RT Reporter Exits Network After ‘Misguided’ Praise of Stalin’s Gulags

RT America’s Washington correspondent Sameera Khan has left the network just days after tweeting out praise of Russian dictator Joseph Stalin’s gulags.

In a Twitter thread, Khan said that last Friday was her last day at the Russian state-owned media company and that her departure was planned weeks before her comments about the Soviet prison camps.

“As many of you may already know, I resigned from my position at RT a couple of weeks ago. Friday was my final day of work,” she said. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my colleagues in DC, London, and Moscow for their consistent support, guidance, and cooperation. It was an absolute privilege to work with such an outstanding group of people.”

“I submitted my resignation on September 30th — a week prior to that hilariously overblown tweet,” she added. “I am sure there will be many questions/concerns/conspiracy theories surrounding my resignation, and I plan to address them all.”

Also Read: RT Correspondent Faces Disciplinary Review After ‘Misguided’ Praise of Stalin’s Gulags

As many of you may already know, I resigned from my position at RT a couple of weeks ago. Friday was my final day of work.

— Sameera Khan (@SameeraKhan) October 13, 2018

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my colleagues in DC, London, and Moscow for their consistent support, guidance, and cooperation. It was an absolute privilege to work with such an outstanding group of people.

– Sameera Khan (@SameeraKhan) October 13, 2018

Considering recent news reports, I am sure there will be many questions/concerns/conspiracy theories surrounding my resignation, and I plan to address them all.

– Sameera Khan (@SameeraKhan) October 13, 2018

I submitted my resignation on September 30th — a week prior to that hilariously overblown tweet.

– Sameera Khan (@SameeraKhan) October 13, 2018

Khan, a former Miss New Jersey, stirred internet outrage after sharing a pair of memes downplaying the atrocities of Stalin’s prisons of the 1930s through 1950s.

“Capitalists fooled you … again,” read the memes that go on to list a number of “facts,” including “Freedom of speech allowed,” “Education, music and theater for prisoners” and “Sentence revoked on good conduct.”

None of these things are true. In one meme shared by Khan, it attributed a bulleted list of claims to a “Source: Stalin haters won’t believe any source.”

RT’s Washington correspondent and former Miss New Jersey keeping it classy by white washing the gulag pic.twitter.com/YYLGWx2EgD

— Ian Bateson (@ianbateson) October 8, 2018

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Disappeared From ‘Stalin’ Movie Poster

Stalin’s murderous decades ruling the Soviet Union caused tens of millions of deaths, with many of them  happening in his gulag prison network.

In a statement, Khan’s then-employer condemned the remarks and promised to investigate the issue and whether the tweets merited disciplinary action.

“RT strongly condemns the posts in question. Ms Kahn’s posts do not represent the network, and were uninformed and misguided. RT is conducting a disciplinary review related to the situation,” a spokesperson told TheWrap at the time.

It’s unclear whether that review was ever completed or why RT would launch an investigation into an employee that was already planning to leave the network. Khan did not immediately respond to request for comment from TheWrap. An RT spokesperson would only would confirm that she had resigned and refused to answer any specific questions.

Khan herself ultimately backed away from her claims about Stalin, tweeting out an apology last week before briefly deactivating her account.

“I have just found out that the memes I shared re: Stalin’s gulags were inaccurate. My apologies to all those who were offended,” she said. “I also in no way intended to make light of the tragic mass persecutions they took place under the Stalin regime and I again apologize for sharing this misleading and offensive information.”

This might be the best tweet ever pic.twitter.com/zhMG6z2EEu

– Jesse Singal (@jessesingal) October 9, 2018

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RT Correspondent Faces Disciplinary Review After ‘Misguided’ Praise of Stalin’s Gulags

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Jeffrey Tambor Disappeared From ‘Stalin’ Movie Poster

RT America’s Washington correspondent Sameera Khan has left the network just days after tweeting out praise of Russian dictator Joseph Stalin’s gulags.

In a Twitter thread, Khan said that last Friday was her last day at the Russian state-owned media company and that her departure was planned weeks before her comments about the Soviet prison camps.

“As many of you may already know, I resigned from my position at RT a couple of weeks ago. Friday was my final day of work,” she said. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of my colleagues in DC, London, and Moscow for their consistent support, guidance, and cooperation. It was an absolute privilege to work with such an outstanding group of people.”

“I submitted my resignation on September 30th — a week prior to that hilariously overblown tweet,” she added. “I am sure there will be many questions/concerns/conspiracy theories surrounding my resignation, and I plan to address them all.”

Khan, a former Miss New Jersey, stirred internet outrage after sharing a pair of memes downplaying the atrocities of Stalin’s prisons of the 1930s through 1950s.

“Capitalists fooled you … again,” read the memes that go on to list a number of “facts,” including “Freedom of speech allowed,” “Education, music and theater for prisoners” and “Sentence revoked on good conduct.”

None of these things are true. In one meme shared by Khan, it attributed a bulleted list of claims to a “Source: Stalin haters won’t believe any source.”

Stalin’s murderous decades ruling the Soviet Union caused tens of millions of deaths, with many of them  happening in his gulag prison network.

In a statement, Khan’s then-employer condemned the remarks and promised to investigate the issue and whether the tweets merited disciplinary action.

“RT strongly condemns the posts in question. Ms Kahn’s posts do not represent the network, and were uninformed and misguided. RT is conducting a disciplinary review related to the situation,” a spokesperson told TheWrap at the time.

It’s unclear whether that review was ever completed or why RT would launch an investigation into an employee that was already planning to leave the network. Khan did not immediately respond to request for comment from TheWrap. An RT spokesperson would only would confirm that she had resigned and refused to answer any specific questions.

Khan herself ultimately backed away from her claims about Stalin, tweeting out an apology last week before briefly deactivating her account.

“I have just found out that the memes I shared re: Stalin’s gulags were inaccurate. My apologies to all those who were offended,” she said. “I also in no way intended to make light of the tragic mass persecutions they took place under the Stalin regime and I again apologize for sharing this misleading and offensive information.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

RT Correspondent Faces Disciplinary Review After 'Misguided' Praise of Stalin's Gulags

GOP Congressman Denounces Family for Endorsing Opponent: 'Stalin Would Be Proud'

16 Hollywood Movies Banned in Other Countries, From 'Noah' to 'The Death of Stalin' (Photos)

Jeffrey Tambor Disappeared From 'Stalin' Movie Poster

RT Correspondent Faces Disciplinary Review After ‘Misguided’ Praise of Stalin’s Gulags

RT’s Kremlin-financed Washington Correspondent Sameera Khan will face a “disciplinary review” after posting memes to Twitter praising the gulags of Joseph Stalin.
“RT strongly condemns the posts in question. Ms Kahn’s post…

RT’s Kremlin-financed Washington Correspondent Sameera Khan will face a “disciplinary review” after posting memes to Twitter praising the gulags of Joseph Stalin.

“RT strongly condemns the posts in question. Ms Kahn’s posts do not represent the network, and were uninformed and misguided. RT is conducting a disciplinary review related to the situation,” a spokesperson told TheWrap on Tuesday.

Khan, a former Miss New Jersey, shared two memes Monday that suggested the Soviet prison camps weren’t actually so bad and that their brutal reputation was a result of “capitalist” propaganda. She came in for immediate criticism online before ultimately deleting the posts — and her entire Twitter account.

“Capitalists fooled you … again,” read the memes that go on to list a number of “facts” including, “Freedom of speech allowed,” “Education, music and theater for prisoners” and “Sentence revoked on good conduct.”

None of these things are true. In one meme, an area dedicated to “source” instead read that “Stalin haters won’t believe any source”

Internet sleuths soon discovered many more instances of Khan praising the dictator in other tweets.

“No man has made a greater contribution to history than Stalin,” she told a Twitter user, before saying that nobody should be reading “western propaganda.”

In other tweets, Khan actively worked to downplay the atrocities of Stalin’s tyranny, according to another Twitter user.

Joseph Stalin ruled the Soviet Union from the mid 1920s until his death in 1953. His regime caused the deaths of millions of Russians, with many of them dying in his gulag prison network.

RT — formerly known as Russia Today — is Russia’s premiere state media enterprise and has been required to register as a “foreign agent” in the United States since November 2017. A rep for the company did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TheWrap.

In a statement some hours before she deleted her Twitter account, Khan apologized for the memes.

“I have just found out that the memes I shared re: Stalin’s gulags were inaccurate. My apologies to all those who were offended,” she said. “I also in no way intended to make light of the tragic mass persecutions they took place under the Stalin regime and I again apologize for sharing this misleading and offensive information.”

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Joe Scarborough Slams Trump for ‘Stalinist’ Language About the Media (Video)

Joe Scarborough: Trump Uses ‘Stalinist’ Language When Talking About the Media pic.twitter.com/amMBkmsShC

— Jon Levine (@LevineJonathan) January 15, 2018

Joe Scarborough returned to an old canard on Monday, blasting President Donald Trump for adopting what he said was the language of Joseph Stalin when talking about the media.

“I look at Donald Trump and I look at the horrors of Donald Trump’s presidency, the violence that he does to constitutional norms, the contempt he has for the rule of law, the Stalinist phrases that he trots out when he speaks about the free press that our founders saw as really the corner stone of the bill of rights,” said Scarborough in the first hour of Monday’s “Morning Joe.”

And while the MSNBC host was visibly despondent, the monologue focused on how he was nevertheless hopeful at how robust U.S. institutions had been in withstanding the Trump assault.

Also Read: ‘Morning Joe’ Rips Trump After ‘Sh-thole’ Comments: ‘Racist,’ ‘Imbalanced,’ ‘Evil Evil Man’ (Video)

“I am hopeful from what I’ve seen so far about how Americans are responding to this great challenge,” he added. “We seem to be responding, I think, so far with passing grades as a country for a man who understands America and understands American values even less than he understands what’s going on around the world and America’s place in the world.”

The show which has become famous for regular broadsides against the president and routinely employs 20th-century dictators as a rhetorical device. In the past, Mao and Kim Jong-Un have also been trotted out to make anti-Trump points.

The renewed talk of Stalin is likely a result of Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Arizona), who said on Sunday that President Trump’s use of the term “enemy of the people” was a direct allusion to how Stalin addressed the media during his own rise to power in the Soviet Union.

“He borrowed that phrase, it was popularized by Joseph Stalin, used by Mao as well — enemy of the people,” he said.

WATCH: @JeffFlake compares @realDonaldTrump‘s language to the words of Josef Stalin pic.twitter.com/uZt3rX9eIX

– Kasie DC (@KasieDC) January 15, 2018

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Joe Scarborough returned to an old canard on Monday, blasting President Donald Trump for adopting what he said was the language of Joseph Stalin when talking about the media.

“I look at Donald Trump and I look at the horrors of Donald Trump’s presidency, the violence that he does to constitutional norms, the contempt he has for the rule of law, the Stalinist phrases that he trots out when he speaks about the free press that our founders saw as really the corner stone of the bill of rights,” said Scarborough in the first hour of Monday’s “Morning Joe.”

And while the MSNBC host was visibly despondent, the monologue focused on how he was nevertheless hopeful at how robust U.S. institutions had been in withstanding the Trump assault.

“I am hopeful from what I’ve seen so far about how Americans are responding to this great challenge,” he added. “We seem to be responding, I think, so far with passing grades as a country for a man who understands America and understands American values even less than he understands what’s going on around the world and America’s place in the world.”

The show which has become famous for regular broadsides against the president and routinely employs 20th-century dictators as a rhetorical device. In the past, Mao and Kim Jong-Un have also been trotted out to make anti-Trump points.

The renewed talk of Stalin is likely a result of Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Arizona), who said on Sunday that President Trump’s use of the term “enemy of the people” was a direct allusion to how Stalin addressed the media during his own rise to power in the Soviet Union.

“He borrowed that phrase, it was popularized by Joseph Stalin, used by Mao as well — enemy of the people,” he said.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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'Morning Joe' Rips Trump After 'Sh-thole' Comments: 'Racist,' 'Imbalanced,' 'Evil Evil Man' (Video)

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ ‘Veep’ Co-Stars Invoke Kevin Spacey, Harvey Weinstein in Chemo Pep-Talk (Video)

Good luck with your chemotherapy, Julia Louis-Dreyfus; please enjoy these inspirational quotes from a couple of accused sexual predators.

“Veep” star Louis-Dreyfus — who earlier this year announced that she is battling breast cancer — shared a video made by her “Veep” co-stars Matt Walsh and Sam Richardson, in which they attempted to bolster the actress’ spirits with some inspirational quotes ahead of her third chemotherapy treatment on Thursday.

Unfortunately, the quotes came courtesy of Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey, who have not exactly been beacons of inspiration lately. Oh, and also Joseph Stalin, whose reputation might be charitably described as mixed.

Also Read: Joe Biden Sends Message of Support to Julia Louis-Dreyfus After Her Breast-Cancer Diagnosis

The video features the pair apply‌ing their Google-fu to dig up heart-lifting quotes. Such as, “I believe in one thing only: The power of human will.” Courtesy of Stalin.

And, “If you’re lucky enough to do well, it’s your responsibility to send the elevator back down,” a lovely sentiment attributed to Spacey.

And also, “I always find that when I do something that I like from my heart, that it works” — which, to the duo’s chagrin, was apparently uttered by Weinstein.

Also Read: ‘Seinfeld’ Co-Stars Offer Support to Julia Louis-Dreyfus Following Breast Cancer Diagnosis

In the end, the duo abandons its quote-digging expedition in favor of belting out a chorus of the Survivor anthem “Eye of the Tiger.”

Watch the video below.

2 of my darling Bozos (love them so much) psyche me up for 3rd chemo today. And guess what? It worked! I’m psyched AF. @SamRichardson @mrmattwalsh pic.twitter.com/OuwR5hvHlf

– Julia Louis-Dreyfus (@OfficialJLD) November 9, 2017

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Good luck with your chemotherapy, Julia Louis-Dreyfus; please enjoy these inspirational quotes from a couple of accused sexual predators.

“Veep” star Louis-Dreyfus — who earlier this year announced that she is battling breast cancer — shared a video made by her “Veep” co-stars Matt Walsh and Sam Richardson, in which they attempted to bolster the actress’ spirits with some inspirational quotes ahead of her third chemotherapy treatment on Thursday.

Unfortunately, the quotes came courtesy of Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey, who have not exactly been beacons of inspiration lately. Oh, and also Joseph Stalin, whose reputation might be charitably described as mixed.

The video features the pair apply‌ing their Google-fu to dig up heart-lifting quotes. Such as, “I believe in one thing only: The power of human will.” Courtesy of Stalin.

And, “If you’re lucky enough to do well, it’s your responsibility to send the elevator back down,” a lovely sentiment attributed to Spacey.

And also, “I always find that when I do something that I like from my heart, that it works” — which, to the duo’s chagrin, was apparently uttered by Weinstein.

In the end, the duo abandons its quote-digging expedition in favor of belting out a chorus of the Survivor anthem “Eye of the Tiger.”

Watch the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Julia Louis-Dreyfus Thanks Katy Perry, Wraps 2nd Chemo Treatment for Breast Cancer

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‘Veep’ Creator Armando Iannucci on Finding Humor in ‘The Death of Stalin’ (Exclusive Video)

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Scottish filmmaker and TV showrunner Armando Iannucci is best known for modern-day political satire, from his mid-2000s British series “The Thick of It” to the HBO hit “Veep.”

But for his new film, he turned to historical material that doesn’t seem like a natural fit for laughs. “The Death of Stalin” follows Nikita Khruschev (Steve Buscemi), Georgy Malenkov (Jeffrey Tambor) and Lavrentiy Beria (Simon Russell Beale) scrambling for power in the aftermath of the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.

Also Read: ‘The Death of Stalin’ Review: Is This 1950s Russia, or Today’s Washington?

“The comedy adds to the level of hysteria,” Iannucci told TheWrap editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman in a video interview at the Toronto Film Festival. “The fact that you’re scrambling for the right to say because if you get it wrong, you might be next.”

IFC has acquired “The Death of Stalin” for release in the U.S.

For more from Iannucci on the film, watch the video above.

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embed:

Scottish filmmaker and TV showrunner Armando Iannucci is best known for modern-day political satire, from his mid-2000s British series “The Thick of It” to the HBO hit “Veep.”

But for his new film, he turned to historical material that doesn’t seem like a natural fit for laughs. “The Death of Stalin” follows Nikita Khruschev (Steve Buscemi), Georgy Malenkov (Jeffrey Tambor) and Lavrentiy Beria (Simon Russell Beale) scrambling for power in the aftermath of the death of Joseph Stalin in 1953.

“The comedy adds to the level of hysteria,” Iannucci told TheWrap editor-in-chief Sharon Waxman in a video interview at the Toronto Film Festival. “The fact that you’re scrambling for the right to say because if you get it wrong, you might be next.”

IFC has acquired “The Death of Stalin” for release in the U.S.

For more from Iannucci on the film, watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Thanked Native Tribes for Use of 'Their Land' at Every Gala Screening This Year

117 Amazing Portraits From TheWrap's Toronto Studio, From Angelina Jolie to Jim Carrey (Photos)

Guillermo del Toro's 'The Shape of Water' Brings Tears, F-Bombs to Toronto

‘The Death of Stalin’ Review: Is This 1950s Russia, or Today’s Washington?

There’s a leadership vacuum at the top and the government is dominated by idiots. An inner circle full of hard-liners, misfits and preening malcontents desperately jockeys for position. And this is all coming to us from director Armando Iannucci, who previously made the barbed political farce “In the Loop” and is best known as the creator of the HBO comedy series “Veep.”

Oh, and by the way, this is not set in the White House in 2017, but the Kremlin in 1953.

Sort of.

“The Death of Stalin,” which premiered on Friday at the Toronto International Film Festival, is Iannucci doing what he always does: taking a biting, profane and hilarious look at the foibles of the blowhards and nitwits in power.

Also Read: ‘The Shape of Water’ Review: Guillermo del Toro’s Glorious Romance Blends Horror and Delight

The film is a departure for Iannucci, though, because of its distance from today’s politics. “The Death of Stalin” tells a twisted account of Nikita Khruschev, Georgy Malenkov and Lavrentiy Beria scrambling for power in the aftermath of the death of Joseph Stalin in March, 1953.

But if you’d like to draw some comparisons to Bannon, Kelly and Scaramucci fighting in the halls of the Trump White House in the 2010s, I’m sure Iannucci won’t mind. After all, he makes little attempt to have his actors look like the characters they’re playing (Steve Buscemi and Simon Russell Beale, who play Khruschev and Beria, respectively, would have been a lot more accurate if they’d traded roles), and absolutely no attempt to have them sound the least bit Russian.

In fact, the voices are nothing but a bold F-you to period-movie conventions: Buscemi plays Khruschev like a tough-guy New Yorker, Jeffrey Tambor is an all-American Malenkov, Michael Palin is a thoroughly British Vyacheslav Molotov and Jason Isaacs adopts a thick Scottish brogue as Georgy Zhukov, the head of the Red Army.

In other words: It might help to know a little bit about midcentury Soviet politics to be up to speed on all the details here, but this ain’t really about the USSR. It’s about us, about the incompetent leaders and sleazy toadies that occupy the halls of power everywhere.

Also Read: IFC Films Picks Up ‘Veep’ Creator Armando Iannucci’s ‘The Death of Stalin’

Still, the historical setting puts Iannucci’s usual profane immediacy at a slight distance, and slows down the pace from the spitfire patter of “In the Loop,” “Veep” and his British series “The Thick of It.” (He co-wrote the screenplay with David Schneider and Ian Martin, from the graphic novel by Fabien Nury.)

“The Death of Stalin” is the master satirist working more quietly and deliberately than usual, with a buffer of 65 years between his characters and their audience. It isn’t as thrillingly transgressive as “In the Loop,” which turned streams of creative obscenities into an art form, or as relentlessly entertaining as the early seasons of “Veep” that were overseen by Iannucci. (The later, Dave Mandel-led seasons didn’t slack off, either.)

But if “The Death of Stalin” isn’t as bracing as some of Iannucci’s past work, it gives us a gallery of dopes and twits to embrace, among them the vain, timid and ineffectual Malenkov, played by the priceless Jeffrey Tambor, and Buscemi’s blunt schemer of a Khruschev, who replies to Stalin’s always-drunken son saying, “I want to make a speech at my father’s funeral” with a succinct, “And I want to f— Grace Kelly.”

Also Read: John Le Carre Thinks The Russians Have Something On Trump

Everyone here is frantic to seize an advantage, whether that means picking the right person to kill or getting your car first in line behind the truck carrying Stalin’s coffin. Some pull it off, others end up with bullets in their heads, and the details are less important than the delicious put-downs, the double crossing, the utterly Iannuccian sense that these leaders – hell, everybody’s leaders – are a bunch of dangerous buffoons.

And by the way, it suggests that if you’re looking for somebody to make a movie about the Trump administration, Armando is probably your guy.

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There’s a leadership vacuum at the top and the government is dominated by idiots. An inner circle full of hard-liners, misfits and preening malcontents desperately jockeys for position. And this is all coming to us from director Armando Iannucci, who previously made the barbed political farce “In the Loop” and is best known as the creator of the HBO comedy series “Veep.”

Oh, and by the way, this is not set in the White House in 2017, but the Kremlin in 1953.

Sort of.

“The Death of Stalin,” which premiered on Friday at the Toronto International Film Festival, is Iannucci doing what he always does: taking a biting, profane and hilarious look at the foibles of the blowhards and nitwits in power.

The film is a departure for Iannucci, though, because of its distance from today’s politics. “The Death of Stalin” tells a twisted account of Nikita Khruschev, Georgy Malenkov and Lavrentiy Beria scrambling for power in the aftermath of the death of Joseph Stalin in March, 1953.

But if you’d like to draw some comparisons to Bannon, Kelly and Scaramucci fighting in the halls of the Trump White House in the 2010s, I’m sure Iannucci won’t mind. After all, he makes little attempt to have his actors look like the characters they’re playing (Steve Buscemi and Simon Russell Beale, who play Khruschev and Beria, respectively, would have been a lot more accurate if they’d traded roles), and absolutely no attempt to have them sound the least bit Russian.

In fact, the voices are nothing but a bold F-you to period-movie conventions: Buscemi plays Khruschev like a tough-guy New Yorker, Jeffrey Tambor is an all-American Malenkov, Michael Palin is a thoroughly British Vyacheslav Molotov and Jason Isaacs adopts a thick Scottish brogue as Georgy Zhukov, the head of the Red Army.

In other words: It might help to know a little bit about midcentury Soviet politics to be up to speed on all the details here, but this ain’t really about the USSR. It’s about us, about the incompetent leaders and sleazy toadies that occupy the halls of power everywhere.

Still, the historical setting puts Iannucci’s usual profane immediacy at a slight distance, and slows down the pace from the spitfire patter of “In the Loop,” “Veep” and his British series “The Thick of It.” (He co-wrote the screenplay with David Schneider and Ian Martin, from the graphic novel by Fabien Nury.)

“The Death of Stalin” is the master satirist working more quietly and deliberately than usual, with a buffer of 65 years between his characters and their audience. It isn’t as thrillingly transgressive as “In the Loop,” which turned streams of creative obscenities into an art form, or as relentlessly entertaining as the early seasons of “Veep” that were overseen by Iannucci. (The later, Dave Mandel-led seasons didn’t slack off, either.)

But if “The Death of Stalin” isn’t as bracing as some of Iannucci’s past work, it gives us a gallery of dopes and twits to embrace, among them the vain, timid and ineffectual Malenkov, played by the priceless Jeffrey Tambor, and Buscemi’s blunt schemer of a Khruschev, who replies to Stalin’s always-drunken son saying, “I want to make a speech at my father’s funeral” with a succinct, “And I want to f— Grace Kelly.”

Everyone here is frantic to seize an advantage, whether that means picking the right person to kill or getting your car first in line behind the truck carrying Stalin’s coffin. Some pull it off, others end up with bullets in their heads, and the details are less important than the delicious put-downs, the double crossing, the utterly Iannuccian sense that these leaders – hell, everybody’s leaders – are a bunch of dangerous buffoons.

And by the way, it suggests that if you’re looking for somebody to make a movie about the Trump administration, Armando is probably your guy.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Downsizing' Review: Matt Damon Is the Incredible Shrinking Everyman

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IFC Films Picks Up ‘Veep’ Creator Armando Iannucci’s ‘The Death of Stalin’

IFC Films has acquired North American rights to “Veep” creator Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin,” a comedic take on the events that transpired after the brutal strongman died in 1953, TheWrap has learned.

IFC closed the seven-figure deal at the Berlin Film Festival’s European Film Market with Gaumont, which financed the movie. Iannucci and IFC previously worked together on “In the Loop,” which scored Iannucci an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay in 2010.

Adrian McLoughlin plays Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin in the film, which features an A-list cast including Steve Buscemi, Jeffrey Tambor, Rupert Friend, Jason Isaacs and Michael Palin. The movie takes a comic approach to the aftermath of Stalin’s death, which plunged the Soviet Union into a power struggle pitting several ambitious officials against each other. Stalin’s longtime lieutenant Lavrentiy Beria was briefly part of the ruling troika, until he was deposed and executed as part of a coup d’etat. Nikita Khrushchev eventually prevailed in the struggle, which lasted until 1958.

Also Read: ‘Veep’ Showrunner Armando Iannucci on Emmy Nods, Jet Lag and 2016 Presidential Candidates

Iannucci handled the screenplay with David Schneider and Ian Martin with additional material by Peter Fellows. Yann Zenou, Nicolas Duval-Adassovsky, Laurent Zeitoun and Kevin Loader produced. The film is adapted from a French graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin.

Gaumont is represented by CAA, while UTA reps Iannucci.

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‘Veep’ Creator Armando Iannucci on Pushing TV Comedy ‘To the Edge of a Cliff’

IFC Films has acquired North American rights to “Veep” creator Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin,” a comedic take on the events that transpired after the brutal strongman died in 1953, TheWrap has learned.

IFC closed the seven-figure deal at the Berlin Film Festival’s European Film Market with Gaumont, which financed the movie. Iannucci and IFC previously worked together on “In the Loop,” which scored Iannucci an Oscar nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay in 2010.

Adrian McLoughlin plays Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin in the film, which features an A-list cast including Steve Buscemi, Jeffrey Tambor, Rupert Friend, Jason Isaacs and Michael Palin. The movie takes a comic approach to the aftermath of Stalin’s death, which plunged the Soviet Union into a power struggle pitting several ambitious officials against each other. Stalin’s longtime lieutenant Lavrentiy Beria was briefly part of the ruling troika, until he was deposed and executed as part of a coup d’etat. Nikita Khrushchev eventually prevailed in the struggle, which lasted until 1958.

Iannucci handled the screenplay with David Schneider and Ian Martin with additional material by Peter Fellows. Yann Zenou, Nicolas Duval-Adassovsky, Laurent Zeitoun and Kevin Loader produced. The film is adapted from a French graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin.

Gaumont is represented by CAA, while UTA reps Iannucci.

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