‘Ága’ Wins Top Prize At Sarajevo Film Festival

The 24th Sarajevo Film Festival has awarded its top prize to Bulgarian director Milko Lazarov’s “Ága.” The festival’s jury was headed by two-time Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi. “Ága” won the Heart of Sarajevo on Thursday night, the fes…

The 24th Sarajevo Film Festival has awarded its top prize to Bulgarian director Milko Lazarov’s “Ága.” The festival’s jury was headed by two-time Oscar-winning Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi. “Ága” won the Heart of Sarajevo on Thursday night, the festival’s prize for best feature film which includes a €16,000 ($18,200) award. The Yakut-language movie, which is a […]

Berlin Film Review: ‘Lemonade’

The old adage about making sour fruit into sweet refreshment is implicit in the title of Romanian writer-director Ioana Uricaru’s promising first feature “Lemonade.” Martha Stewart herself, however, would be stumped by the wizened, acrid lemons our hapless heroine is handed in this heart-pinching hard-luck story from America’s green card-seeking margins. Bearing the tersely empathetic, […]

The old adage about making sour fruit into sweet refreshment is implicit in the title of Romanian writer-director Ioana Uricaru’s promising first feature “Lemonade.” Martha Stewart herself, however, would be stumped by the wizened, acrid lemons our hapless heroine is handed in this heart-pinching hard-luck story from America’s green card-seeking margins. Bearing the tersely empathetic, […]

Ranking the 20 Best Movie Musicals of All Time, From ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ to ‘Lemonade’

This list of movie musicals is all singing, all dancing, all fun — because we could all stand to have some upbeat entertainment.

The musical often feels like a relic of a long-dead Hollywood studio system, but it remains a genre that captures movies’ ability to create story worlds that move freely between reality and fantasy. The worst examples come from filmmakers who give license to music, color, and movement run amok; the best musicals transcend artifice and integrate songs that become expressions of pure character emotion. It offers endless possibilities, but success demands a complete mastery of the medium.

Very few current stars could learn the choreography of Busby Berkeley, Jerome Robbins, or Bob Fosse, and adapting a medium developed and most suited for the stage requires innovative direction. In translating the joy of a live musical to the magic of cinema, some things are easily lost in the shuffle.

From “A Star is Born” to “Singin’ in the Rain,” here are 20 musicals that represent the height and the incredible range of the genre.

20. “42nd Street” (1933)

There are few visual pleasures more satisfying than Busby Berkeley’s choreography. In “42nd Street,” opulence, precision, and unadulterated joy ripple out like the concentric circles of ribbon dancers spinning wildly onscreen. Credited with kicking off the Golden Age of Hollywood musicals, vaudeville actor-turned-director Lloyd Bacon films the classic showbiz tale with a keen eye, finding more beauty than the story required. Allentown, PA hasn’t quite been the same since little Peggy Sawyer left in search of Broadway stardom. The movie boasts hummable tunes like “Shuffle Off to Buffalo,” “42nd Street,” and “You’re Getting to Be a Habit with Me.” It’s the song you’ll love the melody of, “42nd Street.” — Jude Dry

19. “New York, New York” (1977)

Let’s be honest: Martin Scorsese’s attempt at a big studio musical is a mess, but it is one of the weirdest, coolest and most interesting messes ever made. Made between “Taxi Driver” and “Raging Bull” and fueled by Hollywood money (and, according to Scorsese, no shortage of cocaine), it’s a backstage musical about Francine Evans and Jimmy Doyle (played by Liza Minnelli and Robert DeNiro), the couple who wrote “New York, New York.” The soundstudio artifice becomes a playground for the director to explore if he could make his gritty, unfiltered version of the musicals of his youth — look, it was the ’70s and with the coke it might have made sense. Toss in some jazz, some deep-seated depression, and troubled relationships on and off-screen, and you’ve got a film that makes you think about and appreciate the genre and Scorsese himself from a completely different perspective. — Chris O’Falt

18. “Meet Me in St. Louis” (1944)

“Meet Me in St. Louis” is many things to many people. It’s the best Vincente Minnelli musical (produced by Arthur Freed at MGM), directed when the director was most in love with his star, Judy Garland, who was never better — or lovelier. Minnelli was infamous for torturing child actress Margaret O’Brien with memories of a dead dog during the scene when her older sister (Garland) sings the holiday classic “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” but O’Brian long denied the story, saying she could cry on cue. That song helped to turn the movie into a Christmas staple for many families who respond not only to the young romance at its core, but to an elegiac celebration of a lost American time. Sure, we remember the exuberant “Trolly Song,” but Mary Astor and Leon Ames sitting at the piano singing “You and I” is the movie’s emotional core. — Anne Thompson

17. “Lemonade” (2016)

“Lemonade”

No one has mastered the visual album quite like Beyoncé. In 2016, after releasing a single, “Formation,” and a video that commented on police brutality, Hurricane Katrina, and the resilience of the Black community in New Orleans, Queen Bey surprised fans with a momentous HBO special. “Lemonade” wasn’t just a series of music videos strung together as a preview of her upcoming album; it was a tremendously honest peek behind the curtain at the inner lives of the music world’s most powerful couple. Awash with Orisha imagery, nods to “Daughters of the Dust” and the Igbo people, and overlaid with the poetry of Warsaw Shire, “Lemonade” is stitched together with the raw pain of infidelity and the hope of forgiveness and rebirth. It is a stunning accomplishment, a testament to the power and endurance of Black women across generations, and hands down one of the greatest musical events of the 21st century. — Jamie Righetti

16. “The Young Girls of Rochefort” (1967)

A sneakily bittersweet masterpiece that hides its melancholy inside a multi-tiered wedding cake of exuberant musical numbers, “The Young Girls of Rochefort” is easy to mistake for a confection. In part, that’s because its story is a seaside romance about a pair of elegant twins (actual sisters Catherine Deneuve and Françoise Dorléac, appearing together for the only time before the latter’s sudden death) who daydream of falling in love and leaving their sleepy hometown. In part, that’s also because Jacques Demy made the film in the wake of his devastating “Umbrellas of Cherbourg,” and anything short of “Schindler’s List” would seem upbeat by comparison. But despite Michel Legrand’s zesty songs and some of Norman Maen’s jazziest dance choreography, this wonderfully colorful gem beats with a heavy heart. Not even an appearance by Gene Kelly can distract from a film that longs for the joy that’s always just beyond your fingertips; a film so tormented by unknown happiness that one of its characters can’t even see he lives around the corner from the love of his life. — David Ehrlich

Beyonce Shuts Down a Beer Named After Her

It turns out Beyoncé doesn’t like beer as much as her homemade lemonade.

The super star sent a cease and desist letter to Lineup Brewing after the Brooklyn company created a German pilsner called Bieryoncé, according to Pitchfork.

The special brew was created after owner Katarina Martinez missed out on a Beyoncé concert, she told the outlet.

Also Read: Eminem, Beyonce Drop New Track ‘Walk on Water’: Listen Here (Audio)

“As a Hispanic, female run business, I am very inspired by her so I thought I’d pay homage,” said Martinez. “We’re disappointed she didn’t take it as a compliment, but oh well. It was fun while it lasted!”

Beyoncé has inspired a new German-style beer entitled Bïeryoncé! Check it out here: https://t.co/CrHnYBZWuj! pic.twitter.com/2evyng5EdE

— Beyoncé | FOTP (@FOTPBeyonceNews) December 8, 2017

The one-time batch’s design is inspired by the designs from Beyoncé’s 2013 album and tour “On the Run.” (you might recognize the font from “Flawless” t-shirts).

The brewery renamed their pilsner after owner Martinez, revealing the change in a cheeky Instagram post (below).

Also Read: Beyonce Will Voice Nala in Live-Action Adaptation of ‘The Lion King’

“Ask and Bey shall receive Moving forward, our German Pilsner will be called “Kätariná” paying homage to our badass female brewer and owner,” said the caption under the photo of the new cans. “We’re still huge @beyonce fans”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jay-Z Says He Worked on ‘Therapy’ Album With Beyoncé Before She Made ‘Lemonade’

Eminem, Beyonce Drop New Track ‘Walk on Water’: Listen Here (Audio)

Meet the All-Star ‘The Lion King’ Cast Led by Beyoncé and Donald Glover (Photos)

Beyonce Will Voice Nala in Live-Action Adaptation of ‘The Lion King’

It turns out Beyoncé doesn’t like beer as much as her homemade lemonade.

The super star sent a cease and desist letter to Lineup Brewing after the Brooklyn company created a German pilsner called Bieryoncé, according to Pitchfork.

The special brew was created after owner Katarina Martinez missed out on a Beyoncé concert, she told the outlet.

“As a Hispanic, female run business, I am very inspired by her so I thought I’d pay homage,” said Martinez. “We’re disappointed she didn’t take it as a compliment, but oh well. It was fun while it lasted!”

The one-time batch’s design is inspired by the designs from Beyoncé’s 2013 album and tour “On the Run.” (you might recognize the font from “Flawless” t-shirts).

The brewery renamed their pilsner after owner Martinez, revealing the change in a cheeky Instagram post (below).

“Ask and Bey shall receive Moving forward, our German Pilsner will be called “Kätariná” paying homage to our badass female brewer and owner,” said the caption under the photo of the new cans. “We’re still huge @beyonce fans”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jay-Z Says He Worked on 'Therapy' Album With Beyoncé Before She Made 'Lemonade'

Eminem, Beyonce Drop New Track 'Walk on Water': Listen Here (Audio)

Meet the All-Star 'The Lion King' Cast Led by Beyoncé and Donald Glover (Photos)

Beyonce Will Voice Nala in Live-Action Adaptation of 'The Lion King'

Jay-Z Says He Worked on ‘Therapy’ Album With Beyoncé Before She Made ‘Lemonade’

Yes, the rumors are true, and confirmed by the man himself.

In a feature in the New York Times published on Wednesday, Jay-Z said that he and his wife Beyoncé were working on a joint album before she released “Lemonade.”

“We were using our art almost like a therapy session. And we started making music together,” the rapper said.

Also Read: Eminem, Beyonce Drop New Track ‘Walk on Water’: Listen Here (Audio)

“And then the music she was making at that time was further along,” he continued. “So her album came out as opposed to the joint album that we were working on. There was never a point where it was like, ‘I’m making this album.’ I was right there the entire time.”

The Grammy winner went on to say that while listening to each other’s albums was “uncomfortable,” it ultimately helped their marriage.

“You know, most people walk away, and like divorce rate is like 50 percent or something ’cause most people can’t see themselves,” he said. “The hardest thing is seeing pain on someone’s face that you caused, and then having to deal with yourself.”

Jay-Z also discussed his strained relationship with Kanye West, who collaborated with him on “Watch the Throne,” and said hopefully this bump in their friendship will be something to laugh about later in life.

Also Read: 2018 Grammy Nominations: Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar and Bruno Mars Lead, Ed Sheeran Shut Out

“There’s gonna be complications in the relationship that we have to get through,” he said, adding that there’s probably feelings of hurt on both sides. “I’m not a perfect human being by no stretch.”

“But [West is] a very compassionate person,” he said. “And a lot of times he get in trouble trying to help others. So I can identify with it. It’s just that there’s certain things that happened that’s not really acceptable to me. And we just need to speak about it. But there’s genuine love there.”

One of the biggest bombshells of Jay-Z’s “4:44” was in the track “Smile” was his mother Gloria Carter’s sexuality. He explained in the interview that it wasn’t something they talked about as a family growing up, “it just exist. It was there. Everyone knew.”

Also Read: Social Media Reacts to Jay Z’s ‘4:44’: Beyonce Cheating Scandal, Alleged Kardashian Shade

He added that recently, they started “having these beautiful conversations, and just really getting to know each other.”

“We were always good friends but now we’re really great friends. You know,” he said of his relationship with his mom. “And we were just talking as friends. And then she was sharing that she was in love. She can be herself [now]. She doesn’t have to hide for her kids or feel like she’s embarrassing her kids. It was a much different time then. [Now] she can just live her full life, her whole life, and be her.”

For the full interview, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

2018 Grammy Nominations: Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar and Bruno Mars Lead, Ed Sheeran Shut Out

Grammy Nominations Snubs and Surprises, From Jay-Z to Ed Sheeran (Photos)

Mary J Blige, Jay-Z Lead 2017 NAACP Image Awards Nominations

Harvey Weinstein Mocked for Quoting Jay-Z in Sexual Harassment Apology

Yes, the rumors are true, and confirmed by the man himself.

In a feature in the New York Times published on Wednesday, Jay-Z said that he and his wife Beyoncé were working on a joint album before she released “Lemonade.”

“We were using our art almost like a therapy session. And we started making music together,” the rapper said.

“And then the music she was making at that time was further along,” he continued. “So her album came out as opposed to the joint album that we were working on. There was never a point where it was like, ‘I’m making this album.’ I was right there the entire time.”

The Grammy winner went on to say that while listening to each other’s albums was “uncomfortable,” it ultimately helped their marriage.

“You know, most people walk away, and like divorce rate is like 50 percent or something ’cause most people can’t see themselves,” he said. “The hardest thing is seeing pain on someone’s face that you caused, and then having to deal with yourself.”

Jay-Z also discussed his strained relationship with Kanye West, who collaborated with him on “Watch the Throne,” and said hopefully this bump in their friendship will be something to laugh about later in life.

“There’s gonna be complications in the relationship that we have to get through,” he said, adding that there’s probably feelings of hurt on both sides. “I’m not a perfect human being by no stretch.”

“But [West is] a very compassionate person,” he said. “And a lot of times he get in trouble trying to help others. So I can identify with it. It’s just that there’s certain things that happened that’s not really acceptable to me. And we just need to speak about it. But there’s genuine love there.”

One of the biggest bombshells of Jay-Z’s “4:44” was in the track “Smile” was his mother Gloria Carter’s sexuality. He explained in the interview that it wasn’t something they talked about as a family growing up, “it just exist. It was there. Everyone knew.”

He added that recently, they started “having these beautiful conversations, and just really getting to know each other.”

“We were always good friends but now we’re really great friends. You know,” he said of his relationship with his mom. “And we were just talking as friends. And then she was sharing that she was in love. She can be herself [now]. She doesn’t have to hide for her kids or feel like she’s embarrassing her kids. It was a much different time then. [Now] she can just live her full life, her whole life, and be her.”

For the full interview, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

2018 Grammy Nominations: Jay-Z, Kendrick Lamar and Bruno Mars Lead, Ed Sheeran Shut Out

Grammy Nominations Snubs and Surprises, From Jay-Z to Ed Sheeran (Photos)

Mary J Blige, Jay-Z Lead 2017 NAACP Image Awards Nominations

Harvey Weinstein Mocked for Quoting Jay-Z in Sexual Harassment Apology

Processing plant mixes up Canadian punk band and Beyoncé’s Lemonade

As reported by Pitchfork, the highly anticipated vinyl release of Beyoncé’s Lemonade has come with some bonus tracks for a few lucky buyers—or, to be more accurate, it came with some incorrect tracks for a few unlucky buyers. Apparently, the processing plant had mistakenly pressed a handful of tracks from Canadian…

Read more…

As reported by Pitchfork, the highly anticipated vinyl release of Beyoncé’s Lemonade has come with some bonus tracks for a few lucky buyers—or, to be more accurate, it came with some incorrect tracks for a few unlucky buyers. Apparently, the processing plant had mistakenly pressed a handful of tracks from Canadian…

Read more...

Did Taylor Swift Rip Off Beyonce’s Revenge Album?

In the sneak peek to the world premiere of Taylor Swift’s new single “Look What You Made Me Do,” Taylor and her squad are all in black and in formation.

In such formation, in fact, that the Beyhive — Beyonce’s famous legion of fans — is up in arms. “Stills from this music video look like very bad rip offs of Lemonade,” said one Twitter user. “Okay ladies now let’s gentrification,” another quipped.

Beyonce fans compared Swift’s outfit in the upcoming video to Bey’s iconic Superbowl performance, in which she wore a black leotard and fishnets. Imagery from Taylor’s video is also similar to Beyonce’s Southern Gothic videos from the “Lemonade” visual album, which was nominated for four Emmys and won a Peabody Award. Her album was snubbed at this year’s Grammy’s for Album of the Year, which went to Adele’s “25.”

Also Read: Here’s the Taylor Swift-Right Said Fred Comparison That Makes Everything Make Sense (Video)

Now, fans are getting angry that Beyonce could be eclipsed again, by Swift, no less, who was famously interrupted at the Grammys in 2009 by Kanye West, who said that Beyonce should have won the Best Female Video award.

Official #LWYMMDvideo world premiere.
Sunday 8/27 at the @vmas pic.twitter.com/tjAxr8qdsY

— Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) August 25, 2017

“Okay ladies now let’s gentrification.” pic.twitter.com/B8xL0oxrKl

— Kar L. Stine (@karyewest) August 25, 2017

Still from this music video look like very bad rip offs of Lemonade. https://t.co/PfcfivgLr0

— Darth Susan ????????‍♂️ (@TheNeueJohn) August 25, 2017

Simply Lemonade vs Ssips Lemonade pic.twitter.com/EEJjG1rK1z

— jujoffer (@jujoffer) August 25, 2017

Lemonade and Minute Maid pic.twitter.com/onBLP9pHvR

— Neal Carter (@nealcarter) August 25, 2017

This looks like Lemonade: Crystal Light. https://t.co/x2l6MAZyt0

— ReBecca Theodore (@FilmFatale_NYC) August 25, 2017

It looks like this is going to be a Taylor Swift’s “Lemonade”. Pumpkin Spice. pic.twitter.com/ffXJOl8pQf

— Nato Jacobs (@DomTheHuman) August 25, 2017

“Ok, what’s the theme for this video?”

Taylor Swift: “…segregation.”

“Excuse me, what?”

Taylor Swift: pic.twitter.com/832V4e7t6Z

— X (@XLNB) August 25, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here’s the Taylor Swift-Right Said Fred Comparison That Makes Everything Make Sense (Video)

Taylor Swift Drops New Single, Divides Twitter and ‘Breaks the Internet’

‘Walking Dead’ Gives Taylor Swift’s New Album Cover the Negan Treatment

A Taylor Swift Fan Released New Album Details Before Swift Could

In the sneak peek to the world premiere of Taylor Swift’s new single “Look What You Made Me Do,” Taylor and her squad are all in black and in formation.

In such formation, in fact, that the Beyhive — Beyonce’s famous legion of fans — is up in arms. “Stills from this music video look like very bad rip offs of Lemonade,” said one Twitter user. “Okay ladies now let’s gentrification,” another quipped.

Beyonce fans compared Swift’s outfit in the upcoming video to Bey’s iconic Superbowl performance, in which she wore a black leotard and fishnets. Imagery from Taylor’s video is also similar to Beyonce’s Southern Gothic videos from the “Lemonade” visual album, which was nominated for four Emmys and won a Peabody Award. Her album was snubbed at this year’s Grammy’s for Album of the Year, which went to Adele’s “25.”

Now, fans are getting angry that Beyonce could be eclipsed again, by Swift, no less, who was famously interrupted at the Grammys in 2009 by Kanye West, who said that Beyonce should have won the Best Female Video award.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here's the Taylor Swift-Right Said Fred Comparison That Makes Everything Make Sense (Video)

Taylor Swift Drops New Single, Divides Twitter and 'Breaks the Internet'

'Walking Dead' Gives Taylor Swift's New Album Cover the Negan Treatment

A Taylor Swift Fan Released New Album Details Before Swift Could

Beyonce Announces $300 ‘Lemonade’ Box Set

It’s been a little more than a year since Beyonce’s “Lemonade” album had its surprise release on April 23, 2016, following an HBO special that featured videos for every track on the record. Now, Queen Bey has assembled “The How to Make Lemonade Box Set,” described as a “momentous tome and comprehensive look” at her “’Lemonade’… Read more »

It’s been a little more than a year since Beyonce’s “Lemonade” album had its surprise release on April 23, 2016, following an HBO special that featured videos for every track on the record. Now, Queen Bey has assembled “The How to Make Lemonade Box Set,” described as a “momentous tome and comprehensive look” at her “’Lemonade’... Read more »

Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Was the World’s Best-Selling Album in 2016

She may have lost the Grammy album of the year award to Adele, but Beyonce’s “Lemonade” was 2016’s top-selling album in the world, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry market report issued Tuesday. The same report crowned Drake as the No. 1 recording artist and his “One Dance” the global top-selling single. What… Read more »

She may have lost the Grammy album of the year award to Adele, but Beyonce’s “Lemonade” was 2016’s top-selling album in the world, according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry market report issued Tuesday. The same report crowned Drake as the No. 1 recording artist and his “One Dance” the global top-selling single. What... Read more »

Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ and ‘Veep’ Among Peabody Winners

Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade” has made the cut for this year’s Peabody Awards.

Other winners include the FX shows “Atlanta” and “Better Things,” the BBC One drama “Happy Valley,” “Horace and Pete,” “National Treasure,” and HBO’s long-running comedy “Veep.”

The University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Media give the awards each year to 30 stories that capture pressing issues in society. “Winners represent sharp explorations of character, community, and craft in the best stories of today’s scripted television landscape,” the awards said in a statement.

Also Read: Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade,’ ‘Hamilton’ Doc, ‘Stranger Things’ Are Peabody Awards Finalists

The Peabodys will be announcing winners in other categories — including children’s programming, education, and public service — over the next few days.

Here are the entertainment programming winners, as listed by the Peabody Awards.

“Atlanta” 

FX Productions (FX Networks)

Donald Glover’s enchanting series on the struggles of two young black men trying to make it in Atlanta’s rap scene blends vibrant character study and rich socio-political commentary in delivering a detailed and textured exploration of a Southern city.

“Better Things” 

FX Productions (FX Networks)

Co-created by Pamela Adlon and Louis C.K., the result of this searingly funny and beautiful show is an at-times raw examination of the vicissitudes of working motherhood, crackling with feminist verve and energy, that consistently cuts new ground.

“Happy Valley”

BBC One (BBC One, Netflix)

A fresh take on the British crime drama that deals boldly and unflinchingly with the darkest human behavior while keeping its heart and even a tart sense of humor. Series creator Sally Wainwright has given us perhaps the greatest female lead on television today in Catherine Cawood, played by Sarah Lancashire in a stunning performance.

Also Read: Peabody Awards Name Norman Lear and Independent Television Service Winners

 “Horace and Pete”

Pig Newton, Inc. (louisck.net)

 A true original that melds contemporary politics and serialized storytelling with a throwback approach, “Horace and Pete” is a truly independent and groundbreaking demonstration of how quality television is expertly produced for the new media environment, all the while building upon decades of artistry and craft.

 “Lemonade”

HBO Entertainment in association with Parkwood Entertainment (HBO)

“Lemonade” draws from the prolific literary, musical, cinematic, and aesthetic sensibilities of black cultural producers to create a rich tapestry of poetic innovation. The audacity of its reach and fierceness of its vision challenges our cultural imagination, while crafting a stunning and sublime masterpiece about the lives of women of color and the bonds of friendship seldom seen or heard in American popular culture.

“National Treasure”

The Forge (Channel 4)

 A dark and timely examination of sexual abuse at the hands of privileged celebrity, “National Treasure” is an engrossing series that explores the loyalty of family and friends during crisis, the impact of sexual abuse on victims, and the legal system itself. As in real life, there’s no neat ending in this dramatic rendering of one man’s choices and the collateral damage he creates.

“Veep” 

HBO Entertainment (HBO)

 A rare show blessed with a perfectly cast ensemble, including the comedic genius of Julia Louis-Dreyfus, VEEP is a workplace comedy that not only captures the zeitgeist of the current bizarre political moment but transcends its own form to deliver a sobering message, with sharp dialogue, street savvy–and lots of laughs.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade,’ ‘Hamilton’ Doc, ‘Stranger Things’ Are Peabody Awards Finalists

Grammys: Even Adele Thinks Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Was Robbed – ‘What the F— Does She Have to Do?’

20 Best Albums of 2016, From Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ to David Bowie’s ‘Blackstar’ (Videos)

Peabody Awards Name Norman Lear and Independent Television Service Winners

Beyoncé’s visual album “Lemonade” has made the cut for this year’s Peabody Awards.

Other winners include the FX shows “Atlanta” and “Better Things,” the BBC One drama “Happy Valley,” “Horace and Pete,” “National Treasure,” and HBO’s long-running comedy “Veep.”

The University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Media give the awards each year to 30 stories that capture pressing issues in society. “Winners represent sharp explorations of character, community, and craft in the best stories of today’s scripted television landscape,” the awards said in a statement.

The Peabodys will be announcing winners in other categories — including children’s programming, education, and public service — over the next few days.

Here are the entertainment programming winners, as listed by the Peabody Awards.

“Atlanta” 

FX Productions (FX Networks)

Donald Glover’s enchanting series on the struggles of two young black men trying to make it in Atlanta’s rap scene blends vibrant character study and rich socio-political commentary in delivering a detailed and textured exploration of a Southern city.

“Better Things” 

FX Productions (FX Networks)

Co-created by Pamela Adlon and Louis C.K., the result of this searingly funny and beautiful show is an at-times raw examination of the vicissitudes of working motherhood, crackling with feminist verve and energy, that consistently cuts new ground.

“Happy Valley”

BBC One (BBC One, Netflix)

A fresh take on the British crime drama that deals boldly and unflinchingly with the darkest human behavior while keeping its heart and even a tart sense of humor. Series creator Sally Wainwright has given us perhaps the greatest female lead on television today in Catherine Cawood, played by Sarah Lancashire in a stunning performance.

 “Horace and Pete”

Pig Newton, Inc. (louisck.net)

 A true original that melds contemporary politics and serialized storytelling with a throwback approach, “Horace and Pete” is a truly independent and groundbreaking demonstration of how quality television is expertly produced for the new media environment, all the while building upon decades of artistry and craft.

 “Lemonade”

HBO Entertainment in association with Parkwood Entertainment (HBO)

“Lemonade” draws from the prolific literary, musical, cinematic, and aesthetic sensibilities of black cultural producers to create a rich tapestry of poetic innovation. The audacity of its reach and fierceness of its vision challenges our cultural imagination, while crafting a stunning and sublime masterpiece about the lives of women of color and the bonds of friendship seldom seen or heard in American popular culture.

“National Treasure”

The Forge (Channel 4)

 A dark and timely examination of sexual abuse at the hands of privileged celebrity, “National Treasure” is an engrossing series that explores the loyalty of family and friends during crisis, the impact of sexual abuse on victims, and the legal system itself. As in real life, there’s no neat ending in this dramatic rendering of one man’s choices and the collateral damage he creates.

“Veep” 

HBO Entertainment (HBO)

 A rare show blessed with a perfectly cast ensemble, including the comedic genius of Julia Louis-Dreyfus, VEEP is a workplace comedy that not only captures the zeitgeist of the current bizarre political moment but transcends its own form to deliver a sobering message, with sharp dialogue, street savvy–and lots of laughs.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Beyonce's 'Lemonade,' 'Hamilton' Doc, 'Stranger Things' Are Peabody Awards Finalists

Grammys: Even Adele Thinks Beyonce's 'Lemonade' Was Robbed – 'What the F— Does She Have to Do?'

20 Best Albums of 2016, From Beyonce's 'Lemonade' to David Bowie's 'Blackstar' (Videos)

Peabody Awards Name Norman Lear and Independent Television Service Winners

‘Veep’, ‘Atlanta’, ‘Horace & Pete’ Among Peabody Honorees; HBO & FX Tie For Wins

Atlanta, Better Things, Horace and Pete, Veep and Lemonade are among this year’s Peabody Awards entertainment winners, the Peabody organization announced today. HBO and FX each scored two wins.
The honorees are among seven winners in the awards’ entertainment category. Other entertainment winners are BBC One’s Happy Valley and The Forge’s National Treasure.
The seven entertainment winners join the documentary honorees announced Tuesday. The winners in news, radio/podcast…

Atlanta, Better Things, Horace and Pete, Veep and Lemonade are among this year’s Peabody Awards entertainment winners, the Peabody organization announced today. HBO and FX each scored two wins. The honorees are among seven winners in the awards’ entertainment category. Other entertainment winners are BBC One’s Happy Valley and The Forge’s National Treasure. The seven entertainment winners join the documentary honorees announced Tuesday. The winners in news, radio/podcast…

‘Music Is My Mistress’: KENZO Launches Short Film Directed by ‘Lemonade’ Helmer Kahlil Joseph — Watch

The film stars Tracee Ellis Ross and Jesse Williams alongside musician Kelsey Lu.

KENZO has launched “Music Is My Mistress,” a short film by director Kahlil Joseph, the mind behind Beyoncé’s “Lemonade”, Kendrick Lamar’s “m.A.A.d” and Flying Lotus’ “Until the Quiet Comes.” The short stars actors Jesse Williams and Tracee Ellis Ross alongside musician Kelsey Lu. Watch the film below.

READ MORE: This Oscar-Winning 1952 Stop-Motion Short Is Looking Awfully Relevant Right Now

“Having Tracee, Jessie, Lu and Ish also collaborate was amazing,” said KENZO creative directors Carol Lim and Humberto Leon in a statement. “The atmosphere on set was so unique and we think that’s visible in the film. Everyone brought their diverse talents together to create something beautiful.”

True to the director’s style, the short doesn’t follow a linear pattern, and music definitely takes center stage. It features music by Shabazz Palaces and Lu. “It’s a trailer wrapped in a music video inside a short film. It’s a comedy subverting its own seriousness. It feels vast yet intimate, pensive yet deeply funny, lyrical and blunt, precise and improvised,” reads the official description of the short, which was created by KENZO and Annapurna Films.

READ MORE: Jane Birkin On Why She Chose Oscar-Nominated Short ‘La Femme et le TGV’ As Her Final Film

Up next for Joseph is the launch, next month, of “Process.” The short is the companion film to British singer Sampha’s debut album of the same name. Watch “Music Is My Mistress” below.

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Carlos Santana Pokes Beyhive, Says Beyoncé ‘Not a Singer’

The overwhelming consensus since Sunday night is that Beyonce was robbed at the Grammys. But according to legendary guitarist Carlos Santana, Queen Bey deserved the surprising upset that saw Adele’s “25” beat Beyonce’s “Lemonade” to win Album of the Year. Santana, weighing in on the matter this week, for some reason, declared about Adele that “she can sing,” while Beyonce, he says, is “not a singer.”

“I think that Adele won because she can sing, sing,” Santana told the Australian Associated Press, via the New Zealand Herald.

He added, “With all respect to our sister Beyonce, Beyonce is very beautiful to look at and it’s more like modelling kind of music – music to model a dress – she’s not a singer, singer, with all respect to her.”

Also Read: How’d the Grammys Pull Off That Beyonce Number, Anyway?

Santana and Beyonce performed together at the pre-game festivities before the Super Bowl in 2003.

For what it’s worth, even Adele thought Beyonce was robbed.

“I can’t possibly accept this award,” Adele said in her acceptance speech at the end of the Grammy Awards. “I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious, [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul-bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that.”

Also Read: Beyonce Drops New Song With DJ Khaled and Jay Z After Grammys

Beyonce also lost to Adele in the categories “Record of the Year,” “Song of the Year” and “Best Pop Solo Performance.” However, Beyonce didn’t walk away empty-handed: She won “Best Urban Contemporary Album” for her album “Lemonade” and best music video for “Formation.”

And she ultimately won the night with her goddess-like performance — about which Santana also had something to say.

“Adele can sing, sing. She doesn’t bring all the dancers and props, she can just stand there and she just stood there and sang the song and that’s it, and this is why she wins,” Santana said.

Naturally, the Beyhive lost it. See some reaction tweets to Santana’s comments below.

Prince was a REAL guitar player and Carlos Santana makes margaritas. Don’t @ me pic.twitter.com/0csjnlDP3i

— Blue Ivy’s Purse (@_catricia_) February 14, 2017

Carlos Santana trying to sing Beyonce’s song pic.twitter.com/pMrMOMioX1

— Beyhive (@jr_beyhive) February 14, 2017

Beyoncé sang on point while falling backward in a chair and didn’t miss a beat or lose breath with twins on her diaphragm Carlos Santana

— BlackITgirl (@joalmoore) February 14, 2017

Carlos Santana is a legend & can say whatever he wants. Adele did deserve to win. End of story. Can’t wait until this Beyonce hysteria ends

— Shashana (@Shashana80sKid) February 14, 2017

The fact that Carlos Santana said those comments after he’s performed on stage with Beyoncé at halftime and witnessed her talent is baffling

— eh (@Bowtobee) February 14, 2017

Beyoncé out sang and outperformed Carlos Santana at the superbowl pregame years ago so he can keep his comments pic.twitter.com/OR6MxrRxRY

— Mark Del Figgalo (@theIifeofpabIo) February 14, 2017

Carlos Santana: “Beyoncé isn’t a singer.”

me: pic.twitter.com/9jXtxJKHgd

— 0 Likes & 0 Dollars (@Proto_Zsay) February 14, 2017

NOOOOOO, I LOVE CARLOS SANTANA TOO MUCH FOR HIM TO SLANDER BEYONCE, DON’T DO IT CARLOS!!!!!

— Black Aziz Ansari (@Freeyourmindkid) February 14, 2017

Are we all ignoring the fact that Carlos Santana insulted Beyoncé while he COLLABORATED with NICKELBACK?

— jeeke (@jake_rahn) February 14, 2017

Meanwhile, to clear up any confusion on Santana’s part, here’s a breakdown of Beyonce’s live vocal range.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Piers Morgan Didn’t ‘Feel’ Beyonce’s Grammys Performance and Twitter Isn’t Feeling That

Grammys: Even Adele Thinks Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Was Robbed – ‘What the F— Does She Have to Do?’

The Grammys’ Broken Record: Adele’s Big Night Leaves Beyonce on the Sidelines Yet Again

The overwhelming consensus since Sunday night is that Beyonce was robbed at the Grammys. But according to legendary guitarist Carlos Santana, Queen Bey deserved the surprising upset that saw Adele’s “25” beat Beyonce’s “Lemonade” to win Album of the Year. Santana, weighing in on the matter this week, for some reason, declared about Adele that “she can sing,” while Beyonce, he says, is “not a singer.”

“I think that Adele won because she can sing, sing,” Santana told the Australian Associated Press, via the New Zealand Herald.

He added, “With all respect to our sister Beyonce, Beyonce is very beautiful to look at and it’s more like modelling kind of music – music to model a dress – she’s not a singer, singer, with all respect to her.”

Santana and Beyonce performed together at the pre-game festivities before the Super Bowl in 2003.

For what it’s worth, even Adele thought Beyonce was robbed.

“I can’t possibly accept this award,” Adele said in her acceptance speech at the end of the Grammy Awards. “I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious, [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul-bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that.”

Beyonce also lost to Adele in the categories “Record of the Year,” “Song of the Year” and “Best Pop Solo Performance.” However, Beyonce didn’t walk away empty-handed: She won “Best Urban Contemporary Album” for her album “Lemonade” and best music video for “Formation.”

And she ultimately won the night with her goddess-like performance — about which Santana also had something to say.

“Adele can sing, sing. She doesn’t bring all the dancers and props, she can just stand there and she just stood there and sang the song and that’s it, and this is why she wins,” Santana said.

Naturally, the Beyhive lost it. See some reaction tweets to Santana’s comments below.

Meanwhile, to clear up any confusion on Santana’s part, here’s a breakdown of Beyonce’s live vocal range.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Piers Morgan Didn't 'Feel' Beyonce's Grammys Performance and Twitter Isn't Feeling That

Grammys: Even Adele Thinks Beyonce's 'Lemonade' Was Robbed – 'What the F— Does She Have to Do?'

The Grammys' Broken Record: Adele's Big Night Leaves Beyonce on the Sidelines Yet Again

‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ Announces Season 3 Premiere Date Via Beyonce Tribute (Video)

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” announced its Season 3 premiere date Monday in truly fabulous fashion.

In a brief teaser (above), we see Titus Andromedon (Tituss Burgess) making his way through the streets of New York in a tribute to Beyonce’s “Lemonade.” We also learn that Season 3 will premiere on May 19.

Last season, Titus and Mikey (Mike Carlsen) had to put their relationship on hold so Titus could take an acting job on a cruise ship. Meanwhile, Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) got a most unwelcome call from Rev. Richard (Jon Hamm) telling her they must get a divorce.

Also Read: ‘Dear White People’ Creator: Complaints Denying Racism ‘Sat Beside Comments Calling Me a N–er’

The series stars the Emmy-nominated Kemper, Burgess, Jane Krakowski, and Emmy Award winner Carol Kane. The show was created by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, who serve as executive producers with Jeff Richmond and David Miner.

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” is a production of Universal Television, Little Stranger Inc., 3 Arts Entertainment and Bevel Gears for Netflix.

Watch the video

Related stories from TheWrap:

Alexander Skarsgard, Jeffrey Wright Set to Join Netflix Thriller ‘Hold the Dark’

Kate McKinnon to Voice New Ms. Frizzle in Netflix ‘Magic School Bus’ Reboot

Netflix Sets Premiere Date for Britt Robertson’s ‘Girlboss’ (Video)

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” announced its Season 3 premiere date Monday in truly fabulous fashion.

In a brief teaser (above), we see Titus Andromedon (Tituss Burgess) making his way through the streets of New York in a tribute to Beyonce’s “Lemonade.” We also learn that Season 3 will premiere on May 19.

Last season, Titus and Mikey (Mike Carlsen) had to put their relationship on hold so Titus could take an acting job on a cruise ship. Meanwhile, Kimmy (Ellie Kemper) got a most unwelcome call from Rev. Richard (Jon Hamm) telling her they must get a divorce.

The series stars the Emmy-nominated Kemper, Burgess, Jane Krakowski, and Emmy Award winner Carol Kane. The show was created by Tina Fey and Robert Carlock, who serve as executive producers with Jeff Richmond and David Miner.

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt” is a production of Universal Television, Little Stranger Inc., 3 Arts Entertainment and Bevel Gears for Netflix.

Watch the video

Related stories from TheWrap:

Alexander Skarsgard, Jeffrey Wright Set to Join Netflix Thriller 'Hold the Dark'

Kate McKinnon to Voice New Ms. Frizzle in Netflix 'Magic School Bus' Reboot

Netflix Sets Premiere Date for Britt Robertson's 'Girlboss' (Video)

Grammys: Even Adele Thinks Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Was Robbed – ‘What the F— Does She Have to Do?’

Adele may have won Album of the Year tonight, but it turns out even she thinks Beyonce’s “Lemonade” was robbed.

“I can’t possibly accept this award,” Adele said in her acceptance speech. “I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious, [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul-bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that.”

Backstage she was more blunt, wondering aloud to reporters, “What the f— does she have to do to win?’” according to Buzzfeed.

Also Read: The Grammys’ Broken Record: Adele’s Big Night Leaves Beyonce on the Sidelines Yet Again

Adele and Beyonce shared the night’s big rivalry, if you can call it that, with Adele’s “25” and Beyonce’s “Lemonade” vying for some of the same awards. Beyonce had the most nominations of any artist, with nine, and going into the Grammys tonight, she seemed a lock for the top honor. “25” is a beloved pop record after all, but “Lemonade” has been almost universally praised as a groundbreaking concept album, a bold and confrontational political statement, and an artistically risky multimedia project.

Adele used her acceptance speech (and probably won the eternal love of the Internet in the process) to lavishly praise Queen Bey.

Also Read: Grammys Plagued by Tech Issues: ‘Sound Guy Better Be Updating His LinkedIn’

“All us artists adore you. You are our light,” Adele said later in her speech. “And the way that you make me and my friends feel, the way you make my black friends feel is empowering, and you make them stand up for themselves. And I love you. I always have. And I always will.”

Read the whole acceptance speech below.

Hi, guys. Hi. Hi, everyone. hi. hi. hi. hi. As you can see, it took an army to make me strong and willing again to do it, and I thank you all from the bottom of my heart. Five years ago, when I was last here, I was so– I was pregnant, and I didn’t know. And I was awarded that shortly after, I found out shortly after, which was the biggest blessing of my life. And in my pregnancy, and through becoming a mother, I lost a lot of myself. I struggled and I still do struggle being a mom. It’s really hard.

But tonight winning this kind of feels full circle.

But I can’t possibly accept this award, and I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, Beyonce, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that. And all us artists adore you. You are our light. And the way that you make me and my friends feel, the way you make my black friends feel is empowering, and you make them stand up for themselves. and I love you. I always have. and I always will. Grammys, I appreciate it. The academy, I love you, my manager, my husband, and my son. You’re the only reason I do it. Thank you so much. Thank you very much to everybody.

Related stories from TheWrap:

How Many Grammys Has Beyonce Won in Her Career? A Lot

Grammys: A Tribe Called Quest and Busta Rhymes Diss ‘President Agent Orange’ in Tribute to Refugees

Grammys: Pretty Much Everyone Is Making the Same Joke About Katy Perry

Adele may have won Album of the Year tonight, but it turns out even she thinks Beyonce’s “Lemonade” was robbed.

“I can’t possibly accept this award,” Adele said in her acceptance speech. “I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious, [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul-bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that.”

Backstage she was more blunt, wondering aloud to reporters, “What the f— does she have to do to win?'” according to Buzzfeed.

Adele and Beyonce shared the night’s big rivalry, if you can call it that, with Adele’s “25” and Beyonce’s “Lemonade” vying for some of the same awards. Beyonce had the most nominations of any artist, with nine, and going into the Grammys tonight, she seemed a lock for the top honor. “25” is a beloved pop record after all, but “Lemonade” has been almost universally praised as a groundbreaking concept album, a bold and confrontational political statement, and an artistically risky multimedia project.

Adele used her acceptance speech (and probably won the eternal love of the Internet in the process) to lavishly praise Queen Bey.

“All us artists adore you. You are our light,” Adele said later in her speech. “And the way that you make me and my friends feel, the way you make my black friends feel is empowering, and you make them stand up for themselves. And I love you. I always have. And I always will.”

Read the whole acceptance speech below.

Hi, guys. Hi. Hi, everyone. hi. hi. hi. hi. As you can see, it took an army to make me strong and willing again to do it, and I thank you all from the bottom of my heart. Five years ago, when I was last here, I was so– I was pregnant, and I didn’t know. And I was awarded that shortly after, I found out shortly after, which was the biggest blessing of my life. And in my pregnancy, and through becoming a mother, I lost a lot of myself. I struggled and I still do struggle being a mom. It’s really hard.

But tonight winning this kind of feels full circle.

But I can’t possibly accept this award, and I’m very humbled and I’m very grateful and gracious [but] the artist of my life is Beyonce, and the album to me, the “Lemonade” album, Beyonce, was so monumental, and so well thought out. And so beautiful and soul bearing and we all got to see another side of you that you don’t always let us see, and we appreciate that. And all us artists adore you. You are our light. And the way that you make me and my friends feel, the way you make my black friends feel is empowering, and you make them stand up for themselves. and I love you. I always have. and I always will. Grammys, I appreciate it. The academy, I love you, my manager, my husband, and my son. You’re the only reason I do it. Thank you so much. Thank you very much to everybody.

Related stories from TheWrap:

How Many Grammys Has Beyonce Won in Her Career? A Lot

Grammys: A Tribe Called Quest and Busta Rhymes Diss 'President Agent Orange' in Tribute to Refugees

Grammys: Pretty Much Everyone Is Making the Same Joke About Katy Perry

Beyonce Won’t Make Grammy History After Early Losses

Beyonce is already a winner at the 2017 Grammy Awards, taking best music video for the politically charged “Formation,” but she won’t be making Grammy history this year, at least not in the win column. With a stunning nine nominations for her visual album, “Lemonade,” Beyonce had a chance to break or at least tie two major Grammy records:… Read more »

Beyonce is already a winner at the 2017 Grammy Awards, taking best music video for the politically charged “Formation,” but she won’t be making Grammy history this year, at least not in the win column. With a stunning nine nominations for her visual album, “Lemonade,” Beyonce had a chance to break or at least tie two major Grammy records:... Read more »

Beyonce Hit With $20 Million Lawsuit Over ‘Formation’

Beyonce is receiving her good news and bad news these days, it seems.

The singer, who announced that she’s pregnant with twins last week, has now been hit with a $20 million lawsuit over claims that she improperly used the voice of an up-and-coming rapper and YouTube personality in her hit song “Formation.”

In the suit, filed in federal court in Louisiana, the estate of Anthony Barre — aka rapper Messy Mya — claims that “Formation” used Barre’s voice without authorization.

Also Read: Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Is a Ripoff, New Lawsuit Claims

“Defendants used Mr. Barre’s voice, performance and words from his copyrighted works to create the tone, mood, setting and location of the New Orleans-themed ‘Formation,’” the lawsuit reads.

New Orleans-based Barre was shot and killed in 2010.

The suit claims that the suit has “received nothing” from the alleged use of his voice — “no acknowledgment, no credit no remuneration of any kind.”

Also Read: ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Star Brings Out Her Beyonce for a Photo Shoot (Video)

According to the suit, “Formation” misappropriated the lyrics “What happened at the New Orleans” and “Bitch, I’m back by popular demand” from Barre’s 2010 work “Booking the Hoes From New Wildings.” The suit also claims that the line “Oh yeah baby. I like that” from his “A 27-Piece Huh?” was wrongfully lifted.

Alleging copyright infringement and other counts, the suit is seeking damages  “believed to exceed $20 million.”

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Grey’s Anatomy’ Star Brings Out Her Beyonce for a Photo Shoot (Video)

11 Beyonce Twin Pregnancy Memes We’re Crazy in Love With

5 Takeaways From Beyonce’s Interview With Solange

Beyonce is receiving her good news and bad news these days, it seems.

The singer, who announced that she’s pregnant with twins last week, has now been hit with a $20 million lawsuit over claims that she improperly used the voice of an up-and-coming rapper and YouTube personality in her hit song “Formation.”

In the suit, filed in federal court in Louisiana, the estate of Anthony Barre — aka rapper Messy Mya — claims that “Formation” used Barre’s voice without authorization.

“Defendants used Mr. Barre’s voice, performance and words from his copyrighted works to create the tone, mood, setting and location of the New Orleans-themed ‘Formation,'” the lawsuit reads.

New Orleans-based Barre was shot and killed in 2010.

The suit claims that the suit has “received nothing” from the alleged use of his voice — “no acknowledgment, no credit no remuneration of any kind.”

According to the suit, “Formation” misappropriated the lyrics “What happened at the New Orleans” and “Bitch, I’m back by popular demand” from Barre’s 2010 work “Booking the Hoes From New Wildings.” The suit also claims that the line “Oh yeah baby. I like that” from his “A 27-Piece Huh?” was wrongfully lifted.

Alleging copyright infringement and other counts, the suit is seeking damages  “believed to exceed $20 million.”

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Grey's Anatomy' Star Brings Out Her Beyonce for a Photo Shoot (Video)

11 Beyonce Twin Pregnancy Memes We're Crazy in Love With

5 Takeaways From Beyonce's Interview With Solange

In the Age of ‘Lemonade’ and ‘Made In America,’ Should We Still Be Thinking of Film and TV As Different Media? — Critics Survey

Awards season means sorting art into traditional categories, but do our definitions still apply in this radically new digital world?

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question:

Recently, there has been a lot of chatter regarding projects like “O.J.: Made in America” (an eight-hour documentary that was produced by ESPN but premiered at Sundance) and “Lemonade” (which needs no prior introduction, and debuted on HBO), and whether they should be classified as films or television shows.

The conversation has only grown more heated and urgent in the shadow of awards season, which demands that things be lumped into a small number of binary categories: Actor / Actress, Comedy / Drama, Fiction / Documentary, Film / Television. In a world where feature films are premiering on Netflix and miniseries-length documentaries are eligible for Oscars, should we still be thinking of movies and television as different media?

Jordan Hoffman (@JHoffman), The Guardian

I’m going to tell you a quick story. Years ago I dated a gal who lived in Woodstock, NY. At around the same time I was getting into various forms of old folk music. (The Anthology of American Folk Music, also known as the “Harry Smith” collection, had just been remastered to CD, followed by the Coen Brothers’ “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” It was a perfect storm for me to really get into Uncle Eck Dunford.)

Anyway, I had been reading my Greil Marcus and Alan Lomax, so one time I went up to Woodstock and there was this old hippie on the village green who was playing the banjo. I stopped to watch him with a male friend of mine who joined me for the weekend, and when he was done playing (and after I’d thrown a coin or two into his hat) I quizzed him if he was playing “bluegrass” or “old time” music. “Oh, it’s all old time music,” he said with a smile, to which I responded, as only pedantic twenty-something could, that his fingering style was more in line with a bluegrass style. “So it seems to me,” I said, “that what you are actually playing is bluegrass.”

This bearded instrumentalist then turned to my companion, pointed at me and said “your friend here is real hung up on labeling things, man!”

This was an incident that, I kid you not, rocked me to my very core and fundamentally changed my outlook on life.

To that end, I hereby state: call it whatever the hell you want to call it, so long as it’s good. If theaters had programmed “Lemonade” with something else to make it feature-length they woulda had lines around the block (yeah, I know I just opened a can of worms with that feature-length crack).  The TV vs Film divide is something that is worrisome to those who raise financing and those who put a lot of energy into end-of-the-year awards. As I fall into neither camp, I can’t get too worked up about it. I’ve got plenty of other problems.

READ MORE: Critics Pick The Best Film Scores Of The 21st Century

Vadim Rizov, @vrizov, Filmmaker Magazine

Common sense helps answer that, maybe. If the team behind “O.J.” insists that they’re a film, going to the trouble of booking a qualifying run of the product in a theater, we should take them at their word. If you want to consider “Lemonade” as a movie because it’s an individual unit that could be plausibly be shown theatrically, by all means. This discussion only seems to pop up with stand-alone, prestige-y titles; I don’t see anyone arguing the merits of including, say, the episode of “Last Man Standing” where Tim Allen Absolutely Destroys Safe Spaces With Pithy Comments. (Though someone please let Kyle Smith know about it, maybe he might.) I think a lot about Todd Haynes’ very fine “Mildred Pierce,” of which the team behind it insisted it was not a film forced by pragmatics to take the disguised form of a miniseries; if that was really and truly how they felt, they should never, ever have allowed it to be shown theatrically. Anyway, use your common sense vis-a-vis the rules of whatever poll you’re voting in.

The bigger issues raised by this question are more irritating. There is x amount of money in each publication’s budget, and if they’re working in the cultural sphere there are decisions to be made about how much money is allocated to criticism/thinkpieces/hot-takes about film vs. TV. Many writers who previously only covered film have been forced by market exigency to add TV to their coverage duties, some with more unfeigned enthusiasm than others. There’s a *lot* I could say about that, but it’s mostly a market reality question, seems like: more people are going to click (and comment, over and over) on a recap than pretty much any film review. So should we think of the two mediums differently? I’d emphatically say yes, but the difficulty of applying that in practice in a writers’ market currently heavily tilted towards TV would suggest that no, it’s all now the same thing. Please enjoy the ensuing cultural conversation.

Richard Brody (@tnyfrontrow), The New Yorker

I feel like an idiot for deferring, in my year-end list, to the conventions of other publications and organizations regarding what constitutes a theatrical release — let alone one that “counts” for the year 2016. I did so because such conventions provide a basis of comparison and of discussion — and I made sure to provide a snippet of that discussion in an essay to accompany the list, because it’s the discussion that ultimately matters. The survey question actually is two questions: first, what do each of us, individually, experience as a feature film; second, what, for the purposes of awards and lists, should count as a feature film?

Here’s what I experience as a feature film: a closed-ended drama. The relevant distinction between film and TV isn’t where it’s shown; it’s closed-endedness. Even before the age of home video, I saw plenty of feature films on television, knowing that they were the same kinds of things that were playing in theatres; whether they actually did so or not seemed irrelevant. Many of Fassbinder’s movies, whether in the two-hour range (“Martha”), the two-part, four-hour range (“World on a Wire”), or the fourteen-part, fifteen-hour range (“Berlin Alexanderplatz”), were made for television and first shown on television. Denying that these are features because they were first broadcast is contrary to artistic judgment, is merely protectionism to aid movie theatres and distributors. OK, but what about “The Girlfriend Experience” or “The Knick”? I find them to be aspirationally serial, leaving the door open to Season Two and beyond. Fassbinder, had he lived longer, wouldn’t have pitched “Berlin Savignyplatz.”

And as for “Lemonade,” which I admire, it doesn’t seem like a feature film — to me — but like an hour-long music video, which is to say that, as good as its images are, they exist mainly to promote (or, shall we say, to supplement) the more or less uninterrupted album to which it remains tethered. That’s the difference between a music video and a feature, but I’d happily read an endorsement of it as a feature; the discussion’s the thing. The point is that the criteria for what constitutes a feature film are subjective and personal — which is the reason for setting clearly defined and simple rules on the subject, and setting them in terms of where and when something’s released is a reasonable place to start.

David Ehrlich (@davidehrlich), IndieWire

What Richard said. Although I’d point out that the concept of “closed-endedness” has become a lot more difficult to define in these strange times, particularly since the birth of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the dawn of our new blockbuster era. You’d have a hard time finding more aspirationally serial media than this ongoing spate of superhero films, each installment of which exists to serve a greater whole and ends with a “tantalizing” preview of what’s to come (there’s a world of difference between “James Bond will return” and some cryptic footage that hints at whatever villain is coming to fight the Avengers next). To that point, “Lemonade” was far more closed-ended to me than “Captain America: Civil War,” and therefore perhaps more of a “film.”

Of course, all of these questions inevitably between back towards economics as much as they do the viewing experience, and that pertains to where these projects are shown. But we’re only talking about this because the borders have blurred and the definitions have become so slippery, so I find it easiest to set my default position to: “I know a film when I see one.” It’s the only argument I need to be able to feel comfortable with the conclusion that “Lemonade” is a film, but Frank Ocean’s “Endless” is not, but it’s also porous and pliable enough to allow for someone to convince me that the opposite is true.

Christopher Rosen (@chrisjrosen), Entertainment Weekly

Should we still be thinking of film and television as different media? No? Movies are dead, except they’re not. Allow me to quote something I wrote previously about this very film: “Maybe instead of expiring, movies have just transformed into something else. As television has risen to cultural prominence, the biggest films have become episodes — sequels and spinoffs about characters we know that end with a call to tune-in next week. Even ‘Independence Day: Resurgence,’ a sequel no one wanted and that everyone hates, closes with a tease for the next chapter. Hey, why not?”

So if that’s the world of movies in 2016, why not “O.J.: Made In America — The Motion Picture”? It’s an astonishing movie but dressed up like prestige television. It’s #content of the highest order, where storytelling trumps delivery system (and longform is more than a buzzword). That should be the goal — theatrical runs and classifications be damned.

Christopher Campbell (@thefilmcynic), Nonfics / Film School Rejects

In the case of “O.J.: Made in America,” I’ll respect Ezra Edelman’s claim of intent that he wanted to make a long feature film, even though it does seem made to fit the episodic TV broadcast most people saw it as. But I tend to accept documentary miniseries as equal to documentary films, such as in the case of most Ken Burns works. Longform music videos are fine to accept as films, as well, and I think that’s been a question at least since “Thriller,” if not before. There is some greater blending going on lately, where I think the longford narratives of “TV series” “Fleabag” and “Search Party” both work best as lengthy features in need of watching all at once. There are still some certain distinctions between TV and film. I would never equate “Modern Family” with cinema, but classification in general can always be faulty.

Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse), Freelance for Rolling Stone, Vulture, the Verge

Of course film and TV are different mediums, the difference being that movies are good and TV shows are bad. I’m kidding! (Probably. Mostly. “Mad Men” was good, like, movies-good.) But hey, it’s 2016 — we’re abolishing binaries all over the place, with media classification diversifying to occupy as complicated a spectrum as gender. In the olden days, movies were movies and TV was TV, but defining characteristics like episodic structure or location of exhibition have gone completely cuckoo. Maybe a TV show wakes up one day and tells its parents that it’s really been a ten-hour movie all along, and wants to be addressed as such. Farkakte millennials.

In all seriousness, though, I find the whole “is [x release] a movie or TV show or short film or music video or recorded play or animated chapbook or whatever the hell” rigamarole to be tiresome and unproductive outside of list-making signposts. So at this time of year, when critics are compiling their best-of selections for 2016, semantics squabbles are kind of unavoidable. But after the New Year, we’ll all have better things to talk about.

Question: What is the best film currently playing in theaters?

Answer: “Moonlight”

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Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn Star in Beyoncé ‘Formation’ Parody Video — Watch

The video, entitled “Get in Formation,” features Schumer lip-syncing to Beyoncé and performing a similarly provocative dance routine.

It would appear that Amy Schumer was thirsty for her own version of Beyoncé’s “Lemonade.” Schumer and Goldie Hawn have released a new video parodying “Lemonade’s” closing song “Formation,” Pitchfork reports.

READ MORE: Amy Schumer Urged to Lose Weight for ‘Trainwreck’: ‘If You Weigh Over 140 Pounds…It Will Hurt People’s Eyes’

The video, entitled “Get in Formation,” features Schumer and Hawn lip-syncing to Beyoncé’s “Formation” and performing a similarly provocative dance routine, though comparison of the pair’s moves to Beyoncés is probably a bit of a stretch. “Get in Formation,” which includes farm animals and a Chihuahua, is not the first “Formation” parody video, as Jimmy Kimmel and James Corden have also done similar versions. Schumer’s video is also reminiscent of Aziz Ansari and Eric Wareheim’s parody of Kanye West’s “Famous.”

READ MORE: Amy Schumer Hints That Season 5 Of Her Comedy Central Show Isn’t Coming Anytime Soon

On a more serious note, Schumer recently appeared alongside Meryl Streep, Lena Dunham, Amber Tamblyn, Rose McGowan, Whoopi Goldberg, Rosie Perez, Maggie Gyllenhaal and Martha Plimpton in a video responding to Donald Trump’s infamous “Access Hollywood” video, in which the Republican presidential candidate was recorded talking about sexually assaulting women, something Trump described as “locker-room talk.” The new video directed by Liz Garbus, called “It’s Not Okay,” consists primarily of women describing their experiences with rape and sexual assault.

To watch Schumer’s parody of “Formation,” check out the video below.

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‘SNL’ Turns Beyonce’s ‘Lemonade’ Into Melania Trump’s ‘Melanianade’

As Donald Trump’s comments about women and growing list of sexual assault accusers send shockwaves through the final month of this election, the Republican candidate has continuously leaned on the women in his inner circle to vouch for him. But in a digital short on “Saturday Night Live,” those ladies finally got their revenge in a parody of Beyonce’s “Sorry” from “Lemonade.”

Filmed entirely in black and white and titled “Melanianade,” the short featured “SNL” players as Melania Trump, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany, campaign manager Kellyanne Conway, and famed “Apprentice” villain Omarosa. The quintet called out Trump for relying on them to bail him out and, like Beyonce saying goodbye to a shifty boyfriend, declaring they were done with his nonsense.

“You’re taking it for granted that we’ll always be there,” warned Melania, ” But one day soon, Donald, you may wake up and this bomb p***y blouse will be gone.

Also Read: ‘SNL’ Mocks The ‘Second And Worst Ever’ Presidential Debate

The ladies were shown trashing Trump’s stuff, including Melania taking a bat to a TV airing Trump on the news like Beyonce taking a bat to some car windows. We also saw Tiffany Trump smashing one of her father’s portraits, declaring that “I’ll never be Ivanka in your eyes” and that she would henceforth be addressed as Tiff Maples.

Even Mike Pence got a guest appearance in the short, as Melania spotted him “in the corner looking for the back door.” And instead of singing about “Becky with the good hair,” they told Trump that he’d just be “that guy with the weird hair.”

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Latest Melania Moment Has Melania Trump Ponder Switching Places With the Maid

You’ll just be that guy with the weird hair. #Melanianade pic.twitter.com/Jd5d09PnJ4

– Saturday Night Live (@nbcsnl) October 16, 2016

“I wrote that all by myself!” boasted Melania.

“SNL” was hosted this week by Emily Blunt with musical guest Bruno Mars. Tom Hanks will host next week’s show with Lady Gaga performing.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘SNL’ Mocks The ‘Second And Worst Ever’ Presidential Debate

Watch ‘SNL’ Ruin Kellyanne Conway’s Day Off (Video)

See Alec Baldwin Return To ‘SNL’ To Mock The Trump Tapes (Video)

As Donald Trump’s comments about women and growing list of sexual assault accusers send shockwaves through the final month of this election, the Republican candidate has continuously leaned on the women in his inner circle to vouch for him. But in a digital short on “Saturday Night Live,” those ladies finally got their revenge in a parody of Beyonce’s “Sorry” from “Lemonade.”

Filmed entirely in black and white and titled “Melanianade,” the short featured “SNL” players as Melania Trump, daughters Ivanka and Tiffany, campaign manager Kellyanne Conway, and famed “Apprentice” villain Omarosa. The quintet called out Trump for relying on them to bail him out and, like Beyonce saying goodbye to a shifty boyfriend, declaring they were done with his nonsense.

“You’re taking it for granted that we’ll always be there,” warned Melania, ” But one day soon, Donald, you may wake up and this bomb p***y blouse will be gone.

The ladies were shown trashing Trump’s stuff, including Melania taking a bat to a TV airing Trump on the news like Beyonce taking a bat to some car windows. We also saw Tiffany Trump smashing one of her father’s portraits, declaring that “I’ll never be Ivanka in your eyes” and that she would henceforth be addressed as Tiff Maples.

Even Mike Pence got a guest appearance in the short, as Melania spotted him “in the corner looking for the back door.” And instead of singing about “Becky with the good hair,” they told Trump that he’d just be “that guy with the weird hair.”

“I wrote that all by myself!” boasted Melania.

“SNL” was hosted this week by Emily Blunt with musical guest Bruno Mars. Tom Hanks will host next week’s show with Lady Gaga performing.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'SNL' Mocks The 'Second And Worst Ever' Presidential Debate

Watch 'SNL' Ruin Kellyanne Conway's Day Off (Video)

See Alec Baldwin Return To 'SNL' To Mock The Trump Tapes (Video)