Alexandra Billings Won’t Be Silent on Jeffrey Tambor Allegations: ‘He Is Lying’

The “Transparent” actress said Tambor’s “increasingly difficult” behavior “traumatized” people working on the Amazon series.

As the first openly transgender woman to play a transgender character on TV, Alexandra Billings has earned the right to speak to her mind. Best known for her role as Davina on Jill Soloway’s Emmy-winning series “Transparent,” the actress stopped by WNYC’s Nancy Podcast last week to discuss her recent Broadway debut in comedy “The Nap.” Not one to mince words, she also spoke candidly about Jeffrey Tambor’s unceremonious exit from the groundbreaking Amazon series, which came following multiple allegations of sexual harassment from the set. (Tambor denies the allegations.)

“When this happened…it was very easy for me to say, ‘yes they’re absolutely right.’ Because people were going, ‘well, it’s opinion.’ … No, it’s not opinion. They’re absolutely correct. I believe them,” Billings said, emphasizing each word. “Even if I didn’t see absolutely everything, I can tell you without equivocation, they are not lying. Jeffrey Tambor is lying. And I said that very clearly. And I don’t have a problem saying that for the rest of my life.”

Billings said she was preparing to quit the show before the allegations came out. “The last season with ‘Transparent’ was going to be my last season, because of…Jeffrey’s behavior and his attitude. I had every intention of walking in there and saying, ‘I’m not coming back.’ ‘Cause they were talking about doing Season 10, Season 11, and I just couldn’t do it anymore. Because he was increasingly difficult to be around.”

Billings is good friends with both of Tambor’s accusers: Van Barnes, Tambor’s former assistant, and Trace Lysette, who plays Shea on “Transparent.” (A third woman, Tamara Delbridge, said Tambor forcibly kissed her on a film set in 2001.) Billings regrets looking the other way when it came to Tambor’s behavior, which she said was an open secret on set.

“The thing I’m gonna have to live with for the rest of my life is how complicit I was, and I only speak for myself, in allowing him to behave this way,” she said. “We employed trans people, more than, at that time, any other show. And they were traumatized. Because of him. And I did nothing.”

Tambor will not appear on the final season of “Transparent,” which is rumored to include a two-hour musical episode. The actor appeared in the last season of “Arrested Development” on Netflix, which led to many awkward and fumbled interviews. He is next slated to appear in Disney’s “Magic Camp” as the owner of a summer camp for children.

Billings, for her part, isn’t keeping silent anymore.

“I’m going to keep talking about this for the rest of his life,” she said. “No matter what he does, where he goes, or how often he pretends this doesn’t happen until he admits it. For the rest of his life. Just so he knows and we’re clear.”

From ‘The Walking Dead’ to ‘House of Cards’: 8 TV Shows That Went on After Star Exit

Picture going through your Netflix and finding out “Seinfeld” went on without Jerry, “Cheers” without Sam Malone or even that the ongoing “Riverdale” marched on without Archie Andrews. Could you believe it? Would you still watch?

So far in 2018, three award-winning TV shows have continued on without a main character. One was planned (Andrew Lincoln on “The Walking Dead”). The other two, not so much (Kevin Spacey’s exit on “House of Cards,” Roseanne Barr’s firing leading to the spinoff “The Conners.”) The trend continues in 2019. “Transparent” Season 5 will be sans Jeffrey Tambor, who exited after he was accused of sexual harassment (Tambor has denied the accusations).

A show’s lifeline after a major character exits is never certain. But by looking at how that quandary has been met by shows in the past, maybe a little insight can be gained about how it can be handled in the future.

Also Read: Let’s Discuss ‘The Conners’ and the Roseanne Universe Sans Roseanne (Podcast)

Recently with “The Walking Dead,” Lincoln’s departure as Rick Grimes offers no indication that the successful franchise will be ending. In fact, his story will continue in a series of original films on AMC. “TWD” is still currently the top-rated series on cable, but whether Lincoln’s absence will prove costly to the franchise remains to be seen.

TheWrap looks back at 10 notable main character exits, how they were written off, and how long the show lasted afterward.

“House of Cards”

Netflix

Kevin Spacey was fired from his role as president Frank Underwood on the Netflix drama last November, after actor Anthony Rapp accused Spacey of predatory behavior years earlier. Afterward, more than a dozen men came forward to accuse Spacey of similar behavior. Soon after it was announced that season 6 would be the show’s last, with Robin Wright taking over as the lead for one last ride.

Also Read: Here’s How ‘House of Cards’ Wrote Out Kevin Spacey’s Frank Underwood

Reception of the final season, which released Nov. 2, has been generally favorable. Season 6 currently has a 76% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Barring a spinoff, “House of Cards” is now heading into the sunset.

“The Office”

Steve Carrell left the role of Dunder Mifflin regional manager Michael Scott behind in 2011 after the show’s seventh season, telling E! Online after his June 2010 announcement that “I want to fulfill my contract. When I first signed on, I had a contract for seven seasons, and this coming year is my seventh. I just thought it was time for my character to go.”

“The Office” ran for two more seasons after Carrell’s exit, with “The Blacklist”‘s James Spader and even Idris Elba taking a crack at the role of regional manager.

Also Read: Steve Carell Says ‘The Office’ Wouldn’t ‘Fly’ Today: ‘The Climate’s Different’

“Two and a Half Men”

CBS

Charlie Sheen played the antagonistic brother Charlie Harper in the CBS comedy’s first eight seasons, but was fired in early 2011 after he made comments disparaging the show and producer Chuck Lorre.

Also Read: Charlie Sheen ‘Can Relate’ to Roseanne Barr’s ‘Tone of Absolute Despair’

“Two and a Half Men” would proceed without Sheen for four more seasons, replacing him with Ashton Kutcher as an internet billionaire who buys Charlie’s house. The show continued to modest ratings, according to Business Insider, but never the highs seen prior to Sheen’s departure.

“8 Simple Rules”

After John Ritter suffered a heart attack and died early on in the second season of this ABC comedy, actor/comedian David Spade and actor James Garner joined the show.

“We don’t pretend to know exactly where this will take us; we will take episodes one at a time,” ABC Entertainment President Susan Lyne told the Washington Post in September 2003.

“8 Simple Rules” would be canceled after its third season.

“Scrubs”

After the hospital-set comedy switched networks from NBC to ABC after its eight season in 2009, the show was rebooted to focus on a new crop of medical school students. Only stars Zach Braff, Donald Faison and Ted McGinley remained series regulars in supporting roles, with the rest of the show’s originals switching to either recurring or guest appearances only.

Also Read: ‘Veronica Mars’ Revival: Here’s Everything We Know About Kristen Bell’s Hulu Run – So Far

The ninth season, which featured actors Dave Franco and Kerry Bishe, would turn out to be its last.

“That 70’s Show”

Actors Topher Grace and Ashton Kutcher surprised fans when they decided not to return for the show’s eighth and final season.

“I cried. It was really hard, actually. One of those times you really see this incredible team. But the two of them are making choices, and I am super proud of them and knowing they’re doing amazing stuff,” Wilmer Valderrama, who played Fez on the show, told Fox News in May 2005. Kutcher and Grace were both pursuing movie careers at the time.

“Nashville”

When the show began on ABC in 2010, the musical drama focused on Rayna James (Connie Britton) and Juliette Barnes (Hayden Panettiere) vying to be the top country artist in the nation. During the show’s transition to CMT in 2016, creative differences arose between the show and star Britton, according “Nashville” showrunner Marshall Herskovitz in a Variety story in Feb. 2017.

“She loved the people on the show and it was like a family, but after four years, she felt she needed a different challenge, which is something I really understand as an artist,” Herskovitz said.

Also Read: ‘Nashville’ Creator Tells Us All About That Surprise Finale Cameo: ‘So Perfect’

Britton would be killed off in season 5 episode 9, with the show having its final curtain call a year later with season 6.

“Three’s Company”

Asking for equal pay as your male counterpart has become the norm in 2018, but for Suzanne Somers in 1980, asking for the same kind of money as John Ritter was asking for too much.

In a conversation with The Hollywood Reporter in 2015, Somers detailed how she spoke out during contract negotiations for the fifth season of “Three’s Company” in 1980. Things came to a head when Somers asked for a pay hike from $30,000 an episode to $150,000, equal to what Ritter was making at the time. The producer resisted, and soon would fire Somers “to make a point,” Somer’s husband and manager Alan Hamel said in the same story.

While the show would go last four more seasons and launch a short-lived spinoff called “Three’s a Crowd,” ratings never quite reached the highs of its earlier run.

“Spin City”

Michael J. Fox’s portrayal of deputy New York city mayor Mike Flaherty nabbed him two consecutive Golden Globes for outstanding actor in a comedy and an Emmy for best actor in a comedy series.

Also Read: Hollywood Stars and Execs Detail the ‘Apocalyptic’ Scene as California Fires Hit Malibu

But Fox left after season 4 due to his battle with Parkinson’s disease. The show would run for two more seasons with Charlie Sheen taking over in the lead role.

”This big idea that the show must go on — after a while it just didn’t seem as compelling an idea,” Fox told the New York Times at the time. ”It just seemed like the right time.”

Side note: Spin City featured both Sheen (“Two and a Half Men”) and Britton (“Nashville”) as characters. And if that wasn’t enough, the co-creator of “Spin City” was “Scrubs” creator Bill Lawrence.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Walking Dead’: Norman Reedus Says It’s Been ‘Weird As F—’ Without Andrew Lincoln on Set

‘The Walking Dead’: Rick Grimes Returns to Atlanta in Tease of His Last Episode (Video)

‘The Walking Dead’ Showrunner on How Magna, Yumiko and Luke Will Differ From the Comics

‘Swamp Thing’: ‘The Walking Dead’ Actress Jeryl Prescott Cast as Madame Xanadu in DC Universe Series

Picture going through your Netflix and finding out “Seinfeld” went on without Jerry, “Cheers” without Sam Malone or even that the ongoing “Riverdale” marched on without Archie Andrews. Could you believe it? Would you still watch?

So far in 2018, three award-winning TV shows have continued on without a main character. One was planned (Andrew Lincoln on “The Walking Dead”). The other two, not so much (Kevin Spacey’s exit on “House of Cards,” Roseanne Barr’s firing leading to the spinoff “The Conners.”) The trend continues in 2019. “Transparent” Season 5 will be sans Jeffrey Tambor, who exited after he was accused of sexual harassment (Tambor has denied the accusations).

A show’s lifeline after a major character exits is never certain. But by looking at how that quandary has been met by shows in the past, maybe a little insight can be gained about how it can be handled in the future.

Recently with “The Walking Dead,” Lincoln’s departure as Rick Grimes offers no indication that the successful franchise will be ending. In fact, his story will continue in a series of original films on AMC. “TWD” is still currently the top-rated series on cable, but whether Lincoln’s absence will prove costly to the franchise remains to be seen.

TheWrap looks back at 10 notable main character exits, how they were written off, and how long the show lasted afterward.

“House of Cards”

Netflix

Kevin Spacey was fired from his role as president Frank Underwood on the Netflix drama last November, after actor Anthony Rapp accused Spacey of predatory behavior years earlier. Afterward, more than a dozen men came forward to accuse Spacey of similar behavior. Soon after it was announced that season 6 would be the show’s last, with Robin Wright taking over as the lead for one last ride.

Reception of the final season, which released Nov. 2, has been generally favorable. Season 6 currently has a 76% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Barring a spinoff, “House of Cards” is now heading into the sunset.

“The Office”

Steve Carrell left the role of Dunder Mifflin regional manager Michael Scott behind in 2011 after the show’s seventh season, telling E! Online after his June 2010 announcement that “I want to fulfill my contract. When I first signed on, I had a contract for seven seasons, and this coming year is my seventh. I just thought it was time for my character to go.”

“The Office” ran for two more seasons after Carrell’s exit, with “The Blacklist”‘s James Spader and even Idris Elba taking a crack at the role of regional manager.

“Two and a Half Men”

CBS

Charlie Sheen played the antagonistic brother Charlie Harper in the CBS comedy’s first eight seasons, but was fired in early 2011 after he made comments disparaging the show and producer Chuck Lorre.

“Two and a Half Men” would proceed without Sheen for four more seasons, replacing him with Ashton Kutcher as an internet billionaire who buys Charlie’s house. The show continued to modest ratings, according to Business Insider, but never the highs seen prior to Sheen’s departure.

“8 Simple Rules”

After John Ritter suffered a heart attack and died early on in the second season of this ABC comedy, actor/comedian David Spade and actor James Garner joined the show.

“We don’t pretend to know exactly where this will take us; we will take episodes one at a time,” ABC Entertainment President Susan Lyne told the Washington Post in September 2003.

“8 Simple Rules” would be canceled after its third season.

“Scrubs”

After the hospital-set comedy switched networks from NBC to ABC after its eight season in 2009, the show was rebooted to focus on a new crop of medical school students. Only stars Zach Braff, Donald Faison and Ted McGinley remained series regulars in supporting roles, with the rest of the show’s originals switching to either recurring or guest appearances only.

The ninth season, which featured actors Dave Franco and Kerry Bishe, would turn out to be its last.

“That 70’s Show”

Actors Topher Grace and Ashton Kutcher surprised fans when they decided not to return for the show’s eighth and final season.

“I cried. It was really hard, actually. One of those times you really see this incredible team. But the two of them are making choices, and I am super proud of them and knowing they’re doing amazing stuff,” Wilmer Valderrama, who played Fez on the show, told Fox News in May 2005. Kutcher and Grace were both pursuing movie careers at the time.

“Nashville”

When the show began on ABC in 2010, the musical drama focused on Rayna James (Connie Britton) and Juliette Barnes (Hayden Panettiere) vying to be the top country artist in the nation. During the show’s transition to CMT in 2016, creative differences arose between the show and star Britton, according “Nashville” showrunner Marshall Herskovitz in a Variety story in Feb. 2017.

“She loved the people on the show and it was like a family, but after four years, she felt she needed a different challenge, which is something I really understand as an artist,” Herskovitz said.

Britton would be killed off in season 5 episode 9, with the show having its final curtain call a year later with season 6.

“Three’s Company”

Asking for equal pay as your male counterpart has become the norm in 2018, but for Suzanne Somers in 1980, asking for the same kind of money as John Ritter was asking for too much.

In a conversation with The Hollywood Reporter in 2015, Somers detailed how she spoke out during contract negotiations for the fifth season of “Three’s Company” in 1980. Things came to a head when Somers asked for a pay hike from $30,000 an episode to $150,000, equal to what Ritter was making at the time. The producer resisted, and soon would fire Somers “to make a point,” Somer’s husband and manager Alan Hamel said in the same story.

While the show would go last four more seasons and launch a short-lived spinoff called “Three’s a Crowd,” ratings never quite reached the highs of its earlier run.

“Spin City”

Michael J. Fox’s portrayal of deputy New York city mayor Mike Flaherty nabbed him two consecutive Golden Globes for outstanding actor in a comedy and an Emmy for best actor in a comedy series.

But Fox left after season 4 due to his battle with Parkinson’s disease. The show would run for two more seasons with Charlie Sheen taking over in the lead role.

”This big idea that the show must go on — after a while it just didn’t seem as compelling an idea,” Fox told the New York Times at the time. ”It just seemed like the right time.”

Side note: Spin City featured both Sheen (“Two and a Half Men”) and Britton (“Nashville”) as characters. And if that wasn’t enough, the co-creator of “Spin City” was “Scrubs” creator Bill Lawrence.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Walking Dead': Norman Reedus Says It's Been 'Weird As F—' Without Andrew Lincoln on Set

'The Walking Dead': Rick Grimes Returns to Atlanta in Tease of His Last Episode (Video)

'The Walking Dead' Showrunner on How Magna, Yumiko and Luke Will Differ From the Comics

'Swamp Thing': 'The Walking Dead' Actress Jeryl Prescott Cast as Madame Xanadu in DC Universe Series

‘Transparent’ Creator Jill Soloway Explains Not Bashing Jeffrey Tambour in New Memoir

In their new memoir, Jill Soloway does not spend a lot of time bashing Jeffrey Tambor, a decision the “Transparent” co-creator told Entertainment Weekly was about taking ownership of their own actions.

“It’s such a dangerous time right now. I just wanted to really reveal the places where I felt like I didn’t stand up and be the best person I should be,” Soloway said about “She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy,” released Oct. 15. “I really wanted to take responsibility for my own behavior and not be in a place where I’m going after people. Going after people can be exhilarating. It’s not enough to just be angry at men. It isn’t going to get us anywhere.

Also Read: Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

“I think men who are in power right now are really confused,” Soloway continued. “I think I understand why they’re confused because they have been living in a world that has taught them they have a right to [push boundaries]. These are all things that women knew, pre-#MeToo, that you have to put up with certain things that men do, especially men in power. Sometimes it’s subtle, sometimes they might throw a temper, sometimes they’re men who think they’re complimenting you when they’re telling you something about your body and they don’t really recognize that saying those things are power at play.”

But while Soloway is fulling willing to take ownership of their behavior, they are not saying what Tambor did was excusable, saying that there is a difference between inappropriate behavior and an abuse of power.

“I don’t feel responsible for Jeffrey’s behavior. He’s responsible for his behavior,” Soloway said about the actor. “I feel responsible for creating a workplace where people feel safe. I feel responsible in regards to helping [people] understand what threatening behavior means.”

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Replaced as Voice in Paramount’s Upcoming Animated Movie ‘Wonder Park’

Soloway continued: “I think what a lot of people don’t understand is they want to say things like, anybody can sexually harass anybody. With harassment, power is the power card. Being inappropriate is one thing that can happen at any point between any two people whether you’re in a bar, an office, on the train. People will say inappropriate things. They will ask you out when you didn’t want to be asked out. Harassment means that power is at play and I don’t think we truly understand how to talk to people with the most power. I really want to use this moment to invite men to ask themselves about scenarios they participated in that were not consensual.”

Amazon launched an investigation last November after Tambor was accused of harassment by trans actress Van Barnes, who worked as Tambor’s assistant. Shortly after, another trans actress, Trace Lysette, who had a recurring role on “Transparent,” also accusing Tambor of inappropriate behavior.

At the time, Tambor denied the accusations, saying “I can be volatile and ill-tempered, and too often I express my opinions harshly and without tact. But I have never been a predator — ever. I am deeply sorry if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being sexually aggressive or if I ever offended or hurt anyone. But the fact is, for all my flaws, I am not a predator and the idea that someone might see me in that way is more distressing than I can express.”

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Star Jason Bateman Apologizes for ‘Insensitive’ Jeffrey Tambor Defense

Tambor was later accused by makeup artist Tamara Delbridge of forcibly kissed her on the set of the 2001 film “Never Again.” At the time, Tambor said in a statement to TheWrap that he had “absolutely no recollection of anything like this incident ever happening.”

“If it did, it wasn’t meant as anything more than an enthusiastic farewell and gratitude for a job well done at the end of a shoot,” he continued. “However, I am deeply sorry for any discomfort or offense I may have inadvertently caused her.”

During that time, Tambor said he didn’t see how he could return to the Emmy-winning Amazon series.

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Men Accused of Gaslighting Jessica Walter to Defend Jeffrey Tambor

“Playing Maura Pfefferman on ‘Transparent’ has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life,” he said. “What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago.”

Tambor went on: “I’ve already made clear my deep regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive, but the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue. Given the politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set, I don’t see how I can return to ‘Transparent.’”

Amazon announced in February that Tambor would not return for Season 5. “I have great respect and admiration for Van Barnes and Trace Lysette, whose courage in speaking out about their experience on ‘Transparent’ is an example of the leadership this moment in our culture requires,” said Soloway in a statement to TheWrap about Tambor’s exit at the time.

“We are grateful to the many trans people who have supported our vision for Transparent since its inception and remain heartbroken about the pain and mistrust their experience has generated in our community,” Soloway’s statement continued. “We are taking definitive action to ensure our workplace respects the safety and dignity of every individual, and are taking steps to heal as a family.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jared Kushner Calls on Saudi Crown Prince to Be ‘Fully Transparent’ on Khashoggi Death

‘Transparent’ Series Finale Will Be a Musical Episode

From ‘Transparent’ to ‘Pose’ and Beyond: How Trans Writers Are Changing Hollywood’s Script

‘Transparent’: Amazon Is ‘Planning a Season 5’ as ‘Closure,’ Jen Salke Says

In their new memoir, Jill Soloway does not spend a lot of time bashing Jeffrey Tambor, a decision the “Transparent” co-creator told Entertainment Weekly was about taking ownership of their own actions.

“It’s such a dangerous time right now. I just wanted to really reveal the places where I felt like I didn’t stand up and be the best person I should be,” Soloway said about “She Wants It: Desire, Power, and Toppling the Patriarchy,” released Oct. 15. “I really wanted to take responsibility for my own behavior and not be in a place where I’m going after people. Going after people can be exhilarating. It’s not enough to just be angry at men. It isn’t going to get us anywhere.

“I think men who are in power right now are really confused,” Soloway continued. “I think I understand why they’re confused because they have been living in a world that has taught them they have a right to [push boundaries]. These are all things that women knew, pre-#MeToo, that you have to put up with certain things that men do, especially men in power. Sometimes it’s subtle, sometimes they might throw a temper, sometimes they’re men who think they’re complimenting you when they’re telling you something about your body and they don’t really recognize that saying those things are power at play.”

But while Soloway is fulling willing to take ownership of their behavior, they are not saying what Tambor did was excusable, saying that there is a difference between inappropriate behavior and an abuse of power.

“I don’t feel responsible for Jeffrey’s behavior. He’s responsible for his behavior,” Soloway said about the actor. “I feel responsible for creating a workplace where people feel safe. I feel responsible in regards to helping [people] understand what threatening behavior means.”

Soloway continued: “I think what a lot of people don’t understand is they want to say things like, anybody can sexually harass anybody. With harassment, power is the power card. Being inappropriate is one thing that can happen at any point between any two people whether you’re in a bar, an office, on the train. People will say inappropriate things. They will ask you out when you didn’t want to be asked out. Harassment means that power is at play and I don’t think we truly understand how to talk to people with the most power. I really want to use this moment to invite men to ask themselves about scenarios they participated in that were not consensual.”

Amazon launched an investigation last November after Tambor was accused of harassment by trans actress Van Barnes, who worked as Tambor’s assistant. Shortly after, another trans actress, Trace Lysette, who had a recurring role on “Transparent,” also accusing Tambor of inappropriate behavior.

At the time, Tambor denied the accusations, saying “I can be volatile and ill-tempered, and too often I express my opinions harshly and without tact. But I have never been a predator — ever. I am deeply sorry if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being sexually aggressive or if I ever offended or hurt anyone. But the fact is, for all my flaws, I am not a predator and the idea that someone might see me in that way is more distressing than I can express.”

Tambor was later accused by makeup artist Tamara Delbridge of forcibly kissed her on the set of the 2001 film “Never Again.” At the time, Tambor said in a statement to TheWrap that he had “absolutely no recollection of anything like this incident ever happening.”

“If it did, it wasn’t meant as anything more than an enthusiastic farewell and gratitude for a job well done at the end of a shoot,” he continued. “However, I am deeply sorry for any discomfort or offense I may have inadvertently caused her.”

During that time, Tambor said he didn’t see how he could return to the Emmy-winning Amazon series.

“Playing Maura Pfefferman on ‘Transparent’ has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life,” he said. “What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago.”

Tambor went on: “I’ve already made clear my deep regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive, but the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue. Given the politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set, I don’t see how I can return to ‘Transparent.'”

Amazon announced in February that Tambor would not return for Season 5. “I have great respect and admiration for Van Barnes and Trace Lysette, whose courage in speaking out about their experience on ‘Transparent’ is an example of the leadership this moment in our culture requires,” said Soloway in a statement to TheWrap about Tambor’s exit at the time.

“We are grateful to the many trans people who have supported our vision for Transparent since its inception and remain heartbroken about the pain and mistrust their experience has generated in our community,” Soloway’s statement continued. “We are taking definitive action to ensure our workplace respects the safety and dignity of every individual, and are taking steps to heal as a family.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jared Kushner Calls on Saudi Crown Prince to Be 'Fully Transparent' on Khashoggi Death

'Transparent' Series Finale Will Be a Musical Episode

From 'Transparent' to 'Pose' and Beyond: How Trans Writers Are Changing Hollywood's Script

'Transparent': Amazon Is 'Planning a Season 5' as 'Closure,' Jen Salke Says

‘Transparent’ Series Finale Will Be a Musical Episode

“Transparent” will end its fifth and final season with a musical episode, series creator Jill Soloway told the New York Times on Saturday.

“It will hopefully feel like ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ mixed with ‘La La Land’ mixed with ‘Flight of the Conchords’ with something more Jewish thrown in,” Soloway said. “A little ‘Yentl.’”

The Times reports that the episode will be a two-hour production set to air sometime next fall. However, an individual with knowledge of the matter tells TheWrap that the episode’s specific running time, and other creative details, are still being firgured out.

Also Read: From ‘Transparent’ to ‘Pose’ and Beyond: How Trans Writers Are Changing Hollywood’s Script

The upcoming fifth season, which has no premiere date yet, will be the first since the show’s star Jeffrey Tambor was fired by the studio in February. Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Drama in 2015 and 2016.

“Transparent” will end its fifth and final season with a musical episode, series creator Jill Soloway told the New York Times on Saturday.

“It will hopefully feel like ‘Jesus Christ Superstar’ mixed with ‘La La Land’ mixed with ‘Flight of the Conchords’ with something more Jewish thrown in,” Soloway said. “A little ‘Yentl.'”

The Times reports that the episode will be a two-hour production set to air sometime next fall. However, an individual with knowledge of the matter tells TheWrap that the episode’s specific running time, and other creative details, are still being firgured out.

The upcoming fifth season, which has no premiere date yet, will be the first since the show’s star Jeffrey Tambor was fired by the studio in February. Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Drama in 2015 and 2016.

Will Les Moonves Hang On? Here’s Who Did and Didn’t Keep Their Jobs After #MeToo Accusations (Chart)

Friday marks three weeks since six women accused CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual misconduct in a New Yorker story. But unlike many of the men accused since the start of the #MeToo movement last year, Moonves has held on to his job so far.

What happens next for Moonves depends on a CBS investigation being conducted by two outside law firms. But as our list below shows, losing his job is neither a certainty nor an impossibility. The #MeToo movement that began with the October 2017 accusations against Harvey Weinstein has toppled some of the most powerful men in America, from Charlie Rose to Sen. Al Franken. Others have held on despite serious accusations against them.

Here is a list of a few of the most high-profile men who have been accused of sexual misconduct over the past 10 months, followed by more detail about each case.

Lost All Jobs

Louis C.K.

Five women accused comedian Louis C.K. of exposing himself and masturbating in front of them more than a decade ago.

“These stories are true,” C.K. said in response. “The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.”

HBO, Netflix, and FX severed their ties With C.K. The release of his then-upcoming film, “I Love You, Daddy,” was canceled. In January, TBS announced it would not go forward with C.K.’s animated comedy “The Cops.”

Al Franken

Former Minnesota Sen. Al Franken was accused by eight women of unwanted kissing and groping. Franken issued several statements apologizing in some instances and saying that he did not recall specific details surrounding other accusations. He resigned from the U.S. Senate on Jan. 2.

 

Also Read: Casey Affleck: ‘Trying to Find My Own Culpability’ After #MeToo

Matt Lauer

Several women accused “Today” co-host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct. They included three women who said he made sexual advances, a woman who said she had a consensual sexual relationship with Matt Lauer, which she described as an “abuse of power” and another woman who said she passed out as Lauer assaulted her.

Soon after the first accusations came to light, Lauer issued a statement expressing “sorrow” and “regret.” In April, Lauer issued another statement saying: “Any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false.”

Lauer was fired from NBC in November. 

Brett Ratner

Six women accused director Brett Ranter of sexual misconduct, including harassment, groping and forced oral sex in a Nov. 1, 2017 Los Angeles Times story. Four more women accused him off sexual misconduct in a subsequent L.A. Times story, which said two women accused Ratner of working with Russell Simmons to harass or assault them. Variety reported last November that Beverly Hills police had investigated Ratner and music exec Russell Simmons in 2001 after a woman filed a report alleging that she was a victim of sexual battery. The district attorney’s office declined to file criminal charges due to “insufficient evidence.”

Ratner denied the accusations. He later sued one woman, accusing her of libeling him by accusing him of rape.

Ratner was dropped by Warner Bros., Playboy announced it was putting his Hugh Hefner biopic on hold and liquor giant Diageo discontinued Ratner’s Hilhaven Lodge whiskey.

Charlie Rose

Thirty-five women accused longtime journalist Charlie Rose of sexual misconduct, including obscene phone calls, groping and exposing himself. Rose has apologized for any “inappropriate behavior” but denied the accuracy of the allegations. On Nov. 21, CBS News, PBS and Bloomberg cut ties with Rose.

Also Read: #MeToo Blowback Over the Winds of Change in Hollywood

Russell Simmons

More than a dozen women have accused music mogul Russell Simmons of sexual misconduct, including rape. Simmons has denied the accusations. In November, Simmons stepped down from his companies. Soon after, HBO announced that it was removing his name from “all Def Comedy” shows. In January, Oprah Winfrey said she was deleting Simmons from her new self-help book.

Kevin Spacey

More than 30 men accused Kevin Spacey of sexual of sexual misconduct, including actor Anthony Rapp, who said Spacey made a sexual advance on him when he was 14.

Spacey said he did not “remember the encounter,” and came out as gay. A representative later said Spacey was taking “the time necessary to seek evaluation and treatment.”

In November, Netflix fired Spacey from his hit series “House of Cards.” The streaming service also scrapped his Gore Vidal biopic. Spacey was also cut from Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World,” and replaced with Christopher Plummer. In February, Spacey’s foundation in the U.K. shut down

Spacey’s film “Billionaire Boys Club,” which was shot before the accusations came to light, had a digital and VOD rollout on July 17.

Also Read: ‘Brooklyn Nine Nine’ Writers Are ‘Actively Talking About’ a #MeToo Episode

James Toback

Nearly 400 women have accused director James Toback of sexual misconduct, including actresses Selma Blair, Rachel McAdams and Julianne Moore. Toback denied the allegations. He was dropped by his agent and has not released any work since the Los Angeles Times first reported on the accusations in October. 

Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein has been accused by more than more than 80 women of sexual misconduct. In May, he was indicted on charges of rape in the first and third degrees as well as criminal sexual act in the first degree. In July, Weinstein he was indicted on an additional count of criminal sexual act in the first degree and two counts of predatory sexual assault.

Weinstein has denied “any allegations of non-consensual sex.”

After the first accusations against him were reported by The New York Times, he was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company. Apple axed TWC’s series about Elvis Presley; Amazon canceled an in-development series from David O. Russell that was set to star Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. Weinstein was later ejected from Motion Picture Academy and other major industry guilds.

Steve Wynn

Dozens of women accused casino mogul Steve Wynn of sexual misconduct. The accusations included sexual harassment, exposing himself and one woman who accused him of rape, which prompted a $7.5 million settlement payment from Wynn. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing.

Wynn resigned from his post as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee and as chairman and chief executive of his company, Wynn Resorts.

Lost Some Jobs

Morgan Freeman

Eight women came forward to CNN to accuse actor Morgan Freeman of sexual harassment, including the co-writer of the article, who described a pattern of inappropriate comments and unwanted touching. Freeman apologized, but denied accusations of sexual misconduct.

Visa, which featured Freeman’s voice in its commercials, pulled his ads. In May, TransLink announced it was dropping the idea of using Freeman’s voice for some announcements. He was later replaced with Seth Rogen. 

Morgan continues to appear in films, including Disney’s “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” slated for release in November.

Chris Hardwick

On June 14, Chris Hardwick’s ex-girlfriend, actress Chloe Dykstra, said she suffered sexual and emotional abuse from an unnamed ex-boyfriend in a Medium post. Hardwick denied the allegations. He was suspended from AMC, NBC, and the website Nerdist pending an investigation. During his suspension, AMC announced Hardwick would “step aside” from moderating planned AMC and BBC America panels at Comic-Con International in San Diego in July. 

On July 25, AMC announced Hardwick was cleared to return to work. NBC and Nerdist also reinstated Hardwick.

Garrison Keillor

On Nov. 29, Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” was fired by Minnesota Public Radio following sexual misconduct accusations. Keillor later said he had been fired for putting his hand “on a woman’s bare back.” But an investigation by MPR News, published in January, said Keillor had engaged in “years-long pattern of behavior that left several women who worked for Keillor feeling mistreated, sexualized or belittled.”

Keillor denied the accusations.

MPR announced in November it was firing Keillor and would no longer distribute his show “The Writer’s Almanac.” The company also said it was rebranding his former show, “A Prairie Home Companion” under a new name, “Live From Here.” In January, the University of Minnesota removed a plaque bearing his name from its Scholars Walk. In April, Keillor wrote that he was “ready to start up both shows again.” Keillor continues to writes a column for the Union Leader newspaper in New Hampshire.

R. Kelly

Parents of three women said that Kelly was keeping them from their daughters, according to BuzzFeed, which used the word “cult” in quotation marks to describe their living conditions. Another woman later told BuzzFeed that Kelly had sexually abused her. Kelly, who was found not guilty on child pornography charges in 2008, has denied all of the most recent accusations.

A #MuteRKelly hashtag led to the cancellation of several of his concerts. After banning Kelly from its official playlists in May under its “Hate Content and Hateful Conduct policy,” Spotify began streaming his music again in June, following intense backlash from users. Apple Music and Pandora also pulled Kelly’s music from their editorial playlists but his music is still available on all these platforms.

Kelly, who has been touring with singer Charlie Wilson, also dismissed the accusations last month in a song entitled “I Admit.” According to Spin, he is scheduled to perform at the Hulu Theatre at New York City’s Madison Square Garden next month.

John Lasseter

The Hollywood Reporter said “multiple” Pixar insiders accused John Lasseter, then the most powerful man in animation, of unwanted touching, kissing, and comments about people’s physical attributes. Lasseter apologized for what he called “missteps.” 

After a six-month leave of absence, Lasseter announced he was leaving Disney at the end of 2018.

Jeremy Piven

Eight women have accused actor Jeremy Piven of sexual misconduct, including assault. 

Piven denied the accusations, saying he had passed a lie detector test. “As evidenced by the lie detector test I took and passed, I have never forced myself on anyone, nor have I ever exposed myself or restrained anyone against their will,” he told BuzzFeed.

“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” killed a pre-recorded Piven interview. CBS announced it was pulling the plug on Piven’s show, “Wisdom of the Crowd,” citing poor ratings. In July, Piven told Fox 11’s “Good Day L.A.” he was trying his hand at comedy.

Also Read: Anita Hill Calls on Men to ‘Step Up’ in #MeToo Era: ‘There Are No Innocent Bystanders’ (Video)

Tavis Smiley

In December, talk show host Tavis Smiley was suspended by PBS following a sexual misconduct investigation which concluded that Smiley had engaged in sexual relationships with multiple subordinates and created an abusive and threatening environment.

Smiley admitted to past relationships but denied any misconduct. But Public Radio International ended its relationship with Smiley, as did Mills Entertainment, which had been producing his theatrical retelling of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; the production was suspended.

In January, Smiley announced a new show, “The Upside with Tavis Smiley,” on The Word Network. He later went on a five-city tour discussing relationships between men and women in the workplace. He is also working on an upcoming book, “Leading by Listening.”

In February, Smiley filed a lawsuit accusing PBS of acting in “a racially hostile manner” over the years. PBS countersued. 

Jeffrey Tambor

Three women accused actor Jeffrey Tambor of sexual misconduct. Tabor apologized for “mean” and “difficult” behavior, but denied the accusations.

In February, Tambor was fired from his hit Amazon show “Transparent.” That same month, he was removed from a promotional poster for the movie, “The Death of Stalin.” But Tambor remained in the film itself. In June, he was replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park.”

In May, Tambor returned to Netflix’s “Arrested Development” for its fifth season.

Kept All Jobs

John Bailey

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said it received three claims of sexual harassment against its president, John Bailey. No details about the nature of the claims has been released.

Bailey denied the accusations. “That did not happen,” he wrote in a memo to staff obtained by TheWrap.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced in March that an internal investigation had cleared Bailey.

David Copperfield

In January, model Brittney Lewis accused magician David Copperfield of drugging and raping her in 1988, when she was 17.

Copperfield did not address the rape accusations directly. Instead, he tweeted support for the #MeToo movement and asked people not to “rush to judgment.” He continues to perform his magic show at Las Vegas’ MGM Grand.

James Franco

Five women accused James Franco of subjecting them to sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior. 

Franco’s attorney denied Paley’s allegations, calling them “not accurate.”

The actor returns next month for the second season of HBO’s ’70s-set series “The Deuce.”

Nev Schulman

In May, a woman who appeared in his MTV series “Catfish” accused the show’s host, Nev Schulman, of pressuring her into having sex with him. Schulman called the accusations “false.”

After initially halting production on his show “Catfish,”  MTV announced it would resume production after an investigation found the claims “not credible and without merit.”

Ryan Seacrest

Ryan Seacrest was accused of sexual misconduct by his former stylist, Suzie Hardy, who said that the abuse included “grinding his erect penis against her while clad only in his underwear, groping her vagina, and at one point slapping her buttock so hard that it left a large welt still visible hours later.” 

Seacrest denied the accusations. 

In February, E! announced an investigation into allegations of misconduct by Seacrest found “insufficient evidence to support the claims.” He continued to host a wide range of shows on radio and TV, including ABC’s “American Idol” and the daily talk show “Live With Kelly & Ryan.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stephen Colbert Says He Got No Pushback From CBS on Les Moonves Monologue (Video)

CBS to Fold Charlie Rose Investigation Into Les Moonves Probe

‘Murphy Brown’ Revival Will Have #MeToo Episode; Diane English Addresses Les Moonves Accusations

Friday marks three weeks since six women accused CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual misconduct in a New Yorker story. But unlike many of the men accused since the start of the #MeToo movement last year, Moonves has held on to his job so far.

What happens next for Moonves depends on a CBS investigation being conducted by two outside law firms. But as our list below shows, losing his job is neither a certainty nor an impossibility. The #MeToo movement that began with the October 2017 accusations against Harvey Weinstein has toppled some of the most powerful men in America, from Charlie Rose to Sen. Al Franken. Others have held on despite serious accusations against them.

Here is a list of a few of the most high-profile men who have been accused of sexual misconduct over the past 10 months, followed by more detail about each case.

Lost All Jobs

Louis C.K.

Five women accused comedian Louis C.K. of exposing himself and masturbating in front of them more than a decade ago.

“These stories are true,” C.K. said in response. “The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.”

HBO, Netflix, and FX severed their ties With C.K. The release of his then-upcoming film, “I Love You, Daddy,” was canceled. In January, TBS announced it would not go forward with C.K.’s animated comedy “The Cops.”

Al Franken

Former Minnesota Sen. Al Franken was accused by eight women of unwanted kissing and groping. Franken issued several statements apologizing in some instances and saying that he did not recall specific details surrounding other accusations. He resigned from the U.S. Senate on Jan. 2.

 

Matt Lauer

Several women accused “Today” co-host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct. They included three women who said he made sexual advances, a woman who said she had a consensual sexual relationship with Matt Lauer, which she described as an “abuse of power” and another woman who said she passed out as Lauer assaulted her.

Soon after the first accusations came to light, Lauer issued a statement expressing “sorrow” and “regret.” In April, Lauer issued another statement saying: “Any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false.”

Lauer was fired from NBC in November. 

Brett Ratner

Six women accused director Brett Ranter of sexual misconduct, including harassment, groping and forced oral sex in a Nov. 1, 2017 Los Angeles Times story. Four more women accused him off sexual misconduct in a subsequent L.A. Times story, which said two women accused Ratner of working with Russell Simmons to harass or assault them. Variety reported last November that Beverly Hills police had investigated Ratner and music exec Russell Simmons in 2001 after a woman filed a report alleging that she was a victim of sexual battery. The district attorney’s office declined to file criminal charges due to “insufficient evidence.”

Ratner denied the accusations. He later sued one woman, accusing her of libeling him by accusing him of rape.

Ratner was dropped by Warner Bros., Playboy announced it was putting his Hugh Hefner biopic on hold and liquor giant Diageo discontinued Ratner’s Hilhaven Lodge whiskey.

Charlie Rose

Thirty-five women accused longtime journalist Charlie Rose of sexual misconduct, including obscene phone calls, groping and exposing himself. Rose has apologized for any “inappropriate behavior” but denied the accuracy of the allegations. On Nov. 21, CBS News, PBS and Bloomberg cut ties with Rose.

Russell Simmons

More than a dozen women have accused music mogul Russell Simmons of sexual misconduct, including rape. Simmons has denied the accusations. In November, Simmons stepped down from his companies. Soon after, HBO announced that it was removing his name from “all Def Comedy” shows. In January, Oprah Winfrey said she was deleting Simmons from her new self-help book.

Kevin Spacey

More than 30 men accused Kevin Spacey of sexual of sexual misconduct, including actor Anthony Rapp, who said Spacey made a sexual advance on him when he was 14.

Spacey said he did not “remember the encounter,” and came out as gay. A representative later said Spacey was taking “the time necessary to seek evaluation and treatment.”

In November, Netflix fired Spacey from his hit series “House of Cards.” The streaming service also scrapped his Gore Vidal biopic. Spacey was also cut from Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World,” and replaced with Christopher Plummer. In February, Spacey’s foundation in the U.K. shut down

Spacey’s film “Billionaire Boys Club,” which was shot before the accusations came to light, had a digital and VOD rollout on July 17.

James Toback

Nearly 400 women have accused director James Toback of sexual misconduct, including actresses Selma Blair, Rachel McAdams and Julianne Moore. Toback denied the allegations. He was dropped by his agent and has not released any work since the Los Angeles Times first reported on the accusations in October. 

Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein has been accused by more than more than 80 women of sexual misconduct. In May, he was indicted on charges of rape in the first and third degrees as well as criminal sexual act in the first degree. In July, Weinstein he was indicted on an additional count of criminal sexual act in the first degree and two counts of predatory sexual assault.

Weinstein has denied “any allegations of non-consensual sex.”

After the first accusations against him were reported by The New York Times, he was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company. Apple axed TWC’s series about Elvis Presley; Amazon canceled an in-development series from David O. Russell that was set to star Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. Weinstein was later ejected from Motion Picture Academy and other major industry guilds.

Steve Wynn

Dozens of women accused casino mogul Steve Wynn of sexual misconduct. The accusations included sexual harassment, exposing himself and one woman who accused him of rape, which prompted a $7.5 million settlement payment from Wynn. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing.

Wynn resigned from his post as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee and as chairman and chief executive of his company, Wynn Resorts.

Lost Some Jobs

Morgan Freeman

Eight women came forward to CNN to accuse actor Morgan Freeman of sexual harassment, including the co-writer of the article, who described a pattern of inappropriate comments and unwanted touching. Freeman apologized, but denied accusations of sexual misconduct.

Visa, which featured Freeman’s voice in its commercials, pulled his ads. In May, TransLink announced it was dropping the idea of using Freeman’s voice for some announcements. He was later replaced with Seth Rogen. 

Morgan continues to appear in films, including Disney’s “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” slated for release in November.

Chris Hardwick

On June 14, Chris Hardwick’s ex-girlfriend, actress Chloe Dykstra, said she suffered sexual and emotional abuse from an unnamed ex-boyfriend in a Medium post. Hardwick denied the allegations. He was suspended from AMC, NBC, and the website Nerdist pending an investigation. During his suspension, AMC announced Hardwick would “step aside” from moderating planned AMC and BBC America panels at Comic-Con International in San Diego in July. 

On July 25, AMC announced Hardwick was cleared to return to work. NBC and Nerdist also reinstated Hardwick.

Garrison Keillor

On Nov. 29, Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” was fired by Minnesota Public Radio following sexual misconduct accusations. Keillor later said he had been fired for putting his hand “on a woman’s bare back.” But an investigation by MPR News, published in January, said Keillor had engaged in “years-long pattern of behavior that left several women who worked for Keillor feeling mistreated, sexualized or belittled.”

Keillor denied the accusations.

MPR announced in November it was firing Keillor and would no longer distribute his show “The Writer’s Almanac.” The company also said it was rebranding his former show, “A Prairie Home Companion” under a new name, “Live From Here.” In January, the University of Minnesota removed a plaque bearing his name from its Scholars Walk. In April, Keillor wrote that he was “ready to start up both shows again.” Keillor continues to writes a column for the Union Leader newspaper in New Hampshire.

R. Kelly

Parents of three women said that Kelly was keeping them from their daughters, according to BuzzFeed, which used the word “cult” in quotation marks to describe their living conditions. Another woman later told BuzzFeed that Kelly had sexually abused her. Kelly, who was found not guilty on child pornography charges in 2008, has denied all of the most recent accusations.

A #MuteRKelly hashtag led to the cancellation of several of his concerts. After banning Kelly from its official playlists in May under its “Hate Content and Hateful Conduct policy,” Spotify began streaming his music again in June, following intense backlash from users. Apple Music and Pandora also pulled Kelly’s music from their editorial playlists but his music is still available on all these platforms.

Kelly, who has been touring with singer Charlie Wilson, also dismissed the accusations last month in a song entitled “I Admit.” According to Spin, he is scheduled to perform at the Hulu Theatre at New York City’s Madison Square Garden next month.

John Lasseter

The Hollywood Reporter said “multiple” Pixar insiders accused John Lasseter, then the most powerful man in animation, of unwanted touching, kissing, and comments about people’s physical attributes. Lasseter apologized for what he called “missteps.” 

After a six-month leave of absence, Lasseter announced he was leaving Disney at the end of 2018.

Jeremy Piven

Eight women have accused actor Jeremy Piven of sexual misconduct, including assault. 

Piven denied the accusations, saying he had passed a lie detector test. “As evidenced by the lie detector test I took and passed, I have never forced myself on anyone, nor have I ever exposed myself or restrained anyone against their will,” he told BuzzFeed.

“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” killed a pre-recorded Piven interview. CBS announced it was pulling the plug on Piven’s show, “Wisdom of the Crowd,” citing poor ratings. In July, Piven told Fox 11’s “Good Day L.A.” he was trying his hand at comedy.

Tavis Smiley

In December, talk show host Tavis Smiley was suspended by PBS following a sexual misconduct investigation which concluded that Smiley had engaged in sexual relationships with multiple subordinates and created an abusive and threatening environment.

Smiley admitted to past relationships but denied any misconduct. But Public Radio International ended its relationship with Smiley, as did Mills Entertainment, which had been producing his theatrical retelling of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; the production was suspended.

In January, Smiley announced a new show, “The Upside with Tavis Smiley,” on The Word Network. He later went on a five-city tour discussing relationships between men and women in the workplace. He is also working on an upcoming book, “Leading by Listening.”

In February, Smiley filed a lawsuit accusing PBS of acting in “a racially hostile manner” over the years. PBS countersued. 

Jeffrey Tambor

Three women accused actor Jeffrey Tambor of sexual misconduct. Tabor apologized for “mean” and “difficult” behavior, but denied the accusations.

In February, Tambor was fired from his hit Amazon show “Transparent.” That same month, he was removed from a promotional poster for the movie, “The Death of Stalin.” But Tambor remained in the film itself. In June, he was replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park.”

In May, Tambor returned to Netflix’s “Arrested Development” for its fifth season.

Kept All Jobs

John Bailey

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said it received three claims of sexual harassment against its president, John Bailey. No details about the nature of the claims has been released.

Bailey denied the accusations. “That did not happen,” he wrote in a memo to staff obtained by TheWrap.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced in March that an internal investigation had cleared Bailey.

David Copperfield

In January, model Brittney Lewis accused magician David Copperfield of drugging and raping her in 1988, when she was 17.

Copperfield did not address the rape accusations directly. Instead, he tweeted support for the #MeToo movement and asked people not to “rush to judgment.” He continues to perform his magic show at Las Vegas’ MGM Grand.

James Franco

Five women accused James Franco of subjecting them to sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior. 

Franco’s attorney denied Paley’s allegations, calling them “not accurate.”

The actor returns next month for the second season of HBO’s ’70s-set series “The Deuce.”

Nev Schulman

In May, a woman who appeared in his MTV series “Catfish” accused the show’s host, Nev Schulman, of pressuring her into having sex with him. Schulman called the accusations “false.”

After initially halting production on his show “Catfish,”  MTV announced it would resume production after an investigation found the claims “not credible and without merit.”

Ryan Seacrest

Ryan Seacrest was accused of sexual misconduct by his former stylist, Suzie Hardy, who said that the abuse included “grinding his erect penis against her while clad only in his underwear, groping her vagina, and at one point slapping her buttock so hard that it left a large welt still visible hours later.” 

Seacrest denied the accusations. 

In February, E! announced an investigation into allegations of misconduct by Seacrest found “insufficient evidence to support the claims.” He continued to host a wide range of shows on radio and TV, including ABC’s “American Idol” and the daily talk show “Live With Kelly & Ryan.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stephen Colbert Says He Got No Pushback From CBS on Les Moonves Monologue (Video)

CBS to Fold Charlie Rose Investigation Into Les Moonves Probe

'Murphy Brown' Revival Will Have #MeToo Episode; Diane English Addresses Les Moonves Accusations

‘Transparent’s’ Trace Lysette on Accusing Jeffrey Tambor of Sexual Harassment: ‘It Was Hell’

“Transparent” actress Trace Lysette has no regrets about accusing former co-star Jeffrey Tambor of sexual harassment. “It was hell, in a word,” Lysette said during Variety‘s first-ever transgender actors’ roundtable….

“Transparent” actress Trace Lysette has no regrets about accusing former co-star Jeffrey Tambor of sexual harassment. “It was hell, in a word,” Lysette said during Variety‘s first-ever transgender actors’ roundtable. “It was really hard, but I’ve never shied away from making decisions out of fear. What I mean by that is that I knew I had […]

‘Transparent’: Amazon Is ‘Planning a Season 5’ as ‘Closure,’ Jen Salke Says

Season 5 of “Transparent” will provide “closure” to fans, head of Amazon Studios Jennifer Salke said Saturday at the Television Critics Association summer 2018 press tour.

“We are planning a Season 5 of the show,” Salke told reporters. “What form it takes, we haven’t quite announced yet, but it exists and we’re very excited about [it].”

Salke continued to say that “we know exactly what it is creatively,” and she recently met with creator Jill Soloway, who has ideas “beyond ‘Transparent.’”

Also Read: Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

“We were just with Jill this week,” Salke said, who sat for the panel with Amazon TV co-heads Albert Cheng and Vernon Sanders. “I think I’m going to take it upon myself to just tease that Jill came in with sort of what she’s excited about beyond ‘Transparent,’ and I think you can stay tuned in the next week or two to hear more about what that is, but it’s something we’re incredibly excited about. And so, all good, we’re going to give the ‘Transparent’ fans the closure that they and we long for, and do what’s right by, you know, those fans.” 

Season 5 will be the Amazon series’ last. That announcement came after news that star Jeffrey Tambor will not appear in the final season after accusations of sexual misconduct against the actor.

Salke was tight-lipped on how Tambor’s character will be written out, saying that she wanted to allow Soloway “to be able to own that space.”

Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was ‘Mean’ and ‘Difficult’ on ‘Transparent’ Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

In May, Tambor opened up about his behavior on the show’s set, saying he was “mean” and “difficult,” and would yell at Soloway, though he denied the accusations of sexual harassment against him.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Comedy in 2015 and 2016, but the comedy was notably absent from this year’s Emmy nominations.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was ‘Mean’ and ‘Difficult’ on ‘Transparent’ Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

‘Transparent’ to End After Fifth Season

Inside the Fight for ‘Transparent’: Jill Soloway’s Turmoil Over Jeffrey Tambor

Season 5 of “Transparent” will provide “closure” to fans, head of Amazon Studios Jennifer Salke said Saturday at the Television Critics Association summer 2018 press tour.

“We are planning a Season 5 of the show,” Salke told reporters. “What form it takes, we haven’t quite announced yet, but it exists and we’re very excited about [it].”

Salke continued to say that “we know exactly what it is creatively,” and she recently met with creator Jill Soloway, who has ideas “beyond ‘Transparent.'”

“We were just with Jill this week,” Salke said, who sat for the panel with Amazon TV co-heads Albert Cheng and Vernon Sanders. “I think I’m going to take it upon myself to just tease that Jill came in with sort of what she’s excited about beyond ‘Transparent,’ and I think you can stay tuned in the next week or two to hear more about what that is, but it’s something we’re incredibly excited about. And so, all good, we’re going to give the ‘Transparent’ fans the closure that they and we long for, and do what’s right by, you know, those fans.” 

Season 5 will be the Amazon series’ last. That announcement came after news that star Jeffrey Tambor will not appear in the final season after accusations of sexual misconduct against the actor.

Salke was tight-lipped on how Tambor’s character will be written out, saying that she wanted to allow Soloway “to be able to own that space.”

Tambor was accused in November of harassing two trans women on the “Transparent” set, including costar Trace Lysette and his personal assistant Van Jones. A third woman unrelated to the production later came forward, makeup artist Tamara Delbridge.

In May, Tambor opened up about his behavior on the show’s set, saying he was “mean” and “difficult,” and would yell at Soloway, though he denied the accusations of sexual harassment against him.

As TheWrap previously reported, Soloway had considered using Tambor in the season in a flashback-only role as his pre-transition character Mort Pfefferman, but that idea was nixed.

The series has garnered critical acclaim since its premiere and helped put Amazon Prime on the map in the original series arena. Tambor took home a pair of Emmy wins for Best Actor in a Comedy in 2015 and 2016, but the comedy was notably absent from this year’s Emmy nominations.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys and #MeToo: 'Transparent' Shut Out of Nominations

Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was 'Mean' and 'Difficult' on 'Transparent' Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

'Transparent' to End After Fifth Season

Inside the Fight for 'Transparent': Jill Soloway's Turmoil Over Jeffrey Tambor

‘Transparent’: Season 5 is a Go, and Amazon Will Reveal Creator Jill Soloway’s Plans Soon

TCA: Soloway has pitched her plans for what to do post-Jeffrey Tambor, and Amazon Studio boss Jennifer Salke says fans will be given proper “closure.”

After months of limbo, Amazon made it official on Saturday: “Transparent” will return for a fifth season.

Amazon Studios chief Jennifer Salke was mum on details, only to confirm that “we are planning a season 5 of the show. It exists. We know exactly what it is creatively.”

Salke said she had met with creator Jill Soloway this week, and that Soloway “came in with what she’s excited about beyond ‘Transparent.’ So stay tuned the next week or two.”

Salke said she wished she could share more of Soloway’s plans for the character of Maura Pfefferman, which was previously played by Jeffrey Tambor, and “we tred to accelerate some news. We couldn’t get it done in time.” Whatever it is, however, she promised that it would be in service of the show’s fans. The season will “give Transparent fans the closure they long for and do right by fans and we would only want to behave that way,” she said.

In June, Salke told reporters that she was uncertain what a fifth season of the series would look like, or if one would happen at all.

Tambor was fired from the series after a company investigation into sexual harassment allegations made against the actor. Tambor’s involvement with the series was unclear in the aftermath of the allegations, with The New York Times reporting last December that Tambor had no plans to quit.

Tambor was first accused of sexual harassment by his former assistant, Van Barnes. “Transparent” co-star Trace Lysette shared her own harassment allegation shortly after. Tambor had starred in the series through its entire run, winning two Emmys for the role.

Emmys and #MeToo: ‘Transparent’ Shut Out of Nominations

In the wake of the #MeToo movement that has rocked Hollywood over the past year, some actors who are usually recurring figures at the Emmy Awards are notably absent from this year’s list of nominations, particularly “Transparent” lead Jeffrey Tambor.

Jeffrey Tambor has been nominated three times and won two Emmys for his role as Maura Pfefferman on “Transparent,” but earned no nominations on Thursday. The Amazon drama and its lead actor have been under scrutiny in recent months after multiple women accused Tambor of sexual harassment.

Amazon launched an investigation last November after accusations surfaced against Tambor by trans actress Van Barnes, who worked as Tambor’s assistant. Shortly after news of the investigation, another trans actress, Trace Lysette, who had a recurring role on “Transparent,” also came forward, accusing Tambor of thrusting himself upon her.

Also Read: Netflix Snaps HBO’s 17-Year Emmys Streak

At the time, Tambor denied the accusations, saying “I can be volatile and ill-tempered, and too often I express my opinions harshly and without tact. But I have never been a predator — ever. I am deeply sorry if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being sexually aggressive or if I ever offended or hurt anyone. But the fact is, for all my flaws, I am not a predator and the idea that someone might see me in that way is more distressing than I can express.”

A third accuser later came forward. Makeup artist Tamara Delbridge said Tambor forcibly kissed her on the set of the 2001 film “Never Again.” At the time, Tambor said in a statement to TheWrap that he had “absolutely no recollection of anything like this incident ever happening.”

“If it did, it wasn’t meant as anything more than an enthusiastic farewell and gratitude for a job well done at the end of a shoot,” he continued. “However, I am deeply sorry for any discomfort or offense I may have inadvertently caused her.”

Also Read: Emmy Nominations: Here Are All 36 First Time Performer Nominees

During that time, Tambor said he didn’t see how he could return to the Emmy-winning Amazon series.

“Playing Maura Pfefferman on ‘Transparent’ has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life,” he said. “What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago.”

Tambor went on: “I’ve already made clear my deep regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive, but the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue. Given the politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set, I don’t see how I can return to ‘Transparent.’”

Also Read: A Long, Chaotic Emmys Season Ends With Voters Finding a Decent Compromise

Amazon announced in February that Tambor would not be returning to the comedy for Season 5. “I have great respect and admiration for Van Barnes and Trace Lysette, whose courage in speaking out about their experience on ‘Transparent’ is an example of the leadership this moment in our culture requires,” said series creator Jill Soloway in a statement to TheWrap about Tambor’s exit.

“We are grateful to the many trans people who have supported our vision for Transparent since its inception and remain heartbroken about the pain and mistrust their experience has generated in our community,” Soloway’s statement continued. “We are taking definitive action to ensure our workplace respects the safety and dignity of every individual, and are taking steps to heal as a family.”

In May, Tambor opened up about his behavior on the show’s set, saying he was “mean” and “difficult,” and would yell at director Jill Soloway, though he denied the accusations of sexual harassment against him.

Also Read: Anthony Bourdain, ‘Parts Unknown’ Earn 7 Emmy Nominations

The series was nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series in 2015 and 2016.

But “Transparent” isn’t the only show associated with Tambor accusers. His co-star Jessica Walters on Netflix’s “Arrested Development” told the New York Times in May that she had to “let go of being angry at him.”

“He never crossed the line on our show, with any, you know, sexual whatever,” she said. “Verbally, yes, he harassed me, but he did apologize. I have to let it go. [Turns to Tambor.] And I have to give you a chance to, you know, for us to be friends again.”

Along with other cast mates on “Arrested Development,” Jason Bateman defended Tambor, saying, in part, “certain people have certain processes.” Bateman’s take on the situation sparked backlash, for which the actor later apologized, saying he was “embarrassed” for sounding like he was excusing Tambor. In spite of it, Bateman earned a nomination Thursday for his role as Marty Byrde on another Netflix series, “Ozark.”

A few other notable absences from the Emmy ballot include Louis C.K., who served as executive producer for “Better Things.” Its lead actress Pamela Adlon, however, earned an acting nod. The Kevin Spacey-hosted 71st Annual Tony Awards was nominated in the only category this year to which it submitted: Outstanding Lighting Design/Lighting Direction for a Variety Special.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmy Nominations: Here Are All 36 First Time Performer Nominees

EGOT Explosion: John Legend and 4 Others Could Complete Showbiz Grand Slam on Emmy Night

Emmy Nominations by the Numbers: Netflix Surpasses HBO, ‘Game of Thrones’ Scores 22 Nods

‘Game of Thrones’ Just Became the Emmys’ Most Nominated Primetime Series Ever

In the wake of the #MeToo movement that has rocked Hollywood over the past year, some actors who are usually recurring figures at the Emmy Awards are notably absent from this year’s list of nominations, particularly “Transparent” lead Jeffrey Tambor.

Jeffrey Tambor has been nominated three times and won two Emmys for his role as Maura Pfefferman on “Transparent,” but earned no nominations on Thursday. The Amazon drama and its lead actor have been under scrutiny in recent months after multiple women accused Tambor of sexual harassment.

Amazon launched an investigation last November after accusations surfaced against Tambor by trans actress Van Barnes, who worked as Tambor’s assistant. Shortly after news of the investigation, another trans actress, Trace Lysette, who had a recurring role on “Transparent,” also came forward, accusing Tambor of thrusting himself upon her.

At the time, Tambor denied the accusations, saying “I can be volatile and ill-tempered, and too often I express my opinions harshly and without tact. But I have never been a predator — ever. I am deeply sorry if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being sexually aggressive or if I ever offended or hurt anyone. But the fact is, for all my flaws, I am not a predator and the idea that someone might see me in that way is more distressing than I can express.”

A third accuser later came forward. Makeup artist Tamara Delbridge said Tambor forcibly kissed her on the set of the 2001 film “Never Again.” At the time, Tambor said in a statement to TheWrap that he had “absolutely no recollection of anything like this incident ever happening.”

“If it did, it wasn’t meant as anything more than an enthusiastic farewell and gratitude for a job well done at the end of a shoot,” he continued. “However, I am deeply sorry for any discomfort or offense I may have inadvertently caused her.”

During that time, Tambor said he didn’t see how he could return to the Emmy-winning Amazon series.

“Playing Maura Pfefferman on ‘Transparent’ has been one of the greatest privileges and creative experiences of my life,” he said. “What has become clear over the past weeks, however, is that this is no longer the job I signed up for four years ago.”

Tambor went on: “I’ve already made clear my deep regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone as being aggressive, but the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue. Given the politicized atmosphere that seems to have afflicted our set, I don’t see how I can return to ‘Transparent.'”

Amazon announced in February that Tambor would not be returning to the comedy for Season 5. “I have great respect and admiration for Van Barnes and Trace Lysette, whose courage in speaking out about their experience on ‘Transparent’ is an example of the leadership this moment in our culture requires,” said series creator Jill Soloway in a statement to TheWrap about Tambor’s exit.

“We are grateful to the many trans people who have supported our vision for Transparent since its inception and remain heartbroken about the pain and mistrust their experience has generated in our community,” Soloway’s statement continued. “We are taking definitive action to ensure our workplace respects the safety and dignity of every individual, and are taking steps to heal as a family.”

In May, Tambor opened up about his behavior on the show’s set, saying he was “mean” and “difficult,” and would yell at director Jill Soloway, though he denied the accusations of sexual harassment against him.

The series was nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series in 2015 and 2016.

But “Transparent” isn’t the only show associated with Tambor accusers. His co-star Jessica Walters on Netflix’s “Arrested Development” told the New York Times in May that she had to “let go of being angry at him.”

“He never crossed the line on our show, with any, you know, sexual whatever,” she said. “Verbally, yes, he harassed me, but he did apologize. I have to let it go. [Turns to Tambor.] And I have to give you a chance to, you know, for us to be friends again.”

Along with other cast mates on “Arrested Development,” Jason Bateman defended Tambor, saying, in part, “certain people have certain processes.” Bateman’s take on the situation sparked backlash, for which the actor later apologized, saying he was “embarrassed” for sounding like he was excusing Tambor. In spite of it, Bateman earned a nomination Thursday for his role as Marty Byrde on another Netflix series, “Ozark.”

A few other notable absences from the Emmy ballot include Louis C.K., who served as executive producer for “Better Things.” Its lead actress Pamela Adlon, however, earned an acting nod. The Kevin Spacey-hosted 71st Annual Tony Awards was nominated in the only category this year to which it submitted: Outstanding Lighting Design/Lighting Direction for a Variety Special.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmy Nominations: Here Are All 36 First Time Performer Nominees

EGOT Explosion: John Legend and 4 Others Could Complete Showbiz Grand Slam on Emmy Night

Emmy Nominations by the Numbers: Netflix Surpasses HBO, 'Game of Thrones' Scores 22 Nods

'Game of Thrones' Just Became the Emmys' Most Nominated Primetime Series Ever

‘Wonder Park’: A Magical World Comes Back to Life in First Teaser (Video)

In the first teaser trailer for Paramount’s “Wonder Park,” a lost theme park springs back to life after being uncovered by a girl.

In the trailer, a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) walks into a forest which reveals a magical place beyond the trees. The theme park comes back to life, with all of its inhabitants, including bears, monkeys and pigs, reprising their roles in the park.

“Wonderland is now open!” the monkey says.

Also Read: Jeffrey Tambor Replaced as Voice in Paramount’s Upcoming Animated Movie ‘Wonder Park’

The voice talent also includes Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Kenan Thompson, Mila Kunis, John Oliver, Ken Jeong and Matthew Broderick. Jeffrey Tambor, who in recent months has been accused of harassment, was replaced on the animated offering last month. He was replaced by Ken Hudson Campbell, who voiced Boomer the Bear.

The film was previously titled “Amusement Park.” In January, the film’s director Dylan Brown was fired after receiving claims of “inappropriate and unwanted conduct.” No replacement director was announced.

Also Read: Paramount Fires ‘Amusement Park’ Director, Citing ‘Unwanted Conduct’

“Wonder Park” is scheduled for release on March 15 of next year.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount’s ‘Amusement Park’ Movie to Become Nickelodeon TV Show After Theatrical Release

‘Arrested Development’: Jessica Walter Says Jeffrey Tambor Verbally Harassed Her on Set

Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was ‘Mean’ and ‘Difficult’ on ‘Transparent’ Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

In the first teaser trailer for Paramount’s “Wonder Park,” a lost theme park springs back to life after being uncovered by a girl.

In the trailer, a young girl (voiced by Brianna Denski) walks into a forest which reveals a magical place beyond the trees. The theme park comes back to life, with all of its inhabitants, including bears, monkeys and pigs, reprising their roles in the park.

“Wonderland is now open!” the monkey says.

The voice talent also includes Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Kenan Thompson, Mila Kunis, John Oliver, Ken Jeong and Matthew Broderick. Jeffrey Tambor, who in recent months has been accused of harassment, was replaced on the animated offering last month. He was replaced by Ken Hudson Campbell, who voiced Boomer the Bear.

The film was previously titled “Amusement Park.” In January, the film’s director Dylan Brown was fired after receiving claims of “inappropriate and unwanted conduct.” No replacement director was announced.

“Wonder Park” is scheduled for release on March 15 of next year.

Watch the trailer above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Paramount's 'Amusement Park' Movie to Become Nickelodeon TV Show After Theatrical Release

'Arrested Development': Jessica Walter Says Jeffrey Tambor Verbally Harassed Her on Set

Jeffrey Tambor Admits He Was 'Mean' and 'Difficult' on 'Transparent' Set, Denies Sexual Misconduct

Jeffrey Tambor Replaced as Voice in Paramount’s Upcoming Animated Movie ‘Wonder Park’

Jeffrey Tambor, who in recent months has been accused of harassment, has been replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park,” a Paramount spokesperson told TheWrap on Thursday.

Tambor has been replaced in the film, which had previously been titled “Adventure Park,” by Ken Hudson Campbell, whose credits include “Armageddon,” “Groundhog Day” and “Home Alone.”

“Jeffrey Tambor is not part of the final voice cast for ‘Wonder Park.’ During production, we came to the decision that it was in the best interests of the film to go in a different direction,” the Paramount spokesperson told TheWrap. “The character of Boomer the Bear is now voiced by the very talented Ken Hudson Campbell.”

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Star Jason Bateman Apologizes for ‘Insensitive’ Jeffrey Tambor Defense

“Wonder Park” is scheduled for release on March 15 of next year.

The film will be released on March 15th of next year. The voice talent also includes Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Kenan Thompson, Mila Kunis, John Oliver, Ken Jeong and Matthew Broderick, according to the film’s IMDb page.

The IMDb listing for the film describes it as a ” story of a girl, some animals, and a magic amusement park.”

Also Read: ‘Arrested Development’ Men Accused of Gaslighting Jessica Walter to Defend Jeffrey Tambor

In November, Tambor was accused of misconduct by three women — his ex-assistant and transgender actress Van Barnes, “Transparent” actress Trace Lysette, and makeup artist Tamara Delbridge. Tambor denied the allegations, but in February it was announced that Tambor would not be returning for the fifth season of Amazon Prime’s “Transparent,” following an investigation into the matter. Tambor called the investigation “deeply flawed and biased,” saying, “I am profoundly disappointed in Amazon’s handling of these false accusations against me” in a statement.

Tambor returned to his role as dysfunctional family patriarch George Bluth Sr. in the fifth season of “Arrested Development” on Netflix, which premiered in May. However, the return became mired in controversy, when his “Arrested Development” costar Jessica Walter told the told the New York Times that Tambor had verbally harassed her on set. The interview also created fallout for a number of Tambor’s male “Arrested Development” costars, who were criticized for appearing to gaslight Walter while defending Tambor.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Arrested Development’ Star Jason Bateman Apologizes for ‘Insensitive’ Jeffrey Tambor Defense

‘Arrested Development’ Men Accused of Gaslighting Jessica Walter to Defend Jeffrey Tambor

‘Arrested Development’: Jessica Walter Says Jeffrey Tambor Verbally Harassed Her on Set

Jeffrey Tambor, who in recent months has been accused of harassment, has been replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park,” a Paramount spokesperson told TheWrap on Thursday.

Tambor has been replaced in the film, which had previously been titled “Adventure Park,” by Ken Hudson Campbell, whose credits include “Armageddon,” “Groundhog Day” and “Home Alone.”

“Jeffrey Tambor is not part of the final voice cast for ‘Wonder Park.’ During production, we came to the decision that it was in the best interests of the film to go in a different direction,” the Paramount spokesperson told TheWrap. “The character of Boomer the Bear is now voiced by the very talented Ken Hudson Campbell.”

“Wonder Park” is scheduled for release on March 15 of next year.

The film will be released on March 15th of next year. The voice talent also includes Sofia Mali, Jennifer Garner, Kenan Thompson, Mila Kunis, John Oliver, Ken Jeong and Matthew Broderick, according to the film’s IMDb page.

The IMDb listing for the film describes it as a ” story of a girl, some animals, and a magic amusement park.”

In November, Tambor was accused of misconduct by three women — his ex-assistant and transgender actress Van Barnes, “Transparent” actress Trace Lysette, and makeup artist Tamara Delbridge. Tambor denied the allegations, but in February it was announced that Tambor would not be returning for the fifth season of Amazon Prime’s “Transparent,” following an investigation into the matter. Tambor called the investigation “deeply flawed and biased,” saying, “I am profoundly disappointed in Amazon’s handling of these false accusations against me” in a statement.

Tambor returned to his role as dysfunctional family patriarch George Bluth Sr. in the fifth season of “Arrested Development” on Netflix, which premiered in May. However, the return became mired in controversy, when his “Arrested Development” costar Jessica Walter told the told the New York Times that Tambor had verbally harassed her on set. The interview also created fallout for a number of Tambor’s male “Arrested Development” costars, who were criticized for appearing to gaslight Walter while defending Tambor.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Arrested Development' Star Jason Bateman Apologizes for 'Insensitive' Jeffrey Tambor Defense

'Arrested Development' Men Accused of Gaslighting Jessica Walter to Defend Jeffrey Tambor

'Arrested Development': Jessica Walter Says Jeffrey Tambor Verbally Harassed Her on Set

5 Shows Whose Emmy Chances Have Taken a Hit, From ‘Roseanne’ to ‘Full Frontal’ (Photos)

Since last October, a series of allegations and scandals have brought down powerful Hollywood figures and trained a harsh spotlight on many in the entertainment industry. As the June 25 deadline for Emmy nomination voting nears, we have to wonder if an…

Since last October, a series of allegations and scandals have brought down powerful Hollywood figures and trained a harsh spotlight on many in the entertainment industry. As the June 25 deadline for Emmy nomination voting nears, we have to wonder if any of these shows can survive the hit.

“Roseanne”
Emmy voters never really warmed up to Roseanne Barr’s original show, and her racist tweet heard ’round the world likely doomed any chances for the cancelled reboot.

“Arrested Development”
Allegations against Jeffrey Tambor hurt, but a New York Times interview in which Jessica Walter detailed Tambor’s verbal abuse and other (male) cast members came to his defense derailed its Emmy campaign.

“Transparent”
The show’s Season 4, which is eligible for Emmys this year, is the last season with Tambor. It wouldn’t be surprising if the Emmys skip it to see how the next (and final) Tambor-less season plays out.

“Full Frontal With Samantha Bee”
She used the C word to describe Ivanka Trump. The right went ballistic. She apologized. Will (mostly liberal) voters forgive?

The Tony Awards
The Tonys have 13 consecutive nominations and nine wins, but last year’s show was hosted by Kevin Spacey. CBS and the American Theatre Wing opted not to submit the show in any major category, taking it out of the running themselves.

Related stories from TheWrap:

TheWrap's 2018 Emmy Screening Series Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

How the 2018 Emmys Actor and Actress Hopefuls Beat Hollywood's Expectations (Video)

Oscars: Faces of #MeToo, #TimesUp Herald a 'New Path' of Safety and Inclusion

21 Worst Dads in Film and TV, From Homer Simpson to Darth Vader (Photos)

Worst dads on tv and film
Homer Simpson, “The Simpsons”
Homer Simpson is TV’s most famous dad but not exactly a role model. He may be good at heart but some of his favorite past times include drinking, laying on the couch, and strangl…

Worst dads on tv and film

Homer Simpson, “The Simpsons”
Homer Simpson is TV’s most famous dad but not exactly a role model. He may be good at heart but some of his favorite past times include drinking, laying on the couch, and strangling his son Bart whenever he gets out of line.

 

Daniel Plaineview, “There Will Be Blood”

Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis) says it straight out, “he’s an oilman”; he puts family second behind his own greed. That becomes abundantly clear as his relationship deteriorates with his adopted son throughout the movie.

 

Al Bundy, “Married With Children”

Ed O’Neill was a very different kind of family man on “Married With Children” than he is now on “Modern Family.” Al’s cynical outlook on life has a hard time not having an effect on his kids.

 

Frank Gallagher, “Shameless

Frank Gallagher (William H. Macy) is a drunk, he scams the government, cares very little for his personal hygiene, and is the father of six kids, who he only makes life more difficult for. Highlights of Frank’s escapades include convincing one of his son’s he has cancer so he can try to make a quick buck out of the Make-a-Wish Foundation.

 

Dwight Hansen, “This Boy’s Life”

Based on the true story of Tobias Wolff, Robert De Niro plays the step-father to a young Tobias (Leonardo DiCaprio) and verbally, emotionally and physically abuses him.

 

Arlo Givens, “Justified”

A career criminal, Arlo Givens (Raymond J. Barry) is pretty much the exact opposite of his son Raylan (Timothy Olyphant), constantly meddling in Raylan’s investigations to help out his old crime buddies.

 

Red Forman, “That ’70s Show”

Being a strict father is one thing, but Red Forman (Kurtwood Smith) takes it to a whole other level with his son Eric, or as he prefers to call him “dumbass.”

 

Bernard Berkman, “The Squid and the Whale”

A recently divorced literary professor, Bernard Berkman (Jeff Daniels), continually tries to force his own elite sensibilities to his young sons despite what they may actually want or be interested in.

 

George Bluth Sr., “Arrested Development”

At the head of TV’s most dysfunctional family is George Bluth Sr. (Jeffrey Tambor). The self-absorbed, sleazy, business man’s most lasting gift to his children, his failed invention “The Cornballer,” which isn’t good for anything expect giving the kids burns.

 

Randy Robinson, “The Wrestler”

After suffering a heart attack that forces him to retire from wrestling, Randy “the Ram” Robinson tries to reconnect with his estrange daughter. Randy can’t help but to slip into his usual patterns, though, and neglect his daughter.

 

Jack Torrance, “The Shining”

All work and no play made Jack much worse than a dull boy. Jack goes on a murderous rampage after his wife and young son while care-taking for an off season hotel. Not exactly an ideal family vacation.

 

Frank Reynolds, “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”

After years away from his kids, Frank (Danny DeVito) is much more interested in being a member of their group of friends than offering any parental advice.

 

Mr. Wormwood, “Matilda”

Danny DeVito has another character worthy of this list. Always looking for the next scheme rather than paying attention to his daughter, it’s hard to argue when Matilda super glues her father’s hat to his head.

 

Tywin Lannister, “Game of Thrones”

For a man who says that he does everything for the betterment of his family, he sure is awful to his kids. If you want a pat on the back don’t go running to Tywin, he’s more likely to belittle you.

 

Michael Corleone, “The Godfather”

Another father who only wanted to help his family is Michael Corleone. His actions came back to haunt him though when “the family business” results in his daughter’s death.

 

Royal Tenenbaum, “The Royal Tenenbaums”

Having not seen any of his family since he and his wife divorced, Royal Tenenbaum pushes and shoves his way back into their lives just for a place to live. Gene Hackman won a Golden Globe for his performance as the insensitive patriarch of the Tenenbaum family.

 

Don Draper, “Mad Men”

Draper (or Dick Whitman, technically) has kids — he just rarely sees them. He is such a absent dad that this season, Sally and Bobby were home alone in his apartment while it was robbed. Child support aside, Draper is not what you would call a “family man.”

 

George Jung, “Blow”

“Boston George” had a baby girl and got sober cold turkey. If you saw the mountains of cocaine that Jung vacuumed through his nose, you know how dramatic a step that truly was. His daughter became his “heart,” and he couldn’t live without her. But Jung ends up breaking a huge promise to Kristina when he gets busted one last time.

 

Darth Vader, “Star Wars”

In one of the greatest twists in film history, Darth Vader revealed himself to be Luke Skywalker’s father. His first act of fatherly love: cutting his son’s hand off.

 

Ted Mosby, “How I Met Your Mother”

He has been telling his kids the same story for eight years now, going on nine. And you thought your Dad told boring stories.

‘Transparent’s’ Uncertain Future: Amazon Still Unsure How Series Will End Following Jeffrey Tambor’s Exit

Amazon Studios’ head Jennifer Salke said a fifth season of the Emmy-winning series is “not decided,” despite being renewed last year.

Like its protagonist, Maura Pfefferman, “Transparent” is undergoing another monumental transition: Moving on without the actor who brought her to life, Jeffrey Tambor. The Emmy-winning Amazon series, created by Jill Soloway, faces an uncertain future following allegations of sexual misconduct against Tambor. Amazon Studios had already renewed “Transparent” for a fifth season in August, three months before two women, Van Barnes and actress Trace Lysette, accused Tambor of sexual harassment. In February, Amazon announced Tambor would not be returning to the series following an investigation into the allegations.

Many are wondering how the series can move forward without its main character, including Amazon. In an interview with Deadline, newly instated Amazon Studios head Jennifer Salke said she was uncertain what a fifth season of the series would look like, or if one would happen at all. (Soloway identifies as gender non-binary and prefers they pronouns). 

“Within days of my new job being announced, I spent hours with Jill [Soloway], who I knew, and we talked a lot about what [they] wanted to do and where everybody was creatively with the season. Right now we’re in a place where [they’re] taking a little bit of time, figuring out what [they] think that final season will be, and then we’re going to talk in September about what the plan will be. I do think there’ll be some version of a season five, but that’s not decided, and what form it takes is also undecided. Is it a full series? Is it four episodes? Is it a movie? Those conversations are literally all going on and have been set aside for a month, because she and I decided that. [They’ve] got a full slate of other things [they’re] focused on.”

When asked to confirm that Tambor would not be involved, Salke said: “I’ve never heard anything about it. No, no Tambor.”

Tambor is currently appearing in Season 5 of “Arrested Development” on Netflix. After conducting its own investigation of Tambor’s behavior on the “Arrested” set, Netflix found no wrongdoing. “I am profoundly disappointed in Amazon’s handling of these false accusations against me,” Tambor said in a statement after he was let go from “Transparent.” “I deeply regret if any action of mine was ever misinterpreted by anyone and I will continue to vehemently defend myself.”

A source at Amazon told Deadline that Tambor’s behavior “could not be justified or excused under scrutiny.”

Alia Shawkat Wishes She’d Told Her Male ‘Arrested Development’ Co-Stars to ‘Stop Talking’ During Controversial Interview

She regrets not ending the interview as soon as Jessica Walter began crying.

Jason Bateman, David Cross, and Tony Hale were all quick to issue apologies following last month’s controversial New York Times interview occasioned by the new season of “Arrested Development.” After Jessica Walter recalled through tears an incident in which she was verbally harassed by co-star Jeffrey Tambor, her male co-stars appeared to sympathize more with Tambor than Walter.

One voice we haven’t heard from until now is Alia Shawkat, who didn’t say much throughout the discussion. Now, the actress tells Broadly that she wishes she had told the men to “stop talking” and tell Walter to “go on.”

“Once Jeffrey answered [with] his rote response, the other men in the room started to be a lot more verbal than they had before,” Shawkat said. “They started going on about how they support Jeffrey, and they love him, and he’s a great actor—all these things that I agree with; I care about Jeffrey and I think he’s a great actor. But what continued to go on was, in my opinion, too much.”

“I looked at Jessica and I could see how it was sitting with her, and it wasn’t good,” she added. “She comes in and she tries to speak for a little while, and again they keep going.”

“I finally got a word in edgewise, and [that’s when] Jessica got very emotional and started crying. Once that happened, I realized we were having a public and private conversation at the same time, which is very unnatural. All of a sudden, we’re having this intense moment as a group of people who’ve known each other for 15 years — and it’s being recorded,” Shawkat said.

“They were almost trying to cover themselves up while simultaneously talking, instead of actually listening to each other — which is the biggest theme that I learned from this whole experience, this 20-minute interview that made so much noise. The minute Jessica started crying, my instinct was just to go up to her and hug her and be like, ‘This interview’s over.’”

“I felt like I didn’t say enough to defend her. I felt like I didn’t say enough to explain that the movement is so important — and that Jeffrey’s story is a piece of this movement, and we can’t silence it,” she continued. “Women’s voices need to be heard, and, ironically enough — I wasn’t able to be heard. I was really scared that the interviewer didn’t even hear me.”

“Afterwards I was scared that I didn’t say enough and was kind of upset with myself that I wasn’t able to stand my ground more,” Shawkat said. “But once Jessica was upset, that was my main concern. I didn’t even want to necessarily talk about the issues any more. I just wanted to make sure she was ok.”

‘Arrested Development’: Mitch Hurwitz Did Not Realize ‘How Deeply Upsetting’ Jeffrey Tambor’s Outburst Was to Jessica Walter

“I misinterpreted what I understood to have played out, and more importantly the depth of Jessica’s pain about it,” said the series creator of the on-set incident.

Arrested Development” creator Mitch Hurwitz recently broke his silence about the controversy surround the family comedy, telling Deadline he regrets not understanding the severity of an on-set altercation between two of the show’s stars, Jeffrey Tambor and Jessica Walter. This is the first interview Hurwitz has given since Walter broke down in tears during a recent New York Times interview with the “Arrested” cast, during which Jason Bateman minimized the incident and spoke over his onscreen mother. Hurwitz described the details of Tambor’s outburst, explaining that Tambor walked off set after Walter requested they reset.

“It was something minor, like he was doing a speech and Jessica wanted to redo something in her speech,” said Hurwitz. “She’s a perfectionist, which I have a horrible case of myself, and he’s sort of loose with it, finds his way back if he gets off course within the speech, for instance… And she was resetting and he got upset and was like, ‘Oh, come on! You always do this!’ He continued for a bit and she apologized. ‘I’m sorry, Jeffrey, I’m sorry.’ But he continued and then walked off—the set apparently, but he walked out of frame.”

At the time, Walter told Hurwitz how upsetting the incident was and Tambor apologized. “Jessica was really gracious about that—and, you know, was professional in that she didn’t let on that it was still upsetting and present for her. She’s a total pro and the set went back to functioning as well as it always has due to her professionalism, and that’s to her immense credit,” he said.

It wasn’t until the Times interview came out that Hurwitz realized the extent to which the outburst had affected Walter.

I’m guilty of not realizing how deeply upsetting that was for Jessica. I heard about it and saw parts of it in the dailies, although the part I saw didn’t seem that—I don’t know—momentous. But fights and outbursts always start with things that are smaller… There was more to it than I realized, and it’s not my place to opine about what I believe was the weight of it. I misinterpreted what I understood to have played out, and more importantly the depth of Jessica’s pain about it. I feel so bad about that. I feel bad because I love these people—I feel bad for very personal reasons…I wish I’d known, or made a greater effort to know, the pain that it caused.”

Hurwitz also discussed the decision not to fire Tambor after the actor was accused of sexual harassment while on the set of “Transparent.” “Jeffrey refutes those claims, Amazon hasn’t shared details with us, and we’ve never had any sexual harassment allegations of any type on our show—a point that Jessica Walter has made as well,” he said. “I’m not defending sexual harassment. It is and should be a job-terminating offense. I just don’t have any information on whatever happened there. Nor do I have any evidence of him ever sexually harassing anyone in the 20 years, off and on, that I’ve worked with him.”

Read the full interview with Hurwitz here.

Arrested Development’s Mitch Hurwitz discusses Jeffrey Tambor’s on-set outburst

During the filming of Arrested Development’s new season, Jeffrey Tambor had some sort of furious outburst on set that was directed at his on-screen wife Jessica Walter, an incident that the cast largely brushed under the rug until it rose back to the s…

During the filming of Arrested Development’s new season, Jeffrey Tambor had some sort of furious outburst on set that was directed at his on-screen wife Jessica Walter, an incident that the cast largely brushed under the rug until it rose back to the surface during a New York Times interview. In that chat, the show’s…

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Mitchell Hurwitz Weathers The Storm To Bring The Bluths Back To Life In ‘Arrested Development’ Season 5

Mitchell Hurwitz is deep in post-production on Arrested Development’s fifth season, at the show’s edit suite inside LA’s KTTV FOX 11 studios, when we first meet. It’s early April and the first three episodes of the new season are about to play for outs…

Mitchell Hurwitz is deep in post-production on Arrested Development's fifth season, at the show's edit suite inside LA's KTTV FOX 11 studios, when we first meet. It's early April and the first three episodes of the new season are about to play for outside eyes for the first time. But if he's nervous about showing them off it isn't obvious. Really, the word for Hurwitz today is 'serene'. He never thought he'd be here, 15 years after this show first debuted on FOX, and 12…

‘Arrested Development’s Mitch Hurwitz Reveals Tambor-Walter Incident: “There Was More To It Than I Realized”

EXCLUSIVE: Arrested Development creator Mitchell Hurwitz has spoken out for the first time about the on-set argument between Jeffrey Tambor and Jessica Walter, which caused controversy as the fifth season of the show launched on Netflix.
In an intervie…

EXCLUSIVE: Arrested Development creator Mitchell Hurwitz has spoken out for the first time about the on-set argument between Jeffrey Tambor and Jessica Walter, which caused controversy as the fifth season of the show launched on Netflix. In an interview with Deadline, Hurwitz detailed the incident from his perspective for the first time and expressed his regret for not realizing its severity when it occurred. "I'm guilty of not realizing how deeply upsetting that was for…

‘Arrested Development’ Isn’t Fun To Watch Anymore, and Maeby Here’s Why

One of television’s most groundbreaking comedies may be back, and recent events have tarnished our fond memories. But a major plot omission may also be to blame.

Revival culture has had its ups and downs, but here might be the biggest downside for TV fans: acknowledging that once-beloved series were not only better consigned to the past, but haven’t aged well. The latest show to challenge us is “Arrested Development,” and on so many levels, it has proven difficult to enjoy this once-beloved show.

On May 29, just days before the end of Emmys eligibility, Netflix released the first eight episodes of “Arrested” Season 5. Right before that, however, came a now-infamous New York Times interview where the cast (save Portia del Rossi) opened up about the on-set atmosphere. Inspired by questions regarding star Jeffrey Tambor’s behavior on the “Arrested” set as well as “Transparent,” Jessica Walter said that in her entire career, she’d never been treated as badly as she was treated by actor. She was even heard audibly crying in the released audio.

Actors are not their characters, of course, but the more you think about Walter crying in front of her male castmates, and them being oblivious (admittedly in the moment) as to what she was going through, strikes a sharp contrast to her role on the show. Lucille remains as biting and crisp as ever, but watching the new episodes, it’s tough to keep reality out of the picture. It’s Lucille Bluth’s job to make the men cry, after all — not the other way around.

A week before the Times interview was published, the vibe of the cast on the red carpet for the Season 5 premiere was decidedly familial, if guarded on certain issues. (Tambor skipped the red carpet except for photos, and no audience questions were taken during the subsequent panel.)

Jason Bateman told the Times that “this is a family and families, you know, have love, laughter, arguments — again, not to belittle it, but a lot of stuff happens in 15 years.” And indeed, many have pointed out that families can be quite dysfunctional and even disruptive. But while that’s always been a component of the show’s comedy from the beginning, seeing it in real life makes the show itself feel less funny.

It isn’t limited to the questions of what really happened on set, though. While Season 5 includes plenty of touches that highlight what were always the show’s greatest strengths (including a rich depth of callbacks and buried references that reward eagle-eyed viewers), it still feels like it’s missing something. And that something may be Maeby Funke (Alia Shawkat) in charge.

In Season 2, happenstance results in Maeby getting a job as a producer at Tantamount Studios, after she turns the coverage she’d made a studio reader write about “The Old Man and the Sea” (to sub as her book report for English class) into the Jude Law-starring adapation “The Young Man and the Beach.”

Over the course of Seasons 2 and 3, we got only the briefest tastes of Maeby’s blossoming career (despite her lack of a high school diploma) but they were true highlights of the show’s early years.

Arrested Development Season 5 Alia Shawkat

What the Maeby-as-studio-exec storyline lent “Arrested Development” was more than just the opportunity to make meta jokes about the silliness of Hollywood (never a hard target). Its razor-sharp commentary on the culture of the industry and all its biases and vulnerabilities was the sort of satire only a deeply-engrained industry veteran could ever execute — which is why we see it so rarely, given how potentially dangerous it could be.

And for the record, that commentary included at least one not-so-subtle poke at the sexual exploitaiton that happens in the industry, after Maeby nimbly shoots down Mort’s (Jeff Garlin) initial advances:

Mort Meyers: Did you get the stack of scripts that I sent you? ’Cause you certainly look well-rested.
Maeby: Marry me.
Mort Meyers: Ha! I need your notes on those tomorrow. You want to have a drink?
Maeby: Yeah. Why don’t we ask your wife to come with us?
Mort Meyers: Okay, then, I’ll see you tomorrow.

What’s so fascinating about that moment is how even to a teenager, what Mort is setting up (though admittedly backing down on quickly) is painfully obvious. It points both to the show’s depiction of Maeby as perhaps the savviest member of the Bluth family… but also serves as a bit of wish fulfillment. For so many women, that sort of suggestion has gone quite differently, with unimaginable costs.

However you might feel about the overall narrative, one of Season 4’s most grievous sins was how it handled Maeby as a character, literally regressing her to the role of unambitious high school student who even gets duped by her underage love interest (only finding out after she technically commits statutory rape).

And while in Season 5, Maeby is back to her con artist ways, her lack of ambition has reduced her to hiding out at an old folks’ home, making fun of how old people struggle with smart phones and trying to avoid having sex with Ed Begley Jr. It makes you miss Maeby at her best, in charge and empowered.

It’s been years since we’ve really seen that version of Maeby. Instead, the show’s focus has been on the Bluth boys’ weird love lives and father issues. They’re all funny at times, but the balance is off, and it makes the ultimate result hard to get enthusiastic about — especially when we think about what happened behind the scenes, and what came before.

TV Review: ‘Arrested Development’ Season 5 on Netflix

There’s something perfect about the fact that season 5 of “Arrested Development” picks up almost immediately where season 4 left off as if no time has passed at all, alternately ignoring and winking at the fact that its cast has aged. After all (narrat…

There’s something perfect about the fact that season 5 of “Arrested Development” picks up almost immediately where season 4 left off as if no time has passed at all, alternately ignoring and winking at the fact that its cast has aged. After all (narrator voice): it’s “Arrested Development.” Opting to stick with the still unfolding […]