‘Transparent’ Creator Jill Soloway Explains Why They’re Ending Series With a Musical Movie

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As “Transparent” fans learned last fall, the Amazon Prime Video series will end its upcoming fifth and final season not with a bang, but with a musical. On Wednesday, creator Jill Soloway — who prefers to be referenced with gender-neutral pronouns — broke down their decision to wrap the comedy on a high (and probably some low) notes.

When asked by a reporter during the Television Critics Association press tour why the creative team ultimately chose to end “Transparent” with a musical and how it will address the exit of former series regular Jeffrey Tambor (who played Maura), Soloway said it’s “all one big answer.”

“Which is, you know, right as my parent came out, the very first instinct I had before I wrote ‘Transparent’ was that my sister Faith and I were going to make a documentary musical,” Soloway said, before turning to Amazon Studios Head, Jen Salke — who was leading the panel — to add, “I never told you that.”

Also Read: Amazon Sets ‘Good Omens’ Premiere Date, Watch the Opening Credits (Video)

“My sister Faith is an amazing musician and has been writing musicals for years, and as a family we were always doing musicals,” Soloway continued. “So that was kind of the first impulse was to use song. And then ‘Transparent’ came about and it was such a beautiful experience and in many ways, some people have said that ‘Transparent’ has always been a show that wanted to be a musical ’cause there’s these musical numbers and always these scenes about Maura, who wanted the kids to come see her sing, and Shelly singing on a boat.”

“And when everything went down last year and we lost Jeffrey Tambor, and we went through so much as a family, that felt like this very emotional — there are no words, there is no way to really kind of just go back to a plain old Season 5 and try to just repair by coming back,” they added.

The upcoming fifth season, which has no premiere date yet but is expected this fall, will be the first since Tambor was fired by the studio last February.

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In November 2017, Tambor was accused of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including co-star Trace Lysette and the actor’s personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge, later came forward with her own accusation.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

Soloway says that Salke’s hire as the new head of the studios last year helped to make the musical a reality.

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“Getting to know Jen and Jen saying, ‘What would be your dream?’ She said, ‘I wanted something big.’ And I said, ‘What do you think about a musical movie?’ And she was like, ‘Great!’” Soloway said. “And we kind of dared ourselves to follow through and come through and take all of Faith’s songs that she had been writing. Faith was already starting to put songs together for a possible ‘Transparent’ musical five years down the road on Broadway. So we took the songs, we took the storyline and just finished shooting on Friday.”

Soloway added: “And I’m in such a good mood because we were able to do something I feel like is going to astonish and reward fans, and was a way to take music and transform the family to be able to come together and have that kind of like feeling of, in some ways, transition. That the show isn’t necessarily ending, it’s transitioning into a musical.”

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‘Transparent’ Finale Will Bring Series “Full Circle,” Says Amazon’s Jennifer Salke

Read on: Deadline.

There’s no launch date for the final season of Transparent but Amazon Studios boss today proclaimed the musical movie that ends the Jill Soloway series that put the streamer on the map “does everything you want it to do.”
Keeping specifics of the featu…

Power Women Summit 2018 Portraits, From Barbara Boxer to Zoe Saldana (Photos)

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Mira Sorvino, Anita Hill, HAIM, David Oyelowo, Rosanna Arquette, Nancy Dubuc, Jill Soloway and more participated in TheWrap’s inaugural Power Women Summit.

TheWrap’s Inaugural ‘Power Women Summit’ Broadcasts Exclusively on SiriusXM

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 SiriusXM announced that it will exclusively broadcast TheWrap’s first-ever Power Women Summit, which aims to raise awareness and have frank conversations about gender equity in entertainment and media. The week-long special series will premiere on November 12 at 12:00 – 2:00 p.m. ET on Stars channel 109.

The “Power Women Summit on Stars” kicked off on Monday with highlights from the summit, including “Activism and Empowering the Next Generation” with Dolores Huerta, Katie Hill, and Zoe Saldana; “On the Basis of Sex,” with Felicity Jones; and “Leading by Example: A Conversation,” with Jill Soloway and Rebecca Sugar. The trailblazing lineup of speakers that will be featured throughout the week also includes actress and activist Alyssa Milano, former U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer, attorney Anita Hill, actresses Mira Sorvino and Olivia Wilde, #MeToo Movement Founder Tarana Burke, and more.

Also Read: Hollywood Women Make History at First Power Women Summit: Takeaways and Next Moves

“The Wrap put together a remarkable lineup of women, and we are excited to share their powerful, thought-provoking conversations with the national SiriusXM audience,” said Megan Liberman, Senior Vice President of News, Talk, and Entertainment at SiriusXM.

“Right now is a crucial time to discuss equality and women’s rights,” said Sharon Waxman, CEO and Editor in Chief, The Wrap. “There was an air of excitement and momentum at our inaugural Power Women Summit, and I’m grateful to SiriusXM for helping further the message to a national audience.”

The Wrap’s 2018 Power Women Summit took place in Los Angeles on November 1 and 2 before a gathering of more than 1,500 women from across the media and entertainment industry. More information can be found at http://wrapwomen.thewrap.com.

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SiriusXM offers people without a subscription the chance to sample SiriusXM’s content on the SiriusXM app and the streaming web player at SiriusXM.com, seamlessly and without any registration requirements. Go to https://siriusxm.us/2AVma2a to tune in.

SiriusXM subscribers can hear highlights from the 2018 Power Women Summit beginning on Stars channel 109, and those with streaming access can listen online, on-the-go with the SiriusXM mobile app and at home on a wide variety of connected devices including smart TVs, Amazon Alexa devices, Apple TV, PlayStation, Roku, Sonos speakers and more. Go to www.SiriusXM.com/AtHome to learn more.

Hollywood Women Make History at First Power Women Summit: Takeaways and Next Moves

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Hollywood women made history Thursday and Friday.

With 1,500 women from all across the media and entertainment industry, the Power Women Summit was the largest gathering ever of women in Hollywood aimed at moving forward on the goal of achieving gender equity in entertainment and media.

Let’s take a moment and grasp what that means. Women in Hollywood are not like any other group that may be gathering across the country for a purpose. The critical mass of women at this event were the nation’s storytellers. The creators of our popular culture. The shapers of “what’s cool” for our children. The journalists who decide what is news. The celebrities and social media influencers who model trends, behaviors, catch phrases and the next big thing.

Also Read: Anita Hill Vows to Do What the Government Won’t: ‘The Down and Dirty Work of Changing Culture’ (Video)

Photo by Randy Shropshire

What they say and do in their professional lives has a profound impact on the cultural conventions of our nation and, indeed, our world.

Seeing the sea of faces all turned in rapt attention to listen to Anita Hill talking about the need for people of conscience to do the long and hard “dirty work” of creating systemic change, I wanted to tell them that they were already a privileged group. That they were already the anointed, just by having achieved a spot in this incredibly competitive place. That they were some kind of elite, endowed with special powers and obligations for that reason.

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Make no mistake: The women at the Power Women Summit showed up for 50/50 gender equity, the stated theme. They weren’t there for the manicures. (Just kidding, there weren’t any manicures.)

Their enthusiasm and gratitude and pure delight at connecting with their peers across the day on this issue was palpable. It seems obvious that this gathering answered a crying need, a year after the explosion of #MeToo, after the toppling of one media titan after another, after the litany of insults toward women by our president and just a few days before the midterm election. A need to connect, to be heard and to believe that concrete change is achievable.

We didn’t know how many people would actually show up. As organizers, we aimed for a critical mass of 1,000, and ended up with half that number again. The main stage auditorium was standing room only for most of the day. More than 25 #MeToo survivors attended, and many were recognized on stage. The dozen-plus breakout panels were a raucous run for seats to hear experts talk about pay equity, clearing the path for diversity, leveraging social media, including men in the drive for equity and many other topics.

When we opened the main auditorium doors for the afternoon session, I was amazed to watch a flood of women run – run–  for seats to hear from Vice CEO Nancy Dubuc and legendary executive Sherry Lansing and Olympian Ibtihaj Mohammad. (Here’s a video of what the Summit looked like by our intrepid social media guru, Sree Sreenivasan. And here’s a link to the coverage of the speakers and panels. )

By the end of Day Two, I had a stream of young women saying they wished it would go on for another day.

The conference created an inspirational environment by citing quotations of remarkable women in history: Madeleine Albright, Harriet Tubman, Jane Goodall and others.

But here are some words from women at the Summit that are also worth memorializing.

* Poet Hollis Wear Wong:  “Let us embrace the danger of being wholly ourselves/ 
Let us cultivate the heat needed to blaze a new trail forward/ 
We need not a rearrangement, but an uprooting
/ Unapologetic intersections
/ And radical inclusion
/ Refusing to stop even when conditions improve for some/ 
Knowing we are not well until we are all well
/ Knowing we will be pushed past comfort and respectability
/ Past all that we’ve been told from birth is possible
/ Into the unconditional, the truly liberated, the truly equal, the truly free.”

* Anita Hill: “We must make unequivocally clear, even if the government isn’t prepared to protect women from sexual violence, we are. We will do it ourselves. We deserve to work in harassment-free workplaces, and we deserve to have an equal chance to display our very talents throughout these industries, and throughout workplaces all over. These are not privileges that should be limited to men — these are rights we all have.”

* Alana Haim: “I don’t want to ask for more, I never want to ask for more. I just want to ask for equal.”

* Jill Soloway:  “What does it mean to have balance in all leadership, not only as directors and producers on board, but all areas? To us, 50/50 means balance and 2020 means clear vision.”

* Tarana Burke: “I have to get up every day to decide to survive. There are some days where I say, I can’t do it today… It’s not about being bold and brave — it’s about resilience. This is what we’re doing — we’re bouncing back, every day.”

I feel profoundly grateful to all those who helped create this landmark event. The women of Hollywood now have an annual gathering created especially dedicated to their success, and I hope they will continue to build on the historic foundation that was established last week.

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Why We Created the Power Women Summit – The Road to 50/50 by 2020

The Scene at Power Women Summit 2018: Anita Hill, Alyssa Milano, HAIM and More at TheWrap’s Leadership Event (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

TheWrap’s 2018 Power Women Summit, which is dedicated to The Road to 50/50 gender parity in the workplace by 2020 was held Nov. 1-2 at the Intercontinental Downtown Los Angeles hotel. Powerful female leaders from entertainment, media, politics an…

Jill Soloway on 50/50 by 2020: We Need a ‘Narrative That’s as Strong as Trump’s Fascism’

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“Transparent” creator Jill Soloway sat down with “Steven Universe” boss Rebecca Sugar at TheWrap’s Power Women Summit on Friday to discuss 50/50 by 2020 —  the goal to achieve gender equity in Hollywood — which just so happens to be the theme of the two-day event.

“In the Time’s Up rooms, we started to ask ourselves the question: If we as artists create the messages that people around the world use to know how to feel about themselves, what does it mean that 96 percent of directors are white men? Ninety-six percent of directors are white men,” Soloway, who co-founded 50/50 by 2020, an intersectional initiative of Time’s Up, said during the panel “Leading by Example.”

The theory of intersectionality maintains that racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, xenophobia, classism, etc. are bound together should not be considered separately.

“And so we started to ask the question: What does it mean to have balance in all leadership, not only as directors and producers on board, but all areas? To us, 50/50 means balance and 2020 means clear vision,” said the activist and artist — who, along with Sugar, identifies as a non-binary person using the pronouns they and their.

“Just make leadership reflect reality. And that’s our mission for 5050 by 2020, at least as this particular part of the Time’s Up spoke,” added Soloway.

Also Read: Anita Hill Vows to Do What the Government Won’t: ‘The Down and Dirty Work of Changing Culture’

“We’re out there trying to name this intersectional power movement using the creation of culture as our demand to be able to tell — not only be able to tell our stories to the world — but to tell this story in particular,” Soloway said. “That when you look at that four percent, it’s not some weird accident that the four percent is made up of all ‘otherized’ people: women, women of color, people of color, queer people, trans people, people with disabilities. All otherized people with a capital O. And that’s how we’re beginning to tell the story of a narrative of unity.”

Soloway continued: “So what we’re hoping to do with this creation of culture through the ’50/50 by 2020’ floating signifier, is to start to name a narrative that’s as strong as Trump’s fascism. That’s stronger. We need a narrative that’s strong than Hitler. And the Hitler narrative of, ‘The caravan is coming. We must be powerful. People who are other are a risk,’ is the same narrative as Anita Hill said that everybody is fighting. And it gets worse with intersectional, when you add on you are a woman, you’re a woman of color, you’re a queer person, you’re a non-binary person. It gets worse and worse as all of your otherness gets added on.”

“This narrative, a narrative around the power of love and tolerance, we’re at the beginning of creating this movement, guys. We’re just at the beginning,” said Soloway. “One of the reasons we know we’re at the beginning is because so few cis men — liberal cis men — are standing for this movement right now. So few of them. We need cis men to say, liberal cis men, to say, ‘I want a woman leader. I want a woman boss. We need women of color in politics.’ They need to be out there electing women, not just us.”

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Just a few days before the U.S. midterm elections, the focus of the Power Women Summit is to achieve gender equity in Hollywood, with the theme: The Road to 50/50 By 2020.

The Summit is the largest gathering ever assembled of the most influential women in entertainment and media, attended and supported by studios, news organizations and non-profits across the entertainment industry landscape. It is presented by the WrapWomen Foundation, a division of TheWrap News.

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Anita Hill Vows to Do What the Government Won’t: ‘The Down and Dirty Work of Changing Culture’

Anita Hill, Barbara Boxer, HAIM, Sherry Lansing, Zoe Saldana, Jill Soloway Lead TheWrap’s Power Women Summit on Nov 1-2 to Achieve 50-50 Gender Equity in Hollywood 

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Anita Hill, Barbara Boxer, Alyssa Milano, Tarana Burke, HAIM, Felicity Jones, Mira Sorvino, Zoe Saldana and Sherry Lansing are among the iconic women leaders gathering on Thursday, Nov.1 and Friday, Nov. 2 at the Intercontinental Hotel in downtown Los …

Women at the Top of Their Game: Zoe Saldana, Katie Hill, Christine Simmons and Cari Champion Join Power Women Summit, Nov 1-2

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Actress and activist Zoe Saldana, Congressional candidate Katie Hill, sports executive Christine Simmons and ESPN anchor Cari Champion will be joining Power Women Summit, Nov 1 & 2 at the InterContinental Downtown Los Angeles. These dynamic women e…

‘Transparent’ Creator Jill Soloway Explains Not Bashing Jeffrey Tambour in New Memoir

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In their new memoir, Jill Soloway does not spend a lot of time bashing Jeffrey Tambor, a decision the “Transparent” co-creator told Entertainment Weekly was about taking ownership of their own actions.

“It’s such a dangerous time right now. I just wanted to really reveal the places where I felt like I didn’t stand up and be the best person I should be,” Soloway said about “She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy,” released Oct. 15. “I really wanted to take responsibility for my own behavior and not be in a place where I’m going after people. Going after people can be exhilarating. It’s not enough to just be angry at men. It isn’t going to get us anywhere.

Also Read: Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

“I think men who are in power right now are really confused,” Soloway continued. “I think I understand why they’re confused because they have been living in a world that has taught them they have a right to [push boundaries]. These are all things that women knew, pre-#MeToo, that you have to put up with certain things that men do, especially men in power. Sometimes it’s subtle, sometimes they might throw a temper, sometimes they’re men who think they’re complimenting you when they’re telling you something about your body and they don’t really recognize that saying those things are power at play.”

But while Soloway is fulling willing to take ownership of their behavior, they are not saying what Tambor did was excusable, saying that there is a difference between inappropriate behavior and an abuse of power.

“I don’t feel responsible for Jeffrey’s behavior. He’s responsible for his behavior,” Soloway said about the actor. “I feel responsible for creating a workplace where people feel safe. I feel responsible in regards to helping [people] understand what threatening behavior means.”

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Replaced as Voice in Paramount’s Upcoming Animated Movie ‘Wonder Park’

Soloway continued: “I think what a lot of people don’t understand is they want to say things like, anybody can sexually harass anybody. With harassment, power is the power card. Being inappropriate is one thing that can happen at any point between any two people whether you’re in a bar, an office, on the train. People will say inappropriate things. They will ask you out when you didn’t want to be asked out. Harassment means that power is at play and I don’t think we truly understand how to talk to people with the most power. I really want to use this moment to invite men to ask themselves about scenarios they participated in that were not consensual.”

Amazon launched an investigation last November after Tambor was accused of harassment by trans actress Van Barnes, who worked as Tambor’s assistant. Shortly after, another trans actress, Trace Lysette, who had a recurring role on “Transparent,” also accusing Tambor of inappropriate behavior.

At the time, Tambor denied the accusations, saying “I can be volatile and ill-tempered, and too often I express my opinions harshly and without tact. But I have never been a predator — ever. I am deeply sorry if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being sexually aggressive or if I ever offended or hurt anyone. But the fact is, for all my flaws, I am not a predator and the idea that someone might see me in that way is more distressing than I can express.”

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Star Jason Bateman Apologizes for ‘Insensitive’ Jeffrey Tambor Defense

Tambor was later accused by makeup artist Tamara Delbridge of forcibly kissed her on the set of the 2001 film “Never Again.” At the time, Tambor said in a statement to TheWrap that he had “absolutely no recollection of anything like this incident ever happening.”

“If it did, it wasn’t meant as anything more than an enthusiastic farewell and gratitude for a job well done at the end of a shoot,” he continued. “However, I am deeply sorry for any discomfort or offense I may have inadvertently caused her.”

During that time, Tambor said he didn’t see how he could return to the Emmy-winning Amazon series.

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Men Accused of Gaslighting Jessica Walter to Defend Jeffrey Tambor

“Playing Maura Pfefferman on ‘Transparent’ has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life,” he said. “What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago.”

Tambor went on: “I’ve already made clear my deep regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive, but the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue. Given the politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set, I don’t see how I can return to ‘Transparent.’”

Amazon announced in February that Tambor would not return for Season 5. “I have great respect and admiration for Van Barnes and Trace Lysette, whose courage in speaking out about their experience on ‘Transparent’ is an example of the leadership this moment in our culture requires,” said Soloway in a statement to TheWrap about Tambor’s exit at the time.

“We are grateful to the many trans people who have supported our vision for Transparent since its inception and remain heartbroken about the pain and mistrust their experience has generated in our community,” Soloway’s statement continued. “We are taking definitive action to ensure our workplace respects the safety and dignity of every individual, and are taking steps to heal as a family.”

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‘Transparent’ Series Finale Will Be a Musical Episode

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

“Transparent” will end its fifth and final season with a musical episode, series creator Jill Soloway told the New York Times on Saturday.

“It will hopefully feel like ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ mixed with ‘La La Land’ mixed with ‘Flight of the Conchords’ with something more Jewish thrown in,” Soloway said. “A little ‘Yentl.’”

The Times reports that the episode will be a two-hour production set to air sometime next fall. However, an individual with knowledge of the matter tells TheWrap that the episode’s specific running time, and other creative details, are still being firgured out.

Also Read: From ‘Transparent’ to ‘Pose’ and Beyond: How Trans Writers Are Changing Hollywood’s Script

The upcoming fifth season, which has no premiere date yet, will be the first since the show’s star Jeffrey Tambor was fired by the studio in February. Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Drama in 2015 and 2016.

Vice News Journalists Join TheWrap’s Power Women Summit on November 1-2

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VICE News’ Isobel Yeung, Antonia Hylton and Elle Reeve are joining TheWrap’s Power Women Summit, to be held November 1 and 2 in downtown Los Angeles.
Power Women Summit is the largest gathering ever assembled of the most influential women i…

Anita Hill, Felicity Jones, Alyssa Milano and More Join TheWrap’s Power Women Summit

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WrapWomen is honored to announce that Anita Hill will be joining TheWrap’s inaugural Power Women Summit, to be held November 1 and 2 at the Intercontinental Downtown Los Angeles.

She will be joining a trailblazing lineup of speakers. Academy Award nominee Felicity Jones, star of the upcoming “On the Basis of Sex,” will talk about her much anticipated role as Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Alyssa Milano will be joining former U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer and filmmaker Nicole Boxer on stage for a live taping of their podcast “Fight Back.”

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Additionally, “Transparent” showrunner Jill Soloway, “Steven Universe” creator Rebecca Sugar, legendary civil rights activist Dolores Huerta and Olympic medalist Ibtihaj Muhammad will discuss how they are fighting for equal representation in media, sports and beyond.

Get to know our amazing Summit speakers:

Anita Hill, an American attorney and academic, became a national figure in 1991 when she accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment. She is currently University Professor of Law, Public Policy and Women’s Studies at Brandeis University and chair of The Hollywood Commission on Eliminating Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality.

Anita Hill has made history speaking out for women. The nation was riveted by her 1991 Senate Judiciary Committee testimony detailing sexual harassment while working for then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. The impact of Hill’s televised testimony has lasting consequences that endure today, galvanizing women to take action and change conversations about equal treatment in the workplace.

Felicity Jones is best known for her Academy Award, BAFTA, SAG and Golden Globe nominated starring role in “The Theory of Everything.” Jones will play Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Focus Features’ “On the Basis of Sex” which will open at AFI Fest.

Also Read: Anita Hill Says Brett Kavanaugh Hearing Is ‘Not Going to Be Fair’

Actress and activist Alyssa Milano has been behind the #MeToo movement which sparked a viral movement of women fighting against sexual harassment and assault and she has been involved in TimesUp since its inception. In the wake of the mass shooting at Stoneman Douglas High School, Alyssa became one of the founders of NoRA, a coalition dedicated to combating the NRA money in political campaigns so that common sense gun reform can be enacted.

Until the day she left the United States Senate in January 2017, Barbara Boxer has been a forceful advocate for families, children, consumers the environment and her state of California. Boxer served 24 years in the Senate, 10 years in the House, and 6 years on the Marin County Board of Supervisors.

Nicole Boxer is an Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker and political influencer. Boxer believes in the unique power of social impact media advocacy as a tool to create positive change in the world. That belief is the central focus behind Boxer’s media portfolio which spans multiple platforms, including TV, film, podcast, and magazine journalism. Currently, Boxer is directing a new feature documentary film, “Barbara Boxer Gives a Damn.”

Jill Soloway is the author of the memoir “She Wants It: Desire, Power and Toppling the Patriarchy.” “Transparent,” Jill’s autobiographical television series, was the winner of eight Emmy awards and two Golden Globes. Jill’s feature film, “Afternoon Delight,” won the 2013 Directing Award at Sundance and their television series, “I Love Dick,” was nominated for a Golden Globe.

Also Read: ‘Transparent’: Amazon Is ‘Planning a Season 5’ as ‘Closure,’ Jen Salke Says

Ground-breaking, creative juggernaut, Rebecca Sugar is an animator, director, screenwriter, producer, and songwriter. She is best known for creating the Emmy-Nominated series, “Steven Universe,” on which she serves as executive producer, head writer, storyboard artist, and songwriter. Rebecca and her work have been praised for its delicate and poignant discussion of LGBTQ+ themes and embrace of diversity.

Dolores Huerta is a civil rights activist and community organizer. She has worked for labor rights and social justice for over 50 years. In 1962, she and Cesar Chavez founded the United Farm Workers union. She served as Vice President and played a critical role in many of the union’s accomplishments for four decades.

Ibtihaj Muhammad, an American sabre fencer, is a 2016 Olympic medalist, 5-time Senior World medalist and World Champion in the sport of fencing. In August 2016, she became the first American woman to compete in the Olympics in hijab and is also the first Muslim woman to win an Olympic medal for the United States.

Join us as we come together at Power Women Summit, November 1 and 2 at the Intercontinental Downtown Los Angeles. Let’s drive the conversation and effect real change, before the midterm elections.

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45 Hollywood Groups Sign Open Letter Calling for Transgender Inclusion

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More than 45 organizations, talent agencies and production companies signed an open letter on Tuesday urging Hollywood to advance transgender inclusion.

The letter was led by 5050by2020, a strategic initiative within Time’s Up that advocates for the increased inclusion of women, people of color, as well as GLAAD, the world’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) media advocacy organization.

Ryan Murphy Productions, SAG AFTRA, ACLU, Ava DuVernay’s ARRAY Alliance, Shondaland, Apatow Productions, Berlanti Productions, Endeavor Content, Casting Society of America, Bad Robot, Topple, CAA, ICM, UTA, WME, Color Of Change, Sundance Institute and Muslim Public Affairs Council were among the companies and organizations signing the letter.

See Video: ‘Pose’ Trailer: Ryan Murphy Series Is Strictly Ballroom – Plus Voguing, Glitter and Drama

Moreover, the letter introduced TRANSform Hollywood, a resource guide that features best practices, in which people can find suggestions on where to find projects created by trans people, or tips on how to make tips on how to make Hollywood work more inclusive. 5050by2020 and GLAAD will next invite studios and networks to sign the letter.

“This historic display of intersectional support for more authentic and inclusive transgender media images sends a loud message of allyship to transgender people,” said GLAAD president and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis. “Hollywood changed the game for gay and lesbian acceptance by telling compelling stories and involving community members in front and behind the camera. At a time when the industry is at a tipping point for empowering diverse voices and audiences are demanding more inclusion, Hollywood needs to prioritize transgender talent and stories.”

“The TRANSform Hollywood resource guide doesn’t just advance our ability to tell authentic transgender stories and to involve transgender and nonbinary talent in the creative process,” said Jill Soloway, Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning creator of ‘Transparent’ and ‘I Love Dick’, and co-founder of 5050by2020. “It also advances our mission as an industry to create inclusive, fully representative content that enriches our understanding of each other through the empathetic lens of art. We can at once improve the lives of trans people and capture the importance and breadth of our diverse culture.”

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GLAAD’s most recent research found 16 lead or recurring transgender and non-binary characters on television. It also found zero transgender characters in films released by the seven major studios last year.

The letter was first printed in a Variety special issue of transgender actors including Laverne Cox, Alexandra Billings and Chaz Bono.

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‘Transparent’: Amazon Is ‘Planning a Season 5’ as ‘Closure,’ Jen Salke Says

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Season 5 of “Transparent” will provide “closure” to fans, head of Amazon Studios Jennifer Salke said Saturday at the Television Critics Association summer 2018 press tour.

“We are planning a Season 5 of the show,” Salke told reporters. “What form it takes, we haven’t quite announced yet, but it exists and we’re very excited about [it].”

Salke continued to say that “we know exactly what it is creatively,” and she recently met with creator Jill Soloway, who has ideas “beyond ‘Transparent.’”

Also Read: Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

“We were just with Jill this week,” Salke said, who sat for the panel with Amazon TV co-heads Albert Cheng and Vernon Sanders. “I think I’m going to take it upon myself to just tease that Jill came in with sort of what she’s excited about beyond ‘Transparent,’ and I think you can stay tuned in the next week or two to hear more about what that is, but it’s something we’re incredibly excited about. And so, all good, we’re going to give the ‘Transparent’ fans the closure that they and we long for, and do what’s right by, you know, those fans.” 

Season 5 will be the Amazon series’ last. That announcement came after news that star Jeffrey Tambor will not appear in the final season after accusations of sexual misconduct against the actor.

Salke was tight-lipped on how Tambor’s character will be written out, saying that she wanted to allow Soloway “to be able to own that space.”

Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was ‘Mean’ and ‘Difficult’ on ‘Transparent’ Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

In May, Tambor opened up about his behavior on the show’s set, saying he was “mean” and “difficult,” and would yell at Soloway, though he denied the accusations of sexual harassment against him.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Comedy in 2015 and 2016, but the comedy was notably absent from this year’s Emmy nominations.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was ‘Mean’ and ‘Difficult’ on ‘Transparent’ Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

‘Transparent’ to End After Fifth Season

Inside the Fight for ‘Transparent’: Jill Soloway’s Turmoil Over Jeffrey Tambor