‘Halloween’ 40th Anniversary: John Carpenter Says Why One Scary Scene Made Jamie Lee Curtis Laugh

John Carpenter’s breakout horror film “Halloween” came out 40 years ago today, but the filmmaker told us he remembers making it as if it was yesterday.

One moment has stayed with him for years: the culminating scene when Michael Myers tries to get to Jamie Lee Curtis in the closet where she’s hiding. And his account of what really happened behind the scenes is probably not what diehard “Halloween” fans might expect.

“I remember directing Jamie Lee inside the closet, and I was sitting in there with the camera and she was in there, and I remember directing her,” Carpenter told TheWrap. “This was happening and this was happening and I said, ‘Pick up the knife and stab the son of a bitch!’  So we had to do the take again. She said, ‘Can you please not say that? I am going to laugh!’ I remember the look on her face — we had a great time.”

Also Read: From Blogger to ‘Halloween’ Producer: How Ryan Turek Got a Stab at This Year’s Biggest Horror Hit

In David Gordon Green’s new “Halloween,” Curtis steps into the role of Laurie Strode 40 years after she first took on the role of the 17-year-old babysitter who was viciously attacked by serial killer Michael Myers. Since the new film’s announcement, many wondered why the it bears the same title as the original, when it’s clearly a movie about Laurie seeking revenge on Michael — and vice versa.

“It’s odd,” Carpenter said. “I backed David’s decision to name it something different but the absolute geniuses at Universal decided to name it ‘Halloween.’ And I don’t know. I guess it’s OK. Everyone seems to be happy. That’s all that matters. There are powers above me that move in mysterious ways that I don’t understand.”

Carpenter just had one piece of advice for Green.

“It has to be simple — simple and relentless,” he said. “That’s it. That’s the secret to really getting to an audience.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Producer Jason Blum Is Down for a Sequel: ‘We’re Dying to’ Make One

Forty years ago, that’s exactly what Carpenter did. “When I made the movie in 1978, I was just trying to make a low budget exploitation movie where I could show off my stuff and maybe get another job. It was always about getting another job. I threw in everything I wanted to see in a horror movie. I never ever expected it to be anything like this.”

Carpenter weighed in on the new sequel: “I really like the movie. I think it’s terrific. I think that the new ‘Halloween’ is a standalone fabulous slasher film, and I love that about it. I haven’t seen one like it. I was hungry for it and I didn’t even realize it.”

“Halloween” opened to $76 million last weekend, breaking multiple box office records. The film also stars Judy Greer, Anti Matichak, James Jude Courtney, Nick Castle and Will Patton.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look (Photo)

John Carpenter’s breakout horror film “Halloween” came out 40 years ago today, but the filmmaker told us he remembers making it as if it was yesterday.

One moment has stayed with him for years: the culminating scene when Michael Myers tries to get to Jamie Lee Curtis in the closet where she’s hiding. And his account of what really happened behind the scenes is probably not what diehard “Halloween” fans might expect.

“I remember directing Jamie Lee inside the closet, and I was sitting in there with the camera and she was in there, and I remember directing her,” Carpenter told TheWrap. “This was happening and this was happening and I said, ‘Pick up the knife and stab the son of a bitch!’  So we had to do the take again. She said, ‘Can you please not say that? I am going to laugh!’ I remember the look on her face — we had a great time.”

In David Gordon Green’s new “Halloween,” Curtis steps into the role of Laurie Strode 40 years after she first took on the role of the 17-year-old babysitter who was viciously attacked by serial killer Michael Myers. Since the new film’s announcement, many wondered why the it bears the same title as the original, when it’s clearly a movie about Laurie seeking revenge on Michael — and vice versa.

“It’s odd,” Carpenter said. “I backed David’s decision to name it something different but the absolute geniuses at Universal decided to name it ‘Halloween.’ And I don’t know. I guess it’s OK. Everyone seems to be happy. That’s all that matters. There are powers above me that move in mysterious ways that I don’t understand.”

Carpenter just had one piece of advice for Green.

“It has to be simple — simple and relentless,” he said. “That’s it. That’s the secret to really getting to an audience.”

Forty years ago, that’s exactly what Carpenter did. “When I made the movie in 1978, I was just trying to make a low budget exploitation movie where I could show off my stuff and maybe get another job. It was always about getting another job. I threw in everything I wanted to see in a horror movie. I never ever expected it to be anything like this.”

Carpenter weighed in on the new sequel: “I really like the movie. I think it’s terrific. I think that the new ‘Halloween’ is a standalone fabulous slasher film, and I love that about it. I haven’t seen one like it. I was hungry for it and I didn’t even realize it.”

“Halloween” opened to $76 million last weekend, breaking multiple box office records. The film also stars Judy Greer, Anti Matichak, James Jude Courtney, Nick Castle and Will Patton.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her 'Halloween' Character Saved His Life (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' First Look (Photo)

Jamie Lee Curtis’ ‘Boast’ About ‘Halloween,’ Gets Props From The Rock

Jamie Lee Curtis has something to brag about, and she’s not holding back.

“I’m going for one BOAST post,” she tweeted Sunday, proudly sharing the success of her “Halloween” sequel that brought in $77.5 million on its opening weekend, scored second-best opening by any R-rated horror movie, and was the largest box office moneymaker with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role… ever.

And she capped off the pat on the back with a much-deserved hashtag, #womengetthingsdone.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Posts Biggest Opening Weekend for a Film With a 55+ Woman as Lead

Fans, both famous and unfamiliar, cheered her on, including another box office superstar, Dwayne Johnson.

YOU @TheRock represent such creative integrity and have a high moral compass heading. Honored to get this unexpected shout out! We are all in this TOGETHER!

— Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) October 21, 2018

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Nears October Box Office Record With $77 Million Opening

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists, “Halloween” has Curtis playing Laurie Strode, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror. When Michael Myers breaks out, it’s the horror rematch of the century. Armed with a shotgun, Laurie isn’t the hinted, but rather the hunter. The new “Halloween” and its marketing have embraced the image of Curtis’ Laurie as the ultimate survivor.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Halloween’ Film Review: Jamie Lee Curtis Confronts Michael Myers in Stylish Sequel

‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

Jamie Lee Curtis has something to brag about, and she’s not holding back.

“I’m going for one BOAST post,” she tweeted Sunday, proudly sharing the success of her “Halloween” sequel that brought in $77.5 million on its opening weekend, scored second-best opening by any R-rated horror movie, and was the largest box office moneymaker with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role… ever.

And she capped off the pat on the back with a much-deserved hashtag, #womengetthingsdone.

Fans, both famous and unfamiliar, cheered her on, including another box office superstar, Dwayne Johnson.

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists, “Halloween” has Curtis playing Laurie Strode, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror. When Michael Myers breaks out, it’s the horror rematch of the century. Armed with a shotgun, Laurie isn’t the hinted, but rather the hunter. The new “Halloween” and its marketing have embraced the image of Curtis’ Laurie as the ultimate survivor.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween' Film Review: Jamie Lee Curtis Confronts Michael Myers in Stylish Sequel

'Halloween' Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers' One-Shot Murder Scene

'Halloween:' Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

‘Halloween’ Posts Biggest Opening Weekend for a Film With a 55+ Woman as Lead

Jamie Lee Curtis has broken new ground for women at the box office thanks to the role that first made her famous: Laurie Strode, the protagonist of “Halloween” and one of horror’s most famous heroines.

This weekend, David Gordon Green’s sequel to the 1978 slasher earned an opening of $77.5 million, making it the largest box office opening for a film with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role.

“Jamie Lee Curtis is an absolute force of nature in this film,” said Universal Domestic Distribution President Jim Orr. “We knew that we had something special with this actress and this role in a film that’s decades in the making.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

And Curtis certainly has bragging rights.

OK. I’m going for one BOAST post. Biggest horror movie opening with a female lead.
Biggest movie opening with a female lead over 55.
Second biggest October movie opening ever.
Biggest Halloween opening ever #womengetthingsdone @halloweenmovie pic.twitter.com/DhUBy82z3U

— Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) October 21, 2018

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists — Freddy Krueger for “Nightmare on Elm Street,” Jason Voorhees for “Friday the 13th” — “Halloween” has more than just the cold emotionless serial killer Michael Myers. It has the Golden Globe-winning Curtis playing Laurie, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror.

The “Halloween” franchise has indeed gone to Curtis to drive interest, as this 2018 sequel is her fifth appearance in the franchise. Along with the original, she also starred in “Halloween II” in 1981, “Halloween H20” in 1998 and “Halloween: Resurrection” in 2002, the last of which opened with Laurie finally meeting her demise at the hands of Michael. All three sequels have been widely regarded as inferior to the original, and the new film retcons them all out of the franchise’s timeline.

Also Read: Andi Matichak on ‘Halloween’ Co-Star Jamie Lee Curtis: ‘She Really Took Me Under Her Wing’ (Video)

But this “Halloween” treats Laurie differently, both in Green’s story and in Universal’s marketing. For decades, “Halloween” has been the subject of feminist criticism, pinning it as the film that popularized the use of the “final girl” (the one survivor of the slasher film who is often a virgin while more sexually promiscuous women are killed off). Critics have also noted that while Laurie fights off Michael, he survives, and it ultimately takes several gunshots from Michael’s psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis, to save her.

“The movie has bred 1000 PhDs, but… in retrospect, I know that was not the intention here. It was not a feminist statement. It had nothing to do with the fact that promiscuous girls died and the virgin lived, none of it,” Curtis said in an interview with Bustle. “It was written as an emotional journey of a very vulnerable girl being chosen as the centerpoint of this story, where this vulnerable creature is in collision with pure evil, and she’s somewhat an archetype of this young vulnerable dreamer.”

But despite this, Laurie Strode has grown over the years to become an icon as a survivor who withstood the attacks of a cold, violent man, and one whom Curtis has said she is fond of for “her resilience and her strength.”

Now, 40 years later, the new “Halloween” and its marketing have completely embraced the image of Laurie as the ultimate survivor. The trailers for the film show her preparing for the day Michael breaks out of the psych ward and comes hunting for her again, arming her house with guns and a security system. And when Michael escapes, it’s treated as the horror rematch of the century, with Laurie as the hunter.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Film Review: Jamie Lee Curtis Confronts Michael Myers in Stylish Sequel

Both critics and “Halloween” fans have responded positively to this new portrayal. Critics have given the film an 80 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, the highest for any sequel in the series, while fans gave it a B+ on CinemaScore. Even before the film was released, Strode’s legacy led to a touching moment at San Diego Comic-Con, when a fan told Curtis that her performance was a source of strength for him when his home was broken into by a person with a knife.

“I was scared out of my mind, and out of nowhere this thought inside of me went, ‘Well, what would Jamie Lee Curtis do?’” the fan told her. “To make a long story short, I’m here today because of the way that you portrayed Laurie Strode. I’m a victor today instead of a victim.”

Prior to the film’s release, comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian noted that now was a better time than ever to bring “Halloween” back. As actors are returning to iconic roles decades after they first played them — see Harrison Ford in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Blade Runner 2049” — it’s the right time to try that nostalgia appeal with one of horror’s staple franchises.

“At a time when horror is more popular with moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, [‘Halloween’] is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

‘Halloween’ Nears October Box Office Record With $77 Million Opening

Jamie Lee Curtis has broken new ground for women at the box office thanks to the role that first made her famous: Laurie Strode, the protagonist of “Halloween” and one of horror’s most famous heroines.

This weekend, David Gordon Green’s sequel to the 1978 slasher earned an opening of $77.5 million, making it the largest box office opening for a film with a woman over the age of 55 in the lead role.

“Jamie Lee Curtis is an absolute force of nature in this film,” said Universal Domestic Distribution President Jim Orr. “We knew that we had something special with this actress and this role in a film that’s decades in the making.”

And Curtis certainly has bragging rights.

While many slasher films drive their box office off the appeal of their murderous antagonists — Freddy Krueger for “Nightmare on Elm Street,” Jason Voorhees for “Friday the 13th” — “Halloween” has more than just the cold emotionless serial killer Michael Myers. It has the Golden Globe-winning Curtis playing Laurie, an actor/character pair that perhaps can only be rivaled by Sigourney Weaver’s Ellen Ripley in “Alien” when it comes to famous women in horror.

The “Halloween” franchise has indeed gone to Curtis to drive interest, as this 2018 sequel is her fifth appearance in the franchise. Along with the original, she also starred in “Halloween II” in 1981, “Halloween H20” in 1998 and “Halloween: Resurrection” in 2002, the last of which opened with Laurie finally meeting her demise at the hands of Michael. All three sequels have been widely regarded as inferior to the original, and the new film retcons them all out of the franchise’s timeline.

But this “Halloween” treats Laurie differently, both in Green’s story and in Universal’s marketing. For decades, “Halloween” has been the subject of feminist criticism, pinning it as the film that popularized the use of the “final girl” (the one survivor of the slasher film who is often a virgin while more sexually promiscuous women are killed off). Critics have also noted that while Laurie fights off Michael, he survives, and it ultimately takes several gunshots from Michael’s psychiatrist, Dr. Loomis, to save her.

“The movie has bred 1000 PhDs, but… in retrospect, I know that was not the intention here. It was not a feminist statement. It had nothing to do with the fact that promiscuous girls died and the virgin lived, none of it,” Curtis said in an interview with Bustle. “It was written as an emotional journey of a very vulnerable girl being chosen as the centerpoint of this story, where this vulnerable creature is in collision with pure evil, and she’s somewhat an archetype of this young vulnerable dreamer.”

But despite this, Laurie Strode has grown over the years to become an icon as a survivor who withstood the attacks of a cold, violent man, and one whom Curtis has said she is fond of for “her resilience and her strength.”

Now, 40 years later, the new “Halloween” and its marketing have completely embraced the image of Laurie as the ultimate survivor. The trailers for the film show her preparing for the day Michael breaks out of the psych ward and comes hunting for her again, arming her house with guns and a security system. And when Michael escapes, it’s treated as the horror rematch of the century, with Laurie as the hunter.

Both critics and “Halloween” fans have responded positively to this new portrayal. Critics have given the film an 80 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, the highest for any sequel in the series, while fans gave it a B+ on CinemaScore. Even before the film was released, Strode’s legacy led to a touching moment at San Diego Comic-Con, when a fan told Curtis that her performance was a source of strength for him when his home was broken into by a person with a knife.

“I was scared out of my mind, and out of nowhere this thought inside of me went, ‘Well, what would Jamie Lee Curtis do?'” the fan told her. “To make a long story short, I’m here today because of the way that you portrayed Laurie Strode. I’m a victor today instead of a victim.”

Prior to the film’s release, comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian noted that now was a better time than ever to bring “Halloween” back. As actors are returning to iconic roles decades after they first played them — see Harrison Ford in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” and “Blade Runner 2049” — it’s the right time to try that nostalgia appeal with one of horror’s staple franchises.

“At a time when horror is more popular with moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, [‘Halloween’] is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween' Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers' One-Shot Murder Scene

'Halloween' Nears October Box Office Record With $77 Million Opening

‘Halloween’ Director David Gordon Green on How He Pulled Off Michael Myers’ One-Shot Murder Scene

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen the new “Halloween” movie yet.)

Michael Myers is back to wreak havoc in “Halloween,” and perhaps one of the scariest scenes is when Michael goes from house to house on trick-or-treat night leaving a trail of dead bodies in various houses along a suburban street — all in one long horrifying shot.

“We were prepared to fail,” director David Gordon Green told TheWrap about the scene (that yes, is shown in the trailer too). “We had all these exit strategies: He could exit here, we could seam two shots here, or put a clever wipe there.”

The logistical challenge was so great that the crew spent extra time to prepare. “We spent half a day with camera operators talking through it,” Green said. “When we got to the day and all the background is running around, I didn’t want to be scientifically concerned with the precision of matching and getting a clever wipe behind a tree or things like that — that can be useful in these types of ambitions.”

See Video: Andi Matichak on ‘Halloween’ Co-Star Jamie Lee Curtis: ‘She Really Took Me Under Her Wing’

In the end, and after multiple tries, it all came together. “We did 11 takes, and it worked,” he said. “We used the 11th take, all one shot.”

But on the previous takes, he said, “there was always something that went wrong. In one version, the woman in the kitchen was thrown, and we thought, ‘We are running out of time.’”

But necessity really can be the mother of invention. “We’re trying to do this scene in four hours and we’ve got one more take and we’re like, well, ‘Let’s just put her at a table and squirt some blood on it,’ and then in the last minute we added a baby crib and the sound of a baby crying,” he said. “It was originally a husband sleeping on a couch but then we thought, ‘Why wouldn’t Michael just stab him on the way out?’

“We were scrambling and every take was a little different, and the last one worked,” he said. “That’s the crazy part about making a horror movie… success is when something horrible happens in a realistic way so your brain is altered to think it’s a positive thing.”

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

Adding to the horror factor is the fact that we don’t see Michael’s real face with his mask off at any point in the movie. And Green said that was intentional so the audience doesn’t feel empathy for the psychopathic killer.

“In Carpenter’s film, you see his face briefly when his mask is removed — you see the wound on his eye,” he said. “If we were going to go there, you start to humanize him in a way. … Even if they aren’t relatable or identifiable, something connects you when you make eye contact with a character, so I was really suspicious of that.”

Green added, “At the same time, I was afraid it would be a gimmick to avoid it too much.”

The director admitted he was unsettled when the cameras stopped rolling: “It was also weird to see the actor take his mask off and eating a celery stick on set.” (James Jude Courtney and Nick Castle are both credited with playing the role.) 

Also Read: ‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

The new “Halloween” picks up 40 years after Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Michael Myers faced off on Halloween night when she was just 17 years old.

Green, who co-wrote the script with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley, said he jumped at the chance to revisit the characters who had so affected him as a young movie fan. “It was a great opportunity to get in the ring with iconic characters that meant a lot to me as a kid,” he said.

“How often do you have that opportunity to cast people you’ve already admired and work in the genre?” said Green, who previously shot last year’s Boston Marathon bombing victim story “Stronger” with Jake Gyllenhaal.

Also Read: Here Are 12 of TV’s Best Halloween-Themed Episodes (Photos)

“A lot of [‘Stronger’] dealt with randomness of violence, and in a way, that was a horror film, so it wasn’t such a huge narrative leap,” he said. “In some ways, that project informed our approach to Michael’s narrative drive. What’s scary in the real world is what you don’t know, and random acts of violence get under my skin rather than something that is motivated or supernatural.”

“Halloween” also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Nick Castle, James Jude Courtney and Haluk Bilginer. It hit theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Halloween’ Billboard Sabotaged to Show Maxine Waters as Michael Myers

‘Halloween’ Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

‘Halloween’ Star Andi Matichak StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you haven’t seen the new “Halloween” movie yet.)

Michael Myers is back to wreak havoc in “Halloween,” and perhaps one of the scariest scenes is when Michael goes from house to house on trick-or-treat night leaving a trail of dead bodies in various houses along a suburban street — all in one long horrifying shot.

“We were prepared to fail,” director David Gordon Green told TheWrap about the scene (that yes, is shown in the trailer too). “We had all these exit strategies: He could exit here, we could seam two shots here, or put a clever wipe there.”

The logistical challenge was so great that the crew spent extra time to prepare. “We spent half a day with camera operators talking through it,” Green said. “When we got to the day and all the background is running around, I didn’t want to be scientifically concerned with the precision of matching and getting a clever wipe behind a tree or things like that — that can be useful in these types of ambitions.”

In the end, and after multiple tries, it all came together. “We did 11 takes, and it worked,” he said. “We used the 11th take, all one shot.”

But on the previous takes, he said, “there was always something that went wrong. In one version, the woman in the kitchen was thrown, and we thought, ‘We are running out of time.'”

But necessity really can be the mother of invention. “We’re trying to do this scene in four hours and we’ve got one more take and we’re like, well, ‘Let’s just put her at a table and squirt some blood on it,’ and then in the last minute we added a baby crib and the sound of a baby crying,” he said. “It was originally a husband sleeping on a couch but then we thought, ‘Why wouldn’t Michael just stab him on the way out?’

“We were scrambling and every take was a little different, and the last one worked,” he said. “That’s the crazy part about making a horror movie… success is when something horrible happens in a realistic way so your brain is altered to think it’s a positive thing.”

Adding to the horror factor is the fact that we don’t see Michael’s real face with his mask off at any point in the movie. And Green said that was intentional so the audience doesn’t feel empathy for the psychopathic killer.

“In Carpenter’s film, you see his face briefly when his mask is removed — you see the wound on his eye,” he said. “If we were going to go there, you start to humanize him in a way. … Even if they aren’t relatable or identifiable, something connects you when you make eye contact with a character, so I was really suspicious of that.”

Green added, “At the same time, I was afraid it would be a gimmick to avoid it too much.”

The director admitted he was unsettled when the cameras stopped rolling: “It was also weird to see the actor take his mask off and eating a celery stick on set.” (James Jude Courtney and Nick Castle are both credited with playing the role.) 

The new “Halloween” picks up 40 years after Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) and Michael Myers faced off on Halloween night when she was just 17 years old.

Green, who co-wrote the script with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley, said he jumped at the chance to revisit the characters who had so affected him as a young movie fan. “It was a great opportunity to get in the ring with iconic characters that meant a lot to me as a kid,” he said.

“How often do you have that opportunity to cast people you’ve already admired and work in the genre?” said Green, who previously shot last year’s Boston Marathon bombing victim story “Stronger” with Jake Gyllenhaal.

“A lot of [‘Stronger’] dealt with randomness of violence, and in a way, that was a horror film, so it wasn’t such a huge narrative leap,” he said. “In some ways, that project informed our approach to Michael’s narrative drive. What’s scary in the real world is what you don’t know, and random acts of violence get under my skin rather than something that is motivated or supernatural.”

“Halloween” also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, Nick Castle, James Jude Courtney and Haluk Bilginer. It hit theaters on Friday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Halloween' Billboard Sabotaged to Show Maxine Waters as Michael Myers

'Halloween' Slashes to $7.7 Million at Thursday Box Office

'Halloween' Star Andi Matichak StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘Halloween:’ Is There a Post-Credits Scene?

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you don’t want to know what happens in the new “Halloween” movie.)

Bonus, or post-credit scenes, have become staples of big blockbuster films, and with the highly-anticipated “Halloween” scaring up moviegoers, you might wonder whether it has a post-credits scene.

The answer: It sort of has a post-credits scene. If you stay until the very end —  past all of the credits — you will continue to hear Michael Myers’ breathing. If you’re a fan of the franchise, you’ll know Myers’ breathing is somewhat labored due to his famous mask. And sometimes, that’s all you can hear after one of his gruesome kills.

So, while there isn’t an actual post-credits scene in the visual sense, fans are left haunted by a sound that has become synonymous with the “Halloween” franchise. And maybe — just maybe — it means Michael Myers might always find a way to come back to us (in another film?).

See Video: Michael Myers Is Back to Kill in New ‘Halloween’ Trailer

“Halloween” sees Jamie Lee Curtis reprising her role as Laurie Strode, 40 years after the Halloween night when she was 17, when Michael Myers killed her friends and came after her as well. She has prepared to face Myers again since then, and when the killer escapes from prison, she finds herself fighting for revenge.

Directed by David Gordon Green, who also wrote the screenplay alongside Danny McBride, also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, and Nick Castle, who reprises his role as The Shape alongside James Jude Courtney.

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life (Video)

Actor Kidnapped With ‘Halloween: Resurrection’ Actress Details Ordeal: ‘A Pretty Good Beating’

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

(Spoiler alert: Do not read on if you don’t want to know what happens in the new “Halloween” movie.)

Bonus, or post-credit scenes, have become staples of big blockbuster films, and with the highly-anticipated “Halloween” scaring up moviegoers, you might wonder whether it has a post-credits scene.

The answer: It sort of has a post-credits scene. If you stay until the very end —  past all of the credits — you will continue to hear Michael Myers’ breathing. If you’re a fan of the franchise, you’ll know Myers’ breathing is somewhat labored due to his famous mask. And sometimes, that’s all you can hear after one of his gruesome kills.

So, while there isn’t an actual post-credits scene in the visual sense, fans are left haunted by a sound that has become synonymous with the “Halloween” franchise. And maybe — just maybe — it means Michael Myers might always find a way to come back to us (in another film?).

“Halloween” sees Jamie Lee Curtis reprising her role as Laurie Strode, 40 years after the Halloween night when she was 17, when Michael Myers killed her friends and came after her as well. She has prepared to face Myers again since then, and when the killer escapes from prison, she finds herself fighting for revenge.

Directed by David Gordon Green, who also wrote the screenplay alongside Danny McBride, also stars Judy Greer, Andi Matichak, and Nick Castle, who reprises his role as The Shape alongside James Jude Courtney.

“Halloween” will hit theaters on Oct. 19.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her 'Halloween' Character Saved His Life (Video)

Actor Kidnapped With 'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress Details Ordeal: 'A Pretty Good Beating'

Jamie Lee Curtis' Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in 'Halloween' Teasers (Video)

‘Halloween’ to Pour Gasoline on an Already Exploding October Box Office

What has already been an unprecedented October at the box office is about to get yet another jolt with Universal/Blumhouse’s “Halloween,” the direct sequel to John Carpenter’s 1978 horror classic that could join “Venom” as one of October’s top two highest-grossing movie weekends in history.

“We’re well into the fall season, but this October feels more like a July,” said comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian. “We’re 50 percent ahead of last October and six percent ahead of the best October ever, and now here comes ‘Halloween’ to push us even further above that pace.”

Also Read: Jamie Lee Curtis Fires Back at Fox News After Accusation of Being Hypocritical on Gun Control

Independent trackers are projecting an opening for the film of $60-63 million, with Universal predicting a start in the $50 million range. Hitting tracker marks will give the film the second-best-ever October launch, sitting between this year’s “Venom” ($80 million) and 2013’s “Gravity” ($55.7 million).

However, box office analysts tell TheWrap that “Halloween” might get closer to “Venom”‘s mark than trackers are predicting, saying a $70 million opening is within reach.

While other slasher franchises, like “Friday the 13th,” solely market their iconic killer, “Halloween” has been sold as a deadly reunion between the infamous Michael Myers and the famed protagonist Laurie Strode, who will be played for the fifth time by Jamie Lee Curtis. It’s the latest in a series of films that have brought back actors to play classic roles from decades past, including the new “Star Wars” trilogy and “Blade Runner 2049.”

Also Read: Why ‘First Man’ Didn’t Launch Into the Box Office Stratosphere

“‘Halloween’ is coming out at absolutely the right time,” said Dergarabedian. “At a time when horror is more popular than moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, it is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Taking place 40 years after the original, “Halloween” shows Michael Myers as he escapes from the mental institution he has been locked up in for decades. He returns to Haddonfield, Illinois to find the one who got away. That one, of course, is Laurie, now an estranged grandmother who is still traumatized by that infamous Halloween night, and has prepared for the opportunity to finish Michael off for good.

John Carpenter returns as executive producer and composer for the new film. David Gordon Green directed and co-wrote with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley. Curtis stars with Nick Castle, who is reprising his role as Michael Myers. Judy Greer, Andi Matichak and Will Patton also star.

Also expanding wide this weekend is Fox’s “The Hate U Give,” which has been in limited release for the past two weekends with a total of $2.4 million grossed. Trackers are projecting a $7-9 million wide opening for the social justice film, which stars Amandla Stenberg as a black student at a predominantly white prep school who is inspired to become an activist after one of her friends is killed by a white police officer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Purge’: ‘Halloween’ Easter Egg Teases What’s Up With the Masked Man

Michael Myers Is Back to Kill in New ‘Halloween’ Trailer (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life (Video)

Why ‘First Man’ Didn’t Launch Into the Box Office Stratosphere

What has already been an unprecedented October at the box office is about to get yet another jolt with Universal/Blumhouse’s “Halloween,” the direct sequel to John Carpenter’s 1978 horror classic that could join “Venom” as one of October’s top two highest-grossing movie weekends in history.

“We’re well into the fall season, but this October feels more like a July,” said comScore’s Paul Dergarabedian. “We’re 50 percent ahead of last October and six percent ahead of the best October ever, and now here comes ‘Halloween’ to push us even further above that pace.”

Independent trackers are projecting an opening for the film of $60-63 million, with Universal predicting a start in the $50 million range. Hitting tracker marks will give the film the second-best-ever October launch, sitting between this year’s “Venom” ($80 million) and 2013’s “Gravity” ($55.7 million).

However, box office analysts tell TheWrap that “Halloween” might get closer to “Venom”‘s mark than trackers are predicting, saying a $70 million opening is within reach.

While other slasher franchises, like “Friday the 13th,” solely market their iconic killer, “Halloween” has been sold as a deadly reunion between the infamous Michael Myers and the famed protagonist Laurie Strode, who will be played for the fifth time by Jamie Lee Curtis. It’s the latest in a series of films that have brought back actors to play classic roles from decades past, including the new “Star Wars” trilogy and “Blade Runner 2049.”

“‘Halloween’ is coming out at absolutely the right time,” said Dergarabedian. “At a time when horror is more popular than moviegoers than its been in decades and there’s a demand to see women in lead roles, it is definitely going to be the film to watch not just this weekend, but all the way up to Halloween night.”

Taking place 40 years after the original, “Halloween” shows Michael Myers as he escapes from the mental institution he has been locked up in for decades. He returns to Haddonfield, Illinois to find the one who got away. That one, of course, is Laurie, now an estranged grandmother who is still traumatized by that infamous Halloween night, and has prepared for the opportunity to finish Michael off for good.

John Carpenter returns as executive producer and composer for the new film. David Gordon Green directed and co-wrote with Danny McBride and Jeff Fradley. Curtis stars with Nick Castle, who is reprising his role as Michael Myers. Judy Greer, Andi Matichak and Will Patton also star.

Also expanding wide this weekend is Fox’s “The Hate U Give,” which has been in limited release for the past two weekends with a total of $2.4 million grossed. Trackers are projecting a $7-9 million wide opening for the social justice film, which stars Amandla Stenberg as a black student at a predominantly white prep school who is inspired to become an activist after one of her friends is killed by a white police officer.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Purge': 'Halloween' Easter Egg Teases What's Up With the Masked Man

Michael Myers Is Back to Kill in New 'Halloween' Trailer (Video)

Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her 'Halloween' Character Saved His Life (Video)

Why 'First Man' Didn't Launch Into the Box Office Stratosphere

Jamie Lee Curtis Fires Back at Fox News After Accusation of Being Hypocritical on Gun Control

Jamie Lee Curtis struck back at a Fox News article that claimed her advocacy for gun control is hypocritical given her character in the upcoming “Halloween” film uses firearms.

The article said Curtis was “one of several Hollywood actors who use firearms in their films while preaching against them away from the set.”

“It was just silly, because they were trying to make a point without ever asking me what I really think,” the actress told USA Today on Wednesday. “And what I think might surprise them.”

See Video: Jamie Lee Curtis Embraces Fan Who Says Her ‘Halloween’ Character Saved His Life

“I am vocal about common-sense gun safety and gun laws,” she explained. “For instance, I fully support an assault weapon ban, I fully support a bump stock ban.”

However, the actress said her views on gun reform don’t necessarily make her anti-gun entirely.

“I fully support the Bill of Rights,” she clarified. “And fully support the Second Amendment. And have absolutely no problem with people owning firearms if they have been trained, licensed, a background check has been conducted, a pause button has been pushed to give time for that process to take place. And they have to renew their license just like we do with automobiles — which are weapons also.”

Curtis reprises her role of Laurie Strode in the upcoming “Halloween,” which will hit theaters on Oct. 19. She has spent the last 40 years preparing to kill Michael Myers, who traumatized her when she was just 17. She told USA Today she was the one who told production not to showcase automatic weapons.

See Video: Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers

In the movie, when Strode arms her family with guns as Myers gets closer, the character “very specifically says what each weapon does and why you would choose that weapon in self-defense.”

“I’m an actress who’s in slasher movies. I have to be responsible for my own personal choices in my own personal life. But I am an actor for hire. And honestly, if I had made my career as a pacifist actor, I would never have worked, ever,” she explained. “But I have always been proud to represent women who fight back and fight back with intelligence, cunning and creativity, and who fight for their lives and their families’ lives.”

Curtis also tweeted the story on Thursday, and added, “Thanks @Andrea Mandell for the deep dive and and truth telling.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sexy ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Costume Removed From Halloween Site After Backlash

Actor Kidnapped With ‘Halloween: Resurrection’ Actress Details Ordeal: ‘A Pretty Good Beating’

‘Halloween: Resurrection’ Actress’ Accused Kidnappers Face Possible Life in Prison

Jamie Lee Curtis struck back at a Fox News article that claimed her advocacy for gun control is hypocritical given her character in the upcoming “Halloween” film uses firearms.

The article said Curtis was “one of several Hollywood actors who use firearms in their films while preaching against them away from the set.”

“It was just silly, because they were trying to make a point without ever asking me what I really think,” the actress told USA Today on Wednesday. “And what I think might surprise them.”

“I am vocal about common-sense gun safety and gun laws,” she explained. “For instance, I fully support an assault weapon ban, I fully support a bump stock ban.”

However, the actress said her views on gun reform don’t necessarily make her anti-gun entirely.

“I fully support the Bill of Rights,” she clarified. “And fully support the Second Amendment. And have absolutely no problem with people owning firearms if they have been trained, licensed, a background check has been conducted, a pause button has been pushed to give time for that process to take place. And they have to renew their license just like we do with automobiles — which are weapons also.”

Curtis reprises her role of Laurie Strode in the upcoming “Halloween,” which will hit theaters on Oct. 19. She has spent the last 40 years preparing to kill Michael Myers, who traumatized her when she was just 17. She told USA Today she was the one who told production not to showcase automatic weapons.

In the movie, when Strode arms her family with guns as Myers gets closer, the character “very specifically says what each weapon does and why you would choose that weapon in self-defense.”

“I’m an actress who’s in slasher movies. I have to be responsible for my own personal choices in my own personal life. But I am an actor for hire. And honestly, if I had made my career as a pacifist actor, I would never have worked, ever,” she explained. “But I have always been proud to represent women who fight back and fight back with intelligence, cunning and creativity, and who fight for their lives and their families’ lives.”

Curtis also tweeted the story on Thursday, and added, “Thanks @Andrea Mandell for the deep dive and and truth telling.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sexy 'Handmaid's Tale' Costume Removed From Halloween Site After Backlash

Actor Kidnapped With 'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress Details Ordeal: 'A Pretty Good Beating'

'Halloween: Resurrection' Actress' Accused Kidnappers Face Possible Life in Prison

Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode Is Ready to Take on Michael Myers in ‘Halloween’ Teasers (Video)

Anxious for the “Halloween” trailer to come out on Friday? While you’re waiting, you can check out two teasers for the trailer in which Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode prepares to take on Michael Myers.

“Wishes do come true…,” Curtis tweeted on Thursday.

In the teaser (below, bottom of two), Strode sings to herself before approaching a mannequin, which she shoots point blank in the head.

See Photo: Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in one of the teasers (below, top of two). “He’s waited for me.”

Nick Castle, who played Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also reprise his role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Trailer Peek: Jamie Lee Curtis Flaunts Famed Role in Las Vegas

David Gordon Green Green and Danny McBride are scripting the flick, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The first official trailer will drop on Friday.

See the teasers here:

????????#HalloweenMovie trailer tomorrow. pic.twitter.com/dvMKB7RLeM

— #HalloweenMovie (@halloweenmovie) June 7, 2018

Wishes do come true… @halloweenmovie #HalloweenMovie pic.twitter.com/LrC4YX5dvE

— Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) June 7, 2018

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look (Photo)

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

Heidi Klum Thrills in Epic Michael Jackson Halloween Costume (Photos)

Anxious for the “Halloween” trailer to come out on Friday? While you’re waiting, you can check out two teasers for the trailer in which Jamie Lee Curtis’ Laurie Strode prepares to take on Michael Myers.

“Wishes do come true…,” Curtis tweeted on Thursday.

In the teaser (below, bottom of two), Strode sings to herself before approaching a mannequin, which she shoots point blank in the head.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago. This time, she won’t be the one running.

“I’ve waited for him,” says Strode in one of the teasers (below, top of two). “He’s waited for me.”

Nick Castle, who played Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also reprise his role in the upcoming film, an individual with knowledge of the casting told TheWrap last December.

David Gordon Green Green and Danny McBride are scripting the flick, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The first official trailer will drop on Friday.

See the teasers here:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' First Look (Photo)

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to 'Halloween' Franchise

Heidi Klum Thrills in Epic Michael Jackson Halloween Costume (Photos)

Jamie Lee Curtis Is Back as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ First Look (Photo)

You can hold off on purchasing your costumes, pumpkins and candy for several months, but if there is one Halloween-related task you must accomplish today it is checking out Jamie Lee Curtis’ Twitter.

Why is that? It just so happens that the legendary scream queen has just shared the very first photo of her suited up as the iconic Laurie Strode on the set of Blumhouse’s upcoming “Halloween” sequel.

“First shot! First day. Same slate. Same Laurie. David Gordon Green directing from his script. Happy Halloween 2018 everyone. See you 10/19/18 @halloweenmovie #HalloweenMovie,” Curtis tweeted on Tuesday, along with a picture of her back in action as Michael Myers’ little sister.

Also Read: Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

Nick Castle, who played Michael Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also return to reprise the role in the upcoming movie.

Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

Also Read: Jamie Lee Curtis to Return as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ Sequel

See Curtis’ tease below.

First shot! First day. Same slate. Same Laurie. David Gordon Green directing from his script. Happy Halloween 2018 everyone. See you 10/19/18 @halloweenmovie #HalloweenMovie pic.twitter.com/iSC7NOblEA

– Jamie Lee Curtis (@jamieleecurtis) January 30, 2018

“Halloween” will bow on Oct. 19, 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis to Return as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ Sequel

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to ‘Halloween’ Franchise

Jamie Lee Curtis Shares Her Own Sexual Harassment Story Amid Harvey Weinstein Scandal

You can hold off on purchasing your costumes, pumpkins and candy for several months, but if there is one Halloween-related task you must accomplish today it is checking out Jamie Lee Curtis’ Twitter.

Why is that? It just so happens that the legendary scream queen has just shared the very first photo of her suited up as the iconic Laurie Strode on the set of Blumhouse’s upcoming “Halloween” sequel.

“First shot! First day. Same slate. Same Laurie. David Gordon Green directing from his script. Happy Halloween 2018 everyone. See you 10/19/18 @halloweenmovie #HalloweenMovie,” Curtis tweeted on Tuesday, along with a picture of her back in action as Michael Myers’ little sister.

Strode will have her final confrontation with the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

Nick Castle, who played Michael Myers, credited as “The Shape” in the original 1978 “Halloween” movie, will also return to reprise the role in the upcoming movie.

Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, with Green directing. John Carpenter, director of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

See Curtis’ tease below.

“Halloween” will bow on Oct. 19, 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jamie Lee Curtis to Return as Laurie Strode in 'Halloween' Sequel

Original Michael Myers Actor to Return to 'Halloween' Franchise

Jamie Lee Curtis Shares Her Own Sexual Harassment Story Amid Harvey Weinstein Scandal

Jamie Lee Curtis to Return as Laurie Strode in ‘Halloween’ Sequel

Jamie Lee Curtis will reprise her iconic role as Laurie Strode in Blumhouse’s upcoming “Halloween” sequel, the production company announced on Friday.

Jamie Lee Curtis returns to her iconic role as Laurie Strode in HALLOWEEN, released by Universal Pictures October 19, 2018. #HalloweenMovie pic.twitter.com/6tbbz2W1ZV

— Blumhouse (@blumhouse) September 15, 2017

The actress also took to Twitter to share the news, writing, “Same porch. Same clothes. Same issues. 40 years later. Headed back to Haddonfield one last time for Halloween. Release date 10/19/18.”

Strode will have her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

Also Read: Jason Blum Swears on His Hand ‘Halloween’ Will Be Out Next October: ‘You Can Chop My Hand Off’

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, and Green is directing. John Carpenter, master of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The “Halloween” remake arrives during a renaissance for horror, fueled not only by “Get Out” but by the record-breaking debut this month of “It,” the film adaptation of King’s novel that also spawned a 1990 TV miniseries.

Also Read: ‘Halloween’ Director John Carpenter Signs Universal Cable Deal

Earlier this week, Blum told TheWrap the long-awaited production will hit theaters next October — and he was willing to bet his hand on it.

Curtis most recently starred in the satirical horror TV show, “Scream Queens,” in which she played Dean Cathy Munsch alongside Emma Roberts, Abigail Breslin, Keke Palmer and Billie Lourd.

She is represented by CAA and PMK*BNC.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Jigsaw’ Returns to Take Back Halloween in Terrifying Trailer for ‘Saw’ Sequel (Video)

‘Halloween’ Remake in the Works From David Gordon Green and Danny McBride

Jamie Lee Curtis will reprise her iconic role as Laurie Strode in Blumhouse’s upcoming “Halloween” sequel, the production company announced on Friday.

The actress also took to Twitter to share the news, writing, “Same porch. Same clothes. Same issues. 40 years later. Headed back to Haddonfield one last time for Halloween. Release date 10/19/18.”

Strode will have her final confrontation with Michael Myers, the masked figure who has haunted her since she barely escaped his killing spree four decades ago.

David Gordon Green and Danny McBride are scripting the film, due on Oct. 19, 2018, and Green is directing. John Carpenter, master of the original 1978 “Halloween,” is executive producing. Jason Blum is producing alongside Malek Akkad. “Halloween” will be distributed worldwide by Universal Pictures.

The “Halloween” remake arrives during a renaissance for horror, fueled not only by “Get Out” but by the record-breaking debut this month of “It,” the film adaptation of King’s novel that also spawned a 1990 TV miniseries.

Earlier this week, Blum told TheWrap the long-awaited production will hit theaters next October — and he was willing to bet his hand on it.

Curtis most recently starred in the satirical horror TV show, “Scream Queens,” in which she played Dean Cathy Munsch alongside Emma Roberts, Abigail Breslin, Keke Palmer and Billie Lourd.

She is represented by CAA and PMK*BNC.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Jigsaw' Returns to Take Back Halloween in Terrifying Trailer for 'Saw' Sequel (Video)

'Halloween' Remake in the Works From David Gordon Green and Danny McBride

‘Halloween’ Remake Coming From David Gordon Green and Danny McBride

Danny McBride is teaming up with David Gordon Green to remake the legendary horror franchise “Halloween,” John Carpenter said on Facebook on Thursday.

Gordon Green and McBride will write the script together and Gordon Green will direct. Carpenter is executive producing along with possibly scoring the remake. Malek Akkad will serve as producer under his Trancas banner, with Jason Blum producing for Blumhouse Productions along with Gordon Green and McBride via their Rough House Pictures banner.

The “Halloween” film franchise that was started in part by Carpenter and Moustapha Akkad in 1978 has spawned 10 films since Michael Myers first began hacking away at teenagers, generating a total of nearly $400 million in worldwide box office.

The original slasher-flick starred Nick Castle as Myers (a.k.a. The Shape), Jamie Lee Curtis in her film debut as Laurie Strode, the girl he stalks after escaping from a psychiatric hospital, and Donald Pleasence as Dr. Loomis, desperately trying to track down his patient.

Also Read: John Carpenter to Exec Produce New ‘Halloween’ for Miramax

The first sequel, “Halloween II,” was released in 1981, three years after its predecessor, featuring Myers once again on a Halloween night quest of murder and mayhem. Curtis and Pleasence reprised their roles, but their seemingly-unkillable masked stalker was then played by Dick Warlock.

Carpenter has written, directed, composed and/or edited more than 20 films over the course of his career. Along with “Halloween,” he is best known for “The Thing,” “The Fog” and “Big Trouble in Little China.”

Carpenter is repped by APA and Stankevich Law.

Also Read: John Carpenter Throws Shade at ‘Walking Dead’ for ‘Milking’ George Romero’s Work

The “Halloween” remake hits theaters on October 19th, 2018.

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Danny McBride is teaming up with David Gordon Green to remake the legendary horror franchise “Halloween,” John Carpenter said on Facebook on Thursday.

Gordon Green and McBride will write the script together and Gordon Green will direct. Carpenter is executive producing along with possibly scoring the remake. Malek Akkad will serve as producer under his Trancas banner, with Jason Blum producing for Blumhouse Productions along with Gordon Green and McBride via their Rough House Pictures banner.

The “Halloween” film franchise that was started in part by Carpenter and Moustapha Akkad in 1978 has spawned 10 films since Michael Myers first began hacking away at teenagers, generating a total of nearly $400 million in worldwide box office.

The original slasher-flick starred Nick Castle as Myers (a.k.a. The Shape), Jamie Lee Curtis in her film debut as Laurie Strode, the girl he stalks after escaping from a psychiatric hospital, and Donald Pleasence as Dr. Loomis, desperately trying to track down his patient.

The first sequel, “Halloween II,” was released in 1981, three years after its predecessor, featuring Myers once again on a Halloween night quest of murder and mayhem. Curtis and Pleasence reprised their roles, but their seemingly-unkillable masked stalker was then played by Dick Warlock.

Carpenter has written, directed, composed and/or edited more than 20 films over the course of his career. Along with “Halloween,” he is best known for “The Thing,” “The Fog” and “Big Trouble in Little China.”

Carpenter is repped by APA and Stankevich Law.

The “Halloween” remake hits theaters on October 19th, 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Ailes Miniseries in Development at Blumhouse Television

Blumhouse Television Names Marci Wiseman, Jeremy Gold Co-Presidents

Universal Sets Release Dates for Four Blumhouse Horror Movies