Maggie Gyllenhaal, Regina King on Intimacy Experts: ‘I Could Have Used the Help When I Was Younger’

Maggie Gyllenhaal’s sex-trade industry series “The Deuce” features one job that’s unlike any other in television: an intimacy expert. During her Variety Actors on Actors interview with Regina King, “The Kindergarten Teache…

Maggie Gyllenhaal’s sex-trade industry series “The Deuce” features one job that’s unlike any other in television: an intimacy expert. During her Variety Actors on Actors interview with Regina King, “The Kindergarten Teacher” actress explained how the strange role is actually important in helping young actresses stand up for themselves, especially when it comes to sex scenes on […]

Maggie Gyllenhaal On ‘The Sexiness, Opera & Punk’ In Netflix’s ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’

After playing prostitute-turned-blockbuster porn director Candy Merrell on HBO’s gritty ’70s/’80s NYC crime drama The Deuce, portraying a Kindergarten teacher who yearns to become a poet in Netflix’s The Kindergarten Teacher &#8…

After playing prostitute-turned-blockbuster porn director Candy Merrell on HBO’s gritty ’70s/’80s NYC crime drama The Deuceportraying a Kindergarten teacher who yearns to become a poet in Netflix’s The Kindergarten Teacher “was the next step” says actress Maggie Gyllenhaal. And by “next step”, the Crazy Heart supporting actress Oscar nominee means a project that “is an articulation of me”. While Candy maneuvers and rises to a position of control on The Deuce amid the…

2019 Oscar Contenders, From Rami Malek to Spike Lee (Exclusive Photos)

Rami Malek, Spike Lee Willem Dafoe, Annie Lennox, Maggie Gyllenhaal and more are vying for Academy recognition this season. They stopped by StudioWrap for an interview and photo session.
Actor Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”
Actress Kathryn…

Rami Malek, Spike Lee Willem Dafoe, Annie Lennox, Maggie Gyllenhaal and more are vying for Academy recognition this season. They stopped by StudioWrap for an interview and photo session.

Actor Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Actress Kathryn Hahn, “Private Life”

Photographed by Megan Mack for TheWrap

Makeup by Matin for Dior Beauty/ TraceyMattingly.com.

Netflix Stars Explain ‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,’ ‘Private Life’ and ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ – The Contenders NY

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs actor Tim Blake Nelson first received the script for the Coen brothers-directed project back in 2002. Private Life director Tamara Jenkins revealed she wasn’t sure she wanted to broach the topic of infertility before embark…

The Ballad of Buster Scruggs actor Tim Blake Nelson first received the script for the Coen brothers-directed project back in 2002. Private Life director Tamara Jenkins revealed she wasn't sure she wanted to broach the topic of infertility before embarking on Private Life. And Maggie Gyllenhaal said she needed to own the role of an educator obsessed with her student's genius in The Kindergarten Teacher. The trio of films represented the contingent of Netflix films…

This Oscar Season, Women Lead Films Like ‘Colette,’ ‘Mary Queen of Scots’

From the soft-spoken methodical meter KiKi Layne’s Tish Rivers uses to narrate the history of social and criminal injustices that have ruined the lives of black men and their families in writer-director Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” to Ca…

From the soft-spoken methodical meter KiKi Layne’s Tish Rivers uses to narrate the history of social and criminal injustices that have ruined the lives of black men and their families in writer-director Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” to Carey Mulligan’s Jeanette Brinson, a curt and frustrated midcentury housewife who flaunts her extramarital affair […]

‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ Star Maggie Gyllenhaal on Why Flawed Female Characters Matter

Maggie Gyllenhaal wanted to be a part of “The Kindergarten Teacher” as soon as she read the script and locked into its deeply flawed female protagonist — a character that is not often seen on the big screen.

“I’m always looking to shatter a fantasy,” Gyllenhaal told TheWrap’s Thom Geier at a Q&A following a screening of the film in New York on Thursday night. “I wonder if people don’t want [to see] their mothers — to see women as broken and shattered and flawed and confused as we actually are. What works about the movie is she could be our friend, our sister, our neighbor, until she really collapses.” 

In the film, which was released on Netflix last month, Gyllenhaal plays a kindergarten teacher who tries to protect the artistic talent of one of her students and soon crosses the line into obsession. The film is an adaptation of a 2015 Israeli film of the same name, and premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January. 

Gyllenhaal credited the female team behind “The Kindergarten Teacher” — including its writer/director Sarah Colangelo — for the film’s nuanced portrayal of a troubled female character. “If women are at the helm of something, and they do give themselves space to represent something real and human, it won’t be a fantasy of what a woman is. It will be a very complicated version of what a woman is,” she said.  

Also Read: ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ Film Review: Maggie Gyllenhaal Blurs Boundaries as an Art-Obsessed Educator

The film was shot in 22 days in New York City with “no money,” so Gyllenhaal said that Netflix’s acquisition of it was a total game-changer.

“[Netflix] told me how many people had seen the movie in the first 10 days, and I was actually, absolutely astonished,” she said. “And the reason I say that is because this is a complicated, difficult movie that requires care and attention and thinking, and I think for a really long time, people have not had access to that unless they live in really big cities [with] art houses.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ Film Review: Maggie Gyllenhaal Blurs Boundaries as an Art-Obsessed Educator

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull Join Women in Entertainment Summit (Exclusive)

Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘Kindergarten Teacher’ Is What Happens When a Woman Is ‘Starving’ to Be Heard (Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Directing Debut on Elena Ferrante Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal wanted to be a part of “The Kindergarten Teacher” as soon as she read the script and locked into its deeply flawed female protagonist — a character that is not often seen on the big screen.

“I’m always looking to shatter a fantasy,” Gyllenhaal told TheWrap’s Thom Geier at a Q&A following a screening of the film in New York on Thursday night. “I wonder if people don’t want [to see] their mothers — to see women as broken and shattered and flawed and confused as we actually are. What works about the movie is she could be our friend, our sister, our neighbor, until she really collapses.” 

In the film, which was released on Netflix last month, Gyllenhaal plays a kindergarten teacher who tries to protect the artistic talent of one of her students and soon crosses the line into obsession. The film is an adaptation of a 2015 Israeli film of the same name, and premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in January. 

Gyllenhaal credited the female team behind “The Kindergarten Teacher” — including its writer/director Sarah Colangelo — for the film’s nuanced portrayal of a troubled female character. “If women are at the helm of something, and they do give themselves space to represent something real and human, it won’t be a fantasy of what a woman is. It will be a very complicated version of what a woman is,” she said.  

The film was shot in 22 days in New York City with “no money,” so Gyllenhaal said that Netflix’s acquisition of it was a total game-changer.

“[Netflix] told me how many people had seen the movie in the first 10 days, and I was actually, absolutely astonished,” she said. “And the reason I say that is because this is a complicated, difficult movie that requires care and attention and thinking, and I think for a really long time, people have not had access to that unless they live in really big cities [with] art houses.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Kindergarten Teacher' Film Review: Maggie Gyllenhaal Blurs Boundaries as an Art-Obsessed Educator

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull Join Women in Entertainment Summit (Exclusive)

Maggie Gyllenhaal: 'Kindergarten Teacher' Is What Happens When a Woman Is 'Starving' to Be Heard (Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Directing Debut on Elena Ferrante Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ Film Review: Maggie Gyllenhaal Blurs Boundaries as an Art-Obsessed Educator

Lisa Spinelli (Maggie Gyllenhaal) is a good person. She’s a loving mother, a caring wife, and, as the titular educator in “The Kindergarten Teacher,” a dedicated professional. She has endless patience for her students, even as she fills their juice cups up for the thousandth time.

And yet.

Who could fill a juice cup a thousand times, without going a little crazy? Watch her teenage children (Daisy Tahan, Sam Jules) grow up and move on, without her heart breaking? Or look at her worn-out spouse (Michael Chernus,”Orange Is the New Black”) and her worn-in Staten Island home, and not wish for more?

Watch Video: Maggie Gyllenhaal Teeters at Edge of Art and Madness as ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ (Exclusive)

It’s clear early on in Sara Colangelo’s intently understated drama (premiering October 12 in limited release and on Netflix) that Lisa wants more. And all that dissatisfaction, that feeling that life is half over and she’s barely accomplished anything? It’s eating her away.

She tries to find an outlet in a continuing-ed poetry class, but her teacher (a perfectly-pitched Gael García Bernal) is notably unimpressed. She truly loves art, but doesn’t seem able to produce it herself. It’s a strange and demoralizing dilemma.

Until, one day, one of her students (excellent and adorable newcomer Parker Sevak) makes up a poem. And it’s good — better than hers. Lisa is awed by Jimmy’s natural talent, and becomes convinced that he’s a prodigy. She tracks down his father (Ajay Naidu), and passionately compares Jimmy to Mozart. But his dad, like the other adults she consults, thinks a five-year-old should be free to play, not pushed to write poetry with his teacher.

Watch Video: Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘Kindergarten Teacher’ Is What Happens When a Woman Is ‘Starving’ to Be Heard

So Lisa determines, with increasing urgency, to save Jimmy from the philistines. She begins waking him up at naptime, and calling him at home, to teach him how to “see” better. She bribes him with candy, so he’ll go study with her alone. And all the time, we’re worried about what line she’ll cross next.

As both writer and director, Colangelo — adapting a 2014 Israeli film of the same name — knows that we’re watching with particular expectations. There’s a built-in tension to our assumptions, but Lisa is not the predator we expect her to be, nor the sort of monster with whom we’re most familiar.

Looked at from one angle, in fact, most of the movie could be considered entirely sympathetic to Lisa’s perspective. But then the camera lingers just a little too long on her inscrutable expression. Occasionally, the plaintive piano-and-strings score (by Asher Goldschmidt, “White God”) feels just a bit too ominous. And is her habit of touching everyone an expression of her compassion? Or her needs?

Also Read: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull Join Women in Entertainment Summit (Exclusive)

Though Gyllenhaal (who’s also a producer) is all-in on this complex character study, it’s in an admirably subtle way. She never once overplays Lisa’s precarious emotional state, choosing instead to portray a rather ordinary woman doing some rather extraordinary things. It’s an intriguing approach, and one that carries us far.

However, her spare turn and the film’s deliberately unhurried pacing do require the support of an especially solid script. This one, unfortunately, seems like it’s missing a few pages. When the inevitable finale arrives, it feels false: the Lisa we’ve come to know so intimately would never make the most extreme choices the plot requires of her.

That letdown, though, is a reflection on the strong and honest work to come before it. Anyone with some patience and a penchant for thoughtful ambiguity will find more than enough rewards here, from Gyllenhaal’s intelligent performance to Colangelo’s empathetic insight. True, it’s not always an easy movie to sit through. But the impact of Lisa’s plight lingers long after her fate’s been sealed.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Directing Debut on Elena Ferrante Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chadwick Boseman, Ryan Reynolds Share Story of Separated Family (Video)

‘The Deuce’ Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our ‘Broken, Misogynistic Culture’

Former Charlie Rose Intern: He Made Me Watch S&M Scene in Maggie Gyllenhaal’s ‘Secretary’

Lisa Spinelli (Maggie Gyllenhaal) is a good person. She’s a loving mother, a caring wife, and, as the titular educator in “The Kindergarten Teacher,” a dedicated professional. She has endless patience for her students, even as she fills their juice cups up for the thousandth time.

And yet.

Who could fill a juice cup a thousand times, without going a little crazy? Watch her teenage children (Daisy Tahan, Sam Jules) grow up and move on, without her heart breaking? Or look at her worn-out spouse (Michael Chernus,”Orange Is the New Black”) and her worn-in Staten Island home, and not wish for more?

It’s clear early on in Sara Colangelo’s intently understated drama (premiering October 12 in limited release and on Netflix) that Lisa wants more. And all that dissatisfaction, that feeling that life is half over and she’s barely accomplished anything? It’s eating her away.

She tries to find an outlet in a continuing-ed poetry class, but her teacher (a perfectly-pitched Gael García Bernal) is notably unimpressed. She truly loves art, but doesn’t seem able to produce it herself. It’s a strange and demoralizing dilemma.

Until, one day, one of her students (excellent and adorable newcomer Parker Sevak) makes up a poem. And it’s good — better than hers. Lisa is awed by Jimmy’s natural talent, and becomes convinced that he’s a prodigy. She tracks down his father (Ajay Naidu), and passionately compares Jimmy to Mozart. But his dad, like the other adults she consults, thinks a five-year-old should be free to play, not pushed to write poetry with his teacher.

So Lisa determines, with increasing urgency, to save Jimmy from the philistines. She begins waking him up at naptime, and calling him at home, to teach him how to “see” better. She bribes him with candy, so he’ll go study with her alone. And all the time, we’re worried about what line she’ll cross next.

As both writer and director, Colangelo — adapting a 2014 Israeli film of the same name — knows that we’re watching with particular expectations. There’s a built-in tension to our assumptions, but Lisa is not the predator we expect her to be, nor the sort of monster with whom we’re most familiar.

Looked at from one angle, in fact, most of the movie could be considered entirely sympathetic to Lisa’s perspective. But then the camera lingers just a little too long on her inscrutable expression. Occasionally, the plaintive piano-and-strings score (by Asher Goldschmidt, “White God”) feels just a bit too ominous. And is her habit of touching everyone an expression of her compassion? Or her needs?

Though Gyllenhaal (who’s also a producer) is all-in on this complex character study, it’s in an admirably subtle way. She never once overplays Lisa’s precarious emotional state, choosing instead to portray a rather ordinary woman doing some rather extraordinary things. It’s an intriguing approach, and one that carries us far.

However, her spare turn and the film’s deliberately unhurried pacing do require the support of an especially solid script. This one, unfortunately, seems like it’s missing a few pages. When the inevitable finale arrives, it feels false: the Lisa we’ve come to know so intimately would never make the most extreme choices the plot requires of her.

That letdown, though, is a reflection on the strong and honest work to come before it. Anyone with some patience and a penchant for thoughtful ambiguity will find more than enough rewards here, from Gyllenhaal’s intelligent performance to Colangelo’s empathetic insight. True, it’s not always an easy movie to sit through. But the impact of Lisa’s plight lingers long after her fate’s been sealed.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Directing Debut on Elena Ferrante Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chadwick Boseman, Ryan Reynolds Share Story of Separated Family (Video)

'The Deuce' Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our 'Broken, Misogynistic Culture'

Former Charlie Rose Intern: He Made Me Watch S&M Scene in Maggie Gyllenhaal's 'Secretary'

Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘The Deuce’ Should Not Be Shut Down Over James Franco Misconduct Allegations

Maggie Gyllenhaal, a producer and star of The Deuce, HBO’s gritty dramatic examination of misogyny, sexual violence and exploitation in the grimy Times Square of the 1970s, says shutting down the show in response to misconduct allegations against…

Maggie Gyllenhaal, a producer and star of The Deuce, HBO’s gritty dramatic examination of misogyny, sexual violence and exploitation in the grimy Times Square of the 1970s, says shutting down the show in response to misconduct allegations against co-star James Franco would be “the opposite of the right thing to do.” The Deuce, Gyllenhaal told SiriusXM radio host Sway Calloway yesterday (hear it above), is “about transactional sex. It’s about inequality in the…

Maggie Gyllenhaal Acquires ‘The Lost Daughter’ Novel To Make Her Film Directorial Debut

EXCLUSIVE: Golden Globe winner Maggie Gyllenhaal has teamed with Pie Films to acquire film rights to author Elena Ferrante’s novel The Lost Daughter, for which Gyllenhaal will write, produce, and make her first directorial outing. Talia Kleinhend…

EXCLUSIVE: Golden Globe winner Maggie Gyllenhaal has teamed with Pie Films to acquire film rights to author Elena Ferrante’s novel The Lost Daughter, for which Gyllenhaal will write, produce, and make her first directorial outing. Talia Kleinhendler and Osnat Handelsman-Keren of Pie Films will produce alongside Gyllenhaal. The three previously partnered on The Kindergarten Teacher, which premiered at Sundance this year and will be released October 12 on Netflix. The Lost D…

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull Join Women in Entertainment Summit (Exclusive)

The Women in Entertainment Summit, an annual event dedicated to empowering women in the entertainment industry, has added “The Deuce” actress Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Friends” executive producer Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull, the inspiration for “Billions” character Wendy Rhoades, to its Oct. 11 summit.

“We are thrilled to invite our audience to be a part of the conversation with such dedicated thought leaders in the entertainment world,” said Women in Entertainment founder Gretchen McCourt in a statement. “We have volumes to examine in our summit and we are thrilled to offer this time to our speakers and audience.”

Gyllenhaal, Kauffman and Shull will be part of the summit’s Fireside Chats. They join previously announced speakers Geena Davis and CBS All Access’ executive vice president of original content Julie McNamara. The chats will feature conversations on issues pertaining to the #MeToo movement and how to empower the next generation of women in entertainment.

Also Read: ‘She-Ra’ Reboot, ‘Boss Baby’ Score Netflix Series Through DreamWorks Animation

The news of the additions comes after the announcement that there will be a “She-Ra: Evolution of a Warrior Princess” panel at the summit ahead of the Netflix original series premiere. The Dreamworks Animation Television panel will include executive producer Noelle Stevenson, directors Jen Bennett and Kiki Monrique, art director Liz Kresin and story editor Josie Campbell.

The fourth annual Women in Entertainment Summit is set to take place at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. The summit began in 2015 by founders Gretchen McCourt and Rene Rossi.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘Kindergarten Teacher’ Is What Happens When a Woman Is ‘Starving’ to Be Heard (Video)

‘Billions’ Renewed for Season 4 at Showtime

#MeToo Advocate Alyssa Milano Attends Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing

The Women in Entertainment Summit, an annual event dedicated to empowering women in the entertainment industry, has added “The Deuce” actress Maggie Gyllenhaal, “Friends” executive producer Marta Kauffman and Denise Shull, the inspiration for “Billions” character Wendy Rhoades, to its Oct. 11 summit.

“We are thrilled to invite our audience to be a part of the conversation with such dedicated thought leaders in the entertainment world,” said Women in Entertainment founder Gretchen McCourt in a statement. “We have volumes to examine in our summit and we are thrilled to offer this time to our speakers and audience.”

Gyllenhaal, Kauffman and Shull will be part of the summit’s Fireside Chats. They join previously announced speakers Geena Davis and CBS All Access’ executive vice president of original content Julie McNamara. The chats will feature conversations on issues pertaining to the #MeToo movement and how to empower the next generation of women in entertainment.

The news of the additions comes after the announcement that there will be a “She-Ra: Evolution of a Warrior Princess” panel at the summit ahead of the Netflix original series premiere. The Dreamworks Animation Television panel will include executive producer Noelle Stevenson, directors Jen Bennett and Kiki Monrique, art director Liz Kresin and story editor Josie Campbell.

The fourth annual Women in Entertainment Summit is set to take place at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles. The summit began in 2015 by founders Gretchen McCourt and Rene Rossi.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal: 'Kindergarten Teacher' Is What Happens When a Woman Is 'Starving' to Be Heard (Video)

'Billions' Renewed for Season 4 at Showtime

#MeToo Advocate Alyssa Milano Attends Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing

HBO Renews David Simon’s ‘The Deuce’ for Third and Final Season

HBO has renewed its David Simon-helmed drama, “The Deuce” for a third and final season.

Starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce” follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York’s Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world that existed there until the rise of HIV, the violence of the cocaine epidemic and the renewed real estate market all ended the bawdy turbulence.

The second season of the drama premiered on Sept. 9.

Also Read: ‘The Deuce’ Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as ‘F–bonnet for Our Time’

“The Deuce” is from Simon and co-creator George Pelecanos. Franco, Nina Noble and Richard Price are executive producers, with Gyllenhaal and Marc Henry Johnson as producers.

Simon, who also created HBO’s “The Wire” and “Treme” has a habit of wrapping up his series quickly. “The Wire” ran for five seasons, with the fifth getting a shorter run, while the New Orleans-based “Treme” had just 36 episodes over four seasons.

On Twitter, Simon thanked HBO for “the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story.”

We’re always conjuring the last scene before we write the first. So much the better when we work for people who allow us to consistently plan, arc and execute as intended. Thanks, @HBO, for the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story. pic.twitter.com/B1cOuady1X

— David Simon (@AoDespair) September 20, 2018

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‘The Deuce’ Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as ‘F—bonnet for Our Time’

HBO ‘Felt Comfortable’ Proceeding With ‘The Deuce’ After Reviewing James Franco Accusations

‘The Deuce’ Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our ‘Broken, Misogynistic Culture’

HBO has renewed its David Simon-helmed drama, “The Deuce” for a third and final season.

Starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce” follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York’s Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world that existed there until the rise of HIV, the violence of the cocaine epidemic and the renewed real estate market all ended the bawdy turbulence.

The second season of the drama premiered on Sept. 9.

“The Deuce” is from Simon and co-creator George Pelecanos. Franco, Nina Noble and Richard Price are executive producers, with Gyllenhaal and Marc Henry Johnson as producers.

Simon, who also created HBO’s “The Wire” and “Treme” has a habit of wrapping up his series quickly. “The Wire” ran for five seasons, with the fifth getting a shorter run, while the New Orleans-based “Treme” had just 36 episodes over four seasons.

On Twitter, Simon thanked HBO for “the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Deuce' Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as 'F—bonnet for Our Time'

HBO 'Felt Comfortable' Proceeding With 'The Deuce' After Reviewing James Franco Accusations

'The Deuce' Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our 'Broken, Misogynistic Culture'

Maggie Gyllenhaal On Finding A New Kind Of Thriller In ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ – Toronto Studio

In a good year for English-language remakes, Sara Colangelo’s take on the 2015 Israeli film of the same name by Nadav Lapid built on the momentum it gained in Sundance with a TIFF bow in the run-up to its release by Netflix in October. Dropping by the …

In a good year for English-language remakes, Sara Colangelo's take on the 2015 Israeli film of the same name by Nadav Lapid built on the momentum it gained in Sundance with a TIFF bow in the run-up to its release by Netflix in October. Dropping by the Deadline studio with co-star Gael García Bernal, star Maggie Gyllenhaal explained that the project had gripped her from the get-go. "Every once in a while," she said, "there's a script you read where you're like, 'I have to…

Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘Kindergarten Teacher’ Is What Happens When a Woman Is ‘Starving’ to Be Heard (Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal’s new film “The Kindergarten Teacher” may be a Polanski-like psychological thriller and allegory about obsession, but she says it perfectly captures the way many women are feeling in 2018 – mute.

“I think she’s a woman right now who’s going, ‘I’m starving. I thought I was OK. I’m not OK,’” Gyllenhaal told TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), speaking of her character’s need to be heard. “And that’s what all of us are doing. That’s like the cultural conversation right now.”

In Sara Colangelo’s film, which premiered at Sundance and screened at TIFF this month, Gyllenhaal plays a kindergarten teacher who overhears a child reciting a poem and takes an unhealthy obsession with him when she starts to believe he’s a prodigy.

Also Read: Maggie Gyllenhaal to Make Directing Debut on Elena Ferrante Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

“The Kindergarten Teacher” takes a sinister turn and ratchets up the tension to thriller levels, but Gyllenhaal says the story serves as a case study for what happens when a woman’s voice is ignored and suppressed.

“She’s also an artist, and she’s just completely not being heard or seen as an artist, as a person in her life at all,” Gyllenhaal said. “Like many women these days, she’s waking up to the fact that she’s ‘starving.’ In terms of trying to get herself fed, she goes down this really questionable path.”

Gyllenhaal points out that Colangelo’s film is an “allegorical example,” but that the stakes and the parallels to today’s cultural conversation are still very real.

Also Read: ‘The Deuce’ Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our ‘Broken, Misogynistic Culture’

“Here’s an example of the consequences of ‘starving’ a woman. It doesn’t have to be this,” Gyllenhaal said. “But still, here are the consequences. This is what’s on the table if you don’t ‘feed’ us.”

“The Kindergarten Teacher” will be available on Netflix on Oct. 12. Watch a clip from our interview with Gyllenhaal and co-star Gael Garcia Bernal above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal Teeters at Edge of Art and Madness as ‘The Kindergarten Teacher’ (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chadwick Boseman, Ryan Reynolds Share Story of Separated Family (Video)

Sundance Scene: Musical Performances from Idris Elba, Post Malone and Maggie Gyllenhaal (Photos)

Maggie Gyllenhaal’s new film “The Kindergarten Teacher” may be a Polanski-like psychological thriller and allegory about obsession, but she says it perfectly captures the way many women are feeling in 2018 – mute.

“I think she’s a woman right now who’s going, ‘I’m starving. I thought I was OK. I’m not OK,'” Gyllenhaal told TheWrap’s Sharon Waxman at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), speaking of her character’s need to be heard. “And that’s what all of us are doing. That’s like the cultural conversation right now.”

In Sara Colangelo’s film, which premiered at Sundance and screened at TIFF this month, Gyllenhaal plays a kindergarten teacher who overhears a child reciting a poem and takes an unhealthy obsession with him when she starts to believe he’s a prodigy.

“The Kindergarten Teacher” takes a sinister turn and ratchets up the tension to thriller levels, but Gyllenhaal says the story serves as a case study for what happens when a woman’s voice is ignored and suppressed.

“She’s also an artist, and she’s just completely not being heard or seen as an artist, as a person in her life at all,” Gyllenhaal said. “Like many women these days, she’s waking up to the fact that she’s ‘starving.’ In terms of trying to get herself fed, she goes down this really questionable path.”

Gyllenhaal points out that Colangelo’s film is an “allegorical example,” but that the stakes and the parallels to today’s cultural conversation are still very real.

“Here’s an example of the consequences of ‘starving’ a woman. It doesn’t have to be this,” Gyllenhaal said. “But still, here are the consequences. This is what’s on the table if you don’t ‘feed’ us.”

“The Kindergarten Teacher” will be available on Netflix on Oct. 12. Watch a clip from our interview with Gyllenhaal and co-star Gael Garcia Bernal above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Maggie Gyllenhaal Teeters at Edge of Art and Madness as 'The Kindergarten Teacher' (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chadwick Boseman, Ryan Reynolds Share Story of Separated Family (Video)

Sundance Scene: Musical Performances from Idris Elba, Post Malone and Maggie Gyllenhaal (Photos)

53 Stunning Portraits From TheWrap’s Toronto Studio (Exclusive Photos)

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

Maggie Gyllenhaal Seeks Directing Debut With Italian Novel Adaptation (Exclusive Video)

Maggie Gyllenhaal is stepping behind the camera for her directorial debut with an adaptation of a dramatic Elena Ferrante novel, she told TheWrap Saturday at its studio at the Toronto Film Festival.
Gyllenhaal — who stars on HBO’s show &#…

Maggie Gyllenhaal is stepping behind the camera for her directorial debut with an adaptation of a dramatic Elena Ferrante novel, she told TheWrap Saturday at its studio at the Toronto Film Festival.

Gyllenhaal — who stars on HBO’s show “The Deuce” about the rise of porn in New York City — says she was inspired to direct her first film thanks to her character, a call girl turned adult film director named Candy.

“Playing Candy on ‘The Deuce,’ who becomes a director — and, in part, becomes a director in the storytelling because that was something that was important to me — inspired me to direct myself,” Gyllenhaal told TheWrap.

“When I was starting out, if you were a lover of movies and somebody who was a storyteller — at least for me — I was like ‘Yeah, I’m an actress, and I’m going to put my storytelling and my ideas and my thoughts into my projects through my acting,'” she continued. “It’s only pretty recently that I’ve felt that I’ve sort of broken down a wall in myself where I kind of went, ‘No, I think I’d like to direct.”

Although Gyllenhaal doesn’t say which of Ferrante’s novels she’s working on adapting, the Italian author is best known for her Neapolitan Novels, a 4-part series following the lives of two girls, Elena Greco and Raffaella Cerullo, from childhood to adulthood and old age.

The series includes “My Brilliant Friend,” “The Story of a New Name,” “Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay” and “The Story of the Lost Child.”

It was announced in March 2017 that HBO was teaming up with RAI to produce Italian-language drama series based on “My Brilliant Friend.” The show will premiere in November.

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If Maggie Gyllenhaal wasn’t, somehow, on the list of the very best actresses on television at a time of near-unprecedented openness to half the population’s stories, the second season of “The Deuce,” premiering Sept. 9, ought to put her there. Gyllenha…

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Toronto Film Festival Adds Conversations and Events With Mahershala Ali, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jason Reitman

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival has added conversations with Mahershala Ali, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hilary Swank to its lineup, as well as special events including a Jason Reitman Live Read and an IMAX screening of “First Man,” …

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival has added conversations with Mahershala Ali, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hilary Swank to its lineup, as well as special events including a Jason Reitman Live Read and an IMAX screening of “First Man,” TIFF organizers announced on Thursday.

The conversations and events will join the list of 343 films that were previously announced for the festival, which will run from September 6 through September 16.

The In Conversation With … program will feature three onstage discussions with actors who have films at the festival. Ali appears with Viggo Mortensen in Peter Farrelly’s “Green Book,” Gyllenhaal stars in “The Kindergarten Teacher” and Swank co-stars with Michael Shannon, Robert Forster and Blythe Danner in “What They Had.”

The special events include an opening-night screening of the Black Lives Matter-themed drama “Monsters and Men” with an introduction by Drake; a behind-the-scenes look at the upcoming “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” presented by director Dean DeBlois and producer Brad Lewis; a sneak-peek IMAX screening of Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” starring Ryan Gosling as astronaut Neil Armstrong, at Ontario Place Cinesphere, the world’s first permanent IMAX theater.

Also, Toronto will feature a live reading of “The Breakfast Club” directed by Jason Reitman, who in past years has brought his popular Live Read series to TIFF for readings of “American Beauty,” “Boogie Nights” and “The Princess Bride.”

Tickets for the 43rd Toronto International Film Festival go on sale to the public on September 3, with more information available at tiff.net.

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‘The Deuce’ Season 2 Trailer: Maggie Gyllenhaal and James Franco Shake up the Porn Industry

HBO doubles down on James Franco, who plays two characters in the show, despite multiple sexual harassment allegations.

One of the most exciting new television dramas of 2017, “The Deuce,” is returning for a second season, and the foundation laid in an excellent first season has opened up a whole new world for the series. Set in the crime-ridden Times Square of 1970s New York City, “The Deuce” charts the legalization of the porn industry and its dramatic effect on the sex industry and sex workers. Created by “The Wire” duo David Simon and George Pelecanos, the series draws on period research to present a gritty, no-holds-barred portrayal of this explosive time in history.

In the first glimpse of Season 2, we see our intrepid entrepreneurs advance five years. The time is now 1977, and Candy Darling’s (Maggie Gyllenhaal, also a producer on the show) burgeoning directorial career is in full swing, with a little help from James Franco’s Vincent — or is that Frankie? No matter, he’s still on the show.

Franco, who plays identical twin brothers and is an executive producer on the series, was accused of sexual harassment and misconduct by six women earlier this year. The actor denied the allegations. In a statement to Variety, Simon said: “We have no complainant or complaint or any awareness of any incident of concern involving Mr. Franco. Nor has HBO been approached with any complaint. In our experience, he was entirely professional as an actor, director, and producer.”

Nevertheless, HBO seems resolute that, as one character says (quite optimistically) in the trailer: “Everything is changed. It’s not like how it was when we started. It’s like a free world.”

“The Deuce” returns to HBO on September 9. Check out the new trailer below.

Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chadwick Boseman, Ryan Reynolds Share Story of Separated Family (Video)

Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal has partnered with the ACLU to create a video telling the heartbreaking story of a mother seeking asylum after fleeing Honduras with her toddler son.
The video, accompanied by the hashtag #MyNameIsMirian, is meant to be an aff…

Actress Maggie Gyllenhaal has partnered with the ACLU to create a video telling the heartbreaking story of a mother seeking asylum after fleeing Honduras with her toddler son.

The video, accompanied by the hashtag #MyNameIsMirian, is meant to be an affidavit recounting just one story of separation amongst thousands. Many of the stars featured in the clip pushed for reuniting families and called for donations to the ACLU on Twitter.

Notable figures such as “Black Panther” actor Chadwick Boseman and “Veep” actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus read aloud Mirian’s story of being forced out of Honduras after the military teargassed her home, and how she was subsequently separated from her son after reaching the Texas border.

“I asked why the officers were separating my son from me. They did not provide any reason,” read Amy Schumer and Kumail Nanjiani.

“I cry even now when I think about that moment when the border officers took my son away,” read “Deadpool” actor Ryan Reynolds.

Mirian’s statement was made April 6.

On June 26, a federal judge from San Diego ruled that families with children under the age of five must be reunited by July 10. Of the 102 children identified as being under five, 54 are set to be reunited this week.

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How Jonathan Groff and Maggie Gyllenhaal Tackle Their Biggest On-Set Challenges

Jonathan Groff (“Mindhunter”) and Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Deuce”) sat down for a chat during Variety‘s “Actors on Actors,” presented by Shutterstock. For more “Actors on Actors,” click here.  Jonath…

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While talking with Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Deuce”) for Variety’s “Actors on Actors,” presented by Shutterstock, Jonathan Groff (“Mindhunter”) revealed that during the shooting of the 10-episode span of David Fi…

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