Aaron Paul Joins ‘Westworld’ for Season 3

Welcome to Sweetwater, Aaron Paul! The “Breaking Bad” alum has been cast on Season 3 of “Westworld,” a person with knowledge of the production tells TheWrap.

Currently no word on who Paul will play when Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s sci-fi series returns to HBO. There is also no word on when the show itself will return.

The sophomore installment — led by Evan Rachel Wood, Jeffrey Wright, Ed Harris and Thandie Newton — wrapped in June with a finale that saw lower Nielsen numbers than its premiere.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jimmi Simpson Cast Opposite Ben Kingsley on Epix’s ‘Our Lady, LTD’

Paul led and produced the Hulu series “The Path” for its three-season run and is currently shooting the upcoming Apple drama “Are You Sleeping” opposite Octavia Spencer and Lizzy Kaplan. He recently starred in “American Woman” opposite Sienna Miller, which just premiered at TIFF. He will next be seen starring opposite Mary Elizabeth Winstead in “The Parts You Lose,” from director Chris Cantwell.

Based on the film of the same name written by Michael Crichton, “Westworld” was created by husband and wife producing team Nolan and Joy. The two act as showrunners and executive produce with J.J. Abrams, Richard J. Lewis, Roberto Patino, Athena Wickham and Ben Stephenson. The series is produced by Nolan and Joy’s Kilter Films and Abrams’ Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television.

Paul is represented by United Talent Agency.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Focuses on a ‘Woman Who Comes to Power’

Yes, the ‘Westworld’ Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

Welcome to Sweetwater, Aaron Paul! The “Breaking Bad” alum has been cast on Season 3 of “Westworld,” a person with knowledge of the production tells TheWrap.

Currently no word on who Paul will play when Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s sci-fi series returns to HBO. There is also no word on when the show itself will return.

The sophomore installment — led by Evan Rachel Wood, Jeffrey Wright, Ed Harris and Thandie Newton — wrapped in June with a finale that saw lower Nielsen numbers than its premiere.

Paul led and produced the Hulu series “The Path” for its three-season run and is currently shooting the upcoming Apple drama “Are You Sleeping” opposite Octavia Spencer and Lizzy Kaplan. He recently starred in “American Woman” opposite Sienna Miller, which just premiered at TIFF. He will next be seen starring opposite Mary Elizabeth Winstead in “The Parts You Lose,” from director Chris Cantwell.

Based on the film of the same name written by Michael Crichton, “Westworld” was created by husband and wife producing team Nolan and Joy. The two act as showrunners and executive produce with J.J. Abrams, Richard J. Lewis, Roberto Patino, Athena Wickham and Ben Stephenson. The series is produced by Nolan and Joy’s Kilter Films and Abrams’ Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television.

Paul is represented by United Talent Agency.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why 'Westworld' Season 2 Focuses on a 'Woman Who Comes to Power'

Yes, the 'Westworld' Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course 'Westworld' Fans Spotted a 'Game of Thrones' Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Focuses on a ‘Woman Who Comes to Power’

This story about “Westworld” first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“Westworld” showrunners Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy know that some fans found Season 2 to be more of a head-scratcher than Season 1. And that is saying something, since the first year of the HBO sci-fi hit made such an impact with audiences because of its twists and turns.

But the criticisms and confusion lobbed at the Evan Rachel Wood-led show were to be expected, as Nolan and Joy said they make the show on their own terms and took more than a few big swings in their sophomore year.

“The only way I know to write the show is to write it for ourselves,” Nolan said of the drama, which received 21 Emmy nominations, tying it with “Saturday Night Live” and trailing only “Game of Thrones” as the most-nominated program. “You make the show that you want to see and hope that there are enough people in the audience that are excited to see it. And that seems to be where we’re at.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Creators Have Had a Plan for Season 3 Since the Pilot

Joy echoed her husband and co-creator’s feelings, saying she’s “thrilled” with the way Season 2 turned out, especially because of the storyline for Wood, who plays a sweet rancher’s daughter turned gunslinging robot-army leader.

“In addition to being able to do a story that has long interested me about a woman who comes to power and has to navigate her own personality and choices, I think it’s really fascinating right now in society,” Joy said. “It’s a thing we as a society are trying to navigate.”

“Westworld” devoted a lot of its second season, which Nolan said was shot in “significantly less time than we shot the first season,” to locations in other theme parks adjacent to Westworld. One of those was Shogun World, which had almost an entire episode devoted to it.

Also Read: Rick Astley Loved the ‘Westworld’ Rickroll: ‘I Was Freaked’

“That was very, very exciting for us to do an homage to Akira Kurosawa’s work, and the influence Kurosawa’s work had on Western TV,” Nolan said of the legendary Japanese director of “Rashomon” and “Seven Samurai.”

“This is where our show becomes really fun for us,” he continued. “It’s about references. It’s about cinema. It’s about genre.”

And it’s also about HBO. “I think you’ve got a lot of people making ambitious television right now, but HBO kind of invented it,” Nolan said. “‘Game of Thrones’ blazed this trail for massive productions and ambition on television. Really cinematic television. It created this extraordinary opportunity for us to create a show that is this challenging.”

You can more from our interview with the “Westworld” creators — in which they preview Season 3 — here.

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, the ‘Westworld’ Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Season 3: Here’s Everything We Know Right Now

This story about “Westworld” first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“Westworld” showrunners Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy know that some fans found Season 2 to be more of a head-scratcher than Season 1. And that is saying something, since the first year of the HBO sci-fi hit made such an impact with audiences because of its twists and turns.

But the criticisms and confusion lobbed at the Evan Rachel Wood-led show were to be expected, as Nolan and Joy said they make the show on their own terms and took more than a few big swings in their sophomore year.

“The only way I know to write the show is to write it for ourselves,” Nolan said of the drama, which received 21 Emmy nominations, tying it with “Saturday Night Live” and trailing only “Game of Thrones” as the most-nominated program. “You make the show that you want to see and hope that there are enough people in the audience that are excited to see it. And that seems to be where we’re at.”

Joy echoed her husband and co-creator’s feelings, saying she’s “thrilled” with the way Season 2 turned out, especially because of the storyline for Wood, who plays a sweet rancher’s daughter turned gunslinging robot-army leader.

“In addition to being able to do a story that has long interested me about a woman who comes to power and has to navigate her own personality and choices, I think it’s really fascinating right now in society,” Joy said. “It’s a thing we as a society are trying to navigate.”

“Westworld” devoted a lot of its second season, which Nolan said was shot in “significantly less time than we shot the first season,” to locations in other theme parks adjacent to Westworld. One of those was Shogun World, which had almost an entire episode devoted to it.

“That was very, very exciting for us to do an homage to Akira Kurosawa’s work, and the influence Kurosawa’s work had on Western TV,” Nolan said of the legendary Japanese director of “Rashomon” and “Seven Samurai.”

“This is where our show becomes really fun for us,” he continued. “It’s about references. It’s about cinema. It’s about genre.”

And it’s also about HBO. “I think you’ve got a lot of people making ambitious television right now, but HBO kind of invented it,” Nolan said. “‘Game of Thrones’ blazed this trail for massive productions and ambition on television. Really cinematic television. It created this extraordinary opportunity for us to create a show that is this challenging.”

You can more from our interview with the “Westworld” creators — in which they preview Season 3 — here.

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, the 'Westworld' Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course 'Westworld' Fans Spotted a 'Game of Thrones' Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

'Westworld' Season 3: Here's Everything We Know Right Now

‘Westworld’ Creators Have Had a Plan for Season 3 Since the Pilot

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve watched “Westworld” through the Season 2 finale.)

“Westworld” Season 2 won’t look like anything to you when the third installment of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s hit HBO sci-fi series rolls around. Well, we can only assume, seeing as it sounds like what many critics and fans thought was a convoluted sophomore year compared to the already-complicated freshman venture, is a walk in the Western-themed park compared to what the married co-creators tell TheWrap they are cooking up next.

“Yes, Season 3 of ‘Westworld’ is definitely going to be a big undertaking,” Nolan told TheWrap, while discussing the 21 Emmy nominations the drama received this year — including nods for Outstanding Drama, and actors Evan Rachel Wood, Jeffrey Wright, Thandie Newton, Ed Harris and Jimmi Simpson.

Also Read: Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

“Yes, it is our biggest undertaking as of yet,” Joy added. “But the great thing about Season 3 is, when we were writing the pilot, the major storyline for Season 3 was already something that we had talked about nonstop. We’ve been waiting to get to this place and now that we’ve arrived here, we already have a very strong idea of exactly where we want to go and we can’t wait to go there.”

“It’s funny, we took our first vacation in over four years recently,” Joy continued. “And the problem with ‘Westworld,’ is you never leave ‘Westworld.’ So we were sitting there with our family on a beach and, of course we were discussing the nature of consciousness and the world of possibility and how an artificial intelligence would want to change society. So I guess you could say we never stop working on ‘Westworld.’”

Alright, obviously Joy and Nolan weren’t prepared to give up any real details about Season 3 — which does not yet have a premiere or production start date — and that includes their nickname for it. Oh, in case you aren’t a die-hard “Westworld” fan, the co-showrunners have a habit of giving their seasons a secret moniker they reveal later on, with the first being “The Door” and the second ‘The Maze.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

“Oh, we’ve figured that out,” told us of the code word for Season 3. “We’re just not quite ready to share yet,” Nolan said.

“We’ve got a long, long year in terms of writing and pulling together the pieces for the third season,” Nolan added. “I think what’s fun for us about this is discovering this world could be kind of extraordinary like this. And an opportunity — you know, if the show has spoken metaphorically about our world at this point, then the opportunity to visit our world is very exciting for us on both a character level and a story level.”

Oh, and speak of characters. When we talked to Joy about the Season 2 finale, we tried to get her to crack on which five hosts might be inside those control units Dolores/Hale (Tessa Thompson) smuggled out into the real world. Well, we checked in on that and here’s the answer we got: “Characters portrayed by brilliant actors!” Oh, geez. Thanks, guy.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, the ‘Westworld’ Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course ‘Westworld’ Fans Spotted a ‘Game of Thrones’ Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

‘Westworld’ Season 3: Here’s Everything We Know Right Now

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve watched “Westworld” through the Season 2 finale.)

“Westworld” Season 2 won’t look like anything to you when the third installment of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s hit HBO sci-fi series rolls around. Well, we can only assume, seeing as it sounds like what many critics and fans thought was a convoluted sophomore year compared to the already-complicated freshman venture, is a walk in the Western-themed park compared to what the married co-creators tell TheWrap they are cooking up next.

“Yes, Season 3 of ‘Westworld’ is definitely going to be a big undertaking,” Nolan told TheWrap, while discussing the 21 Emmy nominations the drama received this year — including nods for Outstanding Drama, and actors Evan Rachel Wood, Jeffrey Wright, Thandie Newton, Ed Harris and Jimmi Simpson.

“Yes, it is our biggest undertaking as of yet,” Joy added. “But the great thing about Season 3 is, when we were writing the pilot, the major storyline for Season 3 was already something that we had talked about nonstop. We’ve been waiting to get to this place and now that we’ve arrived here, we already have a very strong idea of exactly where we want to go and we can’t wait to go there.”

“It’s funny, we took our first vacation in over four years recently,” Joy continued. “And the problem with ‘Westworld,’ is you never leave ‘Westworld.’ So we were sitting there with our family on a beach and, of course we were discussing the nature of consciousness and the world of possibility and how an artificial intelligence would want to change society. So I guess you could say we never stop working on ‘Westworld.'”

Alright, obviously Joy and Nolan weren’t prepared to give up any real details about Season 3 — which does not yet have a premiere or production start date — and that includes their nickname for it. Oh, in case you aren’t a die-hard “Westworld” fan, the co-showrunners have a habit of giving their seasons a secret moniker they reveal later on, with the first being “The Door” and the second ‘The Maze.”

“Oh, we’ve figured that out,” told us of the code word for Season 3. “We’re just not quite ready to share yet,” Nolan said.

“We’ve got a long, long year in terms of writing and pulling together the pieces for the third season,” Nolan added. “I think what’s fun for us about this is discovering this world could be kind of extraordinary like this. And an opportunity — you know, if the show has spoken metaphorically about our world at this point, then the opportunity to visit our world is very exciting for us on both a character level and a story level.”

Oh, and speak of characters. When we talked to Joy about the Season 2 finale, we tried to get her to crack on which five hosts might be inside those control units Dolores/Hale (Tessa Thompson) smuggled out into the real world. Well, we checked in on that and here’s the answer we got: “Characters portrayed by brilliant actors!” Oh, geez. Thanks, guy.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Yes, the 'Westworld' Creators Actually Do Have an Ending in Mind

Of Course 'Westworld' Fans Spotted a 'Game of Thrones' Easter Egg in the Season 2 Finale

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

'Westworld' Season 3: Here's Everything We Know Right Now

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

After Sunday’s Season 2 finale, HBO will freeze all “Westworld” functions for at least a year — but did the drama’s sophomore run finish better than it began?

This past weekend, Episode 210 earned 1.6 million linear viewers, according to Nielsen, which is down 24 percent in total eyeballs from its debut this spring. HBO added another 600,000 viewers via an encore and its HBO Go and Now streams, per the pay-TV channel, bringing the nightly total up to 2.2 million.

“Westworld” Season 2 premiered back in April to 2.1 million linear viewers, per Nielsen, which was actually 100,000 audience members slimmer than the show’s Season 1 finale. Counting an encore as well as HBO Go and Now streams, that night’s sum grew to 3 million overall viewers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

“Westworld” sees a lot of delayed viewing. Last season, the TV reimagining of the 1973 feature film saw nearly 80 percent of its viewers tune in post-premiere night, according to HBO. The premium cabler is expecting a Season 2 average of around 10 million viewers once all data has come in.

Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series closed its sophomore run with a feature-length finale, titled “The Passenger,” which answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of, but left viewers with a whole new mess of head-scratchers, like that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here. And everything we currently know about Season 3 here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

‘Westworld’: That Entire Bonkers Season 2 Ending, Explained

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

After Sunday’s Season 2 finale, HBO will freeze all “Westworld” functions for at least a year — but did the drama’s sophomore run finish better than it began?

This past weekend, Episode 210 earned 1.6 million linear viewers, according to Nielsen, which is down 24 percent in total eyeballs from its debut this spring. HBO added another 600,000 viewers via an encore and its HBO Go and Now streams, per the pay-TV channel, bringing the nightly total up to 2.2 million.

“Westworld” Season 2 premiered back in April to 2.1 million linear viewers, per Nielsen, which was actually 100,000 audience members slimmer than the show’s Season 1 finale. Counting an encore as well as HBO Go and Now streams, that night’s sum grew to 3 million overall viewers.

“Westworld” sees a lot of delayed viewing. Last season, the TV reimagining of the 1973 feature film saw nearly 80 percent of its viewers tune in post-premiere night, according to HBO. The premium cabler is expecting a Season 2 average of around 10 million viewers once all data has come in.

Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series closed its sophomore run with a feature-length finale, titled “The Passenger,” which answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of, but left viewers with a whole new mess of head-scratchers, like that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here. And everything we currently know about Season 3 here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After 'Westworld's Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

'Westworld': That Entire Bonkers Season 2 Ending, Explained

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

Kendrick Lamar, JK Rowling, Jonathan Nolan and 20 Other Surprising New Academy Members

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Monday a record-breaking number of new member invitees that puts the organization on track to reach its 2016 goals of doubling the number of non-white and female members.
Some of the 928 invi…

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Monday a record-breaking number of new member invitees that puts the organization on track to reach its 2016 goals of doubling the number of non-white and female members.

Some of the 928 invitees were quite curious, either because it was surprising they weren’t already members — or that the Academy would even think to induct them.

Consider French-born filmmaker Michel Gondry, who won an Oscar for co-writing his 2004 film “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” but somehow never snagged an invite from the Academy until now.

Or Jonathan Nolan, who earned a nomination with his brother Christopher for 2000’s “Memento,” but has been passed over all these years despite his acclaimed scripts for “The Dark Knight,” “The Dark Knight Rises” and “Interstellar.”

Then there’s “Harry Potter” creator J.K. Rowling. Sure, the author inspired an entire generation of kids to read rather than head to the cinema — but she only has one produced screenplay to her credit, 2016’s “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.” (A sequel, “The Crimes of Grindewald,” is due in November.)

Still, Rowling has been crucial to the “Harry Potter” franchise, which has racked up 14 Oscar nominations and $7 billion in worldwide box office since the first one was released in 2001.

If those invitations seemed a long time coming, then rapper Kendrick Lamar nabbing one seemed out of the blue.

Lamar is an objectively outstanding artist who has won nearly every important music award there is. He even won a Pulitzer Prize for his album “DAMN.” but his Hollywood résumé is thin aside from his recent work on the “Black Panther” soundtrack.

The same is true of members of Prince’s band, Wendy Melvoin and Lisa Coleman, who scored membership for their work on such Oscar-bait films as “Just Wright” and “Valentino’s Ghost.”

Performers like “Game of Thrones” star Emilia Clarke, former “Closer” actress Kyra Sedwick and Gina Rodriguez are more associated with their work on TV, while comedic performers like Hannibal Buress (“Tag”) and Dave Chappelle (“Robin Hood: Men in Tights”) have mostly performed in broad big-screen comedies that don’t typically earn Academy recognition.

The 2018 list of invitees is a sign that the Academy is opening its doors a bit wider as it continues to diversify its ranks.

Wait, they weren’t already members?:

Eileen Atkins (“Gosford Park”) — Actors branch
Abigail Breslin (“Little Miss Sunshine”) — Actors branch
Melissa Etheridge (Oscar winner for “An Inconvenient Truth”) — Music branch
Michel Gondry (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”) — Directors Branch
Jean-Pierre Jeunet (Oscar nominee for “Amelie”) — Director’s branch
Toby Jones (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”) — Actors branch
Jonathan Nolan (“Memento”) — Writers branch
Eduardo Noriega (“Open Your Eyes”) — Actors branch
Jada Pinkett Smith (“Menace II Society”) — Actors branch
Joely Richardson (“The Patriot”) — Actors branch
Amy Schumer (“Trainwreck”) — Actors branch
Miles Teller (“Whiplash”) — Actors branch

Really, them?:

Hannibal Buress (“Tag”) — Actors branch
Dave Chappelle (“Robin Hood: Men in Tights”) — Actors branch
Emilia Clarke (“Me Before You”) — Actors branch
Lisa Coleman (“Dangerous Minds”) — Music branch
Lena Headey (“The Purge”) — Actors branch
Kendrick Lamar (“Black Panther”) — Music branch
Wendy Melvoin (“Soul Food”) — Music branch
Gina Rodriguez (“Deepwater Horizon”) — Actors branch
J.K. Rowling (“Fantastic Beasts”) — Writers branch
Kyra Sedgwick (“Something to Talk About”) — Actors branch
Yeardley Smith (“The Simpsons Movie”) — Actors branch

Related stories from TheWrap:

Academy Invites Colossal List of 928 New Members

Oscars: What Does It Take to Become a Member of the Motion Picture Academy Anyway?

No Kobe, No Problem: Oscars Academy's Class of 2018 on Track to Be as Big and Diverse as Last 2 Years'

Jennifer Todd Wins Academy Board Runoff Election Over Jason Blum

‘Westworld’ Season 3: Here’s Everything We Know Right Now

(The mother of all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Do you feel like someone pulled your control unit out of your head after watching the “Westworld” Season 2 finale — including that wild post-credits scene? Of course you do. So what do you do next? Start scouring the internet for hints about the third installment, obviously.

While the details we have on the next season of Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series are few and far between, we have been able to roundup a few tidbits that should tide you over for at least as long as it takes Dolores to get through one of her famous speeches about “the world.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

1. It’s going to take place in the “real world,” for the most part.

At the end of the Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” three of the Hosts officially entered the real world in our central timeline: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) — thanks to Dolores’ decision to bring him back — and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself.

“It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs],” Joy told TheWrap. “So we’ll come to know more of who ‘Hale’ is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.”

Joy also clarified that there is someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores, saying, “Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the ‘Real World’ in Season 3

2. But not entirely in the real world.

We’ve seen Westworld, The Raj and Shogun World, but we know we have some more Delos Destinations to explore. “Well, not all of our favorite characters have managed to escape yet, so…,” Nolan said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly  published after the finale. Yeah, OK, so more parks next time.

Also Read: Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

3. Not everyone is coming back.

Look, you saw how many people died in the finale, so it shouldn’t come as a shock based on the sheer number of casualties that not every star will be sticking with the series when it returns.

“We’ve had some interesting conversations,” Nolan told EW. “It’s a large ensemble cast and sadly we’re saying goodbye to some people at the end of this season. But as always with this show, who remains and who doesn’t is something we’re having a lot of fun with. There’s going to be a bit of a wait for a third season but we want to surprise and hopefully delight people with the way things progress.”

We do know that Dolores and Maeve (Thandie Newton) are both coming back, as Wood said in an interview with TheWrap back in April that she’s receiving equal pay for Season 3 and then Newton told Vanity Fair the same thing about herself.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Finale: What’s Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

4. We know these guys are dead (at least for now).

Maeve, Angela (Talulah Riley), Abernathy (Louis Herthum), Costa (Fares Fares ), Strand (Gustaf Skarsgård), Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman), Clementine (Angela Sarafyan), Emily (Katja Herbers), and Teddy (James Marsden), Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward), Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins). And also Charlotte Hale, but that’s complicated.

Well, they are all complicated. Especially because Joy explained that whole deal with the five control units “Halores” smuggled out of the park. And then she tried to tell us Ford is really gone for good this time. Sigh.

5. And these guys are definitely alive (at the moment).

Dolores, Bernard, Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William and whoever is in that Hale-shaped Host body.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

6. The Hosts that “sublimed” into the Valley Beyond are most likely gone for good.

Teddy, Akecheta (Zach McClarnon) and a few other lucky robots made it into their version of paradise, and Joy made it clear to TheWrap that Dolores has changed the coordinates of the Sublime to keep them away from humans forever.

“I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish,” Joy told TheWrap. “They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

7. We’re going back to the future — at some point.

Joy told us that that crazy post-credits scene that scrambled your brain even more than the finale itself takes place at a later date than the rest of the story. A much later date.

“But he’s in a very different timeline,” Joy said. “The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

“And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

8. Season 3 is not going to premiere for a while.

Nolan told Entertainment Weekly you shouldn’t expect any fresh episodes anytime soon, noting: “We’re still talking it through, honestly, with our friends at HBO, and with the cast and the crew. We want to take the time to make every season as exciting as possible. And we have an enormous challenge going into Season 3 with the worlds that we’re building going forward. We want to make sure we have the time to do that right.”

Part of the problem here is also the fact HBO hasn’t set a premiere date for the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones,” which we do know is coming in 2019. Chances are the premium cable network won’t want to air “Westworld” before it says goodbye to its most popular series, so you do the math.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the ‘Real World’ in Season 3

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

‘Westworld’ Finale: What’s Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

(The mother of all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Do you feel like someone pulled your control unit out of your head after watching the “Westworld” Season 2 finale — including that wild post-credits scene? Of course you do. So what do you do next? Start scouring the internet for hints about the third installment, obviously.

While the details we have on the next season of Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series are few and far between, we have been able to roundup a few tidbits that should tide you over for at least as long as it takes Dolores to get through one of her famous speeches about “the world.”

1. It’s going to take place in the “real world,” for the most part.

At the end of the Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” three of the Hosts officially entered the real world in our central timeline: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) — thanks to Dolores’ decision to bring him back — and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself.

“It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs],” Joy told TheWrap. “So we’ll come to know more of who ‘Hale’ is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.”

Joy also clarified that there is someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores, saying, “Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.”

2. But not entirely in the real world.

We’ve seen Westworld, The Raj and Shogun World, but we know we have some more Delos Destinations to explore. “Well, not all of our favorite characters have managed to escape yet, so…,” Nolan said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly  published after the finale. Yeah, OK, so more parks next time.

3. Not everyone is coming back.

Look, you saw how many people died in the finale, so it shouldn’t come as a shock based on the sheer number of casualties that not every star will be sticking with the series when it returns.

“We’ve had some interesting conversations,” Nolan told EW. “It’s a large ensemble cast and sadly we’re saying goodbye to some people at the end of this season. But as always with this show, who remains and who doesn’t is something we’re having a lot of fun with. There’s going to be a bit of a wait for a third season but we want to surprise and hopefully delight people with the way things progress.”

We do know that Dolores and Maeve (Thandie Newton) are both coming back, as Wood said in an interview with TheWrap back in April that she’s receiving equal pay for Season 3 and then Newton told Vanity Fair the same thing about herself.

4. We know these guys are dead (at least for now).

Maeve, Angela (Talulah Riley), Abernathy (Louis Herthum), Costa (Fares Fares ), Strand (Gustaf Skarsgård), Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman), Clementine (Angela Sarafyan), Emily (Katja Herbers), and Teddy (James Marsden), Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward), Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins). And also Charlotte Hale, but that’s complicated.

Well, they are all complicated. Especially because Joy explained that whole deal with the five control units “Halores” smuggled out of the park. And then she tried to tell us Ford is really gone for good this time. Sigh.

5. And these guys are definitely alive (at the moment).

Dolores, Bernard, Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William and whoever is in that Hale-shaped Host body.

6. The Hosts that “sublimed” into the Valley Beyond are most likely gone for good.

Teddy, Akecheta (Zach McClarnon) and a few other lucky robots made it into their version of paradise, and Joy made it clear to TheWrap that Dolores has changed the coordinates of the Sublime to keep them away from humans forever.

“I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish,” Joy told TheWrap. “They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.”

7. We’re going back to the future — at some point.

Joy told us that that crazy post-credits scene that scrambled your brain even more than the finale itself takes place at a later date than the rest of the story. A much later date.

“But he’s in a very different timeline,” Joy said. “The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

“And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.”

8. Season 3 is not going to premiere for a while.

Nolan told Entertainment Weekly you shouldn’t expect any fresh episodes anytime soon, noting: “We’re still talking it through, honestly, with our friends at HBO, and with the cast and the crew. We want to take the time to make every season as exciting as possible. And we have an enormous challenge going into Season 3 with the worlds that we’re building going forward. We want to make sure we have the time to do that right.”

Part of the problem here is also the fact HBO hasn’t set a premiere date for the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones,” which we do know is coming in 2019. Chances are the premium cable network won’t want to air “Westworld” before it says goodbye to its most popular series, so you do the math.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the 'Real World' in Season 3

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After 'Westworld's Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

'Westworld' Finale: What's Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Fool us once, shame on you. Fool us twice, probably still shame on you, because making “Westworld” fans think Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) is gone for good yet again, and then bringing him back once more would be just plain mean.

But after the insane “Westworld” Season 2 finale, Lisa Joy assured TheWrap Ford has really and truly been deleted from Bernard’s (Jeffrey Wright) brain and her and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series. Well, like, that version of Ford.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

During the episode, titled “The Passenger,” Bernard had several exchanges with his old partner, who had been hanging out inside the Host’s brain for the better part of the back half of the season. And that was a little weird, seeing as it seemed Bernard had “deleted” Ford from his brain in the season’s penultimate episode, only for him to pop back up at the beginning of this one.

But come the end of the finale, Bernard realizes the scenes with his imaginary friend really were imaginary this time round, and Ford is out. For real.

Look, just read what Joy said to us and you decide for yourselves if he’ll be back in Season 3.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

TheWrap: Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imagining Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Fool us once, shame on you. Fool us twice, probably still shame on you, because making “Westworld” fans think Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) is gone for good yet again, and then bringing him back once more would be just plain mean.

But after the insane “Westworld” Season 2 finale, Lisa Joy assured TheWrap Ford has really and truly been deleted from Bernard’s (Jeffrey Wright) brain and her and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series. Well, like, that version of Ford.

During the episode, titled “The Passenger,” Bernard had several exchanges with his old partner, who had been hanging out inside the Host’s brain for the better part of the back half of the season. And that was a little weird, seeing as it seemed Bernard had “deleted” Ford from his brain in the season’s penultimate episode, only for him to pop back up at the beginning of this one.

But come the end of the finale, Bernard realizes the scenes with his imaginary friend really were imaginary this time round, and Ford is out. For real.

Look, just read what Joy said to us and you decide for yourselves if he’ll be back in Season 3.

TheWrap: Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imagining Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale's Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

'Westworld' Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Finale: What’s Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well that was odd.

Toward the end of “Westworld”s Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” one of the strangest exchanges that viewers have ever witnessed on Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series occurred between Ashley Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth) and Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson). Or rather, Stubbs and “Halores” had a bizarre conversation, as Evan Rachel Wood’s character was really inhabiting a new skin that looked just like Hale.

And while TheWrap was busy wondering if the theme park’s head of security had figured that out, as he stopped Hale on the beach to have a little chat as she was trying to leave, we totally missed the real twist there. Yeah, Stubbs is a host. And we even have the interview with Joy to prove it.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

See what she said about the reveal below.

TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs new it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford (Anthony Hopkins) designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well that was odd.

Toward the end of “Westworld”s Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” one of the strangest exchanges that viewers have ever witnessed on Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series occurred between Ashley Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth) and Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson). Or rather, Stubbs and “Halores” had a bizarre conversation, as Evan Rachel Wood’s character was really inhabiting a new skin that looked just like Hale.

And while TheWrap was busy wondering if the theme park’s head of security had figured that out, as he stopped Hale on the beach to have a little chat as she was trying to leave, we totally missed the real twist there. Yeah, Stubbs is a host. And we even have the interview with Joy to prove it.

See what she said about the reveal below.

TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs new it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford (Anthony Hopkins) designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale's Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

'Westworld' Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

OK, a lot of Hosts were either dead or had crossed into the “Valley Beyond” aka the Sublime by the end of the “Westworld” Season 2 finale. But there are at least three robots still standing: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself. (We’re not counting those guys in the post-credits scene. That’s a whole different can of worms.)

Oh, wait, there are also five Hosts’ consciousnesses inside the five control units that “Halores” smuggled into the real world when exiting the park at the end of Sunday’s season-closer. And while we don’t know for certain who is inside each of those little pearls, TheWrap prodded co-creator Lisa Joy to give us some idea of which dead Hosts — RIP Maeve (Thandie Newton) & co — Dolores is planning on reconstructing and which were sent off into the ether. And actually, where exactly that ether is.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Here’s what she said:

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

OK, a lot of Hosts were either dead or had crossed into the “Valley Beyond” aka the Sublime by the end of the “Westworld” Season 2 finale. But there are at least three robots still standing: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself. (We’re not counting those guys in the post-credits scene. That’s a whole different can of worms.)

Oh, wait, there are also five Hosts’ consciousnesses inside the five control units that “Halores” smuggled into the real world when exiting the park at the end of Sunday’s season-closer. And while we don’t know for certain who is inside each of those little pearls, TheWrap prodded co-creator Lisa Joy to give us some idea of which dead Hosts — RIP Maeve (Thandie Newton) & co — Dolores is planning on reconstructing and which were sent off into the ether. And actually, where exactly that ether is.

Here’s what she said:

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Season 2 Finale's Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

'Westworld' Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

'Westworld' Star Jeffrey Wright's Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: 'Relax and Surrender'

‘Westworld’ Boss on Season 2 Finale: Dolores’ Bold Move, the ‘Door,’ and the Truth About Free Will

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched “The Passenger,” the second season finale of “Westworld.” When “Westworld” introduced the idea of a “door” to another world for the hosts in the alte…

SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you have not yet watched “The Passenger,” the second season finale of “Westworld.” When “Westworld” introduced the idea of a “door” to another world for the hosts in the alternate reality theme park, it left a lot of questions dangling about just where that door would lead, what the hosts’ […]

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

The second season of “Westworld” took a cue from the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s handbook on Sunday, capping an insane finale, titled “The Passenger,” with an equally insane post-credits scene. In the short clip, we see the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William, stumble out of an elevator into an abandoned room that the hit sci-fi series has never entered before. He comes across his daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), who, uh, he actually killed in the penultimate episode. The Man in Black is understandably confused, and so was TheWrap. So we asked the show’s co-creator Lisa Joy to explain it to us.

Here is what she said:

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s-t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f-k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: So because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch Evan Rachel Wood and James Marsden Give ‘Westworld’ a Sitcom Spin (Video)

‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Ask Your Amazon Alexa to Take You Into ‘Westworld’ Right Now

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

The second season of “Westworld” took a cue from the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s handbook on Sunday, capping an insane finale, titled “The Passenger,” with an equally insane post-credits scene. In the short clip, we see the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William, stumble out of an elevator into an abandoned room that the hit sci-fi series has never entered before. He comes across his daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), who, uh, he actually killed in the penultimate episode. The Man in Black is understandably confused, and so was TheWrap. So we asked the show’s co-creator Lisa Joy to explain it to us.

Here is what she said:

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s-t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f-k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

TheWrap: So because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well, after an ending like that, where do we even begin?

“Westworld” brought its second season to a close Sunday night with a feature-length finale that threw us completely off our programmed loop. But while the episode, titled “The Passenger,” answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of co-creator Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series, it left us with a whole new mess of head-scratchers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Seeing as we are still very much in TBD territory on an air date for the third season, we’ve got a long wait in store before we can stop scratching ours heads. But to help, TheWrap caught up with Joy to help us make sense of that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

And — in a very Ford-like manner — she even gave TheWrap the answers to questions we didn’t think to ask. See our exchange below.

Also Read: Ask Your Amazon Alexa to Take You Into ‘Westworld’ Right Now

TheWrap: So there was a lot of death in that finale [laughs]. What was the reasoning behind killing off so many people, especially knowing some people ( i.e. humans) probably don’t have a way of coming back?

Joy: In embarking on this season we knew, in a sense, we’d be telling a story of revolution, of war and the tragedy and inevitability of war is death. There are stakes to violence and it is mortality. And I love all of our actors. I think they are incredible collaborators, cool people, incredible talent and it truly is harrowing to lose any of them. But, you know, it’s in the service of the story and the story is something that we’re all working together to paint as realistically as you can paint a story about an AI revolution in a Western theme park [laughs]. And so for the drama to have stakes, the deaths must be real. And so, yeah, there was a lot of deaths [laughs].

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

TheWrap: Did Bernard have to be the one to kill Dolores (and bring her back) and did Dolores have to be the one to kill Bernard (and bring him back) — and why?

Joy: Yeah, when we were thinking of that — and you see it in the back of some of the shots, the picture of an M.C. Escher drawing of a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand — and the ways that the things we create and give birth to, create and influence us. And that is the cycle that Bernard and Dolores have been locked in since before Bernard was Bernard — when he was Arnold. The fates of all the characters are integral in the storylines, but some of them chose a kind of different struggle, you know?

And this season was about choice. It was about respecting choice, as well as making one’s own choice. And throughout the season, one of the things Dolores’ character struggles with in assuming the mantle of basically military leadership was, as much as she wanted to protect the Hosts, as noble as her aims were to protect them from the darkness that she herself has witnessed so many times in humans, in order to do that on a basic military level, she had to take on some of the paternalistic traits that she was kind of vowing against in the first place.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

It was a difficult dichotomy, but I think something that would realistically occur. So she made a lot of choices for a lot of people and came to regret those choices. Not necessarily because they were wrong in their outcome, or what her intended outcome was, but because it was wrong, she realized, to take away someone else’s agency, even if you disagreed with the choices they were making.

So, you know, she changed Teddy in order to “save” him. She knew he wouldn’t survive. So she took away his agency and made him something, even though I think it was designed to be temporary like, “Let’s just live through this so we can have this life together.” And then she was going to kind of dictate the fates of Maeve and Akecheta and all the people who fled to the Sublime, because, to her, that reality was not one worth pursuing.

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

But she sees the error of her ways later because of Bernard. He literally killed her to stop the monster that she had become. And in being resurrected by him — when he also realizes that she wasn’t full monster, that indeed without her plan, they would be wiped off the face of the earth, she would be the last of his kind — he brings her back, and in that time she has changed. She has realized that embracing choice is necessary. That as much as her goal may have been noble, she has to accept the idea that they were fallible and that she is fallible, unless unchecked.

I think it’s a very powerful notion, the notion that our personal views, although closely held, are not necessarily right. That part of what is noble is making sure there are checks and balances and a plurality of opinions. And that is something that she has grown to understand.

So when she brings Bernard back in the real world, she’s basically accepting that idea and embracing that idea, even if it leads to her own personal undoing. She knows that that kind of balance is what is needed for true freedom for her kind.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

TheWrap: OK, is it safe to assume that going forward in the next season we’ll be in the real world more?

Joy: Absolutely. It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs]. So we’ll come to know more of who “Hale” is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.

TheWrap: So then there has to be someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores — right?

Joy: Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

Also Read: ‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘Westworld’ Won’t Present at San Diego Comic-Con, HBO Says

TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs knew it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

TheWrap: OK, that went completely over my head. Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imaginig Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

Also Read: Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s–t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f–k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton, Rinko Kikuchi on the ‘Fun’ of All That Shogun World Doppleganging

TheWrap: So, because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Joy: Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well, after an ending like that, where do we even begin?

“Westworld” brought its second season to a close Sunday night with a feature-length finale that threw us completely off our programmed loop. But while the episode, titled “The Passenger,” answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of co-creator Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series, it left us with a whole new mess of head-scratchers.

Seeing as we are still very much in TBD territory on an air date for the third season, we’ve got a long wait in store before we can stop scratching ours heads. But to help, TheWrap caught up with Joy to help us make sense of that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

And — in a very Ford-like manner — she even gave TheWrap the answers to questions we didn’t think to ask. See our exchange below.

TheWrap: So there was a lot of death in that finale [laughs]. What was the reasoning behind killing off so many people, especially knowing some people ( i.e. humans) probably don’t have a way of coming back?

Joy: In embarking on this season we knew, in a sense, we’d be telling a story of revolution, of war and the tragedy and inevitability of war is death. There are stakes to violence and it is mortality. And I love all of our actors. I think they are incredible collaborators, cool people, incredible talent and it truly is harrowing to lose any of them. But, you know, it’s in the service of the story and the story is something that we’re all working together to paint as realistically as you can paint a story about an AI revolution in a Western theme park [laughs]. And so for the drama to have stakes, the deaths must be real. And so, yeah, there was a lot of deaths [laughs].

TheWrap: Did Bernard have to be the one to kill Dolores (and bring her back) and did Dolores have to be the one to kill Bernard (and bring him back) — and why?

Joy: Yeah, when we were thinking of that — and you see it in the back of some of the shots, the picture of an M.C. Escher drawing of a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand — and the ways that the things we create and give birth to, create and influence us. And that is the cycle that Bernard and Dolores have been locked in since before Bernard was Bernard — when he was Arnold. The fates of all the characters are integral in the storylines, but some of them chose a kind of different struggle, you know?

And this season was about choice. It was about respecting choice, as well as making one’s own choice. And throughout the season, one of the things Dolores’ character struggles with in assuming the mantle of basically military leadership was, as much as she wanted to protect the Hosts, as noble as her aims were to protect them from the darkness that she herself has witnessed so many times in humans, in order to do that on a basic military level, she had to take on some of the paternalistic traits that she was kind of vowing against in the first place.

It was a difficult dichotomy, but I think something that would realistically occur. So she made a lot of choices for a lot of people and came to regret those choices. Not necessarily because they were wrong in their outcome, or what her intended outcome was, but because it was wrong, she realized, to take away someone else’s agency, even if you disagreed with the choices they were making.

So, you know, she changed Teddy in order to “save” him. She knew he wouldn’t survive. So she took away his agency and made him something, even though I think it was designed to be temporary like, “Let’s just live through this so we can have this life together.” And then she was going to kind of dictate the fates of Maeve and Akecheta and all the people who fled to the Sublime, because, to her, that reality was not one worth pursuing.

But she sees the error of her ways later because of Bernard. He literally killed her to stop the monster that she had become. And in being resurrected by him — when he also realizes that she wasn’t full monster, that indeed without her plan, they would be wiped off the face of the earth, she would be the last of his kind — he brings her back, and in that time she has changed. She has realized that embracing choice is necessary. That as much as her goal may have been noble, she has to accept the idea that they were fallible and that she is fallible, unless unchecked.

I think it’s a very powerful notion, the notion that our personal views, although closely held, are not necessarily right. That part of what is noble is making sure there are checks and balances and a plurality of opinions. And that is something that she has grown to understand.

So when she brings Bernard back in the real world, she’s basically accepting that idea and embracing that idea, even if it leads to her own personal undoing. She knows that that kind of balance is what is needed for true freedom for her kind.

TheWrap: OK, is it safe to assume that going forward in the next season we’ll be in the real world more?

Joy: Absolutely. It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs]. So we’ll come to know more of who “Hale” is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.

TheWrap: So then there has to be someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores — right?

Joy: Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs knew it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

TheWrap: OK, that went completely over my head. Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imaginig Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s–t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f–k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

TheWrap: So, because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Joy: Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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'Westworld': OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

Is The Man In Black A Human Or Host? ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Lisa Joy On Season 2 Finale & What’s Next

SPOILER ALERT: This story contains details about tonight’s season 2 finale of Westworld on HBO
From the moment Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) died at the end of Westworld‘s season 1, a robot apocalypse has ensued throughout this past season, w…

SPOILER ALERT: This story contains details about tonight's season 2 finale of Westworld on HBO From the moment Dr. Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) died at the end of Westworld‘s season 1, a robot apocalypse has ensued throughout this past season, with hosts and humans as collateral damage. And while the Delos SWAT team appears to have quelled the android uprise, we’re left with the notion at the end of tonight’s 1 1/2 hour episode 20, “The Passenger”, written by husband and…

Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Vanishing Point.”)

Juliet is dead on “Westworld” — but that doesn’t mean Sela Ward’s relationship with the show needs to be.

After her character’s chilling death by suicide on Sunday’s episode — Season 2’s penultimate installment that also served as our introduction to the older version of William’s (Ed Harris) wife — we know we won’t be seeing her in the HBO sci-fi series’ current timeline. But thanks to the many flashbacks the show features, it’s not out of the question that Juliet will return.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

“We absolutely talked about the possibility,” Ward said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, published after the episode, about conversations with co-creator Lisa Joy. “I don’t know that they have made that decision. I think they keep all of that very close to the vest, and we’ll see. I have no idea.”

This episode, titled “Vanishing Point,” took us into the show’s very recent past for an inside look at an evening with the MIB (aka an older version of Jimmi Simpson’s William) and his family life outside of the park. Set on the night his lovely (but disturbed) wife Juliet killed herself, we find out she did it because she saw who he really was and what he has done, thanks to an ID chip that revealed his doings inside of Westworld.

“I don’t think she thinks he’s a robot,” Ward said of how Juliet perceived William before she died (as him possibly being a Host is not out of the question at this point in the game). “I think she saw, through that data card, what a real monster that he had become. She saw all of the… he was really beyond redemption, all of the horrors that you could ever imagine a human being committing. Killing and torture. Looking at the reality of she doesn’t even know who she is married to. It’s real life, profoundly shocking.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

Before Juliet takes her own life, we also see her and William’s adult daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), is concerned about her mother — a recovering alcoholic whose behavior becomes embarrassing at a party — and wants to get her back into treatment. Juliet refuses to go, and insists she is fine, placing the blame for her troubles onto William and insisting to their daughter he doesn’t love either of them and never has.

Ward says it is correct to assume Juliet died thinking her daughter believes she’s “just a drunk” and doesn’t know why.

“This mother-daughter relationship is very complicated,” Ward said. “I think she felt very betrayed by her daughter, betrayed by life in a way, between her husband, who she doesn’t even know and who has been this monster revealed to her, and her daughter wants to send her back to rehab because she considers it equivalent to an institution. There is really no safe space, nowhere to turn. I can’t even imagine the loneliness of that. Despair is such an interesting state of being for a human being. It’s so incredibly debilitating to think that’s what you’re seeing a portrait of and why she just feels there’s no way out.”

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F—ing Head’

‘Game of Thrones’ and ‘Westworld’ Won’t Present at San Diego Comic-Con, HBO Says

‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Vanishing Point.”)

Juliet is dead on “Westworld” — but that doesn’t mean Sela Ward’s relationship with the show needs to be.

After her character’s chilling death by suicide on Sunday’s episode — Season 2’s penultimate installment that also served as our introduction to the older version of William’s (Ed Harris) wife — we know we won’t be seeing her in the HBO sci-fi series’ current timeline. But thanks to the many flashbacks the show features, it’s not out of the question that Juliet will return.

“We absolutely talked about the possibility,” Ward said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, published after the episode, about conversations with co-creator Lisa Joy. “I don’t know that they have made that decision. I think they keep all of that very close to the vest, and we’ll see. I have no idea.”

This episode, titled “Vanishing Point,” took us into the show’s very recent past for an inside look at an evening with the MIB (aka an older version of Jimmi Simpson’s William) and his family life outside of the park. Set on the night his lovely (but disturbed) wife Juliet killed herself, we find out she did it because she saw who he really was and what he has done, thanks to an ID chip that revealed his doings inside of Westworld.

“I don’t think she thinks he’s a robot,” Ward said of how Juliet perceived William before she died (as him possibly being a Host is not out of the question at this point in the game). “I think she saw, through that data card, what a real monster that he had become. She saw all of the… he was really beyond redemption, all of the horrors that you could ever imagine a human being committing. Killing and torture. Looking at the reality of she doesn’t even know who she is married to. It’s real life, profoundly shocking.”

Before Juliet takes her own life, we also see her and William’s adult daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), is concerned about her mother — a recovering alcoholic whose behavior becomes embarrassing at a party — and wants to get her back into treatment. Juliet refuses to go, and insists she is fine, placing the blame for her troubles onto William and insisting to their daughter he doesn’t love either of them and never has.

Ward says it is correct to assume Juliet died thinking her daughter believes she’s “just a drunk” and doesn’t know why.

“This mother-daughter relationship is very complicated,” Ward said. “I think she felt very betrayed by her daughter, betrayed by life in a way, between her husband, who she doesn’t even know and who has been this monster revealed to her, and her daughter wants to send her back to rehab because she considers it equivalent to an institution. There is really no safe space, nowhere to turn. I can’t even imagine the loneliness of that. Despair is such an interesting state of being for a human being. It’s so incredibly debilitating to think that’s what you’re seeing a portrait of and why she just feels there’s no way out.”

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld': OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

'Westworld': Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His 'F—ing Head'

'Game of Thrones' and 'Westworld' Won't Present at San Diego Comic-Con, HBO Says

'Westworld': Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F—ing Head’

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of Season 2 of “Westworld,” “Vanishing Point.”)

Bernard Lowe has finally cut Robert Ford out of his life — literally.

Toward the end of Sunday’s episode of “Westworld,” Jeffrey Wright’s character reached a breaking point with his old partner and friend. The head of the park’s programming division — and a Host himself — has been living with the late Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) “inside” his brain for the better part of 2 installments, but he decided enough was enough when Westworld’s creator tried to get him to kill Elsie (Shannon Woodward) — again.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

TheWrap spoke with Wright ahead of the episode, which was Season 2’s penultimate, to figure out how Bernard was finally able to break his unhealthy bond with Ford, and where things are headed in next week’s finale.

First off, Wright’s pretty happy Ford was unsuccessful in his second attempt (that we know of) to get Bernard to murder Elsie, who Ford insists is going to betray Bernard on their way to secure the Forge. (That’s the storage facility for all the data the park has been mining from its guests’ brains, which Evan Rachel Wood’s Dolores is also gunning to capture. Or destroy — unclear right now.)

“That’s not Bernard’s M.O.,” Wright told TheWrap, laughing, of his counterpart’s decision to spare Elsie.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

Instead, in a very-unlike-himself manner, Bernard screams “get out of my f–king head” at Ford’s consciousness, cuts a hole in his own arm, plugs himself in and starts to use a control tablet to “delete” Ford. Bernard insists to his imaginary friend that he can stop Dolores all on his own and Ford says, actually, Bernard’s the “only one who can,” then suddenly disappears. (Though it’s not entirely clear whether it was Ford, or Bernard, that deleted the “data package” containing Ford’s consciousness from Bernard’s system.) Then Bernard drives off toward the Forge, leaving Elsie annoyed — but safe — behind him.

But while we may not know yet if it was Bernard who deleted Ford, Wright says it’s safe to say Bernard was the one who decided to kick Ford out.

“I think part of that decision was born out of Bernard exercising choice,” Wright said. “And so Bernard is quietly and consistently emerging now, and he is thrusting himself into the middle of things. And, likewise, the rest of the world is heading in that direction too. So he’s driving toward his self-determined fate.”

Also Read: Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

And Wright is “100 percent” thrilled with Bernard’s decision.

“Absolutely. That’s Bernard’s version of an awakening,” he said. “He’s been a little slow out of the gate relative to the other [hosts], but his desire for freedom runs through Ford. So that’s part of the unresolved business that needed to be sorted out. That was absolutely necessary to where he needed to be headed, so we’ll see where he ends up with it.”

Speaking of where he ends up, was Wright content with where we leave Bernard at the end of Season 2 — and will you, the viewer, be as well, seeing as we don’t know when Season 3 is coming?

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

“Big time,” he said. “Well, I think we’ll be alright.”

Wait, which is it?!?

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs next Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of Season 2 of “Westworld,” “Vanishing Point.”)

Bernard Lowe has finally cut Robert Ford out of his life — literally.

Toward the end of Sunday’s episode of “Westworld,” Jeffrey Wright’s character reached a breaking point with his old partner and friend. The head of the park’s programming division — and a Host himself — has been living with the late Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) “inside” his brain for the better part of 2 installments, but he decided enough was enough when Westworld’s creator tried to get him to kill Elsie (Shannon Woodward) — again.

TheWrap spoke with Wright ahead of the episode, which was Season 2’s penultimate, to figure out how Bernard was finally able to break his unhealthy bond with Ford, and where things are headed in next week’s finale.

First off, Wright’s pretty happy Ford was unsuccessful in his second attempt (that we know of) to get Bernard to murder Elsie, who Ford insists is going to betray Bernard on their way to secure the Forge. (That’s the storage facility for all the data the park has been mining from its guests’ brains, which Evan Rachel Wood’s Dolores is also gunning to capture. Or destroy — unclear right now.)

“That’s not Bernard’s M.O.,” Wright told TheWrap, laughing, of his counterpart’s decision to spare Elsie.

Instead, in a very-unlike-himself manner, Bernard screams “get out of my f–king head” at Ford’s consciousness, cuts a hole in his own arm, plugs himself in and starts to use a control tablet to “delete” Ford. Bernard insists to his imaginary friend that he can stop Dolores all on his own and Ford says, actually, Bernard’s the “only one who can,” then suddenly disappears. (Though it’s not entirely clear whether it was Ford, or Bernard, that deleted the “data package” containing Ford’s consciousness from Bernard’s system.) Then Bernard drives off toward the Forge, leaving Elsie annoyed — but safe — behind him.

But while we may not know yet if it was Bernard who deleted Ford, Wright says it’s safe to say Bernard was the one who decided to kick Ford out.

“I think part of that decision was born out of Bernard exercising choice,” Wright said. “And so Bernard is quietly and consistently emerging now, and he is thrusting himself into the middle of things. And, likewise, the rest of the world is heading in that direction too. So he’s driving toward his self-determined fate.”

And Wright is “100 percent” thrilled with Bernard’s decision.

“Absolutely. That’s Bernard’s version of an awakening,” he said. “He’s been a little slow out of the gate relative to the other [hosts], but his desire for freedom runs through Ford. So that’s part of the unresolved business that needed to be sorted out. That was absolutely necessary to where he needed to be headed, so we’ll see where he ends up with it.”

Speaking of where he ends up, was Wright content with where we leave Bernard at the end of Season 2 — and will you, the viewer, be as well, seeing as we don’t know when Season 3 is coming?

“Big time,” he said. “Well, I think we’ll be alright.”

Wait, which is it?!?

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs next Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

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'Westworld': Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

Thandie Newton Explains Why 'Westworld' Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

'Westworld' Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: 'Hello, Old Friend'

'Westworld': Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve's Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

‘Westworld’: Someone Either Screwed Up the Last Episode or Dropped a Huge Easter Egg

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen last Sunday’s episode of “Westworld.”)

Alright, either someone royally screwed up during the filming of last Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2 or fans just found an incredible Easter egg because some weird stuff was going on in the background.

The most recent installment of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series was a day in the limelight episode for Ghost Nation member Akecheta (Zahn McClarnon). Entitled “Kiksuya,” the story centered around his history in the park and how he came to the mission he is on today to help all the other hosts “find the door” out of the park.

But because you were so focused on all the moving moments going on the foreground, you may have missed what was either a giant oversight or extreme attention to detail.

Also Read: Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

About halfway through the episode, we see Akecheta wandering around the park, and making his way to Sweetwater. Here is where you’re going to need to pause and look the left side of the screen, as eagle-eyed Reddit user flickersense noticed you can see Maeve (Thandie Newton) in her Season 1 saloon getup, followed by a cameraman and crew. No, really, look at this GIF if you don’t believe us:

So one of two things happened here. Well, one of probably 1,000 things is happening here, but for the sake of us not freezing all mother functions all day long, let’s get to the two most logical options.

The first is that these guys are totally supposed to be in the scene and are following Host madam Maeve to shoot footage for a promo video for the park. See, that checks out, right? It makes more sense that Nolan and Joy (who are crazy about tricking you with tiny little details) would throw this in as a treat for viewers who pay attention instead of the second choice: someone screwed up.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Shocks Again by Bringing Back a Key Character: ‘Hello, Old Friend’

Yeah, mistakes happen, so there is a chance that while shooting from multiple angles for this episode (or a previous one, like the one where the Cradle was revealed) and someone missed this in the edit bay. This mistake is backed up further when you notice that it looks like McClarnon is headed toward a green screen, so he may not even be walking in Sweetwater here, but rather they added the footage of the park later. It’s hard to believe someone would make such a big mistake a show that costs so much money to produce, but it’s always a possibility.

So, which side are you on: hidden detail or someone in the edit department is getting a talking-to?

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Thandie Newton Explains Why ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

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‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen last Sunday’s episode of “Westworld.”)

Alright, either someone royally screwed up during the filming of last Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2 or fans just found an incredible Easter egg because some weird stuff was going on in the background.

The most recent installment of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series was a day in the limelight episode for Ghost Nation member Akecheta (Zahn McClarnon). Entitled “Kiksuya,” the story centered around his history in the park and how he came to the mission he is on today to help all the other hosts “find the door” out of the park.

But because you were so focused on all the moving moments going on the foreground, you may have missed what was either a giant oversight or extreme attention to detail.

About halfway through the episode, we see Akecheta wandering around the park, and making his way to Sweetwater. Here is where you’re going to need to pause and look the left side of the screen, as eagle-eyed Reddit user flickersense noticed you can see Maeve (Thandie Newton) in her Season 1 saloon getup, followed by a cameraman and crew. No, really, look at this GIF if you don’t believe us:

So one of two things happened here. Well, one of probably 1,000 things is happening here, but for the sake of us not freezing all mother functions all day long, let’s get to the two most logical options.

The first is that these guys are totally supposed to be in the scene and are following Host madam Maeve to shoot footage for a promo video for the park. See, that checks out, right? It makes more sense that Nolan and Joy (who are crazy about tricking you with tiny little details) would throw this in as a treat for viewers who pay attention instead of the second choice: someone screwed up.

Yeah, mistakes happen, so there is a chance that while shooting from multiple angles for this episode (or a previous one, like the one where the Cradle was revealed) and someone missed this in the edit bay. This mistake is backed up further when you notice that it looks like McClarnon is headed toward a green screen, so he may not even be walking in Sweetwater here, but rather they added the footage of the park later. It’s hard to believe someone would make such a big mistake a show that costs so much money to produce, but it’s always a possibility.

So, which side are you on: hidden detail or someone in the edit department is getting a talking-to?

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Thandie Newton Explains Why 'Westworld' Season 2 Threw Her for a Loop

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'Westworld': Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve's Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

‘Westworld’ Just Got Inside Its Own Head With That Shocking Reunion

(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Phase Space.”)

Dr. Robert Ford was dead: to begin with. (We’re, like, 99.9 percent sure, at this point.)

But his mind? Well, that’s a horse of a different color.

Anthony Hopkins made his triumphant return to “Westworld” as everyone’s favorite late, great amusement park creator (sorry, Walt) on Sunday’s episode, “Phase Space.” And while his shocking cameo lasted but a few seconds and he only uttered three words, his unexpected appearance on Jonthan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO series will be enough to launch a thousand fan theories come morning.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Shogun World Reflects Ties Between Samurai Films and Westerns

Now, if Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) shot Ford in the back of the head at the end of Season 1 and his lifeless body is currently rotting inside the park, then how did Hopkins resurrect his performance?

Toward the end of the episode, Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) has Elsie (Shannon Woodward) slice his robot host brain out of his head and upload it to “The Cradle” (Westworld’s mainframe, hive mind, the thing that controls all the things, etc.) so they can figure out what is keeping them from regaining control of the system.

Once he’s “inside” the park’s head, he starts walking through a simulated version of Sweetwater and toward the Mariposa Saloon. He passes versions of Dolores and Teddy (James Marsden) before entering the establishment to see his partner’s face reflecting back at him in the glass of the piano (See below).

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

“Hello, old friend,” Ford says, while tickling the ivories.

And the episode ends with Bernard — and all of us at home — in shock.

We’re not sure where things go from here, but we know Ford is dead (we saw the maggots eating his face, OK?!?) so what we are seeing here is most likely an uploaded version of his consciousness. And based on all those successful(?) attempts to put James Delos inside a host earlier this season in the episode “Riddle of the Sphinx,” we know that can be done.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

You just need one of those control units that look like a bouncy ball. Like, oh, I don’t know, the one we’ve seen Bernard upload someone’s consciousness onto in repeated flashbacks this season.

Yes, it seems like it was Ford that Bernard was uploading. And it seems like he put Ford inside the Cradle — he just doesn’t remember it now.

“Westworld” airs Sundays a 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’: Shogun World Reflects Ties Between Samurai Films and Westerns

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

‘Westworld’: Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton, Rinko Kikuchi on the ‘Fun’ of All That Shogun World Doppleganging

(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Phase Space.”)

Dr. Robert Ford was dead: to begin with. (We’re, like, 99.9 percent sure, at this point.)

But his mind? Well, that’s a horse of a different color.

Anthony Hopkins made his triumphant return to “Westworld” as everyone’s favorite late, great amusement park creator (sorry, Walt) on Sunday’s episode, “Phase Space.” And while his shocking cameo lasted but a few seconds and he only uttered three words, his unexpected appearance on Jonthan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO series will be enough to launch a thousand fan theories come morning.

Now, if Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) shot Ford in the back of the head at the end of Season 1 and his lifeless body is currently rotting inside the park, then how did Hopkins resurrect his performance?

Toward the end of the episode, Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) has Elsie (Shannon Woodward) slice his robot host brain out of his head and upload it to “The Cradle” (Westworld’s mainframe, hive mind, the thing that controls all the things, etc.) so they can figure out what is keeping them from regaining control of the system.

Once he’s “inside” the park’s head, he starts walking through a simulated version of Sweetwater and toward the Mariposa Saloon. He passes versions of Dolores and Teddy (James Marsden) before entering the establishment to see his partner’s face reflecting back at him in the glass of the piano (See below).

“Hello, old friend,” Ford says, while tickling the ivories.

And the episode ends with Bernard — and all of us at home — in shock.

We’re not sure where things go from here, but we know Ford is dead (we saw the maggots eating his face, OK?!?) so what we are seeing here is most likely an uploaded version of his consciousness. And based on all those successful(?) attempts to put James Delos inside a host earlier this season in the episode “Riddle of the Sphinx,” we know that can be done.

You just need one of those control units that look like a bouncy ball. Like, oh, I don’t know, the one we’ve seen Bernard upload someone’s consciousness onto in repeated flashbacks this season.

Yes, it seems like it was Ford that Bernard was uploading. And it seems like he put Ford inside the Cradle — he just doesn’t remember it now.

“Westworld” airs Sundays a 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld': Shogun World Reflects Ties Between Samurai Films and Westerns

'Westworld': Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve's Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

'Westworld': Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

'Westworld': Thandie Newton, Rinko Kikuchi on the 'Fun' of All That Shogun World Doppleganging

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Tells Us Why Maeve’s Superpower Went Into Overdrive in Shogun World

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

Maeve (Thandie Newton), give it to us straight, are you a witch? After watching the ex-madam host turn an android Shogun army against itself on Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” — and hearing that one guy scream it — we just had to ask.

The way Newton explains Maeve’s ever-growing power is like this: “She’s really got control over other hosts in the way satellites can give us all information on our screens in our living rooms. It’s technology taken to its sort of obvious conclusion. And it’s not something she can do easily.”

Also Read: HBO: Elephants on ‘Westworld’ Received ‘Utmost Care and Respect’

Fans finally got their long-awaited dive into Shogun World with the episode “Akane No Mai,” which began with a robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1 and ended with Geisha host Akane (guest star Rinko Kikuchi) and Maeve’s teams joining forces in a battle for their lives against the Shogun’s men.

Maeve was able to save herself and Akane from certain death at the last second by psychically forcing their would-be executioners to take themselves out instead. Though she soon had the entire army at its own throat, a mind manipulation stunt of this size is unprecedented for Maeve, whose “powers” also seem to come and go.

“All the times she’s used this skill, it’s a time of great trauma and fear and danger,” Newton said of Maeve’s power. “So I don’t think it’s something that she can just use easily and typically. It’s something that comes at times of high points of drama.

“And I love the fact that it’s erred in that respect. You know, it’s not like a superpower where she can shoot lasers from her eyes or something like that. It’s a superpower that comes out of difficulty in the same way we grow and learn out of difficulty. For me, it echoes that. Where it goes I really, really can’t say — but it’s pretty amazing.”

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

HBO: Elephants on ‘Westworld’ Received ‘Utmost Care and Respect’

‘Westworld’ Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

Maeve (Thandie Newton), give it to us straight, are you a witch? After watching the ex-madam host turn an android Shogun army against itself on Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” — and hearing that one guy scream it — we just had to ask.

The way Newton explains Maeve’s ever-growing power is like this: “She’s really got control over other hosts in the way satellites can give us all information on our screens in our living rooms. It’s technology taken to its sort of obvious conclusion. And it’s not something she can do easily.”

Fans finally got their long-awaited dive into Shogun World with the episode “Akane No Mai,” which began with a robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1 and ended with Geisha host Akane (guest star Rinko Kikuchi) and Maeve’s teams joining forces in a battle for their lives against the Shogun’s men.

Maeve was able to save herself and Akane from certain death at the last second by psychically forcing their would-be executioners to take themselves out instead. Though she soon had the entire army at its own throat, a mind manipulation stunt of this size is unprecedented for Maeve, whose “powers” also seem to come and go.

“All the times she’s used this skill, it’s a time of great trauma and fear and danger,” Newton said of Maeve’s power. “So I don’t think it’s something that she can just use easily and typically. It’s something that comes at times of high points of drama.

“And I love the fact that it’s erred in that respect. You know, it’s not like a superpower where she can shoot lasers from her eyes or something like that. It’s a superpower that comes out of difficulty in the same way we grow and learn out of difficulty. For me, it echoes that. Where it goes I really, really can’t say — but it’s pretty amazing.”

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

HBO: Elephants on 'Westworld' Received 'Utmost Care and Respect'

'Westworld' Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito's 'Westworld' Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn't Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

‘Westworld’: Rinko Kikuchi Explains How Shogun World Episode Sidesteps Cultural Appropriation

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

“Westworld” fans finally saw Shogun World on Sunday’s episode, “Akane No Mai.” And while opinions are sure to differ about how historic Japanese customs and the Samurai way of life was worked into Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s hit HBO series, guest star Rinko Kikuchi told TheWrap she does not believe culture appropriation was an issue for Shogun World.

And the Japanese actress should know, as she practically ran the joint. Or, at least, its most popular Geisha house.

Tonight’s long-awaited dive into Delos Destinations’ Samurai-centric location came with a packed plot that began with a robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1, and ended with Geisha host Akane (Kikuchi) and Maeve (Thandie Newton) joining forces in a large-scale fight for their lives against the Shogun’s android army.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Creators on Shogun World in Season 2: There’s Basically a ‘Whole Episode in Japanese’

Through all of that, the Oscar-nominee didn’t see anything that rubbed her the wrong way?

“Of course there were small things,” Kikuchi told TheWrap via interpreter Lena-Grace Suda during a phone interview. “For example, [Kikuchi] felt like, ‘You wouldn’t necessarily wear a wig in this way.’ But those are really just minor things. On the general scale, [Kikuchi] felt as though the creative team had a lot of respect toward Japan, actually. And making a Samurai set, even in Japan, is very difficult nowadays, because it just takes a lot of money. A very high budget. So [Kikuchi] actually feels very honored that she was able to play out a scene like this, such an elaborate scene in ‘Westworld.’ “

On the other hand, Kikuchi wonders if cultural appropriation in Shogun World even has to be part of the conversation because it’s not based on anything real.

“The fact that a lot of people even think of cultural appropriation, [Kikuchi] thinks that in and of itself is a really brilliant thing because the show gets people thinking and talking,” Suda said. “For example, there are other themes, like, ‘What’s really real and what’s not real in this world we live in?’ and the relationship that exists between humans and AI. So she thinks the fact that people think about topics like cultural appropriation is a testament to how good the show is.”

Also Read: HBO: Elephants on ‘Westworld’ Received ‘Utmost Care and Respect’

Newton told TheWrap that handling the cultural aspects carefully was of “great importance” to the showrunners.

“I think they really wanted to spend the time and effort getting it right, so they had experts come in, Japanese consultants. The actors, they flew in from Japan,” Newton said. “They were all so keen to make this slice of television as authentic as possible as a Kurosawa-esque homage. So great detail and attention was paid.”

“The lead players in ‘Westworld’ don’t come with ego, don’t come with that kind of baggage,” Newton added. “We’re all just desperate to make it as good as it can be in the relatively short space of time that we’ve got to do it. This one episode is just three weeks’ of work. That’s unheard of to get an hour’s work [on screen]. It looks beautiful. It doesn’t have the kind of budget say, ‘Game of Thrones’ has. And so much of what makes it as good as it is is the hard work and expertise of the crew and the cast.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Newton adds that she doesn’t think the show was appropriating the culture so much as trying to shine a light on that culture.

“‘Westworld’ can do that because the whole point of that theme park is it’s harking back to times and entertainment that people have loved,” Newton said. “So, obviously, when you’re looking at Kurosawa and traditional Japan, it’s the fusion of traditional Japan and also Kurosawa that would be where ‘Westworld’ takes it’s inspiration. I think those two things combined. We did a really really good job, and I guess it’s up for the audience to decide.”

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

HBO: Elephants on ‘Westworld’ Received ‘Utmost Care and Respect’

‘Westworld’ Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

“Westworld” fans finally saw Shogun World on Sunday’s episode, “Akane No Mai.” And while opinions are sure to differ about how historic Japanese customs and the Samurai way of life was worked into Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s hit HBO series, guest star Rinko Kikuchi told TheWrap she does not believe culture appropriation was an issue for Shogun World.

And the Japanese actress should know, as she practically ran the joint. Or, at least, its most popular Geisha house.

Tonight’s long-awaited dive into Delos Destinations’ Samurai-centric location came with a packed plot that began with a robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1, and ended with Geisha host Akane (Kikuchi) and Maeve (Thandie Newton) joining forces in a large-scale fight for their lives against the Shogun’s android army.

Through all of that, the Oscar-nominee didn’t see anything that rubbed her the wrong way?

“Of course there were small things,” Kikuchi told TheWrap via interpreter Lena-Grace Suda during a phone interview. “For example, [Kikuchi] felt like, ‘You wouldn’t necessarily wear a wig in this way.’ But those are really just minor things. On the general scale, [Kikuchi] felt as though the creative team had a lot of respect toward Japan, actually. And making a Samurai set, even in Japan, is very difficult nowadays, because it just takes a lot of money. A very high budget. So [Kikuchi] actually feels very honored that she was able to play out a scene like this, such an elaborate scene in ‘Westworld.’ “

On the other hand, Kikuchi wonders if cultural appropriation in Shogun World even has to be part of the conversation because it’s not based on anything real.

“The fact that a lot of people even think of cultural appropriation, [Kikuchi] thinks that in and of itself is a really brilliant thing because the show gets people thinking and talking,” Suda said. “For example, there are other themes, like, ‘What’s really real and what’s not real in this world we live in?’ and the relationship that exists between humans and AI. So she thinks the fact that people think about topics like cultural appropriation is a testament to how good the show is.”

Newton told TheWrap that handling the cultural aspects carefully was of “great importance” to the showrunners.

“I think they really wanted to spend the time and effort getting it right, so they had experts come in, Japanese consultants. The actors, they flew in from Japan,” Newton said. “They were all so keen to make this slice of television as authentic as possible as a Kurosawa-esque homage. So great detail and attention was paid.”

“The lead players in ‘Westworld’ don’t come with ego, don’t come with that kind of baggage,” Newton added. “We’re all just desperate to make it as good as it can be in the relatively short space of time that we’ve got to do it. This one episode is just three weeks’ of work. That’s unheard of to get an hour’s work [on screen]. It looks beautiful. It doesn’t have the kind of budget say, ‘Game of Thrones’ has. And so much of what makes it as good as it is is the hard work and expertise of the crew and the cast.”

Newton adds that she doesn’t think the show was appropriating the culture so much as trying to shine a light on that culture.

“‘Westworld’ can do that because the whole point of that theme park is it’s harking back to times and entertainment that people have loved,” Newton said. “So, obviously, when you’re looking at Kurosawa and traditional Japan, it’s the fusion of traditional Japan and also Kurosawa that would be where ‘Westworld’ takes it’s inspiration. I think those two things combined. We did a really really good job, and I guess it’s up for the audience to decide.”

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

HBO: Elephants on 'Westworld' Received 'Utmost Care and Respect'

'Westworld' Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito's 'Westworld' Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn't Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton, Rinko Kikuchi on the ‘Fun’ of All That Shogun World Doppleganging

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

Did Sunday’s “Westworld” feel a little too familiar to you? OK, so Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s hit HBO series may have cribbed a bit from itself for “Akane No Mai” — the fifth episode of Season 2 aka “the Shogun World one.” But the self-plagiarism was all in good fun, series regular Thandie Newton and guest star Rinko Kikuchi told TheWrap.

Tonight’s long-awaited dive into Delos Destinations’ Samurai-centric location delivered a plot that — thanks to the laziness of head story writer Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman) — was very similar to what we’ve seen in the titular theme park, beginning with a Geisha house robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1.

Except this one focuses on a standoff between new host characters Akane (Kikuchi), the head Geisha, and Musashi (Hiroyuki Sanada), a former member of the Shogun’s army. They are the Japanese doppelgängers of our beloved Maeve (Newton) and Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), who watch this surreal copycat storyline play out before them after being taken prisoner in the fake foreign land.

Also Read: We Finally Know What the Park in ‘Westworld’ Was Created For

“Yeah, that was so fun,” Newton laughed, as she told TheWrap of shooting the scene. “I didn’t really get to appreciate that ’til I saw it, because a lot of it has to do with Rodrigo — or rather Hiro, and those guys outside. But yeah, when I saw it, I just loved the similarity of shots and the slow-mo and how it harks back to what we did in Season 1. I just loved that laugh and the thrill of it.”

“I think that it really enhances, not only what we did in the first season … but just calling back to those moments is even richer now because of everything we know that it meant,” Newton added. “That this was just a program. That these characters were programmed. And to see that it’s happening in a completely different landscape, with a different language. Obviously, it’s just incredibly cool for our show to be doing that.”

(TheWrap cutting in here to add that the “incredibly cool” scene is set to a reimagined version of the Rolling Stone’s “Paint It, Black” by “Westworld” composer Ramin Djawadi — the same song the OG sequence is backed by in Season 1. However, this iteration was made using Japanese instruments like the shamisen, koto, various taiko drums and shakuhachi flutes — not a player piano.)

Also Read: HBO: Elephants on ‘Westworld’ Received ‘Utmost Care and Respect’

Japanese native and Oscar nominee Kikuchi told TheWrap in an interview through interpreter Lena-Grace Suda that acting out those shots meant even more to her as a fan of Season 1 and a fan of Newton.

“That scene really resonated with her also, because Maeve was a character that she really, really loved from the first season,” Suda told TheWrap on Kikuchi’s behalf. “It was really amazing to have her stand right in front of her. And throughout filming the whole sequence she felt like Maeve had an influence on her as a fan. And also as an actor — who, this is her career — she felt as though it was a great experience.”

“She feels honored to have been able to play Akane, who plays a counterpart, sharing the same spirit or identity [with Maeve],” Suda said. “And also, Rinko herself just recently became a mother so for her it was really easy for her to translate those experiences onto Akane, her character.”

Also Read: Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

Newton told TheWrap her part in preparing for the episode was to “really focus on traditional Japanese culture and the way a woman stands, and sits, and holds her body, and the language, and try to speak as fluent conversational Japanese as I could.”

“So I worked long and hard for weeks to make it seem like I had enough of a handle on the language that it would make me seem fluent,” Newton added. “And then me with that and Rinko with studying the character of Maeve in the first season we definitely met in the middle.”

See a clip of the original sequence from “Westworld” Season 1 above.

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

‘Westworld’ Star Clifton Collins Jr on Becoming That ‘Faithful Sidekick’ for Ed Harris in Season 2

(Spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Akane No Mai.”)

Did Sunday’s “Westworld” feel a little too familiar to you? OK, so Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s hit HBO series may have cribbed a bit from itself for “Akane No Mai” — the fifth episode of Season 2 aka “the Shogun World one.” But the self-plagiarism was all in good fun, series regular Thandie Newton and guest star Rinko Kikuchi told TheWrap.

Tonight’s long-awaited dive into Delos Destinations’ Samurai-centric location delivered a plot that — thanks to the laziness of head story writer Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman) — was very similar to what we’ve seen in the titular theme park, beginning with a Geisha house robbery that’s almost a shot-for-shot remake of the Mariposa Saloon heist from Season 1.

Except this one focuses on a standoff between new host characters Akane (Kikuchi), the head Geisha, and Musashi (Hiroyuki Sanada), a former member of the Shogun’s army. They are the Japanese doppelgängers of our beloved Maeve (Newton) and Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), who watch this surreal copycat storyline play out before them after being taken prisoner in the fake foreign land.

“Yeah, that was so fun,” Newton laughed, as she told TheWrap of shooting the scene. “I didn’t really get to appreciate that ’til I saw it, because a lot of it has to do with Rodrigo — or rather Hiro, and those guys outside. But yeah, when I saw it, I just loved the similarity of shots and the slow-mo and how it harks back to what we did in Season 1. I just loved that laugh and the thrill of it.”

“I think that it really enhances, not only what we did in the first season … but just calling back to those moments is even richer now because of everything we know that it meant,” Newton added. “That this was just a program. That these characters were programmed. And to see that it’s happening in a completely different landscape, with a different language. Obviously, it’s just incredibly cool for our show to be doing that.”

(TheWrap cutting in here to add that the “incredibly cool” scene is set to a reimagined version of the Rolling Stone’s “Paint It, Black” by “Westworld” composer Ramin Djawadi — the same song the OG sequence is backed by in Season 1. However, this iteration was made using Japanese instruments like the shamisen, koto, various taiko drums and shakuhachi flutes — not a player piano.)

Japanese native and Oscar nominee Kikuchi told TheWrap in an interview through interpreter Lena-Grace Suda that acting out those shots meant even more to her as a fan of Season 1 and a fan of Newton.

“That scene really resonated with her also, because Maeve was a character that she really, really loved from the first season,” Suda told TheWrap on Kikuchi’s behalf. “It was really amazing to have her stand right in front of her. And throughout filming the whole sequence she felt like Maeve had an influence on her as a fan. And also as an actor — who, this is her career — she felt as though it was a great experience.”

“She feels honored to have been able to play Akane, who plays a counterpart, sharing the same spirit or identity [with Maeve],” Suda said. “And also, Rinko herself just recently became a mother so for her it was really easy for her to translate those experiences onto Akane, her character.”

Newton told TheWrap her part in preparing for the episode was to “really focus on traditional Japanese culture and the way a woman stands, and sits, and holds her body, and the language, and try to speak as fluent conversational Japanese as I could.”

“So I worked long and hard for weeks to make it seem like I had enough of a handle on the language that it would make me seem fluent,” Newton added. “And then me with that and Rinko with studying the character of Maeve in the first season we definitely met in the middle.”

See a clip of the original sequence from “Westworld” Season 1 above.

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

Giancarlo Esposito's 'Westworld' Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn't Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

'Westworld' Star Clifton Collins Jr on Becoming That 'Faithful Sidekick' for Ed Harris in Season 2

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Is a Mess (Commentary)

“I used to see the beauty in this world, and now I see the truth,” Dolores says in the second episode of the new season of “Westworld.” I feel the same way about the show.

The first season of “Westworld” created an infinite playground of possibilities, moral dilemmas and existential questions for its robotic hosts. It toyed with us in multiple timelines and kept us guessing about who was real and who was just part of a larger game. It was gratuitous and convoluted, but in the best ways. It was a glorious mess.

But sadly, this new season is just a mess. Three episodes into HBO’s “Westworld,” I’m close to checking out. The show is swimming in blood, timelines and fortune-cookie wisdom. But the show has lost the curiosity factor that made the original season engrossing.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2: Yes, There’s a New Set of Timelines – Here’s How to Keep Them Straight

We’re going in circles. I’ve seen the hosts die so many times, I’m no longer afraid to see them die again, only to (probably) be revived. No one cares what happens to the humans, who, we’re constantly reminded, can seem so inhuman. The question of what is programmed and what is free will feels less important when the outcomes feel the same either way. Westworld isn’t a game anymore, yet the stakes feel lower than ever.

Fascinating world-building went into “Westworld” the first time around. We had fun exploring the park and learning the rules. This time through, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy push us into the deep end of the pool. We’re unraveling mysteries and timelines from the get-go. Thus far they’ve only teased other worlds outside of Westworld, such as the Shogun World introduced in Season 1. Now the third episode of Season 2 introduces an Indian safari world. (Did anyone else catch that sitar plucked version of “Seven Nation Army?” I can’t decide anymore if the musical reworkings are awesome or a travesty).

Let’s for a moment try and figure out where we are in this maze. Or is it a door now?

After Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) got his brains blown out, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) kicked off a host uprising in which the stakes have been reset and no one is safe. She’s made it her mission to eradicate her makers, liberate hosts and win freedom in the real world, which she remembers visiting along with all her past lives. Dolores used to be a character of values and goodness in this bleak, sci-fi universe. Now she’s a revenge-bent murderess who thinks of herself as a God. She hips hosts like the now hapless Teddy (James Marsden) to the true nature of reality and disposes of the rest to suit her needs.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Here Are Some Characters to Watch for in Season 2 (Photos)

Maeve (Thandie Newton) is on a journey to reunite with the daughter she remembers from one of her past lives, and she’s recruited her lover Hector (Rodrigo Santoro) and the park’s former chief storyteller Lee (Simon Quarterman) to get her where she needs to go. Her arc feels grounded, and her manipulative cunning and wordplay are more interesting to watch than Dolores’s torture spree. Also, Lee flashes his dick.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) is on yet another mysterious quest to the deepest reaches of Westworld, but good luck figuring out what he has planned beyond that. Being susceptible to an army of violent robots hasn’t made him any less invincible. And even his younger self William (Jimmi Simpson) is back along with his awful alpha bro of a brother-in-law, Logan (Ben Barnes), suggesting there’s more to William’s past than we realize, even though that seems to go against much of his Season 1 story arc and reveal.

Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) seems adrift, popping up in multiple timelines all while finding his own grip on reality. What’s confusing with him is that he knows he’s a host, but not everyone does? And he himself maybe doesn’t have a great sense of who he is? He’s fidgeting, injecting himself with serum and blinking in and out of consciousness, but even with his glasses, it’s impossible to track his mental condition across timelines. All we know is he’s shellshocked.

Also Read: Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

Bernard spends much of his time hacking hosts and helping Charlotte (Tessa Thompson) track down a host who is basically a living, breathing flash drive of data. Yes, because even in a future where AI has become imperceptible from humanity, the most valuable currency is still behavioral data that might better help sell people junk. This is echoed in a banal flashback of William showing around a potential investor and touting Westworld as if it were just a Mecca for market research.

There’s a scene between Maeve, Hector and Lee, where Lee wonders how it is that Maeve and Hector are in love. Hector says Lee doesn’t know everything about him, but then Lee starts quoting the words right out of Hector’s mouth. These characters have free will, but they’re also programmed to behave and speak as they’ve been written.

So when I’m watching Dolores confront a posse of hosts, it feels like we’re still watching hosts play-acting one of Ford’s scenarios. They’re wild and unhinged killing humans left and right, but aren’t they still puppets with someone else pulling the strings? Are all of us puppets? Unraveling these existential paradoxes didn’t feel this contrived the first time around.

Also Read: Chaos Takes Control in Kanye Westworld After Singer Brings Himself Back Online (Video)

The first season didn’t skimp on bloodshed and carnage, but it didn’t have as much straight-up warfare as Season 2, with lengthy shootouts and showdowns between swarms of hosts and humans in every episode. And don’t forget that scalping. This isn’t “Westworld” anymore; it’s “Game of Thrones.”

Weeks before this latest season of “Westworld” premiered, HBO dropped a poster that had a secret code embedded in it that pointed to a hidden layer to the show’s website and a new teaser trailer. It felt like HBO’s entire marketing team was catering to a handful of Redditors. The show is deep in weeds of its own making.

This is still obviously a show with ambitions, intrigue and potential. Everything that made Season 1 such a phenomenon is still here. But so far this season, I feel like I’m stuck in a maze, wondering why I wandered in here in the first place.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Westworld’ Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

‘Westworld’ Star Clifton Collins Jr on Becoming That ‘Faithful Sidekick’ for Ed Harris in Season 2

‘Westworld’: Every Sad or Confused Face James Marsden Made in the Season 2 Premiere (Photos)

“I used to see the beauty in this world, and now I see the truth,” Dolores says in the second episode of the new season of “Westworld.” I feel the same way about the show.

The first season of “Westworld” created an infinite playground of possibilities, moral dilemmas and existential questions for its robotic hosts. It toyed with us in multiple timelines and kept us guessing about who was real and who was just part of a larger game. It was gratuitous and convoluted, but in the best ways. It was a glorious mess.

But sadly, this new season is just a mess. Three episodes into HBO’s “Westworld,” I’m close to checking out. The show is swimming in blood, timelines and fortune-cookie wisdom. But the show has lost the curiosity factor that made the original season engrossing.

We’re going in circles. I’ve seen the hosts die so many times, I’m no longer afraid to see them die again, only to (probably) be revived. No one cares what happens to the humans, who, we’re constantly reminded, can seem so inhuman. The question of what is programmed and what is free will feels less important when the outcomes feel the same either way. Westworld isn’t a game anymore, yet the stakes feel lower than ever.

Fascinating world-building went into “Westworld” the first time around. We had fun exploring the park and learning the rules. This time through, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy push us into the deep end of the pool. We’re unraveling mysteries and timelines from the get-go. Thus far they’ve only teased other worlds outside of Westworld, such as the Shogun World introduced in Season 1. Now the third episode of Season 2 introduces an Indian safari world. (Did anyone else catch that sitar plucked version of “Seven Nation Army?” I can’t decide anymore if the musical reworkings are awesome or a travesty).

Let’s for a moment try and figure out where we are in this maze. Or is it a door now?

After Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) got his brains blown out, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) kicked off a host uprising in which the stakes have been reset and no one is safe. She’s made it her mission to eradicate her makers, liberate hosts and win freedom in the real world, which she remembers visiting along with all her past lives. Dolores used to be a character of values and goodness in this bleak, sci-fi universe. Now she’s a revenge-bent murderess who thinks of herself as a God. She hips hosts like the now hapless Teddy (James Marsden) to the true nature of reality and disposes of the rest to suit her needs.

Maeve (Thandie Newton) is on a journey to reunite with the daughter she remembers from one of her past lives, and she’s recruited her lover Hector (Rodrigo Santoro) and the park’s former chief storyteller Lee (Simon Quarterman) to get her where she needs to go. Her arc feels grounded, and her manipulative cunning and wordplay are more interesting to watch than Dolores’s torture spree. Also, Lee flashes his dick.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) is on yet another mysterious quest to the deepest reaches of Westworld, but good luck figuring out what he has planned beyond that. Being susceptible to an army of violent robots hasn’t made him any less invincible. And even his younger self William (Jimmi Simpson) is back along with his awful alpha bro of a brother-in-law, Logan (Ben Barnes), suggesting there’s more to William’s past than we realize, even though that seems to go against much of his Season 1 story arc and reveal.

Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) seems adrift, popping up in multiple timelines all while finding his own grip on reality. What’s confusing with him is that he knows he’s a host, but not everyone does? And he himself maybe doesn’t have a great sense of who he is? He’s fidgeting, injecting himself with serum and blinking in and out of consciousness, but even with his glasses, it’s impossible to track his mental condition across timelines. All we know is he’s shellshocked.

Bernard spends much of his time hacking hosts and helping Charlotte (Tessa Thompson) track down a host who is basically a living, breathing flash drive of data. Yes, because even in a future where AI has become imperceptible from humanity, the most valuable currency is still behavioral data that might better help sell people junk. This is echoed in a banal flashback of William showing around a potential investor and touting Westworld as if it were just a Mecca for market research.

There’s a scene between Maeve, Hector and Lee, where Lee wonders how it is that Maeve and Hector are in love. Hector says Lee doesn’t know everything about him, but then Lee starts quoting the words right out of Hector’s mouth. These characters have free will, but they’re also programmed to behave and speak as they’ve been written.

So when I’m watching Dolores confront a posse of hosts, it feels like we’re still watching hosts play-acting one of Ford’s scenarios. They’re wild and unhinged killing humans left and right, but aren’t they still puppets with someone else pulling the strings? Are all of us puppets? Unraveling these existential paradoxes didn’t feel this contrived the first time around.

The first season didn’t skimp on bloodshed and carnage, but it didn’t have as much straight-up warfare as Season 2, with lengthy shootouts and showdowns between swarms of hosts and humans in every episode. And don’t forget that scalping. This isn’t “Westworld” anymore; it’s “Game of Thrones.”

Weeks before this latest season of “Westworld” premiered, HBO dropped a poster that had a secret code embedded in it that pointed to a hidden layer to the show’s website and a new teaser trailer. It felt like HBO’s entire marketing team was catering to a handful of Redditors. The show is deep in weeds of its own making.

This is still obviously a show with ambitions, intrigue and potential. Everything that made Season 1 such a phenomenon is still here. But so far this season, I feel like I’m stuck in a maze, wondering why I wandered in here in the first place.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Westworld' Renewed for Season 3 at HBO

Giancarlo Esposito's 'Westworld' Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn't Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

'Westworld' Star Clifton Collins Jr on Becoming That 'Faithful Sidekick' for Ed Harris in Season 2

'Westworld': Every Sad or Confused Face James Marsden Made in the Season 2 Premiere (Photos)