Christian Slater Tackles the Biggest Cyberthreat in New Short Film: Your Printer (Video)

And you thought your printer was just a problem when it ran out of ink. Printer and tech giant Hewlett-Packard has enlisted “Mr. Robot” star Christian Slater to show you that your printer could also be a major threat to your company’s cybersecurity.

Slater stars alongside “Better Call Saul” star Jonathan Banks in “The Wolf: True Alpha,” a new short film available through HP Studios. In the 20-minute short, the third in a series of shorts with the name “The Wolf,” Slater plays a rogue hacker named The Wolf who shows you the potential global consequences when your printer or another smart device is left unsecured.

The film is directed by Lance Acord, known for his work on “Lost in Translation” and “Where the Wild Things Are,” and has been released by HP to show IT professionals how vulnerable their company could be to an attack.

Also Read: ‘Mr. Robot’ to End After 4-Season Run on USA

HP is one of several tech companies to begin pursuing entertainment and digital streaming content and it released its first feature film, “Manto,” at Cannes earlier this year.

“The Wolf: True Alpha” is available on both HP Studios’ website and YouTube, and for the first time will be available for OTT streaming on Roku devices.

Slater will return for the fourth and final season of USA’s “Mr. Robot” as the eponymous character, and he recently starred in Emilio Estevez’s drama “The Public” that played at TIFF.

Watch a trailer for “The Wolf: True Alpha” above and find the full short film here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Christian Slater Says ‘Mr Robot’ Will End After Season 4: ‘I Believe That Will Be the Last Season’

‘Mr Robot’ Star Christian Slater EmmyQuickie Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Christian Slater Talks ‘Unique Challenges’ of ‘Mr. Robot’ Season 2 (Exclusive Video)

And you thought your printer was just a problem when it ran out of ink. Printer and tech giant Hewlett-Packard has enlisted “Mr. Robot” star Christian Slater to show you that your printer could also be a major threat to your company’s cybersecurity.

Slater stars alongside “Better Call Saul” star Jonathan Banks in “The Wolf: True Alpha,” a new short film available through HP Studios. In the 20-minute short, the third in a series of shorts with the name “The Wolf,” Slater plays a rogue hacker named The Wolf who shows you the potential global consequences when your printer or another smart device is left unsecured.

The film is directed by Lance Acord, known for his work on “Lost in Translation” and “Where the Wild Things Are,” and has been released by HP to show IT professionals how vulnerable their company could be to an attack.

HP is one of several tech companies to begin pursuing entertainment and digital streaming content and it released its first feature film, “Manto,” at Cannes earlier this year.

“The Wolf: True Alpha” is available on both HP Studios’ website and YouTube, and for the first time will be available for OTT streaming on Roku devices.

Slater will return for the fourth and final season of USA’s “Mr. Robot” as the eponymous character, and he recently starred in Emilio Estevez’s drama “The Public” that played at TIFF.

Watch a trailer for “The Wolf: True Alpha” above and find the full short film here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Christian Slater Says 'Mr Robot' Will End After Season 4: 'I Believe That Will Be the Last Season'

'Mr Robot' Star Christian Slater EmmyQuickie Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Christian Slater Talks 'Unique Challenges' of 'Mr. Robot' Season 2 (Exclusive Video)

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Finale Gives Birth To A Brand New Jimmy

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul.
There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 final…

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul. There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 finale addresses this and continues to clear the path for the inevitable intersection with the Breaking Bad timeline — although we’ll probably have to wait a little longer to see Walter White or Jesse Pinkman make an appearance in Saul. Even…

‘Better Call Saul’: How Bob Odenkirk and the Cast Develop Their Characters, One Tiny Bit of Backstory At a Time

Odenkirk and fellow stars Jonathan Banks, Rhea Seehorn, and Patrick Fabian tell IndieWire how the nuanced writing, costumes, and their own intuitions drive their work on the series.

In the latest episode of “Better Call Saul,” viewers get an intense peek into the psyche of Gus (Giancarlo Esposito), as the character sat beside the bedside of nemesis Hector Salamanca and told a little story about the fruit tree he loved as a child, and the coati who tried to rob young Gus of its fruit. While it doesn’t offer up any specific biographic details, it’s a feast of a monologue which reveals quite a bit about who Gus is, and why we should be afraid of him.

It’s just yet another exciting insight into the life of one of “Saul’s” characters. That sort of moment, co-star Rhea Seehorn told IndieWire, is why “these shows stand out. There’s never spoon-feeding to the audience, and that includes us not having to reiterate plot-wise over and over. Sometimes you watch TV and they let you know how they feel to make sure you’re keeping up. But on this show, they just completely trust the audience. That they’ll get it, and when something’s meant to be mysterious, they take it with open arms.”

That sense of mystery doesn’t just affect the audience, but the cast. They’ve learned a lot about their characters since the show’s premiere in 2015, but are still piecing it together through the details.

When Bob Odenkirk first started playing the man who would eventually be known as Saul Goodman, “I hadn’t painted a very complete picture of that guy,” he told IndieWire. “I figured he went to strip clubs at night, and then went home as drunk as he could safely drive, and then played a little golf on the weekends, and tried to not think about being alone too much. So I didn’t have much of a guy there beyond a guy who’s like a shark, moving as fast as he could through life.”

Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

In fact, he said, it’s only now in the fourth season that he feels like “we have now gotten to know these guys, so it’s only now that I feel like this season has been the season where both Rhea and I have said, ‘Oh, I don’t think my character would do that’ a few times. Not too often. Because we know them now. And we didn’t know them before.”

Odenkirk doesn’t see that as a bad thing, though. “I think it’s been all to the good. It doesn’t stop production, or stop the show. It just means we have to have a conversation with the producers about who they’ve been. I feel like, at this point for him to do something he has never done is a little… Like, I have to question that. Because we’ve seen him in wildly different modes, and we’ve seen him do vastly different things, and those are all part of who he is. So if he goes out of that world that we’ve already established, I have to ask the question,” he said. “But we always work it out. Whether it’s a logic that has to be explained to us, or different choices that they make with the writing to help us justify a choice by the character — we always figure it out.”

In the earliest days of the show, wardrobe played a big role in helping them figure those things out. “Our costumer designer, Jennifer Bryan, is just brilliant,” Seehorn said. “My very first costume fitting with her, she said, ‘There’s just something about Kim that feels like she’s still buying separates from Marshalls and Ross and stuff. And they’re not matching suits, but she hopes everyone in the office [thinks they do].”

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 6 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Rhea Seehorn in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

It was an observation that literally inspired tears in Seehorn, because “that’s not in this business. Women don’t always get to have those kinds of conversations in a fitting — it could be much more superficial stuff. This was deep character, and I’m just like, ‘That’s exactly what I think. There’s something about her that’s trying to fit in, and she’s the most herself in front of Jimmy.'”

And Fabian also found himself leaning on the impeccable suits that he was asked to wear for “Saul” for character insight. “I’d love to say that going to school and being an actor for 20 years has given me a head start in a lot of things, and I’ll take credit for some talent, but I tell you what, I put on that suit because that woman has designed Howard’s suit of armor,” he said. “When I throw that on, my work is 70 percent there. It makes me feel like, when I walk into a scene, that I am wearing more money than anybody else has in the room. And it just gives me an attitude and a sense of superiority that I think lends itself to Howard’s character pretty well.”

(Of course, as the audience has already begun to see in Season 4, those suits are starting to get rumpled. “I think everybody pretty much thinks they know Howard and they think they know how in control and how buttoned up he is and I think they’re in for a bit of a surprise this season, what Howard can and cannot be.”)

Patrick Fabian as Howard Hamlin - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Patrick Fabian in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

As the series progressed, when it came to how Kim’s actual backstory matched with her own ideas, Seehorn said that “more of it’s matched up than I would’ve thought possible. Sometimes I like to pretend that that’s because I am just as smart as them, but that’s not usually what it is.”

Instead, she said, “I took from what they had in the very beginning, of someone who has great economy of language and uses as few words as possible to get her point across, and very ambitious. And I started building the backstory facts from that, including the relationship with Jimmy. And you sort of take the puzzle pieces you give them, and you try to figure out, what notches would fit in those? And it keeps getting built out. So by the time they started adding other pieces, they were always wonderfully surprising in the way that they added a layer, but they also fit. Because I feel like together, it’s this constant matrix.”

The details about her life that have emerged over the years, such as coming from a small town in the midwest, seemed to extend naturally from what had been established previously. “There was something from the very beginning that felt outsider-looking-in to me from the beginning about her,” she said. “And also, immediately I was like, well that matches with the relationship with Jimmy, even prior to dating this history that goes back to the mailroom. There’s something about being on the outside and trying to fit in that I think they share.”

Also important was the question of Kim’s age. “I did the backwards math there and said, so if you’re in a law firm coming out of a mailroom, at a time when usually it’s intern-high school age or college age, and she was older than that. And she’s trying to move up, so if that’s what you’re clinging to, then let’s make where you came from as far from that as you can.”

While Banks is also learning more about Mike as the series progresses, he told IndieWire that he never gets surprised by what the writers choose to add to the character. “They write this full dimensional, wonderful rich character for me. And what that does [for me] as an actor — I’ll do Mike’s backstory forever. Because they’ve given me so much to work with.”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Jonathan Banks in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Even when the writers take Mike in a new direction that doesn’t necessarily make sense to him, it eventually comes together. “When I disagree with something, I’ll say so. I mean, when they had him in the group therapy session, with the daughter in that depressing room, where you would have slit your wrists if you had to go into that group therapy, I went, ‘What are you doing, you’re putting Mike in a group therapy session, oh no, no.’ Well, they said, ‘It’s for the daughter-in-law.’ I went, ‘Okay, yeah.’ But then they extricate me from that because I lay into those people eventually.”

Added Banks, “My version of Mike … Mike’s been dark a long, long, long, time. They gave us the Vietnam veteran sniper and who was he before that, even as a kid. You think about the things you did as a kid that you regret or the hurt that you may have inflicted on someone. And we all have sometimes much greater degrees of that. So how dark? I haven’t even decided yet but I promise you, he’d been dark a long, long time.”

As Season 4 progresses, we’ve seen Mike fully commit to helping set up Gus’s enterprises, and as Banks says, “to hook up with Gus, it’s a decision, yes. But is it any darker than other places that he’s been? No, it’s not…Playing that character and that precision, I like that. I like that because again, I go back to dimensions, look what else I’ve given him. Look what else they’ve given this character.”

Banks’s instincts when it comes to the character, it’s worth noting, weren’t just backed up by the direction the writers took Mike — Banks (as he told IndieWire) actually had an impact on key backstory elements. “Years ago in one of the ‘Breaking Bad’ episodes, I let my granddaughter out of the car and I had balloons, mylar balloons and I gave her a few of them. And then I send her up and say, ‘Your mom’s waiting for you, go on.'”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Jonathan Banks in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

As he continued, “I said to Vince, who was directing that episode, when I sent my daughter up and it was from a distance … I turned to him afterwards and I said, ‘That’s my granddaughter, but that is not my daughter.’ I said, ‘Whatever has happened to Mike, happened because of his son.’ So three, four years later, Peter said to me, “Remember when you said that about …’ And here came the episode [Season 1’s “Five-O”].”

Until Season 3, Fabian hadn’t even known that the other Hamlin in the firm name Hamlin Hamlin & McGill referred to the father of his character, though he had assumed that it was the case. “I had a line [in a scene with Kim] talking about my father wanted me to hang another H on the wall. That’s such a loaded line of so many things. Of father and son issues, wanting to be your own. All that sort of thing. Familial obligations,” he said. “And since we don’t see Howard release that very often, that’s a moment where it also tells me if he’s willing to even say that line, that shows how much affection he has for Kim, how much he looks at her as either a protégé, or a daughter, or a mentee, and all those sort of things. That’s the kind of economy in the writing that I think I’m able to use and find that really tells me a lot about Howard.”

Fabian noted that when they first began shooting the series, creators Peter Gould and Vince Gilligan “were still sort of finding out what they thought. They knew kind of what he was, but the great thing about being on a show for a long run is that the writers start writing to some of your strengths.”

So at the beginning there was some uncertainty as to how Fabian felt he should play Howard. “We were doing something in the very beginning of the very first episode and I think I was sort of leaning into it. And when I say leaning into it, it’s a gentle way of saying I was completely overacting. I was playing this sort of Snidely Whiplash, twirling my mustache sort of thing,” he said.

“And then Vince came over to me because he was directing that particular episode and he said, ‘You know what? I’m not sure if Howard is a bad guy. And I don’t think you should be either.’ It was a great note to drop in, I think, for any actor, at least for me, to not make assumptions and not run to the end of something that you don’t know is there yet. To really take it one step at a time.”

New episodes of “Better Call Saul” Season 4 air Mondays at 9 p.m. on AMC.

‘Better Call Saul’: Jonathan Banks Won’t Say Much About Season 4, but Has a Lot to Say About Life and Death

The Emmy-nominated actor told IndieWire that an on-set revelation he had during “Breaking Bad” dictated a massive part of his character’s backstory.

Mike Ehrmantraut might be one of the scariest guys on television, but Jonathan Banks, who’s been playing the character since his introduction in the second season of “Breaking Bad” in 2009, is a beloved figure on the set of “Better Call Saul.” During a day of production last April, Banks wandered through the offices and sound stages where Season 4 was being shot, hugging and embracing everyone he passed.

Banks’ vast depth of humanity was evident when IndieWire met him on the set — specifically, the waiting room outside Howard Hamlin’s office. “I haven’t been here before,” Banks observed as we sat across from each other. “Most of the time, I’m out under a bridge somewhere in the dark with some kind of instrument. I don’t get to be someplace where it’s warm and nice. It’s usually cold and miserable or hot and miserable.”

While Banks didn’t have much to say about Season 4 at that stage, he did talk about the past — specifically how an instinct he had during the shooting of “Breaking Bad” perhaps contributed to a key part of Mike’s backstory. He also dug into larger issues of life and death, as well as his feelings toward Giancarlo Esposito. An edited transcript follows.

When production gets going on a new season of the show, I know they don’t tell you all that much about what’s to come. Do you like that?

I don’t ask that much. They’d probably tell me more if I asked but I like to see the scripts as they come. I don’t want to be thinking down the line somewhere.

So you really try to stay in the moment?

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I don’t see that there’s any other way to do it. People say, “You know you die in “Breaking Bad.” And my only answer to them is “Well, yeah, but you know you’re gonna die too.” You live.

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

In Season 3, what it was like reuniting with Giancarlo?

He is one of the great loves of all time. What a sweetheart. I mean, he plays this austere, very precise character and that’s not who he is at all. He’s this full of life kid… Giancarlo is just, Giancarlo’s wonderful, with one of the most positive attitudes about life, about how you approach it and what you do. Live it fully, yeah.

What’s your favorite thing that you’ve gotten to do as part of this show?

Well, I think Gordon Smith is writing the one that we’re doing right now. And when Gordon wrote the backstory for my son and I really got to act, that was my favorite moment.

That’s an incredible episode. Was that something they told you in advance: “By the way, you’ve got a big showcase coming up?”

This is how that went down. Years ago in one of the “Breaking Bad” episodes, I let my granddaughter out of the car and I had balloons, mylar balloons and I gave her a few of them. And then I send her up and say, “Your mom’s waiting for you, go on.” And then I take those balloons and go and black out a place and then go and shoot people.

I said to Vince, who was directing that episode, “That’s my granddaughter, but that is not my daughter.” I said, “Whatever has happened to Mike, happened because of his son.” So three, four years later, Peter said to me, “Remember when you said that about …” And here came the episode.

It must be nice, when you’re playing a character like this, to find out a key part of their backstory lines up with what you’d imagined. 

I was in utter and complete agreement that you can have this guy, this tough guy doing whatever he’s doing  — but how did get here? And they gave me how he got there, which I was in complete agreement with.

Is there anything you feel like you still need to know about Mike?

Yes. That little boy came from somewhere.

You mean Mike’s son.

Yeah. Who is she? Who’s that woman? Where was that heartbreak, what happened there? I have a few theories.

Do you feel like the writers have their ideas?

I don’t know if they even concentrated on it yet. If the bug’s in their ear? For sure.

I’m along for the ride at this point. I just am. Wherever we’re going, we’re going. When I disagree with something, I’ll say so. But I mean, when they had him in the group therapy session with the daughter in that depressing room that you would have slit your wrists if you had to go into that group therapy. I went, “What are you doing, you’re putting Mike in a group therapy session, oh no, no.” Well, they said, “It’s for the daughter-in-law.” I went, “Okay, yeah.”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Just the concept of putting Mike in group therapy speaks to the idea of taking a character out of their comfort zone.

Yeah, and boy was that ever out of my comfort zone. It’s certainly out of my comfort zone. And that’s not to say that I condemn that, if people have that need that, however they get to where they’re going. It’s just, I really have a hard time with understanding, for me, Johnny Banks, when you’ve been in great pain or you’ve inflicted great pain on someone, that you somehow can make it okay. No, no, you can’t. Not in my mind. But it’s partly who you are, you keep going on, you keep going on for whatever reason.

I think suicide is cowardly. If you wouldn’t do it to another human being, why would you do it to yourself? But at the same time, who am I to judge someone else’s pain, their darkness? I have no idea how much pain they’re in, none, none. But I do think Mike would have eaten his gun had it not been for his granddaughter.

You know where there’s a line between you and him.

Yeah, yeah. I will tell you this, I have friends that have lost a child that had they not had … Dear friends, had they not had other children, I don’t know if they could have gone on.

Having played this character in this universe for so long, do you find yourself getting surprised by him?

No. There’s a short answer, no. A very brief short answer. No, they write this full dimensional, wonderful rich character for me. I’ll do Mike’s backstory forever. Because they’ve given me so much to work with.

I’ve never seen a scene with him where I was like, “Mike wouldn’t do that.” He always seems very centered in whatever he’s doing.

Yeah. I feel that way. My version of Mike … Mike’s been dark a long, long, long, time. They gave us the Vietnam veteran sniper and who was he before that, even as a kid. You think about the things you did as kid that you regret or the hurt that you may have inflicted on someone. And we all have sometimes much greater degrees of that. So how dark? I haven’t even decided yet but I promise you, he’d been dark a long, long time. So then to hook up with Gus is, it’s a decision, yes. But is it any darker than other places that he’s been? No, it’s not.

Mike’s a character who knows how to handle things — the number of times we’ve seen him in a legit panic have been very, very few. Is it nice to play that? 

Yeah. It catches me a little off guard in that I could no more what, put tracers on a gas cap then fly to the moon. But playing that character and that precision, I like that. I like that because again, I go back to dimensions, look what else I’ve given him. Look what else they’ve given this character.

I feel like every once in a while I have to remind myself where he ends up at the end, because there is such a shift to him, especially when you see him with his granddaughter here.

But that’s his decency, that’s the only decent thing left in his life.

Right.

Listen, he killed his son. In his mind, he killed his son. So his only decency, maybe in a lifetime, for him, is that last chance with this young, little soul that he wants to be truthful. He wants her to be kind.

In the meantime, he’ll teach her how to use power tools.

Yup. And help him do something bad.

New episodes of “Better Call Saul” Season 4 premiere Mondays at 9 p.m. on AMC.

‘Breaking Bad’ Cast And Creator Join Conan – And Maybe Walter White Lives On – Comic-Con

Some interesting Breaking Bad tidbits have emerged from Conan O’Brien’s annual excursion to Comic-Con. As the comedian noted, “This is our fourth year at Comic-Con. That’s right. I’ve been coming to Comic-Con for four years. Or to put…

Some interesting Breaking Bad tidbits have emerged from Conan O’Brien’s annual excursion to Comic-Con. As the comedian noted, “This is our fourth year at Comic-Con. That's right. I've been coming to Comic-Con for four years. Or to put that in terms everyone at Comic-Con understands, "17 Spiderman movies." To celebrate that return and the 10th anniversary of Breaking Bad, O’Brien interviewed series stars Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, Anna Gunn, Dean Norris, Jonathan Banks

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4: Cast and Producers Explain Why They Didn’t Rush Production to Be at the Emmys This Year

Thanks to the eligibility rules, the “Breaking Bad” prequel won’t be competing against “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Game of Thrones” this year. But watch out for 2019.

The Emmys are sometimes referred to as primetime’s biggest party, but this year one of TV’s most acclaimed dramas is sitting it out. And everyone involved seems fine about it.

From 2015 to 2017, “Better Call Saul” has been a major contender in the awards race, building upon its pedigree as the prequel to frequent winner “Breaking Bad.” This year, that’s not the case, though it has nothing to do with a lack in the show’s quality — instead, it simply comes down to the calendar.

In order to be eligible for the 2018 Emmys, “Saul”  needed to premiere at least half of Season 4 before May 31, — but the show doesn’t actually return until August 6. “We just have to make the show the best we can make it,” producer Melissa Bernstein told IndieWire. “We can’t retrofit it to an awards schedule.”

In fact, Bernstein said, co-creator Vince Gilligan doesn’t approach the show with any awards strategy, because “he is the most superstitious person. He’s like, don’t even say that … They don’t operate with that in mind, because it’s counterproductive.”

Colby French as Officer Platt, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 7 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Colby French and Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

During a recent visit to the show’s set in New Mexico, IndieWire had plenty of questions about the upcoming Season 4, which Gilligan has promised will be “darker” and “richer.” But another question that came up was how the cast felt about waiting until 2019 for recognition.

For some, the issue wasn’t even on their mind. In fact, five-time nominee Jonathan Banks didn’t even know that Season 4 wouldn’t be eligible this year.

But as he said, “I think it’s okay… I mean, I never win, anyway. I get a lot of nominations, but I don’t win.”

Banks noted that he doesn’t love attending the actual ceremony: “When it’s really hot in September, which it has been a couple times, where you’re just boiling and then all of sudden you walk into that ice cold auditorium, it is not a good feeling, it’s just hard, it’s hard.”

But his wife does like going: “She was a designer and she loves designing her dress and all that.”

She doesn’t pick what he wears, though. Instead, Banks rents his regular tux from a tuxedo shop in Thousand Oaks. And Banks did say that he would miss it, “because I see people that I don’t see very often, that I don’t know very well. Just to pass by, rub shoulders with them is nice.”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 3 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Jonathan Banks and Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Odenkirk said that not being in the race this year meant that he felt “relieved. It’s a lot of pressure to feel like you’re in the running for this thing, and you deserve it, and why would you win it against other people? Just to even think on those terms about what you’re making, it’s better to be able to go ahead with what we’re doing and think that all that matters is the story and our fans, and that’s it. They’re hopefully enjoying this great story, and beyond that, I don’t have to feel judged, or worry about measuring up to a thing that you can’t predict, or make happen.”

Also, IndieWire observed, he wouldn’t have to worry about the question of what to wear, though Odenkirk noted that “I’ve gotten better at that, because I’ve gotten some awesome free tuxes that fit me well.”

Seehorn, meanwhile, was a bit more ambivalent, though was more than willing to acknowledge why this wasn’t ultimately a negative for the show. “It’s a strange thing. I mean … first I was like, ‘Aw, too bad. Because we got invited to the prom three times, so why don’t we get to go to prom?’ And then you realize, we got invited to the prom because these writers know what they’re doing and they take the exact amount of time they need to write the stories.”

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 6 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Rhea Seehorn in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

As she continued, “It’s our fans that demand a certain caliber of writing and acting and performing and post. The amount of post on this show is huge too, as you may see with the editing and the music, color timing, the photography. It takes the exact amount of time it needs to take, and it wouldn’t have been the show any other way. So you kind of just let go of the rest of it.”

For the record, no one discounted the importance of the Emmys within the TV community, or what it personally means to them to be recognized.

“I think the Emmys are a beautiful and necessary event, and I think we all value the Emmys very much, but I think we approach the story first,” Michael Mando (who plays the enigmatic Nacho) said. “We don’t think that far [ahead] when we’re doing the stories. We’re really thinking about what’s the truth of these characters, what is the reality of these characters, how can we serve the story, and how can we welcome back the audience with the best possible show we can.”

For the team, it really comes down to this: “We know it can be frustrating, especially when there’s so many shows on, it’s so easy to get lost in the shuffle and we don’t take our audience sticking with us for granted in the midst of all of that,” Bernstein said. “But if we tried to rush it just to make the window shorter, but the show was worse? Everybody would be disappointed, I think.”

“Better Call Saul” Season 4 premieres August 6 on AMC.

‘Better Call Saul’ Star Jonathan Banks: Acting ‘Aint About New Head Shots’

“Better Call Saul’” star Jonathan Banks has some solid advice for aspiring actors: “Just act.”

Don’t give up in the face of rejection, the repeat Emmy nominee said. And don’t listen to people who insist you “get a real job.”

“It won’t work, pal,” he said at a panel discussion for TheWrap’s Emmy Season Screening Series  Thursday night. “You’re an artist. If you chose to be an artist, you might have to live with that mentality until the day you die… If you’re an actor, you’ve got to act. It ain’t about new head shots.”

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: The Link Between ‘The Adventures of Mabel’ and Jimmy McGill

Speaking with “Underground” star Aisha Hinds, “Fargo” star Mary Elizabeth Winstead and “Timeless” star Abigail Spencer — all of whom talked about how they withstood doubters and advice to give up — he said its important for actors to remember the reason for their work. “It’s the performance that you share with another person.”

Banks also discussed what inspired him want to become an actor. “When I’m 16, maybe 17, I see “Zorba the Greek,” and… I see Anthony Quinn dancing through life and I thought, Jesus Christ, that’s who I want to be,” he said. “That’s what made me want to be an actor.”

Watch the full video above, and check out our posts on what Hinds, Winstead and Spencer told the audience.

You can sign up here to attend future TheWrap events.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’s’ Jonathan Banks Sums Up Rest of Season 2 With One Word: ‘Violence’

‘Better Call Saul’ Star Jonathan Banks on Breaking Records and 5 Other Emmy Nominee Questions

‘Breaking Bad’ Prequel ‘Better Call Saul’ Enlists Jonathan Banks

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“Better Call Saul'” star Jonathan Banks has some solid advice for aspiring actors: “Just act.”

Don’t give up in the face of rejection, the repeat Emmy nominee said. And don’t listen to people who insist you “get a real job.”

“It won’t work, pal,” he said at a panel discussion for TheWrap’s Emmy Season Screening Series  Thursday night. “You’re an artist. If you chose to be an artist, you might have to live with that mentality until the day you die… If you’re an actor, you’ve got to act. It ain’t about new head shots.”

Speaking with “Underground” star Aisha Hinds, “Fargo” star Mary Elizabeth Winstead and “Timeless” star Abigail Spencer — all of whom talked about how they withstood doubters and advice to give up — he said its important for actors to remember the reason for their work. “It’s the performance that you share with another person.”

Banks also discussed what inspired him want to become an actor. “When I’m 16, maybe 17, I see “Zorba the Greek,” and… I see Anthony Quinn dancing through life and I thought, Jesus Christ, that’s who I want to be,” he said. “That’s what made me want to be an actor.”

Watch the full video above, and check out our posts on what Hinds, Winstead and Spencer told the audience.

You can sign up here to attend future TheWrap events.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul's' Jonathan Banks Sums Up Rest of Season 2 With One Word: 'Violence'

'Better Call Saul' Star Jonathan Banks on Breaking Records and 5 Other Emmy Nominee Questions

'Breaking Bad' Prequel 'Better Call Saul' Enlists Jonathan Banks

'Breaking Bad' Alum Jonathan Banks on Joining 'Community': 'It's a Stretch for Me'

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The return of Gus Fring looms over season three of AMC’s “Better Call Saul.” At the Los Angeles premiere, Bob Odenkirk, Jonathan Banks and the show’s creators celebrated the drama’s return at a screening at Arclight Culver City, then segued to a party at the Culver Hotel. AMC and Sundance president and general manager Charlie Collier introduced... Read more »

TV News Roundup: ‘Community’ Co-Stars Jonathan Banks and Ken Jeong Reunite, NatGeo’s ‘Genius’ Casts T.R. Knight

In today’s TV News Roundup, “Community” co-stars Jonathan Banks and Ken Jeong to reunite on “Dr. Ken,” T.R. Knight is cast as J. Edgar Hoover for National Geographic’s scripted series “Genius,” and more. CASTING A reunion is in the works for “Better Call Saul” star Jonathan Banks and his “Community” co-star Ken Jeong. Banks will… Read more »

In today’s TV News Roundup, “Community” co-stars Jonathan Banks and Ken Jeong to reunite on “Dr. Ken,” T.R. Knight is cast as J. Edgar Hoover for National Geographic’s scripted series “Genius,” and more. CASTING A reunion is in the works for “Better Call Saul” star Jonathan Banks and his “Community” co-star Ken Jeong. Banks will... Read more »