Woody Harrelson, Kevin Costner Film ‘The Highwaymen’ to Drop on Netflix Next March

Netflix announced on Monday that its upcoming film, “The Highwaymen,” starring Woody Harrelson and Kevin Costner will debut on the platform on March 29, 2019.

The film directed by John Lee Hancock (“The Blindside”) follows the untold true story of the legendary detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde, during a time when outlaws made headlines and lawmen made history.

When the full force of the FBI and the latest forensic technology aren’t enough to capture the nation’s most notorious criminals, two former Texas Rangers (Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson) must rely on their gut instincts and old school skills to get the job done, according to Netflix’s description.

Also Read: Woody Harrelson, Luke Evans, Nick Jonas Drama ‘Midway’ Gets 2019 Release Date

The outlaws made headlines. The lawmen made history. From director John Lee Hancock, #TheHighwaymen follows the untold true story of the detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde. On March 29, @modernwest and @WoodyHarrelson unite for the first time on screen! #NetflixNewsWeek pic.twitter.com/kRxZVgMUHU

— See What’s Next (@seewhatsnext) December 10, 2018

“The Highwaymen” will mark the first time Costner and Harrelson have worked together on screen. Costner was last seen in Aaron Sorkin’s Academy Award-nominated “Molly’s Game,” starring Jessica Chastain. Harrelson, who had a brief cameo in Sony’s “Venom,” last starred in “Solo: A Star Wars Story” for Disney, and he was nominated for best supporting actor for his role in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Hancock last directed “The Founder,” starring Michael Keaton.

Also Read: ‘Venom’ Mid-Credits Scene Explained: What You Need to Know About Woody Harrelson and Carnage

The story of Bonnie and Clyde is infamous. The two outlaws were most famously portrayed by Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in 1967.

Also Read: Chloe Grace Moretz, Jack O’Connell to Play Bonnie and Clyde in ‘Love Is a Gun’

Chloë Grace Moretz and Jack O’Connell will also play Bonnie and Clyde in a new film by Kike Maillo called “Love Is a Gun.”

That film is based on “Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde” by bestselling author Jeff Guinn. Oscar nominee Shelton Turner (“Up in the Air”) wrote the screenplay, while Johnny Newman (“Narcos”) added revisions. “Love Is a Gun” follows the emotional story of two of history’s most famous lovers.

Production on “Love Is a Gun” is set to begin in early 2019.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Venom’ Mid-Credits Scene Explained: What You Need to Know About Woody Harrelson and Carnage

Woody Harrelson, Luke Evans, Nick Jonas Drama ‘Midway’ Gets 2019 Release Date

‘Zombieland’ Sequel to Reunite Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Abigail Breslin

Netflix announced on Monday that its upcoming film, “The Highwaymen,” starring Woody Harrelson and Kevin Costner will debut on the platform on March 29, 2019.

The film directed by John Lee Hancock (“The Blindside”) follows the untold true story of the legendary detectives who brought down Bonnie and Clyde, during a time when outlaws made headlines and lawmen made history.

When the full force of the FBI and the latest forensic technology aren’t enough to capture the nation’s most notorious criminals, two former Texas Rangers (Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson) must rely on their gut instincts and old school skills to get the job done, according to Netflix’s description.

“The Highwaymen” will mark the first time Costner and Harrelson have worked together on screen. Costner was last seen in Aaron Sorkin’s Academy Award-nominated “Molly’s Game,” starring Jessica Chastain. Harrelson, who had a brief cameo in Sony’s “Venom,” last starred in “Solo: A Star Wars Story” for Disney, and he was nominated for best supporting actor for his role in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

Hancock last directed “The Founder,” starring Michael Keaton.

The story of Bonnie and Clyde is infamous. The two outlaws were most famously portrayed by Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty in 1967.

Chloë Grace Moretz and Jack O’Connell will also play Bonnie and Clyde in a new film by Kike Maillo called “Love Is a Gun.”

That film is based on “Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde” by bestselling author Jeff Guinn. Oscar nominee Shelton Turner (“Up in the Air”) wrote the screenplay, while Johnny Newman (“Narcos”) added revisions. “Love Is a Gun” follows the emotional story of two of history’s most famous lovers.

Production on “Love Is a Gun” is set to begin in early 2019.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Venom' Mid-Credits Scene Explained: What You Need to Know About Woody Harrelson and Carnage

Woody Harrelson, Luke Evans, Nick Jonas Drama 'Midway' Gets 2019 Release Date

'Zombieland' Sequel to Reunite Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg, Woody Harrelson, Abigail Breslin

‘The Highwaymen’: Netflix Reveals Date & First Look For Kevin Costner-Woody Harrelson Bonnie & Clyde Pic

Netflix has released a first look image of John Lee Hancock’s Netflix film The Highwaymen, which it will launch on March 29, 2019. Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson lead cast in the anticipated feature about a pair of police officers who come out…

Netflix has released a first look image of John Lee Hancock’s Netflix film The Highwaymen, which it will launch on March 29, 2019. Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson lead cast in the anticipated feature about a pair of police officers who come out of retirement to catch infamous outlaws Bonnie & Clyde. The outlaws made headlines. The lawmen made history. From director John Lee Hancock,

18 Dramatic Championship Sports Movie Moments: From ‘Rocky’ to ‘Remember the Titans’ (Photos)

The World Series is here again, and if it’s anything like the Cubs’ curse-breaking 2016 victory or the Astros and Dodgers’ seven-game barnburner in 2017, it might end up becoming the basis for a movie or documentary like the ones on o…

The World Series is here again, and if it’s anything like the Cubs’ curse-breaking 2016 victory or the Astros and Dodgers’ seven-game barnburner in 2017, it might end up becoming the basis for a movie or documentary like the ones on our list. Whether it’s the thrill of victory or the agony of defeat, TheWrap recaps the biggest moments in these sports classics.

“The Pride of the Yankees” (1942)

This beautifully dramatized moment of sports history, as wonderfully monologued by Gary Cooper, helped to immortalize the already infamous “Luckiest man” speech by Lou Gehrig.

“Rocky” (1976)

In the ultimate underdog story, newcomer Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) gets a shot at the world heavyweight title against champ Apollo Creed. Rocky proves he has the goods, going the entire 15 rounds against Creed, but loses in a split decision. Rocky would get a rematch though and win the title in “Rocky II”.

“Breaking Away” (1979)

One of the most inspiring underdog stories ever made, the Little 500 bicycle race in Bloomington, Indiana is a local classic as made famous by this film. In the film’sclosing race scene, the locals, dressed in plain white T-shirts with their nickname the “Cutters,” upset the richer college students with more expensive bikes and uniforms, riding across the finish line in pure glory.

“Chariots of Fire” (1981)

Two Englishmen push each other to be the best sprinter at the 1924 Olympics. While they won gold on the big screen’s racetrack, “Chariots of Fire” would go on to win Oscar gold for best picture.

“The Natural” (1984)

Robert Redford plays middle-age rookie Roy Hobbs in “The Natural.” Hobbs leads his team to a championship on his final at-bat when he launches the most famous home run in movie history. Thus proving the unspoken rule in baseball: if you break the lights you win the game.

“Hoosiers” (1986)

Another Indiana classic in what is widely considered one of the greatest sports movies of all time, “Hoosiers” follows a small town high school basketball team as they make it all the way to the state finals. They play a bigger and more athletic team in the finals, but with a last second shot pull off the surprise victory.

“Major League” (1989)

Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger lead an outfit of misfit Cleveland Indians from last place to a shot at the league pennant against the powerhouse Yankees. Even though the film is a comedy, the final game plays out in dramatic fashion.

Paramount Network Denies Accusation That Cow Corpses Were ‘Mutilated’ for Kevin Costner’s ‘Yellowstone’

Paramount Network has denied PETA’s accusation that “Yellowstone” producers allowed real cow corpses to be “mutilated” on the set of its hit Kevin Costner western series, calling the claims “inaccurate.”

“Paramount Network takes animal safety very seriously and with utmost professionalism,” Kurt Patat, Paramount Network SVP of communications told TheWrap on Wednesday afternoon. “The production has taken necessary precautions to provide for animal safety and their well-being on set. All animals are monitored on set by professional handlers. We have been in touch with PETA which presented us with inaccurate claims that we were able to correct including no cows were killed or mutilated for the scene in question.”

Earlier on Wednesday, the animal rights organization said a “whistleblower” told them that “dead cows’ hindquarters and necks had been hacked apart” for use as props, and that “the bodies of others were likely left to rot in the sun or manipulated in order to appear bloated for a scene.”

PETA’s whistleblower added that “concerns from crew members who questioned why fake cows weren’t being used instead were essentially shrugged off,” according to the animal rights group.

Also Read: ‘Yellowstone’ Is Paramount Network’s Most-Watched Show – Yes, Counting the Spike TV Years

The crew has found it “almost impossible” to wash the stench from the decomposing carcasses off their bodies, PETA reported.

There’s a real danger associated with all of the gore, PETA argued: “Exposure to animal carcasses can cause disease transmission to humans and lead to contamination of the environment.”

PETA’s veterinarian expert shared two studies with TheWrap to back up the accusation. For those interested in learning more, click here for one from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and here for another from the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

Also Read: Harvey Weinstein Won’t Be in Credits for Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone,’ ‘Waco’

“The slaughterhouse industry is a violent and cruel one, and to use the bodies of animals who were subjected to that cruelty for a TV stunt is not only disrespectful but also extremely wasteful,” PETA senior vice president Lisa Lange said in a statement on Wednesday. “PETA is calling on Kevin Costner and the producers of ‘Yellowstone’ to come clean about how and from where the animals were purchased, cut the gruesome scenes, and pledge to use only props and other cruelty-free alternatives in the future.”

PETA said it sent letters to Costner, series co-creator Taylor Sheridan, and to Paramount Network about the issue, and that they had gone mostly unanswered. In the letters, PETA said it also raised concerns about an upcoming rodeo scene.

“Instead of using existing stock footage as PETA suggested, the production reportedly banned cell phones on set to prevent the crew from documenting and leaking more photos,” said the animal rights group.

Also Read: PETA Urges ‘Dog’s Purpose’ Boycott, Says Pooch Was Terrorized

Should any readers be wondering at this point why it matters if one does manipulate or even mutilate an already-dead animal, we asked PETA to explain that in its own words for our audience.

“It matters because using the cows’ bodies for television props is wasteful, and we still don’t have clear answers from the production as to where the cows came from, when and where they were slaughtered, who ordered the slaughter, when they were transported to the set, etc.,” a PETA spokeswoman replied in an email on Wednesday. “As was the case with bison on ‘Alpha,’ cows for ‘Yellowstone’ very well could have been intentionally slaughtered for the show — and so far, we don’t have information proving otherwise. In addition, by purchasing the cows, the production supported one of the most violent, abusive industries in existence, and allegedly mutilating their corpses is a whole new level of disturbing that even the least sensitive of people should be upset by.”

TheWrap is awaiting a response from PETA regarding Paramount Network’s denial.

Related stories from TheWrap:

PETA Rips ‘Sad Spectacle’ Butterfly Stunt on ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ Finale

Surprise! PETA Backs Lars von Trier’s Animal Mutilation Scene in ‘The House That Jack Built’

Robert Pattinson Gets a Big Hand From PETA for Refusing to Masturbate a Dog

Paramount Network has denied PETA’s accusation that “Yellowstone” producers allowed real cow corpses to be “mutilated” on the set of its hit Kevin Costner western series, calling the claims “inaccurate.”

“Paramount Network takes animal safety very seriously and with utmost professionalism,” Kurt Patat, Paramount Network SVP of communications told TheWrap on Wednesday afternoon. “The production has taken necessary precautions to provide for animal safety and their well-being on set. All animals are monitored on set by professional handlers. We have been in touch with PETA which presented us with inaccurate claims that we were able to correct including no cows were killed or mutilated for the scene in question.”

Earlier on Wednesday, the animal rights organization said a “whistleblower” told them that “dead cows’ hindquarters and necks had been hacked apart” for use as props, and that “the bodies of others were likely left to rot in the sun or manipulated in order to appear bloated for a scene.”

PETA’s whistleblower added that “concerns from crew members who questioned why fake cows weren’t being used instead were essentially shrugged off,” according to the animal rights group.

The crew has found it “almost impossible” to wash the stench from the decomposing carcasses off their bodies, PETA reported.

There’s a real danger associated with all of the gore, PETA argued: “Exposure to animal carcasses can cause disease transmission to humans and lead to contamination of the environment.”

PETA’s veterinarian expert shared two studies with TheWrap to back up the accusation. For those interested in learning more, click here for one from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and here for another from the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

“The slaughterhouse industry is a violent and cruel one, and to use the bodies of animals who were subjected to that cruelty for a TV stunt is not only disrespectful but also extremely wasteful,” PETA senior vice president Lisa Lange said in a statement on Wednesday. “PETA is calling on Kevin Costner and the producers of ‘Yellowstone’ to come clean about how and from where the animals were purchased, cut the gruesome scenes, and pledge to use only props and other cruelty-free alternatives in the future.”

PETA said it sent letters to Costner, series co-creator Taylor Sheridan, and to Paramount Network about the issue, and that they had gone mostly unanswered. In the letters, PETA said it also raised concerns about an upcoming rodeo scene.

“Instead of using existing stock footage as PETA suggested, the production reportedly banned cell phones on set to prevent the crew from documenting and leaking more photos,” said the animal rights group.

Should any readers be wondering at this point why it matters if one does manipulate or even mutilate an already-dead animal, we asked PETA to explain that in its own words for our audience.

“It matters because using the cows’ bodies for television props is wasteful, and we still don’t have clear answers from the production as to where the cows came from, when and where they were slaughtered, who ordered the slaughter, when they were transported to the set, etc.,” a PETA spokeswoman replied in an email on Wednesday. “As was the case with bison on ‘Alpha,’ cows for ‘Yellowstone’ very well could have been intentionally slaughtered for the show — and so far, we don’t have information proving otherwise. In addition, by purchasing the cows, the production supported one of the most violent, abusive industries in existence, and allegedly mutilating their corpses is a whole new level of disturbing that even the least sensitive of people should be upset by.”

TheWrap is awaiting a response from PETA regarding Paramount Network’s denial.

Related stories from TheWrap:

PETA Rips 'Sad Spectacle' Butterfly Stunt on 'RuPaul's Drag Race' Finale

Surprise! PETA Backs Lars von Trier's Animal Mutilation Scene in 'The House That Jack Built'

Robert Pattinson Gets a Big Hand From PETA for Refusing to Masturbate a Dog

‘Yellowstone’ Finale Nabs 2.4 Million Viewers, Season’s Second-Highest Rating

The first season finale of “Yellowstone” had season-high ratings for the Paramount Network drama.

Wednesday’s episode of the Kevin Costner-led drama pulled a 0.7 rating among adult viewers under 50, according to Nielsen’s live plus same day numbers, marking a 12 percent increase over the previous week and a 21 percent increase over the entire season average.

In total, the episode was watched by 2.4 million viewers, shy only of the series premiere, which nabbed 2.8 million same-day viewers.

Also Read: ‘Yellowstone’ Is Paramount Network’s Most-Watched Show – Yes, Counting the Spike TV Years

“Yellowstone” has been a ratings success for Paramount Network, growing throughout its run to become the network’s most-watched series ever.

With seven days of delayed viewing included where available, the show has averaged 5.0 million total viewers each week. That makes it the second most-watched series on all of cable television, behind only AMC’s “Walking Dead.”

Paramount Network has already ordered a 10-episode second season, set to air in 2019.

Created by Taylor Sheridan, “Yellowstone” stars Costner as John Dutton, the rancher who controls the largest contiguous cattle ranch in the United States. Luke Grimes, Kelly Reilly, Wes Bentley, Cole Hauser, Kelsey Asbille, Brecken Merrill, Jefferson White, Danny Huston and Gil Birmingham also star.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Yellowstone’ Is Paramount Network’s Most-Watched Show – Yes, Counting the Spike TV Years

‘Yellowstone’ Renewed for Season 2 at Paramount Network

Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone’ Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

The first season finale of “Yellowstone” had season-high ratings for the Paramount Network drama.

Wednesday’s episode of the Kevin Costner-led drama pulled a 0.7 rating among adult viewers under 50, according to Nielsen’s live plus same day numbers, marking a 12 percent increase over the previous week and a 21 percent increase over the entire season average.

In total, the episode was watched by 2.4 million viewers, shy only of the series premiere, which nabbed 2.8 million same-day viewers.

“Yellowstone” has been a ratings success for Paramount Network, growing throughout its run to become the network’s most-watched series ever.

With seven days of delayed viewing included where available, the show has averaged 5.0 million total viewers each week. That makes it the second most-watched series on all of cable television, behind only AMC’s “Walking Dead.”

Paramount Network has already ordered a 10-episode second season, set to air in 2019.

Created by Taylor Sheridan, “Yellowstone” stars Costner as John Dutton, the rancher who controls the largest contiguous cattle ranch in the United States. Luke Grimes, Kelly Reilly, Wes Bentley, Cole Hauser, Kelsey Asbille, Brecken Merrill, Jefferson White, Danny Huston and Gil Birmingham also star.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Yellowstone' Is Paramount Network's Most-Watched Show – Yes, Counting the Spike TV Years

'Yellowstone' Renewed for Season 2 at Paramount Network

Paramount Network's 'Yellowstone' Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

‘Yellowstone’ Is Paramount Network’s Most-Watched Show – Yes, Counting the Spike TV Years

Yellowstone is a national park. “Yellowstone” may be a national treasure — or at least, the drama series is to the new Paramount Network.

With its Season 1 finale looming on Wednesday, the first series developed by the rebranded cable channel has averaged 5.0 million total viewers each week, per Nielsen’s most current ratings, which counts seven days of delayed viewing where available. That makes it the second most-watched series on all of cable television, behind only AMC’s “Walking Dead.”

It also makes “Yellowstone” the channel’s most-watched series ever — and that includes the network’s Spike TV days. No wonder Paramount already renewed its prized pony.

Also Read: HGTV’s ‘Love It or List It’ Just Scored Show’s Best Rating in Almost 5 Years

In terms of ratings, “Yellowstone” has averaged a 1.42 among adults 18-49, which is the demographic most-coveted by advertisers.

Below is a nifty grid showing off the cable series rankings across the 52-week 2017-18 TV season. This one ranks series by Nielsen’s Live + 3 Day metric, which counts 72-hours worth of delayed viewing.

Nielsen

Also Read: ABC’s Channing Dungey Says Kenya Barris Was ‘Frustrated’ by Limitations of Broadcast TV

Sidebar: Who knew “Curse of Oak Island” did so well? And how about those Hallmark shows? Yes, this story is about “Yellowstone,” but one more mini-tangent: See that discrepancy between the No. 1 and No. 2 shows above? Anyone who declares “The Walking Dead” to be dead is dead between the ears.

OK, back to the main subject here. One last brag on behalf of the Paramount Network: On digital platforms, “Yellowstone” has generated nearly 10 million streams on Viacom owned-and-operated platforms, as well as 6.8 million video-on-demand transactions.

Yippee-Ki-Yay, indeed.

The “Yellowstone” Season 1 finale airs Wednesday night at 10/9c on Paramount Network.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone’ Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

Harvey Weinstein Won’t Be in Credits for Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone,’ ‘Waco’

Layoffs Hit AwesomenessTV 3 Weeks After Acquisition By Viacom

Yellowstone is a national park. “Yellowstone” may be a national treasure — or at least, the drama series is to the new Paramount Network.

With its Season 1 finale looming on Wednesday, the first series developed by the rebranded cable channel has averaged 5.0 million total viewers each week, per Nielsen’s most current ratings, which counts seven days of delayed viewing where available. That makes it the second most-watched series on all of cable television, behind only AMC’s “Walking Dead.”

It also makes “Yellowstone” the channel’s most-watched series ever — and that includes the network’s Spike TV days. No wonder Paramount already renewed its prized pony.

In terms of ratings, “Yellowstone” has averaged a 1.42 among adults 18-49, which is the demographic most-coveted by advertisers.

Below is a nifty grid showing off the cable series rankings across the 52-week 2017-18 TV season. This one ranks series by Nielsen’s Live + 3 Day metric, which counts 72-hours worth of delayed viewing.

Nielsen

Sidebar: Who knew “Curse of Oak Island” did so well? And how about those Hallmark shows? Yes, this story is about “Yellowstone,” but one more mini-tangent: See that discrepancy between the No. 1 and No. 2 shows above? Anyone who declares “The Walking Dead” to be dead is dead between the ears.

OK, back to the main subject here. One last brag on behalf of the Paramount Network: On digital platforms, “Yellowstone” has generated nearly 10 million streams on Viacom owned-and-operated platforms, as well as 6.8 million video-on-demand transactions.

Yippee-Ki-Yay, indeed.

The “Yellowstone” Season 1 finale airs Wednesday night at 10/9c on Paramount Network.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount Network's 'Yellowstone' Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

Harvey Weinstein Won't Be in Credits for Paramount Network's 'Yellowstone,' 'Waco'

Layoffs Hit AwesomenessTV 3 Weeks After Acquisition By Viacom

15 Hollywood Actors Who Had Epic Fails as Music Stars (Photos)

There are a few (lots of) Hollywood actors that tried venturing out into the musical world. Some (very few) made it work and others… Well, here’s a list of 15 that should’ve just not.
Lindsay Lohan
Lohan debuted her first album &#8220…

There are a few (lots of) Hollywood actors that tried venturing out into the musical world. Some (very few) made it work and others… Well, here’s a list of 15 that should’ve just not.

Lindsay Lohan

Lohan debuted her first album “Speak” in 2004 and it actually did pretty well commercially. Her music video for “Rumors” even got nominated for an MTV Video Music Award.

She wasn’t horrible, but she just wasn’t pop star good.

Eddie Murphy

Believe it or not, Eddie Murphy had a low-key music career. You probably know him best from his single “I’m a Believer” off Shrek… and that’s probably it.

He just released a reggae single with Snoop Dogg in 2o13, but like most of his stuff no one’s heard it.

Johnny Depp

Johnny Depp has been into music for a very long time, but it wasn’t until 2015 where he took it upon himself to create a band with Alice Cooper and Joe Perry called Hollywood Vampires.

He’s told People: “Music is still part of my life… But you won’t be hearing The Johnny Depp Band. That won’t ever exist.”

William Shatner

William Shatner’s music isn’t exactly music more so as it is interpretive spoken word.

He speaks the lyrics in an exaggerated manner rather than sing them so there’s that career down the drain.

Ryan Gosling

We love Ryan Gosling, but his music career? Not so much.

The actor started a rock group called Dead Man’s Bones–creepy–with his friend Zach Shields in 2007. They released an album by the same name too.

Their music couldn’t have been all too bad because a song made into the soundtrack for “The Conjuring.”

But we don’t want to stare at Ryan Gosling singing, we’d much rather stare at him on a giant screen acting.

Leonard Nimoy

Leonard Nimoy decided to enhance his “Star Trek” character by recording science-fiction themed songs.

His first album was titled” Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock’s Music from Outer Space.”

Nimoy’s music was eclectic to say the least.

Michael Cera

Michael Cera is a touring bass player of indie rock band Mister Heavenly.

In 2014, he released his debut album titled “True That” to generally positive reviews.

He hasn’t released anything else and quite frankly, we’re glad he hasn’t. Movies seem to be more of Cera’s thing.

Kevin Costner

This big time movie star is also part of a country rock band called Kevin Costner & Modern West. They even started a worldwide tour in 2007.

Apparently, he’s at his happiest when making music, but I think we can all agree that he’s a better actor than he is a musician.

Keanu Reeves

The “Matrix” actor played bass guitar for a rock band called Dogstar and also performed with another band called Becky.

Turns out music was just a hobby for the actor, because he quit when the band got too serious.

Jennifer Love Hewitt

Jennifer Love Hewitt actually started her music career pretty early. At 12-years-old she debuted her first album exclusively in Japan and it did extremely well.

Shia LaBeouf

Shia LaBeouf recently made headlines when he showed everyone he could rap, but there were a few people who weren’t too pleased with his freestyle skills–Soulja Boy.

Although LaBeouf wasn’t a terrible rapper, he probably should just stick to acting.

Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis’ debut album was actually released by Motown in 1987 for its R&B stylings. “The Return of Bruno” didn’t do very well but it also wasn’t completely garbage, it was just OK.

Jada Pinkett Smith

Unlike her husband, Will Smith, Jada’s music career didn’t land her a Grammy but that doesn’t mean it was all bad.

She created a metal band called Wicked Wisdom in 2002 and when Sharon Osbourne saw them perform she said she was “blown away.”

Russell Crowe

Russell Crowe’s musical career also started way back when (1980’s) and has been going subjectively strong until at least 2012.

It’s obvious his acting career was a lot more popular than his singing.

David Hasselhoff

David Hasselhoff had a pretty extensive music career, which kicked off in the 1980s. He even made it to the number one spot on German pop charts with this single “Looking for freedom.”

He dropped his 17th album in 2012, so either he has a pretty good fan base or he just doesn’t care and makes music just to make it.

Either way, his time is better spent on screen.

 

‘Yellowstone’ Renewed for Season 2 at Paramount Network

Paramount Network has renewed “Yellowstone” for a second season, the network announced on Tuesday.

The Kevin Costner-led drama will return for a 10-episode season set to air in 2019. Taylor Sheridan, who previously received a best original screenplay nomination at the Oscars for writing “Hell or High Water” and recently penned the “Sicario” sequel “Day of the Soldado,” will return as writer and showrunner on the series.

“Yellowstone” stars Costner as John Dutton, the rancher who controls the largest contiguous cattle ranch in the United States. Luke Grimes, Kelly Reilly, Wes Bentley, Cole Hauser, Kelsey Asbille, Brecken Merrill, Jefferson White, Danny Huston and Gil Birmingham also star.

Also Read: Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone’ Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

Sheridan and Coster also serve as executive producers on the series, alongside John Linson, Art Linson and David C. Glasser. Ted Gold and Lauren Ruggiero serve as executives in charge of production for Paramount Network.

“Yellowstone” is currently airing its first season on Paramount, with the final episode scheduled to air on August 22.

Averaging 5 million viewers per episode across its first season, the drama is the first scripted original picked up for a second season by the fledgling network. The half-hour dramedy “American Woman,” which debuted last month, is still awaiting a decision from the network.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone’ Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

Harvey Weinstein Won’t Be in Credits for Paramount Network’s ‘Yellowstone,’ ‘Waco’

Kevin Costner Lands Lead in Paramount Network Series ‘Yellowstone’

Paramount Network has renewed “Yellowstone” for a second season, the network announced on Tuesday.

The Kevin Costner-led drama will return for a 10-episode season set to air in 2019. Taylor Sheridan, who previously received a best original screenplay nomination at the Oscars for writing “Hell or High Water” and recently penned the “Sicario” sequel “Day of the Soldado,” will return as writer and showrunner on the series.

“Yellowstone” stars Costner as John Dutton, the rancher who controls the largest contiguous cattle ranch in the United States. Luke Grimes, Kelly Reilly, Wes Bentley, Cole Hauser, Kelsey Asbille, Brecken Merrill, Jefferson White, Danny Huston and Gil Birmingham also star.

Sheridan and Coster also serve as executive producers on the series, alongside John Linson, Art Linson and David C. Glasser. Ted Gold and Lauren Ruggiero serve as executives in charge of production for Paramount Network.

“Yellowstone” is currently airing its first season on Paramount, with the final episode scheduled to air on August 22.

Averaging 5 million viewers per episode across its first season, the drama is the first scripted original picked up for a second season by the fledgling network. The half-hour dramedy “American Woman,” which debuted last month, is still awaiting a decision from the network.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount Network's 'Yellowstone' Premiere Draws 4.8 Million Viewers

Harvey Weinstein Won't Be in Credits for Paramount Network's 'Yellowstone,' 'Waco'

Kevin Costner Lands Lead in Paramount Network Series 'Yellowstone'

‘Whitney’ Film Review: Whitney Houston’s Rise and Fall Captured in Somber, Exhaustive Portrait

There was something uniquely American about Whitney Houston’s career. Through her non-threatening music and pristine persona, she occupied a place in the country’s consciousness few other black figures had reached before her.

The white mainstream was eager to embrace her, while African Americans concurrently doubted her understanding of their struggles. Yet she often acted as a bridge between the two, as was beautifully exemplified in her emblematic rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the 1991 Super Bowl.

Such is one of many conflicting notions that plagued her unparalleled rise to stardom, her troubled private life, and ultimately her untimely death on Feb. 11, 2012. Serving as both a tribute to her privileged voice — for which she’s been dubbed the “best American singer in the last 50 years” — and a thorough examination of the many intimate battles she fought as a result of overwhelming fame and substance abuse, Kevin Macdonald’s documentary “Whitney” is a mostly somber and exhaustive portrait of an icon fallen from grace.

Watch Video: Whitney Houston Doc Serves Up Bombshells, Paula Abdul Shade in First Trailer

Early on, Macdonald (who won an Oscar in 2000 for “One Day in September”) reveals his intention to investigate any possible traumatic incidents that might have factored into Whitney Houston’s self-destructive behavior and proneness to engage in toxic relationships. He directly asks many of the film’s subjects, particularly family members, if they recall any neglect. The answer, at first, is always to dismiss any possibility of anything bad ever happening to “Nippy,” as her loved ones referred to her. The official narrative paints her as a happy girl from Newark who grew up singing in church and surrounded by a family of entertainers.

Cissy Houston, Whitney’s mother and a legendary performer herself, appears only in the first few minutes of the film, those dedicated to her daughter’s upbringing and how rigorously she was trained to succeed. As Whitney’s story unfolds and darkness surfaces, Cissy fades into the background and is never seen speaking about her child’s most painful, and unfortunately public, moments.

Also Read: Can ‘Whitney’ Continue White-Hot Summer Documentary Trend at Box Office?

Instead, Macdonald fills in the gaps with dozens of testimonials from individuals who interacted with the superstar in all facets of her singular existence: aunts, siblings, former employees, managers, record company executives, family friends, “The Bodyguard” co-star Kevin Costner, and even the infamous Bobby Brown. Access is truly Macdonald’s main resource here, something that, for better or worse, last year’s “Whitney: Can I Be Me” didn’t have in such hefty quantities.

One major absentee, however, is Whitney’s long-time friend and collaborator Robyn Crawford, who only appears via archival footage. Their closeness sparked rumors regarding Whitney’s sexual orientation and her viability as a wholesome product for the American masses. Crawford, an out lesbian today, was demonized by the men in Whitney’s life and eventually receded following years of altercations with Bobby Brown. Thankfully, even if Crawford is never on camera to share her account, the film partly vindicates her as Whitney’s creative and emotional anchor.

Also Read: Lorde Apologizes for ‘Extremely Poorly Chosen’ Whitney Houston Quote on Bathtub Instagram Pic

Much less flattering is the way in which Whitney’s brothers Gary Garland and Michael Houston present their perspectives on a variety of issues pertinent to their famed sister. Their blatant homophobia is on display, as is their admission that they introduced Whitney to drugs. Interestingly enough, both are more concerned with any insinuation that they may have taken advantage of the status and opulence Whitney provided, rather than any regarding their bigoted views.

To Macdonald’s credit, he is persistent on specific topics when interviewing the Houston brothers, and even more so with Bobby Brown, who adamantly refuses to talk about Whitney’s drug addiction and his significant part in it. Regarding John Russell Houston, the singer’s father, the film lets those who knew him take charge and the result is not in his favor. Once everything is said and done, most of those in Whitney’s periphery come across as opportunistic bloodsuckers.

Assembling this doc was surely a gargantuan undertaking by editor Sam Rice-Edwards, who makes his debut cutting a feature, as he managed to piece together a comprehensive, if not entirely cohesive, two-hour work from countless hours of behind-the-scenes footage, talking-head conversations, live performances, news coverage, and family videos. One of Macdonald’s notable editorial decisions is his attempt to contextualize Whitney’s cultural prominence in relation to American history by interspersing clips of major events taking place simultaneously.

It’s a curious idea, but not entirely successful given the amount of moving parts at play.
Near the end of “Whitney,” when a major revelation is dropped on us about a traumatic episode in the artist’s childhood, Macdonald goes as far as to include the name of the alleged perpetrator, but his take becomes problematic because of the implications that come along with this new information in terms of who Whitney chose to love. It’s too easy a catchall source for all her hardships.

“Whitney” is at its most powerful when it focuses on reminding us what we all lost, because the more you think about how outstanding her gift was, the more tragic her absence feels.



Related stories from TheWrap:

Kanye West Slammed by Whitney Houston’s Cousin Over ‘Disgusting’ Album Cover Depicting Late Singer’s Bathroom

5 Memorable Whitney Houston Performances (Video)

‘Bobbi Kristina’ Trailer Tackles Whitney Houston’s Daughter’s Final Days (Video)

‘America’s Got Talent’: This Dude Just Crushed Whitney Houston’s ‘I Have Nothing’ (Video)

There was something uniquely American about Whitney Houston’s career. Through her non-threatening music and pristine persona, she occupied a place in the country’s consciousness few other black figures had reached before her.

The white mainstream was eager to embrace her, while African Americans concurrently doubted her understanding of their struggles. Yet she often acted as a bridge between the two, as was beautifully exemplified in her emblematic rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” at the 1991 Super Bowl.

Such is one of many conflicting notions that plagued her unparalleled rise to stardom, her troubled private life, and ultimately her untimely death on Feb. 11, 2012. Serving as both a tribute to her privileged voice — for which she’s been dubbed the “best American singer in the last 50 years” — and a thorough examination of the many intimate battles she fought as a result of overwhelming fame and substance abuse, Kevin Macdonald’s documentary “Whitney” is a mostly somber and exhaustive portrait of an icon fallen from grace.

Early on, Macdonald (who won an Oscar in 2000 for “One Day in September”) reveals his intention to investigate any possible traumatic incidents that might have factored into Whitney Houston’s self-destructive behavior and proneness to engage in toxic relationships. He directly asks many of the film’s subjects, particularly family members, if they recall any neglect. The answer, at first, is always to dismiss any possibility of anything bad ever happening to “Nippy,” as her loved ones referred to her. The official narrative paints her as a happy girl from Newark who grew up singing in church and surrounded by a family of entertainers.

Cissy Houston, Whitney’s mother and a legendary performer herself, appears only in the first few minutes of the film, those dedicated to her daughter’s upbringing and how rigorously she was trained to succeed. As Whitney’s story unfolds and darkness surfaces, Cissy fades into the background and is never seen speaking about her child’s most painful, and unfortunately public, moments.

Instead, Macdonald fills in the gaps with dozens of testimonials from individuals who interacted with the superstar in all facets of her singular existence: aunts, siblings, former employees, managers, record company executives, family friends, “The Bodyguard” co-star Kevin Costner, and even the infamous Bobby Brown. Access is truly Macdonald’s main resource here, something that, for better or worse, last year’s “Whitney: Can I Be Me” didn’t have in such hefty quantities.

One major absentee, however, is Whitney’s long-time friend and collaborator Robyn Crawford, who only appears via archival footage. Their closeness sparked rumors regarding Whitney’s sexual orientation and her viability as a wholesome product for the American masses. Crawford, an out lesbian today, was demonized by the men in Whitney’s life and eventually receded following years of altercations with Bobby Brown. Thankfully, even if Crawford is never on camera to share her account, the film partly vindicates her as Whitney’s creative and emotional anchor.

Much less flattering is the way in which Whitney’s brothers Gary Garland and Michael Houston present their perspectives on a variety of issues pertinent to their famed sister. Their blatant homophobia is on display, as is their admission that they introduced Whitney to drugs. Interestingly enough, both are more concerned with any insinuation that they may have taken advantage of the status and opulence Whitney provided, rather than any regarding their bigoted views.

To Macdonald’s credit, he is persistent on specific topics when interviewing the Houston brothers, and even more so with Bobby Brown, who adamantly refuses to talk about Whitney’s drug addiction and his significant part in it. Regarding John Russell Houston, the singer’s father, the film lets those who knew him take charge and the result is not in his favor. Once everything is said and done, most of those in Whitney’s periphery come across as opportunistic bloodsuckers.

Assembling this doc was surely a gargantuan undertaking by editor Sam Rice-Edwards, who makes his debut cutting a feature, as he managed to piece together a comprehensive, if not entirely cohesive, two-hour work from countless hours of behind-the-scenes footage, talking-head conversations, live performances, news coverage, and family videos. One of Macdonald’s notable editorial decisions is his attempt to contextualize Whitney’s cultural prominence in relation to American history by interspersing clips of major events taking place simultaneously.

It’s a curious idea, but not entirely successful given the amount of moving parts at play.
Near the end of “Whitney,” when a major revelation is dropped on us about a traumatic episode in the artist’s childhood, Macdonald goes as far as to include the name of the alleged perpetrator, but his take becomes problematic because of the implications that come along with this new information in terms of who Whitney chose to love. It’s too easy a catchall source for all her hardships.

“Whitney” is at its most powerful when it focuses on reminding us what we all lost, because the more you think about how outstanding her gift was, the more tragic her absence feels.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Kanye West Slammed by Whitney Houston's Cousin Over 'Disgusting' Album Cover Depicting Late Singer's Bathroom

5 Memorable Whitney Houston Performances (Video)

'Bobbi Kristina' Trailer Tackles Whitney Houston's Daughter's Final Days (Video)

'America's Got Talent': This Dude Just Crushed Whitney Houston's 'I Have Nothing' (Video)

Kevin Costner Talks ‘Yellowstone’, Varied Roles & A Venice ‘Fandango’ Lesson – Cannes Lions

Paramount Network’s cinematic first original drama series, Yellowstone, debuted last night in the U.S., and star Kevin Costner was in Cannes today to talk up the show. Costner plays John Dutton, patriarch of the family that owns America’s largest conti…

Paramount Network's cinematic first original drama series, Yellowstone, debuted last night in the U.S., and star Kevin Costner was in Cannes today to talk up the show. Costner plays John Dutton, patriarch of the family that owns America's largest contiguous ranch who bumps up against land developers, a Native American reservation and America's first National Park. It’s an intense study of a violent world that hails from writer-director Taylor Sheridan. Discussing his…

On Yellowstone, the only thing unspoiled is the land

Yellowstone, the inaugural television effort from Sicario and Hell Or High Water screenwriter Taylor Sheridan, feints at being several types of programs throughout its feature-length premiere: a pulpy modern Western, a sudsy family drama, a consequenti…

Yellowstone, the inaugural television effort from Sicario and Hell Or High Water screenwriter Taylor Sheridan, feints at being several types of programs throughout its feature-length premiere: a pulpy modern Western, a sudsy family drama, a consequential clash of cultures on the final American frontier. But none of…

Read more...

Kevin Costner and Taylor Sheridan Talk Creating the ‘Kingdom’ of ‘Yellowstone’

Writer-director Taylor Sheridan has built a career telling unblinkingly stark tales of long-neglected corners and fringes of the center of America. So when he was conceiving the dark epic “Yellowstone,” set against the equally vast Modern W…

Writer-director Taylor Sheridan has built a career telling unblinkingly stark tales of long-neglected corners and fringes of the center of America. So when he was conceiving the dark epic “Yellowstone,” set against the equally vast Modern West Montana, he turned to an equally distinctly American screen presence to stand at the center: Kevin Costner. “Kevin’s one […]

‘Yellowstone’ Review: Kevin Costner Plays Cowboy in Taylor Sheridan’s Brutal Western Trainwreck

Paramount Network’s modern take on cowboys vs. indigenous Americans is a sprawling mess with no one to root for and little to admire.

In some ways, “Yellowstone” is an embodiment of Taylor Sheridan’s core attributes as a writer. Lush, rolling landscapes set the scene for a starkly violent story. Beautiful actors are torn down to their barest forms, depicting rugged men and women who couldn’t care less about box office totals or post-premiere parties. These are real people with meaningful priorities; priorities bigger than themselves.

In “Sicario,” it’s one woman trying to find justice in an unjust war. In “Hell or High Water,” it’s two brothers robbing banks in order to get by in a broken economy. In “Yellowstone,” Sheridan broadens his scope to an entire family — presumably, to provide more narrative fodder for television’s elongated stories — and the larger-than-life force they’re working for and against is the land itself. The Duttons have made Montana their home and intend to keep it that way, no matter what a prosperous and power-hungry contingent of indigenous Americans have to say about it.

Yet it’s in this centuries-old conflict that Sheridan loses his way, as well as his expanded focus. So much of “Yellowstone” seems needlessly morbid and painfully paced. It’s like a car wreck in slow-motion, which makes the opening scene of a fatal collision between trucks and horse trailers all the more telling. Jarring in its compositions — and featuring one shot viewers won’t soon forget — the series’ introduction doesn’t really earn its brutality. Death haunts the first three episodes, though rarely are any of them felt so much as they’re manifested for the prestige of it all.

"Yellowstone" premieres Wednesday, June 20 on Paramount Network. Kevin Costner stars as John Dutton.

Kevin Costner in “Yellowstone”

KEVIN LYNCH FOR PARAMOUNT NETWORK

Kevin Costner stars as John Dutton, an absurdly wealthy cowboy who owns the largest contiguous cattle ranch in America. A widower and father of four children, John’s money doesn’t keep him from being a man of the people — swinging into cattle auctions and sleeping in a horse stable — nor does it protect him from hardship. His wife died years prior, and he still wears the wounds on the brims of his many cowboy hats. One son, Cory (Luke Grimes), is estranged and refuses to let John see his grandson. Within the first episode (a 90-minute behemoth), there’s more tragedy coming.

Despite a peaceful setting in a profession most people would consider conflict-free, John is besieged on all sides. The closest town is expanding and wants to buy his land for residential development. There’s nowhere else for them to turn, considering the nation’s first national park needs to preserve what it can. Plus, thanks to a profitable chain of casinos, there’s a wealthy indigenous American who wants to push John out of power and out of the state, if he can.

Thomas Rainwater (played by Gil Birmingham) is, at first, a character offering necessary perspective. He complains of the restrictions placed on his people and sees his business as a means to expand not only their populace, but their influence on the state as a whole. He has bigger plans for his money than big houses and luxury items. Thomas wants to reset the power balance to what it was before the continent was colonized. “I’m the opposite of progress,” he tells John. “I’m the past catching up with you.”

Considering how often America’s farmers and ranchers are framed as the last vestiges of the country’s foundation, Thomas serves as a pertinent reminder of how far back the relevant history extends. Yet instead of embracing his complexities and engaging in a reparation-based discussion, the series makes it easy to see Thomas as a villain; maybe his ideas are sound, but his methods are immoral. John may be the white man hoarding land stolen from Thomas’ ancestors, but the dirt under his fingernails isn’t as muddy as his opponent’s.

"Yellowstone" premieres Wednesday, June 20 on Paramount Network. Pictured (l to r): (Pete Sands), Mo (Mo Brings Plenty), Thomas Rainwater (Gil Birmingham), Rip Wheeler (Cole Hauser), John Dutton (Kevin Costner), Jamie Dutton (Wes Bentley)

Gil Birmingham, Cole Hauser, Kevin Costner, and Wes Bentley in “Yellowstone”

Paramount Network

Not much more can be said about their personal-turned-political battle without spoiling the first episode, but it’s safe to say their relationship devolves more than it evolves after a defining moment in the premiere. Beyond the potential within the dynamic between these two, “Yellowstone” is almost entirely hollow. They’re not just bad men (and one woman), but predominantly uninteresting characters. John’s children are one-dimensional, and the actors playing them struggle to add depth. Grimes fares the best, though Cory’s consistently extreme actions don’t gel with the heroic neutral party he’s meant to embody. Wes Bentley’s Jamie Dutton, the family lawyer with ambitions to run for attorney general, is so simple you’ll side with his troll of a sister when she starts hitting him in the face just to provoke a reaction.

That being said, Kelly Reilly’s character, Beth Dutton, is both chock full of “lone female character in a gritty drama” clichés — hard-drinking, tough-talking, daddy’s girl with as many nude scenes as scenes all about serving other characters’ whims — and intent on bucking them for the sake of shock value. When she goes on a first date with the bad boy rancher, she runs screaming at wolves instead of sharing anything meaningful in conversation. There’s symbolism in her actions and greater heft in her backstory, but Beth feels like a splintering stick used to prop up everyone else’s drama when she can’t even support herself.

Prestige is what everyone is looking for in the rolling mountains of Montana, but no one finds it. “Yellowstone” is Sheridan’s first TV show, Costner’s first series regular role, and Paramount Network’s first drama series. With the Oscar-nominated scribe penning each episode and directing every entry — not to mention the Oscar-winning Costner as the ensemble’s guiding star — “Yellowstone” is made up of components that turn heads. Even the setting is enough to leave you gazing in wonder, but that’s just good location scouting, not grand storytelling. New networks (or rebranded networks) often need noticeable pedigree to attract attention, but they don’t need a dud. This geyser never goes off.

Grade: C-

“Yellowstone” premieres Wednesday, June 20 at 9 p.m. ET on Paramount Network.

9 Stars Who Played Jackie Kennedy, From Natalie Portman to Katie Holmes (Photos)

Jackie Kennedy has been a favorite role for actresses the past half-century. Click on to see who’s donned the pink suit and pillbox hat to play one of America’s most famous First Ladies.
The real Jackie Kennedy (1929-1994) was born Jacqueli…

Jackie Kennedy has been a favorite role for actresses the past half-century. Click on to see who’s donned the pink suit and pillbox hat to play one of America’s most famous First Ladies.

The real Jackie Kennedy (1929-1994) was born Jacqueline Bouvier and married the future President Kennedy in 1953, 10 years before he was assassinated in Dallas.

Divine “Eat Your Makeup” (1968).

Yes, the drag queen later famous for John Waters movies such as “Hairspray”  impersonated Jackie in this tasteless reenactment of the JFK assassination, from Waters’ first 16 mm short.

Jacqueline Bisset

“The Greek Tycoon” (1978).

This drama was loosely based on the former First Lady’s relationship with Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis.

Blair Brown

“Kennedy” (1983).

This NBC miniseries starring Martin Sheen as the title character was pegged to the 20th anniversary of the JFK assassination.

Stephanie Romanov

“Thirteen Days” (2000).

This political thriller about the Cuban missile crisis starred Kevin Costner as a top Kennedy adviser.

Kat Steffens

“Parkland” (2013).

This feature from Tom Hanks‘ Playtone production company tells the story of JFK’s last day from several viewpoints, including the medical team that tended to him after the shooting.

“Killing Kennedy” (2013)

This NatGeo TV movie about the assassination and the events that led to it was based on the bestseller from Fox News host Bill O’Reilly.

TV Review: ‘Condor’ and ‘Yellowstone,’ With Kevin Costner

The allure of genre is still with us, even as so much of what’s best on television has left it behind. Sure, “The Handmaid’s Tale” has built often-thrilling tonal lurches into its dystopian vision and “Atlanta” shares only a running time (and sometimes…

The allure of genre is still with us, even as so much of what’s best on television has left it behind. Sure, “The Handmaid’s Tale” has built often-thrilling tonal lurches into its dystopian vision and “Atlanta” shares only a running time (and sometimes not even that) with its forbears in the half-hour comedy space. But […]

TV News Roundup: Paramount Network Debuts Trailer for Kevin Costner Series ‘Yellowstone’ (Watch)

In today’s roundup, Paramount Network debuts the trailer for Kevin Costner’s “Yellowstone,” while National Geographic releases behind-the-scenes video of “Grey’s Anatomy” star T.R. Knight transforming into Max …

In today’s roundup, Paramount Network debuts the trailer for Kevin Costner’s “Yellowstone,” while National Geographic releases behind-the-scenes video of “Grey’s Anatomy” star T.R. Knight transforming into Max Jacob for “Genius: Picasso.” FIRST LOOKS Paramount Network has dropped the official trailer for Kevin Costner‘s new series “Yellowstone,” which is set to premiere on Wednesday, June 20 […]

17 of the Most Dramatic Sports Movie Moments: From ‘Rocky’ to ‘Remember the Titans’ (Photos)

Whether it’s the thrill of victory or the agony of defeat, TheWrap recaps the biggest moments in these sports classics.

“The Pride of the Yankees” (1942)

This beautifully dramatized moment of sports history, as wonderfully monologued by Gary Cooper, helped to immortalize the already infamous “Luckiest man” speech by Lou Gehrig.

“Rocky” (1976)

In the ultimate underdog story, newcomer Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) gets a shot at the world heavyweight title against champ Apollo Creed. Rocky proves he has the goods, going the entire 15 rounds against Creed, but loses in a split decision. Rocky would get a rematch though and win the title in “Rocky II”.

“Breaking Away” (1979)

One of the most inspiring underdog stories ever made, the Little 500 bicycle race in Bloomington, Indiana is a local classic as made famous by this film. In the film’sclosing race scene, the locals, dressed in plain white T-shirts with their nickname the “Cutters,” upset the richer college students with more expensive bikes and uniforms, riding across the finish line in pure glory.

“Chariots of Fire” (1981)

Two Englishmen push each other to be the best sprinter at the 1924 Olympics. While they won gold on the big screen’s racetrack, “Chariots of Fire” would go on to win Oscar gold for best picture.

“The Natural” (1984)

Robert Redford plays middle-age rookie Roy Hobbs in “The Natural.” Hobbs leads his team to a championship on his final at-bat when he launches the most famous home run in movie history. Thus proving the unspoken rule in baseball: if you break the lights you win the game.

“Hoosiers” (1986)

Another Indiana classic in what is widely considered one of the greatest sports movies of all time, “Hoosiers” follows a small town high school basketball team as they make it all the way to the state finals. They play a bigger and more athletic team in the finals, but with a last second shot pull off the surprise victory.

“Major League” (1989)

Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger lead an outfit of misfit Cleveland Indians from last place to a shot at the league pennant against the powerhouse Yankees. Even though the film is a comedy, the final game plays out in dramatic fashion.

Whether it’s the thrill of victory or the agony of defeat, TheWrap recaps the biggest moments in these sports classics.

“The Pride of the Yankees” (1942)

This beautifully dramatized moment of sports history, as wonderfully monologued by Gary Cooper, helped to immortalize the already infamous “Luckiest man” speech by Lou Gehrig.

“Rocky” (1976)

In the ultimate underdog story, newcomer Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) gets a shot at the world heavyweight title against champ Apollo Creed. Rocky proves he has the goods, going the entire 15 rounds against Creed, but loses in a split decision. Rocky would get a rematch though and win the title in “Rocky II”.

“Breaking Away” (1979)

One of the most inspiring underdog stories ever made, the Little 500 bicycle race in Bloomington, Indiana is a local classic as made famous by this film. In the film’sclosing race scene, the locals, dressed in plain white T-shirts with their nickname the “Cutters,” upset the richer college students with more expensive bikes and uniforms, riding across the finish line in pure glory.

“Chariots of Fire” (1981)

Two Englishmen push each other to be the best sprinter at the 1924 Olympics. While they won gold on the big screen’s racetrack, “Chariots of Fire” would go on to win Oscar gold for best picture.

“The Natural” (1984)

Robert Redford plays middle-age rookie Roy Hobbs in “The Natural.” Hobbs leads his team to a championship on his final at-bat when he launches the most famous home run in movie history. Thus proving the unspoken rule in baseball: if you break the lights you win the game.

“Hoosiers” (1986)

Another Indiana classic in what is widely considered one of the greatest sports movies of all time, “Hoosiers” follows a small town high school basketball team as they make it all the way to the state finals. They play a bigger and more athletic team in the finals, but with a last second shot pull off the surprise victory.

“Major League” (1989)

Charlie Sheen and Tom Berenger lead an outfit of misfit Cleveland Indians from last place to a shot at the league pennant against the powerhouse Yankees. Even though the film is a comedy, the final game plays out in dramatic fashion.

‘Yellowstone’ Trailer: Taylor Sheridan and Kevin Costner Team Up for Modern Cowboy TV Drama

The new series from the writer of “Sicario” and “Hell or High Water” premieres in June on Paramount Network.

Whether it’s the movies he’s written, “Sicario” or “Hell or High Water,” or his directorial debut “Wind River,” Taylor Sheridan has based a thriving career on examining the true nature of masculinity. “Yellowstone,” his debut TV series for the ever-growing Paramount Network is the latest entry in Sheridan projects trying to figure out whether all men are bad or good.

In case there was any doubt, this first trailer closes with Gil Birmingham’s character actually saying, “All men are bad. But some of us try real hard to be good.” (Presumably, there’s more to wrestle with in the rest of the ten episodes of “Yellowstone,” but this sneak peek is light on plot details.)

Kevin Costner stars as John Dutton, the patriarch of a Montana ranching family, trying to keep his business afloat during a particularly trying economic downswing. As outside forces encroach on the Duttons’ literal and figurative territory, it looks like there are some explosive consequences.

Aside from Costner, “Yellowstone” also stars Wes Bentley, Kelly Reilly, and Luke Grimes as other members of the Dutton family.

Watch the trailer (featuring a rodeo, irresponsible lighter fluid usage, and very angry-looking Danny Huston) below:

“Yellowstone” premieres this June on the Paramount Network.

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John Fusco: Courting Bonnie & Clyde Hunter Frank Hamer’s Rights, Near Teaming Of Newman-Redford And What Lawman Wanted To Do To Warren Beatty

As Netflix starts production on the John Lee Hancock-directed The Highwaymen with Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson playing the legendary lawmen who brought bank robbers Bonnie & Clyde to their bloody end, Deadline asked the film’s original screenwriter John Fusco to detail the twists and turns of a project whose origins began with his long courtship of the son of legendary Texas Ranger Frank Hamer. The Hamer family so hated the stylized Arthur Penn-directed 1967 classic…

As Netflix starts production on the John Lee Hancock-directed The Highwaymen with Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson playing the legendary lawmen who brought bank robbers Bonnie & Clyde to their bloody end, Deadline asked the film’s original screenwriter John Fusco to detail the twists and turns of a project whose origins began with his long courtship of the son of legendary Texas Ranger Frank Hamer. The Hamer family so hated the stylized Arthur Penn-directed 1967 classic…

Netflix Confirms Deadline Scoop: Kevin Costner, Woody Harrelson Playing Lawmen Who Killed Bonnie & Clyde

Netflix announced today what Deadline told you last summer. Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson are playing Texas Ranger Frank Hamer and ex-partner Maney Gault in The Highwaymen from director John Lee Hancock. This was the project that goes back far enough that it once had Paul Newman and Robert Redford ready to play those roles, before Newman’s health failed. Hamer and Gault came out of retirement to hunt down the notorious bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde. Shooting has begun…

Netflix announced today what Deadline told you last summer. Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson are playing Texas Ranger Frank Hamer and ex-partner Maney Gault in The Highwaymen from director John Lee Hancock. This was the project that goes back far enough that it once had Paul Newman and Robert Redford ready to play those roles, before Newman’s health failed. Hamer and Gault came out of retirement to hunt down the notorious bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde. Shooting has begun…

5 Memorable Whitney Houston Performances (Video)

Six years ago today, the incomparable Whitney Houston dies. She was only 48.

The official cause of death was drowning (with the coroner reporting that heart disease and cocaine were contributing factors) in her tub at L.A.’s Beverly Hilton. She passed during Grammy Awards weekend.

After about three decades of hits, musically and on the big screen, she left behind six studio albums, one holiday album and three movie soundtrack albums. In 2008, Guinness World Records named her the most-awarded female performer of all time.

Also read: Whitney Houston’s Mother Blasts Lifetime Biopic: ‘Please Let Her Rest’

In her memory, TheWrap looks back on five memorable performances from Houston’s career. Watch them below:

1. At age 19, she performed for the first time on “The Merv Griffin Show.” She sang “Home” from musical “The Wiz” — with just a piano.

2. Houston officially proved she could be the top in pop as well as R&B with 1987’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody.” She would later fight against being too pop-centric, but there was a time and place in her career for it.

See photo: Yaya DaCosta Strikes Iconic Whitney Houston Pose in First Look at Lifetime Biopic

3. In 1991, Houston sang the National Anthem, one of her greatest vocal feats. It would later become a song of patriotism during the Persian Gulf war and again later after the 9/11 terrorist bombings.

4. Of course, Hollywood came knocking at Houston’s door. She would go on to star opposite Kevin Costner in “The Bodyguard.” The entire soundtrack for “The Bodyguard” can be counted as memorable, but Houston’s adaptation of Dolly Parton‘s “I Will Always Love You” will always exemplify the place in which Houston’s career was at the time.

Also read: Lifetime’s Aaliyah Biopic Finds Its Missy Elliott and Timbaland

5. After seven years away from the studio, Houston had something to prove. “I Look To You,” the title track on her 2009 album would test her vocals, but showed that she could still sing circles around most artists. The album would sell 304,000 copies in one week, making it Houston’s top debut of her career.

Bonus: A personal favorite from the movie “Waiting to Exhale.” The “Exhale” or “Shoop” song.

Six years ago today, the incomparable Whitney Houston dies. She was only 48.

The official cause of death was drowning (with the coroner reporting that heart disease and cocaine were contributing factors) in her tub at L.A.’s Beverly Hilton. She passed during Grammy Awards weekend.

After about three decades of hits, musically and on the big screen, she left behind six studio albums, one holiday album and three movie soundtrack albums. In 2008, Guinness World Records named her the most-awarded female performer of all time.

Also read: Whitney Houston’s Mother Blasts Lifetime Biopic: ‘Please Let Her Rest’

In her memory, TheWrap looks back on five memorable performances from Houston’s career. Watch them below:

1. At age 19, she performed for the first time on “The Merv Griffin Show.” She sang “Home” from musical “The Wiz” — with just a piano.

2. Houston officially proved she could be the top in pop as well as R&B with 1987’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody.” She would later fight against being too pop-centric, but there was a time and place in her career for it.

See photo: Yaya DaCosta Strikes Iconic Whitney Houston Pose in First Look at Lifetime Biopic

3. In 1991, Houston sang the National Anthem, one of her greatest vocal feats. It would later become a song of patriotism during the Persian Gulf war and again later after the 9/11 terrorist bombings.

4. Of course, Hollywood came knocking at Houston’s door. She would go on to star opposite Kevin Costner in “The Bodyguard.” The entire soundtrack for “The Bodyguard” can be counted as memorable, but Houston’s adaptation of Dolly Parton‘s “I Will Always Love You” will always exemplify the place in which Houston’s career was at the time.

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5. After seven years away from the studio, Houston had something to prove. “I Look To You,” the title track on her 2009 album would test her vocals, but showed that she could still sing circles around most artists. The album would sell 304,000 copies in one week, making it Houston’s top debut of her career.

Bonus: A personal favorite from the movie “Waiting to Exhale.” The “Exhale” or “Shoop” song.