views on gun reform don’t necessarily make her anti-gun entirely.

“I fully support the Bill of Rights,” she clarified. “And fully support the Second Amendment. And have absolutely no problem with people owning firearms if they have been trained, licensed, a background check has been conducted, a pause button has been pushed to give time for that process to take place. And they have to renew their license just like we do with automobiles — which are weapons also.”

Curtis reprises her role of Laurie Strode in the upcoming “Halloween,” which will hit theaters on Oct. 19. She has spent the last 40 years preparing to kill Michael Myers, who traumatized her when she was just 17. She told USA Today she was the one who told production not to showcase automatic weapons.

See Video: Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers

In the movie, when Strode arms her family with guns as Myers gets closer, the character “very specifically says what each weapon does and why you would choose that weapon in self-defense.”

“I’m an actress who’s in slasher movies. I have to be responsible for my own personal choices in my own personal life. But I am an actor for hire. And honestly, if I had made my career as a pacifist actor, I would never have worked, ever,” she explained. “But I have always been proud to represent women who fight back and fight back with intelligence, cunning and creativity, and who fight for their lives and their families’ lives.”

Curtis also tweeted the story on Thursday, and added, “Thanks @Andrea Mandell for the deep dive and and truth telling.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Jamie Lee Curtis struck back at a Fox News article that claimed her advocacy for gun control is hypocritical given her character in the upcoming “Halloween” film uses firearms.

The article said Curtis was “one of several Hollywood actors who use firearms in their films while preaching against them away from the set.”

“It was just silly, because they were trying to make a point without ever asking me what I really think,” the actress told USA Today on Wednesday. “And what I think might surprise them.”

“I am vocal about common-sense gun safety and gun laws,” she explained. “For instance, I fully support an assault weapon ban, I fully support a bump stock ban.”

However, the actress said her views on gun reform don’t necessarily make her anti-gun entirely.

“I fully support the Bill of Rights,” she clarified. “And fully support the Second Amendment. And have absolutely no problem with people owning firearms if they have been trained, licensed, a background check has been conducted, a pause button has been pushed to give time for that process to take place. And they have to renew their license just like we do with automobiles — which are weapons also.”

Curtis reprises her role of Laurie Strode in the upcoming “Halloween,” which will hit theaters on Oct. 19. She has spent the last 40 years preparing to kill Michael Myers, who traumatized her when she was just 17. She told USA Today she was the one who told production not to showcase automatic weapons.

In the movie, when Strode arms her family with guns as Myers gets closer, the character “very specifically says what each weapon does and why you would choose that weapon in self-defense.”

“I’m an actress who’s in slasher movies. I have to be responsible for my own personal choices in my own personal life. But I am an actor for hire. And honestly, if I had made my career as a pacifist actor, I would never have worked, ever,” she explained. “But I have always been proud to represent women who fight back and fight back with intelligence, cunning and creativity, and who fight for their lives and their families’ lives.”

Curtis also tweeted the story on Thursday, and added, “Thanks @Andrea Mandell for the deep dive and and truth telling.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sexy 'Handmaid's Tale' Costume Removed From Halloween Site After Backlash

Actor Kidnapped With 'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress Details Ordeal: 'A Pretty Good Beating'

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‘Halloween’ Reboot Blocked Edgar Wright From Using Michael Myers Masks in ‘Baby Driver’

One of the best jokes in “Baby Driver” was originally much different.

One of the best jokes in Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver” is when three criminals are forced to wear masks of comedian Mike Myers’ face because one of them got confused and ordered them instead of masks of the iconic horror movie killer Michael Myers from the “Halloween” franchise. The joke became a breakout bit from the film just from the trailer alone, but it turns out Wright originally wrote the scene with the “Halloween” character in mind.

Greg Nicotero, the effects artist who worked on “Baby Driver,” revealed on Instagram the original Michael Myers masks that were created to be used in Wright’s movie. Nicotero called the original scene one of his favorite jokes from the movie that had to get cut. The original scene was written to have two characters wearing “Halloween” masks and one of them messing up by having a Mike Myers mask.

“I thought it was really funny and very, very clever so we created this mask for the movie and unfortunately were unable to get permission to use it so the mask sits proudly on a zombie bust in my office,” Nicotero said.

“Because of the upcoming ‘Halloween’ reboot, the rights holders didn’t want to let us use the Michael Myers mask,” Wright chimed in on Twitter. “So we went with three Austin Powers masks instead of just the one – with Mike Myers blessing.”

Fortunately, Wright noted that “Halloween” has a long history of denying people the right to use the Myers mask in non-franchise properties, so the rights holders’ refusal to grant him permission for “Baby Driver” was nothing personal. Wright also posted more of the intended “Baby Driver” masks to his social media pages.

The “Halloween” reboot opens nationwide October 19, via Universal Pictures.

Needle wounds and bug-birthing masks: All the Easter eggs we found in the new Halloween trailer

There was a new trailer released today for the upcoming sequel/“alternative reality”-set continuation of the Halloween franchise. It was a solid preview for the movie—but also, it was a treasure trove for sharp-eyed fans keeping a close watch for any c…

There was a new trailer released today for the upcoming sequel/“alternative reality”-set continuation of the Halloween franchise. It was a solid preview for the movie—but also, it was a treasure trove for sharp-eyed fans keeping a close watch for any callbacks to the prior films.

Read more...

Michael Myers Is Back to Kill in New ‘Halloween’ Trailer (Video)

Michael Myers is back to kill in the new exhilarating trailer for “Halloween,” and Laurie Strode is ready to face him.

The trailer opens to Michael walking the streets of a neighborhood on Halloween, killing more women who are minding their own business in their respective homes. The end of the trailer shows an epic stand-off between Michael and Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), with images that will leave you sleepless.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure in the film, who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades earlier. This time, she won’t be the one running.

See Video: Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life

Nick Castle, who played Myers and credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, is reprising the role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

See Video: ‘Halloween’ Trailer: Michael Myers Returns and He’s Coming for Jamie Lee Curtis

Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Will Patton, Virginia Gardner, and Nick Castle also star.

Watch the trailer below.

Evil is real. #HalloweenMovie pic.twitter.com/l5wDrWxJgL

— #HalloweenMovie (@halloweenmovie) September 5, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Actor Kidnapped With ‘Halloween: Resurrection’ Actress Details Ordeal: ‘A Pretty Good Beating’

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

‘Halloween’ Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

Michael Myers is back to kill in the new exhilarating trailer for “Halloween,” and Laurie Strode is ready to face him.

The trailer opens to Michael walking the streets of a neighborhood on Halloween, killing more women who are minding their own business in their respective homes. The end of the trailer shows an epic stand-off between Michael and Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), with images that will leave you sleepless.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure in the film, who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades earlier. This time, she won’t be the one running.

Nick Castle, who played Myers and credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, is reprising the role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Will Patton, Virginia Gardner, and Nick Castle also star.

Watch the trailer below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Actor Kidnapped With 'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress Details Ordeal: 'A Pretty Good Beating'

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

'Halloween' Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

‘Halloween’ Trailer: Michael Myers Returns and He’s Coming for Jamie Lee Curtis (Video)

He’s back.

(Cue creepiest horror film theme music of all time.)

In the first official trailer for “Halloween,” which dropped Friday, fans get more than a glimpse of Michael Myers, the horrifying killer who has returned to haunt Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) once more after decades of being locked up for his crimes.

Also Read: Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Myers is visited in prison by investigative reporters who are looking into his frightening tale — and reunite him with his iconic mask. But the action really starts when the gun-toting Strode appears, ready to kill her old enemy, as her granddaughter explains to her friends that the story about him being “her brother” is totally made up.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure in the film, who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades earlier. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in the trailer. “He’s waited for me.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

Nick Castle, who played Myers and credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, is reprising the role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Will Patton, Virginia Gardner, and Nick Castle also star.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look (Photo)

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

He’s back.

(Cue creepiest horror film theme music of all time.)

In the first official trailer for “Halloween,” which dropped Friday, fans get more than a glimpse of Michael Myers, the horrifying killer who has returned to haunt Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) once more after decades of being locked up for his crimes.

Myers is visited in prison by investigative reporters who are looking into his frightening tale — and reunite him with his iconic mask. But the action really starts when the gun-toting Strode appears, ready to kill her old enemy, as her granddaughter explains to her friends that the story about him being “her brother” is totally made up.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure in the film, who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades earlier. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in the trailer. “He’s waited for me.”

Nick Castle, who played Myers and credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, is reprising the role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Will Patton, Virginia Gardner, and Nick Castle also star.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' First Look (Photo)

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to 'Halloween' Franchise

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Anxious for the “Halloween” trailer to come out on Friday? While you’re waiting, you can check out two teasers for the trailer in which Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode prepares to take on Michael Myers.

“Wishes do come true…,” Curtis tweeted on Thursday.

In the teaser (below, bottom of two), Strode sings to herself before approaching a mannequin, which she shoots point blank in the head.

See Photo: Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in one of the teasers (below, top of two). “He’s waited for me.”

Nick Castle, who played Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also reprise his role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

David Gordon Green Green and Danny McBride are scripting the flick, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The first official trailer will drop on Friday.

See the teasers here:

????????#HalloweenMovie trailer tomorrow. pic.twitter.com/dvMKB7RLeM

— #HalloweenMovie (@halloweenmovie) June 7, 2018

Wishes do come true… @halloweenmovie #HalloweenMovie pic.twitter.com/LrC4YX5dvE

— Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) June 7, 2018

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Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

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Anxious for the “Halloween” trailer to come out on Friday? While you’re waiting, you can check out two teasers for the trailer in which Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode prepares to take on Michael Myers.

“Wishes do come true…,” Curtis tweeted on Thursday.

In the teaser (below, bottom of two), Strode sings to herself before approaching a mannequin, which she shoots point blank in the head.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in one of the teasers (below, top of two). “He’s waited for me.”

Nick Castle, who played Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also reprise his role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green Green and Danny McBride are scripting the flick, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The first official trailer will drop on Friday.

See the teasers here:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' First Look (Photo)

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to 'Halloween' Franchise

Heidi Klum Thrills in Epic Michael Jackson Halloween Costume (Photos)

‘Halloween’ Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

With a big smile on her face, Jamie Lee Curtis took the stage at CinemaCon in Las Vegas to show the first trailer to “Halloween,” the upcoming sequel to John Carpenter’s classic 1978 horror film that gave Curtis her big break in Hollywood.

“Aside from ‘Star Wars,’ I can’t think of another movie in which the same actor plays the same character forty years later,” Curtis said. “I am proud to return to the role that marked the start of my creative life.”

The trailer shows Curtis as Laurie Strode, now a grandmother, whose grandchildren are the subject of rumors at their high school because of the famous clash Laurie had with the murderous Michael Myers forty years ago. The spiritual scars of that confrontation still haven’t healed, with Laurie still training at a shooting range she built in her backyard, preparing for the day Michael comes back.

“I pray every night that he would escape… so I could kill him,” she hisses.

Also Read: Will Smith’s Genie Unleashed in Early ‘Aladdin’ Footage

And on Halloween night 2018, that day comes, as an asylum bus containing Michael “mysteriously” crashes. Laurie knows what that means, running out into her neighborhood and ordering the kids trick-or-treating to get inside. With knives and guns drawn, Laurie prepares as Michael arrives wearing the mask that made him an urban legend.

David Gordon Green is directing the film from a script he co-wrote with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley. Laurie and Michael will return to theaters October 19.

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With a big smile on her face, Jamie Lee Curtis took the stage at CinemaCon in Las Vegas to show the first trailer to “Halloween,” the upcoming sequel to John Carpenter’s classic 1978 horror film that gave Curtis her big break in Hollywood.

“Aside from ‘Star Wars,’ I can’t think of another movie in which the same actor plays the same character forty years later,” Curtis said. “I am proud to return to the role that marked the start of my creative life.”

The trailer shows Curtis as Laurie Strode, now a grandmother, whose grandchildren are the subject of rumors at their high school because of the famous clash Laurie had with the murderous Michael Myers forty years ago. The spiritual scars of that confrontation still haven’t healed, with Laurie still training at a shooting range she built in her backyard, preparing for the day Michael comes back.

“I pray every night that he would escape… so I could kill him,” she hisses.

And on Halloween night 2018, that day comes, as an asylum bus containing Michael “mysteriously” crashes. Laurie knows what that means, running out into her neighborhood and ordering the kids trick-or-treating to get inside. With knives and guns drawn, Laurie prepares as Michael arrives wearing the mask that made him an urban legend.

David Gordon Green is directing the film from a script he co-wrote with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley. Laurie and Michael will return to theaters October 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Will Smith's Genie Unleashed in Early 'Aladdin' Footage

'First Man' Trailer Peek: Ryan Gosling and Claire Foy Blast Off

The Government Plays Boogeyman in Politically Charged 'The First Purge'

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

Nick Castle, who played Michael Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will return to reprise the role in the upcoming Blumhouse movie, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap.

David Gordon Green is directing the film that will also star original cast member Jamie Lee Curtis and also Judy Greer. Laurie Strode (Curtis) will have her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the new “Halloween” film, due in theaters Oct. 19, 2018. John Carpenter, master of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures. Blumhouse, Trancas International Films and Miramax are producing together.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Remake in the Works From David Gordon Green and Danny McBride

Castle played Michael Myers 40 years ago in the original late-’70s horror classic — and now he’s coming back to finish the job.

Castle’s other acting credits include “The Boy Who Could Fly” from 1986. Other than that, he has a bunch of directing credits including 1984’s “The Last Starfighter” and “Escape from New York” (1981).

Bloody Disgusting first reported the news of Castle’s return.

Nick Castle, who played Michael Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will return to reprise the role in the upcoming Blumhouse movie, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap.

David Gordon Green is directing the film that will also star original cast member Jamie Lee Curtis and also Judy Greer. Laurie Strode (Curtis) will have her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the new “Halloween” film, due in theaters Oct. 19, 2018. John Carpenter, master of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures. Blumhouse, Trancas International Films and Miramax are producing together.

Castle played Michael Myers 40 years ago in the original late-’70s horror classic — and now he’s coming back to finish the job.

Castle’s other acting credits include “The Boy Who Could Fly” from 1986. Other than that, he has a bunch of directing credits including 1984’s “The Last Starfighter” and “Escape from New York” (1981).

Bloody Disgusting first reported the news of Castle’s return.

Harry Styles Soars in New Music Video for ‘Sign of the Times’ (Video)

Harry Styles has released the new music video for his song “Sign of the Times,” in which he flies through the clouds and walks on water.

The video opens with Styles wearing a black trench coat and leather boots, walking across a field in front of a beautiful sunset. As the song’s chorus kicks in, Styles takes flight, flying over tree tops, a lake and mountains — at one point, he even walks on water.

Styles teased the video last week. Last month, Twitter lost its mind over how a creepy stunt double appeared on the set of the new music video, with many pointing out his eerie resemblance to “Halloween” baddie Michael Myers. A stuntman wore what appeared to be a mask, while hanging from a helicopter.

Also Read: Harry Styles Breaks Silence on Relationship With Taylor Swift, Tells Her ‘Thank You’

The 23-year-old singer will release his album on May 12. “Sign of the Times” debuted and peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 list after it was released last month. According to Billboard, tickets for his first solo would tour went on sale Friday and sold out in seconds. The U.S. leg of the tour will begin on Sept. 19 in San Francisco and will wrap on Oct. 14 in Phoenix.

Also Read: Creepy Harry Styles Stunt Double Terrifies People on Internet

Watch the video above, and see some Twitter reactions to the video below.

Harry Styles looked kinda Heathcliff-ish in the ‘Sign of the Times’ music video. ????????

— Dang (@Reitczielle) May 8, 2017

The Harry Styles Sign of the Times music video should be the new footage for the Soarin’ ride at Epcot

— Soph Opera (@sofatoes) May 8, 2017

@Harry_Styles Grammy Video of the year – Sign Of The Times by Harry Styles ????????????

— kate;;; (@admirelouiss) May 8, 2017

The video for Harry Styles’ Sign of The Times is so funny (such a good song haram the video).

— V (@reelrambler) May 8, 2017

I can’t believe I live in the same world where harry styles, sign of the times and sign of the times music video exists

— meg (@heswantstofly) May 8, 2017

@Harry_Styles No words the video of sign of the times is just wow. Totally amazing congratulations ❤️????????????

— María (@AndiieSilva) May 8, 2017

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Harry Styles has released the new music video for his song “Sign of the Times,” in which he flies through the clouds and walks on water.

The video opens with Styles wearing a black trench coat and leather boots, walking across a field in front of a beautiful sunset. As the song’s chorus kicks in, Styles takes flight, flying over tree tops, a lake and mountains — at one point, he even walks on water.

Styles teased the video last week. Last month, Twitter lost its mind over how a creepy stunt double appeared on the set of the new music video, with many pointing out his eerie resemblance to “Halloween” baddie Michael Myers. A stuntman wore what appeared to be a mask, while hanging from a helicopter.

The 23-year-old singer will release his album on May 12. “Sign of the Times” debuted and peaked at No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 list after it was released last month. According to Billboard, tickets for his first solo would tour went on sale Friday and sold out in seconds. The U.S. leg of the tour will begin on Sept. 19 in San Francisco and will wrap on Oct. 14 in Phoenix.

Watch the video above, and see some Twitter reactions to the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Did Alden Ehrenreich Edge Out Harry Styles for Han Solo?

Why Isaiah Thomas, Harry Styles and Spencer Hastings Are TV's Social Media MVPs of the Week

One Direction Plays 'Never Have I Ever,' Harry Styles Gets Mocked on 'Ellen' (Video)

Creepy Harry Styles Stunt Double Terrifies People on Internet

Twitter is losing its collective mind over how creepy Harry Styles’ stunt double appears on the set of his new music video, with many pointing out his eerie resemblance to “Halloween” baddie Michael Myers.

Fans of the One Direction singer took to Twitter on Thursday, soon after photos emerged of a stuntman wearing what appears to be a mask, while hanging from a helicopter for a music video to accompany Style’s debut solo single.

Also Read: ‘Dunkirk’: Watch the First Full Trailer for Christopher Nolan’s WWII Epic (Video)

See Twitter react with horror below:

Harry Styles’ stunt double wearing a mask of his face will haunt your dreams pic.twitter.com/fFkxqOk3lR

— Andrew Hayden-Smith (@AndrewHaydSmith) April 6, 2017

When they haven’t made a new Halloween movie so u gotta b Harry Styles stunt double in the meantime pic.twitter.com/3dRyYV3DdZ

— Mr. What Zit Tooya (@sarNloh) April 5, 2017

Ok is it me or does Harry Styles’ stunt double legit look like Michael Myers from Halloween? pic.twitter.com/q6b3R66OFI

— ~ Shannon ~ (@shannonmaile_) April 6, 2017

Harry Styles’ stunt double is what you see behind you when your brain screams “don’t look in the mirror” but you look anyways

— Kaylin (@tbhKaylin) April 6, 2017

Apparently, the guy on the left is a stunt double for Harry Styles’ new video. I can’t help thinking I’ve seen him somewhere before, though! pic.twitter.com/WTGSb5fTJs

— Christopher Farrelly (@ChrisFarrelly) April 6, 2017

No joke – this is the mask Harry Styles’ stunt-double wore for his #SignoftheTimes video. This is what nightmares are made of ???????????????? pic.twitter.com/LTIxVKuAto

— HOLLYWIRE (@HOLLYWIRE) April 6, 2017

Obscure but…The Harry Styles stunt double looks like one specific Auton from a 1970 episode of Doctor Who pic.twitter.com/ceu5TY9xNl

— Fred Delicious (@Fred_Delicious) April 6, 2017

Style’s single “Sign of the Times” hasn’t been released yet, but in a preview, The Sun called it an “epic rock ballad that sounds like a cross between David Bowie and Lana Del Rey (as weird as that sounds.”

The singer stars in Christopher Nolan’s war film “Dunkirk,” out this summer.

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Twitter is losing its collective mind over how creepy Harry Styles’ stunt double appears on the set of his new music video, with many pointing out his eerie resemblance to “Halloween” baddie Michael Myers.

Fans of the One Direction singer took to Twitter on Thursday, soon after photos emerged of a stuntman wearing what appears to be a mask, while hanging from a helicopter for a music video to accompany Style’s debut solo single.

See Twitter react with horror below:

Style’s single “Sign of the Times” hasn’t been released yet, but in a preview, The Sun called it an “epic rock ballad that sounds like a cross between David Bowie and Lana Del Rey (as weird as that sounds.”

The singer stars in Christopher Nolan’s war film “Dunkirk,” out this summer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Meet the Movie Press': 'Indiana Jones 5,' Screening Room Controversy, Harry Styles' Haircut (Video)

'Meet the Movie Press': Christopher Nolan Casts Harry Styles; Spider-Man's Costume; Daisy Ridley as Lara Croft? (Video)

One Direction's Harry Styles Joins Christopher Nolan's 'Dunkirk'

One Direction Plays 'Never Have I Ever,' Harry Styles Gets Mocked on 'Ellen' (Video)

Harry Styles 'About to Leave' One Direction, Says Lance Bass

‘Halloween’ Remake Coming From David Gordon Green and Danny McBride

Danny McBride is teaming up with David Gordon Green to remake the legendary horror franchise “Halloween,” John Carpenter said on Facebook on Thursday.

Gordon Green and McBride will write the script together and Gordon Green will direct. Carpenter is executive producing along with possibly scoring the remake. Malek Akkad will serve as producer under his Trancas banner, with Jason Blum producing for Blumhouse Productions along with Gordon Green and McBride via their Rough House Pictures banner.

The “Halloween” film franchise that was started in part by Carpenter and Moustapha Akkad in 1978 has spawned 10 films since Michael Myers first began hacking away at teenagers, generating a total of nearly $400 million in worldwide box office.

The original slasher-flick starred Nick Castle as Myers (a.k.a. The Shape), Jamie Lee Curtis in her film debut as Laurie Strode, the girl he stalks after escaping from a psychiatric hospital, and Donald Pleasence as Dr. Loomis, desperately trying to track down his patient.

Also Read: John Carpenter to Exec Produce New ‘Halloween’ for Miramax

The first sequel, “Halloween II,” was released in 1981, three years after its predecessor, featuring Myers once again on a Halloween night quest of murder and mayhem. Curtis and Pleasence reprised their roles, but their seemingly-unkillable masked stalker was then played by Dick Warlock.

Carpenter has written, directed, composed and/or edited more than 20 films over the course of his career. Along with “Halloween,” he is best known for “The Thing,” “The Fog” and “Big Trouble in Little China.”

Carpenter is repped by APA and Stankevich Law.

Also Read: John Carpenter Throws Shade at ‘Walking Dead’ for ‘Milking’ George Romero’s Work

The “Halloween” remake hits theaters on October 19th, 2018.

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Danny McBride is teaming up with David Gordon Green to remake the legendary horror franchise “Halloween,” John Carpenter said on Facebook on Thursday.

Gordon Green and McBride will write the script together and Gordon Green will direct. Carpenter is executive producing along with possibly scoring the remake. Malek Akkad will serve as producer under his Trancas banner, with Jason Blum producing for Blumhouse Productions along with Gordon Green and McBride via their Rough House Pictures banner.

The “Halloween” film franchise that was started in part by Carpenter and Moustapha Akkad in 1978 has spawned 10 films since Michael Myers first began hacking away at teenagers, generating a total of nearly $400 million in worldwide box office.

The original slasher-flick starred Nick Castle as Myers (a.k.a. The Shape), Jamie Lee Curtis in her film debut as Laurie Strode, the girl he stalks after escaping from a psychiatric hospital, and Donald Pleasence as Dr. Loomis, desperately trying to track down his patient.

The first sequel, “Halloween II,” was released in 1981, three years after its predecessor, featuring Myers once again on a Halloween night quest of murder and mayhem. Curtis and Pleasence reprised their roles, but their seemingly-unkillable masked stalker was then played by Dick Warlock.

Carpenter has written, directed, composed and/or edited more than 20 films over the course of his career. Along with “Halloween,” he is best known for “The Thing,” “The Fog” and “Big Trouble in Little China.”

Carpenter is repped by APA and Stankevich Law.

The “Halloween” remake hits theaters on October 19th, 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Ailes Miniseries in Development at Blumhouse Television

Blumhouse Television Names Marci Wiseman, Jeremy Gold Co-Presidents

Universal Sets Release Dates for Four Blumhouse Horror Movies