Will Forte Runs Lines for ‘MacGruber’ TV Series With Jimmy Fallon (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

You’re running out of time to get super excited about the possibility of a “MacGruber” TV series. On Tuesday, Will Forte stopped by “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” to confirm the great news, and to run a few lines.

“It is true that Jorma Taccone, John Solomon and I last week pitched a ‘MacGruber’ TV series to some place,” Forte told his host and fellow “SNL” alum.

“The content is very powerful,” Forte summed up the direction he wants to take the character, which originated in hilarious “Saturday Night Live” digital shorts and was adapted into a feature-length movie in 2010. “It’s very important.”

He later added adjectives “high-minded” and “complex,” so we need this show.

Also Read: ‘MacGruber’ TV Series in the Works With Will Forte, Kristen Wiig

Forte then gave the 30 Rock audience a sweet sneak preview, pulling mini-scripts from his jacket. We’ll set the scene for readers: MacGruber (Forte), Vicki St. Elmo (Kristen Wiig, but in this case Fallon) and Piper (Ryan Philippe) have just finished foiling an evil plot. Lovers MacGruber and Vicki are celebrating in a passionate embrace.

MacGruber: “We did it. We did it. Well, my love, now that that’s over, I think it might be time for a little R&R.”

Vicki: “Yeah, I could use some rest and relaxation.”

MacGruber: “No. The other R&R: Ramming and rimming.”

Also Read: Will Forte Gives Up How ‘The Last Man on Earth’ Would Have Ended (Audio)

And, scene.

“We pitched that. We pitched that,” Forte said amid thunderous applause. “We said that in a room to people in suits.”

Watch the video above, because we definitely couldn’t do the moment the full justice it deserves in mere transcription form.

The guy’s a freakin’ genius, MacGruber!



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‘MacGruber’ TV Series in the Works With Will Forte, Kristen Wiig

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

A “MacGruber” series starring the original cast including Will Forte and Kristen Wiig has been pitched to various streaming networks, writer-director Jorma Taccone said in an interview published Friday.

“We just spent the last two days pitching it as a series,” Taccone told The Daily Beast. “Eight-to-ten episodes.”

The Lonely Island member created the original character, a spoof of the action series “MacGyver,” for “Saturday Night Live” in 2007. Played by Forte, the character appeared in a number of sketches and was later adapted into a 2010 feature film starring Forte, Wiig, Ryan Phillippe, Val Kilmer and Maya Rudolph.

Also Read: ‘SNL’ Five-Timers Club: Most Frequent Hosts, From Alec Baldwin to Jonah Hill (Photos)

According to Taccone, all are on board to return should the series find a home.

“I would feel terrible if the people involved were embarrassed about it, but Ryan loves that s–t, Kristen loves that s–t, all the people involved are so psyched,” he said.

The 2010 film was a critical and financial failure, pulling in just $9.3 million worldwide, but nonetheless rising to the level of cult favorite among fans.

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Freeform Cancels Lonely Island-Produced Comedy ‘Alone Together’ After 2 Seasons

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Freeform has canceled its Lonely Island-produced comedy series, “Along Together” after two seasons.

“Alone Together” starred stand-up comedians Esther Povitsky (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”) and Benji Aflalo (“Not Safe with Nikki Glaser”) as two overlooked millennial misfits from different backgrounds trying to make their way in the vain and status-obsessed culture of Los Angeles. These two only find salvation in their male/female strictly platonic friendship.

Chris D’Elia, Ginger Gonzaga, Edgar Blackmon and Nikki Glaser also starred. Povitsky and Aflalo wrote and executive produced the series alongside The Lonely Island trio of Andy Samberg, Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer, and Paul Mather and Becky Sloviter.

Also Read: ‘Joyland’: TV Adaptation of Stephen King Novel in the Works at Freeform

The 10-episode sophomore run was available to stream on Hulu along with airing back-to-back new episodes over five Wednesdays on Freeform.

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Tracy Morgan and Tiffany Haddish can’t agree on Jay-Z’s The Blueprint vs. 4:44

Read on: The A.V. Club.

Tonight, Tracy Morgan returns to television alongside Tiffany Haddish in The Last O.G., a show about an ex-con adjusting to life in a gentrified Brooklyn, and reckoning with his sudden role as a father. At a SXSW panel for the show, we played a game with Haddish, Morgan, and pilot director Jorma Taccone called 90s Or…

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Tracy Morgan On How ‘The Last O.G’ Is An Ode To His Background – SXSW

Read on: Deadline.

Tracy Morgan is making his sitcom comeback since his 2014 New Jersey car accident with his latest series, The Last O.G., starring alongside Tiffany Haddish and Cedric The Entertainer. Before the SXSW premiere, Morgan, Haddish, and The Lonely Island’s Jorma Taccone, who directed the pilot, stopped by the Deadline Studio.
“The origins are my life, my background. These are people that I have known,” said Morgan on what inspired the show’s premise. “It’s a story that’s never…

Hollywood Remembers Jill Messick

Read on: Deadline.

The death of Jill Messick, the former exec and producer, is generating an outpouring of reminiscences from people she helped at a time when they were starting out. Messick’s family today released a barbed statement after her death, lamenting that being dragged into the Harvey Weinstein- Rose McGowan mess was just too much for her. But that association hardly defines her; it was a nano second of a long career. Here are some of the people on whose lives and careers Messick…

‘It Happened in LA’ Review: Here’s a Different Look at La La Land

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

The best place to see “L.A. Times” is unquestionably L.A. — more to the point, probably the Los Feliz or the Vista theaters over by the hipster enclaves of Silver Lake and vicinity. But it’s safe to say that a very good second option would be the Sundance Film Festival, where writer-director-actor Michelle Morgan’s comedy had its world premiere on Friday night.

“L.A. Times” is an indie rom-com for the 21st century, steeped in the trends and foibles of trendy Millennials who work in or around the entertainment industry. It’s a film made for audiences with personal experience negotiating Santa Monica Blvd. with or without Waze, finding the food truck of the week and living in a place where everybody you know is working on a script, or at least on an idea that might turn into a script someday, maybe, with financing from that rich Brazilian guy that their friend knows.

The Sundance audience at the Library Theatre on Friday contained a hefty helping of those people, but beyond that it was an indie-film audience for sure. And the audience relished tossed off lines like “we met at Bonaroo,” “my Uber driver and I have never been to Glassell Park,” and this exchange:

“I thought it was movie night. I thought we were going to watch ‘Tokyo Story.’”

Again?”

Also Read: ‘The Big Sick’ a Hilarious Remedy for Trump-Distracted Sundance

Although there’s a hint of a Woody Allen homage in the opening credits, “L.A. Times” is made by and for the opposite coast from Woody’s urban tales. It’s an L.A. story, but for a generation that doesn’t automatically read its title as a newspaper reference. (For the record, the paper had nothing to do with this movie and isn’t even mentioned in it.)

“I wrote this movie because I love L.A., and I also hate it,” Morgan said at a post-screening Q&A. “The characters were inspired by real-life people, but the situations were kind of made up.”

The romantic comedy shifting between people in a large group of offbeat friends is of course a time-honored genre, and Morgan certainly isn’t out to subvert it or overhaul it. This is a gentle, genial update, consistently amusing and always likable; it may not break new ground, but it finds enough of new jokes, and Morgan’s obvious love of language gives it an extra charge.

(I mean, one of her characters unself-consciously uses the word eschew in the first few minutes of the movie, and gets away with it.)

Also Read: So How Did Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

The story centers on Annette and Elliott (Morgan and Jorma Taccone), a couple of writers; she’s mostly given up on writing, but he’s on a successful (if obviously schlocky) TV series full of mighty sword-wielding warriors glorying in their disembowelments. We follow Annette and Elliott through a breakup, while also dropping in on the lives of their friends: the girlfriend who sleeps with men too quickly (Dree Hemingway), the guy in love with his cousin (Kentucker Audley) and the TV star looking for women who aren’t too demanding (Adam Shapiro), among many others.

All the jokes at L.A.’s expense are pretty mild, but Morgan makes for a delightfully annoying leading lady (her character’s boyfriend says he fell for her after watching her complain at a restaurant). And she’s also a quirky enough director to not make the familiar tropes feel like rehashes.

She likes to shoot dialogue in single shots rather than using coverage, and she loves odd framing: putting characters in the corner of the frame, or shooting them to cut off their bodies and show lots of open space above them, or in one instance filming a phone conversation with the lead character’s face out of the shot, visible only in reflection on a glass coffee table.

These idiosyncrasies come across less as grand cinematic statements than as Morgan trying to have a little fun. But that makes perfect sense, because having fun is kind of the point here, and the Sundance audience did just that.

Now, they just need to hope that audiences out of Park City and west of the San Andreas Fault get the jokes.

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‘L.A. Times’ Actors Offer Risqué Previews to Quirky West Coast Comedy (Video)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

There’s a movie debuting at Sundance this year called “L.A. Times” — and no — it’s not about the newspaper of the same name.

Starring Jorma Taccone, Michelle Morgan (who also wrote and directed), Dree Hemingway, the three spoke with TheWrap’s Steve Pond from this year’s film festival in Park City, Utah.

The comedy is a plucky take on thirty-something romance in Los Angeles as they try to determine whether ideal happiness exists in coupledom or if the perfectly suited twosome is actually just an urban myth.

Also Read: Buzzy Sundance Doc ‘Step’ Uncovers Hidden ‘Reality’ of Poverty in High School Squad (Video)

The actors wanted everyone to know the salacious topics that arise — and don’t arise — in the film, including prostitution.

Taccone admitted that’s the raciest thing his character gets entangled with in the comedy, but adds: “He was driven to it!”

As for the newspaper, L.A. Times film writer Mark Olsen pointed out his media organization had nothing to do with the film, adding that when this year’s Sundance slate came out, “There were some very quizzical looks around the newsroom, as if people were afraid they had been in a documentary and/or reality show without knowing it.”

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Fear not, L.A. Times — “L.A. Times” does not have you covered.

Watch more from TheWrap’s interview with the film’s cast above.

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The best place to see “L.A. Times” is unquestionably L.A. – more to the point, probably the Los Feliz or the Vista theaters over by the hipster enclaves of Silver Lake and vicinity. But it’s safe to say that a very good second option would be the Sundance Film Festival, where writer-director-actor Michelle Morgan’s comedy had its world premiere on Friday night.

“L.A. Times” is an indie rom-com for the 21st century, steeped in the trends and foibles of trendy Millennials who work in or around the entertainment industry. It’s a film made for audiences with personal experience negotiating Santa Monica Blvd. with or without Waze, finding the food truck of the week and living in a place where everybody you know is working on a script, or at least on an idea that might turn into a script someday, maybe, with financing from that rich Brazilian guy that their friend knows.

The Sundance audience at the Library Theatre on Friday contained a hefty helping of those people, but beyond that it was an indie-film audience for sure. And the audience relished tossed off lines like “we met at Bonaroo,” “my Uber driver and I have never been to Glassell Park,” and this exchange:

“I thought it was movie night. I thought we were going to watch ‘Tokyo Story.’”

Again?”

Also Read: ‘The Big Sick’ a Hilarious Remedy for Trump-Distracted Sundance

Although there’s a hint of a Woody Allen homage in the opening credits, “L.A. Times” is made by and for the opposite coast from Woody’s urban tales. It’s an L.A. story, but for a generation that doesn’t automatically read its title as a newspaper reference. (For the record, the paper had nothing to do with this movie and isn’t even mentioned in it.)

“I wrote this movie because I love L.A., and I also hate it,” Morgan said at a post-screening Q&A. “The characters were inspired by real-life people, but the situations were kind of made up.”

The romantic comedy shifting between people in a large group of offbeat friends is of course a time-honored genre, and Morgan certainly isn’t out to subvert it or overhaul it. This is a gentle, genial update, consistently amusing and always likable; it may not break new ground, but it finds enough of new jokes, and Morgan’s obvious love of language gives it an extra charge.

(I mean, one of her characters unself-consciously uses the word eschew in the first few minutes of the movie, and gets away with it.)

Also Read: So How Did Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut Hold Up at Sundance?

The story centers on Annette and Elliott (Morgan and Jorma Taccone), a couple of writers; she’s mostly given up on writing, but he’s on a successful (if obviously schlocky) TV series full of mighty sword-wielding warriors glorying in their disembowelments. We follow Annette and Elliott through a breakup, while also dropping in on the lives of their friends: the girlfriend who sleeps with men too quickly (Dree Hemingway), the guy in love with his cousin (Kentucker Audley) and the TV star looking for women who aren’t too demanding (Adam Shapiro), among many others.

All the jokes at L.A.’s expense are pretty mild, but Morgan makes for a delightfully annoying leading lady (her character’s boyfriend says he fell for her after watching her complain at a restaurant). And she’s also a quirky enough director to not make the familiar tropes feel like rehashes.

She likes to shoot dialogue in single shots rather than using coverage, and she loves odd framing: putting characters in the corner of the frame, or shooting them to cut off their bodies and show lots of open space above them, or in one instance filming a phone conversation with the lead character’s face out of the shot, visible only in reflection on a glass coffee table.

These idiosyncrasies come across less as grand cinematic statements than as Morgan trying to have a little fun. But that makes perfect sense, because having fun is kind of the point here, and the Sundance audience did just that.

Now, they just need to hope that audiences out of Park City and west of the San Andreas Fault get the jokes.

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Hulu Hires Billy Rosenberg to Head Comedy Department

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Hulu has hired Party Over Here’s Billy Rosenberg to head its comedy department.

Starting next month, the new director of Hulu Originals will oversee the development and production of the streaming company’s current and upcoming slate of comedy series. He’ll report directly to Head of Originals, Beatrice Springborn.

Hulu’s comedies include “Casual,” “Difficult People,” “The Mindy Project,” and the upcoming “FutureMan” from Seth Rogen.

Also Read: Louis CK’s ‘Horace and Pete’ Picked Up by Hulu

Rosenberg had been working with The Lonely Island — Andy Samberg, Akiva Schaffer and Jorma Taccone — for a few years now, leading their production company.

Before his time with the “SNL: Digital Shorts” alums, Rosenberg was a longtime executive for Shawn Levy’s 21 Laps Entertainment.  There, he developed and produced movies “The Spectacular Now,” “Date Night,” and “The Watch,” among others.

Rosenberg got his start as an executive working for producer Lynda Obst when she had a pod deal at Paramount Studios. He’s a graduate from the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts.

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