Netflix Cancels ‘The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs’ Red Carpet At AFI Fest Amid Southern Califorina Fires

In the wake of the fires that have been affecting Los Angeles, Netflix announced Sunday that they have decided to cancel the red carpet for the AFI Fest screening of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs at the Chinese Theater in Hollywood, Deadline has learned…

In the wake of the fires that have been affecting Los Angeles, Netflix announced Sunday that they have decided to cancel the red carpet for the AFI Fest screening of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs at the Chinese Theater in Hollywood, Deadline has learned. However, the screening will go on as scheduled. The western written and directed by Ethan Coen and Joel Coen stars Tim Blake Nelson, Liam Neeson, James Franco, Zoe Kazan, Tyne Daly, and Tom Waits. It originally premiered…

Maggie Gyllenhaal: ‘The Deuce’ Should Not Be Shut Down Over James Franco Misconduct Allegations

Maggie Gyllenhaal, a producer and star of The Deuce, HBO’s gritty dramatic examination of misogyny, sexual violence and exploitation in the grimy Times Square of the 1970s, says shutting down the show in response to misconduct allegations against…

Maggie Gyllenhaal, a producer and star of The Deuce, HBO’s gritty dramatic examination of misogyny, sexual violence and exploitation in the grimy Times Square of the 1970s, says shutting down the show in response to misconduct allegations against co-star James Franco would be “the opposite of the right thing to do.” The Deuce, Gyllenhaal told SiriusXM radio host Sway Calloway yesterday (hear it above), is “about transactional sex. It’s about inequality in the…

James Franco’s Alleged Harassment Ruined ‘The Deuce,’ One of the Best Shows About Sex — Opinion

In a show about sexuality, employing an alleged abuser is particularly egregious — and entirely distracting.

In 2015, two years before #MeToo, the porn industry severed ties with its golden boy, James Deen. Three days after the “kinky feminist” with boy-next-door good looks was accused of sexual assault by three women, major studios Evil Angel and Kink.com cut all financial ties with him. While its content includes “consensual and exploratory aggressive and rough sex,” a representative for Evil Angel said Deen’s behavior was “contrary to [the] company values.” Deen was a porn star with mainstream crossover appeal who was known and celebrated for performing hardcore sex, yet the porn industry saw no gray area when it came to consent.

That’s a concept Hollywood still can’t seem to grasp. “The Deuce,” a television show about sex, sex work, and the porn industry, did nothing about the allegations against its own golden boy actor and executive producer, James Franco, who stands accused of sexual assault or misconduct by five different women. (Franco denied the allegations.)

In January 2018, amidst his awards campaign for “The Disaster Artist,” the Los Angeles Times reported that five women accused Franco of sexual misconduct. This week, those allegations earned renewed attention when, in a leaked excerpt from her forthcoming memoir, actress Busy Philipps alleged that Franco physically assaulted her on the set of “Freaks and Geeks.” She writes: “He threw me to the ground. Flat on my back. Wind knocked out of me.” Following a Twitter outcry, one user pointed out that Philipps had shared the story on the record multiple times before.

In March 2011, the Los Angeles Times reported Phillips’ recounting of the anecdote as part of its Paley Fest coverage. Franco was not in attendance, with the cast using his absence as the opportunity to roast him in absentia.

It all seemed to be in jest until “Cougar Town’s” Busy Philipps, who played Franco’s hard-edged girlfriend Kim Kelly on “Freaks and Geeks,” chimed in with an odd anecdote. During one scene, she said, the actor threw her to the ground, even though the script didn’t call for the action.

Franco had created a back story in which his character had “maybe been abused by his father, and so he didn’t want any physicality between him and his girlfriend. This was unbeknownst to me,” Philipps recalled, giggling. During the scene, the two characters were verbally sparring, and Philipps was meant to slap Franco lightly on the arm.

After doing so, he blew up, saying “‘Don’t you ever [expletive] touch me again!’ and threw me to the ground. I had the wind knocked out of me,” Philipps said, adding that she then ran into her trailer crying.

[Judd] Apatow, probably trying to change the subject, sarcastically responded by saying Franco was the only cast member to since be nominated for an Academy Award.”And he’s way better looking than all of us,” [Jason] Segel added.

“He’s also the only one too cool to be here,” [Seth] Rogen said, not skipping a beat.

Beyond the awkward tension surrounding Franco, the evening was otherwise light and fun as cast members ribbed one another and even poked fun at themselves.

During that panel, Apatow recalled Franco as being “already method.” A year after “Freaks and Geeks” ended its run, Franco starred in “James Dean,” a TNT biopic about the iconic method actor. To prepare for the part, Franco began smoking two packs of cigarettes a day, learned to ride a motorcycle, and took up guitar and bongos.

"The Deuce Pilot HBO Productions 2015 1114 Avenue of the Americas New York City 10036 Characters: James Franco- Vincent Gary Carr- C.C. Margarita Leveiva- Abby Amber Skye Noyes- Ellen Don Harvey- Flanagan

James Franco in “The Deuce”

Paul Schiraldi Photography/HBO

Franco has been accused of hitting a scene partner as part of a “back story,” removing protective guards over someone’s genitals during an orgy scene in his film “The Long Home,” and throwing a tantrum because an acting student wouldn’t take off her top. That’s not method acting; it’s assault.

“The Deuce” aims to celebrate sexuality, humanize sex workers, and contextualize the porn industry, and often achieves these admirable goals. However, “The Deuce” is compromised as long as it employs an alleged sexual abuser. Neither Simon nor HBO pursued any formal or proactive investigation into Franco’s conduct on the set of “The Deuce,” a show with multiple sex scenes in almost every episode. However, Simon did hire an “intimacy coordinator” to facilitate the filming of sex scenes for Season Two.

As HBO prepared to shoot Season 2 of “The Deuce,” co-creator David Simon released the following statement: “Personally I can only speak knowledgeably to ‘The Deuce.’ I’ve checked with all my fellow producers and other personnel. We have no complainant or complaint or any awareness of any incident of concern involving Mr. Franco. Nor has HBO been approached with any complaint. In our experience, he was entirely professional as an actor, director and producer.”

When asked how “The Deuce” had changed since #MeToo, Simon told Rolling Stone: “I felt like we were the right show for the moment. That if you are really interested in discussing the culture of Weinstein and [James] Toback, how ingrained it is and how it’s perfectly framed within the vernacular of how men view women, we had a lot to say about that.” Coming from the man who created what is arguably the smartest television show of all time with “The Wire,” that statement seems willfully ignorant.

The Season Two premiere opened with Frankie (Franco) surrounded by topless women, waltzing into the peepshow he runs with his twin brother Vinny (also Franco). Later in the episode, Vinny walks onto a porn set run by Candy (Maggie Gyllenhaal). As nude women saunter past, that expression of sheepish bewilderment is Franco at his least believable.

Busy Philips Says James Franco Physically Assaulted Her On ‘Freaks And Geeks’ Set

In Busy Philipps’ memoir This Will Only Hurt a Little, she shares candid stories about her life, but the title isn’t just a title. In the book, she recalls an incident on the set of the cult TV teen dramedy Freaks and Geeks when James Franc…

In Busy Philipps’ memoir This Will Only Hurt a Little, she shares candid stories about her life, but the title isn’t just a title. In the book, she recalls an incident on the set of the cult TV teen dramedy Freaks and Geeks when James Franco physically assaulted her. According to Radar Online and Yahoo Entertainment, the memoir, which will be released Oct. 16, has a passage where Philipps describes a scene where she had to gently hit Franco’s character on the chest during…

Busy Philipps Says James Franco Physically Assaulted Her on ‘Freaks and Geeks’ Set

Actress Busy Philipps doesn’t mince her words when it comes to describing her former co-star James Franco’s behavior while they filmed the 1999 TV series “Freaks and Geeks.” She says Franco was a “f—ing” bully …

Actress Busy Philipps doesn’t mince her words when it comes to describing her former co-star James Franco’s behavior while they filmed the 1999 TV series “Freaks and Geeks.” She says Franco was a “f—ing” bully on set and once shoved her to the ground. In an excerpt from Philipps’ upcoming memoir, “This Will Only Hurt a […]

Busy Philipps Says James Franco Was a ‘F—ing Bully’ on Set of ‘Freaks and Geeks’

Busy Philipps says in her new book that James Franco once threw her to the ground during the filming of their teen dramedy “Freaks and Geeks” in 1999, Radar Online reports.

Radar said that in her book “This Will Only Hurt a Little,” Philipps said she was left flat on her back, with the “wind knocked out” of her. In the scene, her character was to hit Franco’s character in the chest as she delivered a line. But Philipps said that when she did, Franco threw her to the ground, Radar said.

“He grabbed both my arms and screamed in my face, ‘DON’T EVER TOUCH ME AGAIN!’” she wrote in the book, according to Radar. “And he threw me to the ground. Flat on my back. Wind knocked out of me.” She also wrote that Franco was a “f—ing bully.”

Also Read: Busy Philipps Says She Was Raped at 14: ‘It’s Taken Me 25 Years to Say Those Words’

According to the site, Philipps wrote that bystanders on set were horrified and that her co-star Linda Cardellini suggested she tell her manager about the incident. Franco apologized the next day after being told to do so by the director and producers, Philipps wrote.

A rep for Franco did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment on Monday, nor did a rep for Philipps or the publisher, Simon & Schuster.

Franco was accused by five women of sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior, the Los Angeles Times reported in January. At the time, his attorney, Michael Plonsker, disputed the women’s accusations to the Times.

Philipps also says in the memoir she was sexually assaulted as a teenager, and said last week on Ellen Degeneres’ talk show that she wanted to share more than just “fun, Hollywood stories” in the book.

“I’ve been kind of waiting my whole life for someone to ask me to write a book about myself,” Philipps said. “But I did want to have it be a little bit revealing because I feel like, you know there are the fun, Hollywood stories — I’ve been an actor in this business since I was 19 years old — and there’s all that fun stuff, but I also was really interested in where I came from and sort of the harder things in my life that I’ve faced and I wanted to put that in there for people as well.”

“This Will Only Hurt a Little” is out on Oct. 16.

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Busy Philipps says in her new book that James Franco once threw her to the ground during the filming of their teen dramedy “Freaks and Geeks” in 1999, Radar Online reports.

Radar said that in her book “This Will Only Hurt a Little,” Philipps said she was left flat on her back, with the “wind knocked out” of her. In the scene, her character was to hit Franco’s character in the chest as she delivered a line. But Philipps said that when she did, Franco threw her to the ground, Radar said.

“He grabbed both my arms and screamed in my face, ‘DON’T EVER TOUCH ME AGAIN!'” she wrote in the book, according to Radar. “And he threw me to the ground. Flat on my back. Wind knocked out of me.” She also wrote that Franco was a “f—ing bully.”

According to the site, Philipps wrote that bystanders on set were horrified and that her co-star Linda Cardellini suggested she tell her manager about the incident. Franco apologized the next day after being told to do so by the director and producers, Philipps wrote.

A rep for Franco did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment on Monday, nor did a rep for Philipps or the publisher, Simon & Schuster.

Franco was accused by five women of sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior, the Los Angeles Times reported in January. At the time, his attorney, Michael Plonsker, disputed the women’s accusations to the Times.

Philipps also says in the memoir she was sexually assaulted as a teenager, and said last week on Ellen Degeneres’ talk show that she wanted to share more than just “fun, Hollywood stories” in the book.

“I’ve been kind of waiting my whole life for someone to ask me to write a book about myself,” Philipps said. “But I did want to have it be a little bit revealing because I feel like, you know there are the fun, Hollywood stories — I’ve been an actor in this business since I was 19 years old — and there’s all that fun stuff, but I also was really interested in where I came from and sort of the harder things in my life that I’ve faced and I wanted to put that in there for people as well.”

“This Will Only Hurt a Little” is out on Oct. 16.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Busy Phillips Looks Nothing Like Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Can't Believe Anti-Trump Activist Mixed Them Up

'Banshee' Co-Creator to Rewrite 'Mule' for Todd Phillips, Warner Bros. (Exclusive)

19 One-Season Shows You Need to Watch, From 'The Get Down' to 'The Tick' (Photos)

'Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt': Jon Hamm and Amy Sedaris to Reprise Guest Roles for Final Season

Busy Philipps Calls Out James Franco for Physically Assaulting Her on ‘Freaks and Geeks’ Set

“He threw me to the ground. Flat on my back. Wind knocked out of me,” Philipps writes in her upcoming memoir.

Busy Philips’ upcoming memoir, “This Will Only Hurt a Little,” includes a passage in which the actress looks back on a physical altercation that took place between James Franco and herself on the set of their comedy-drama television series “Freaks and Geeks.” The book excerpt was first released by Radar Online and has been verified by Yahoo Entertainment.

The physical altercation between Franco and Philips occurred during a “Freaks and Geeks” scene in which Philips’ character had to gently hit Franco’s character in the chest while delivering a line. Franco allegedly broke character and got upset with Philipps after she hit him.

“He grabbed both my arms and screamed in my face, ‘DON’T EVER TOUCH ME AGAIN!’” Philipps writes in the book. “And he threw me to the ground. Flat on my back. Wind knocked out of me.”

Philipps calls Franco a “fucking bully” while discussing the moment on the set. The actress said everybody on set was horrified when he pushed her to the ground and she later told co-star Linda Cardellini about what happened. Cardellini advised Philipps to call her manager and report the incident. According to Philipps, Franco apologized the next day because he was ordered to do so by directors and producers, but he was never formally punished for what occurred.

Philipps’ allegation arrives less than a year after five women accused Franco of sexual misconduct and/or harassment in an article published January 11 by The Los Angeles Times. Franco has remained largely out of the spotlight since the allegations went public. The actor can currently be seen in the second season of HBO’s “The Deuce,” and he has a supporting role in the Coen brothers’ “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs,” opening in theaters and on Netflix November 16.

Philipps’ memoir, “This Will Only Hurt a Little,” is available to purchase October 16. IndieWire has reached out to Franco’s representative for further comment.

‘The Deuce’ Starring James Franco Renewed For Third & Final Season By HBO

Two episode into The Deuce‘s sophomore run on HBO, the premium cable network has renewed it for a third and has set an end date. Season 3 will be the period drama’ final installment.
Created by George Pelecanos and David Simon and starring …

Two episode into The Deuce‘s sophomore run on HBO, the premium cable network has renewed it for a third and has set an end date. Season 3 will be the period drama’ final installment. Created by George Pelecanos and David Simon and starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Deuce follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York's Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world…

‘The Deuce’ Renewed for Third and Final Season at HBO, Completing the Creators’ Original Plan

David Simon and George Pellecanos will get to finish their latest masterpiece, but will Candy get to make her own?

The Deuce” will give viewers one final peek into Manhattan’s seedy former glory. HBO has renewed David Simon and George Pellecanos’ drama for Season 3, the last in the series.

For anyone thinking this is a reactionary move given the scandals surrounding star James Franco, think again: Simon and Pellecanos have been on the record about a three-season plan since before their latest drama debuted, and Franco will remain a part of the narrative in its final season.

Simon confirmed as much on Twitter, releasing a photo of the cast and crew with a message of thanks to HBO. “We’re always conjuring the last scene before we write the first,” Simon said. “So much the better when we work for people who allow us to consistently plan, arc and execute as intended.” Read the full statement below.

Starring Franco as twin brothers and Maggie Gyllenhaal (who also produces) as a prostitute-turned-filmmaker Eileen “Candy” Merrell, Season 3 is expected to jump into the mid-’80s, after Season 2 saw a time jump from 1971 to 1977.

The drama’s linear ratings for Season 2 have been down slightly from the first season. Season 1 averaged just under 900,000 viewers per episode, with the finale pulling in a season low of 774,000 watchers. Season 2 has only aired two episodes, but neither topped that figured, snagging just over 600,000 per week.

Reviews, however, have remained strong. Season 1 earned a very high average score of 85 on Metacritic.com, and Season 2 improved on that number by one point. Simon and Pellecanos’ former series, including “The Wire” and “Show Me a Hero,” earned similar raves and low ratings, making their work valuable prestige properties for a network that values quality.

No timeline was provided regarding a release date, but the final season is expected in 2019. Here’s the official logline for “The Deuce”:

Starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce” follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York’s Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world that existed there until the rise of HIV, the violence of the cocaine epidemic and the renewed real estate market all ended the bawdy turbulence.

HBO Renews David Simon’s ‘The Deuce’ for Third and Final Season

HBO has renewed its David Simon-helmed drama, “The Deuce” for a third and final season.

Starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce” follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York’s Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world that existed there until the rise of HIV, the violence of the cocaine epidemic and the renewed real estate market all ended the bawdy turbulence.

The second season of the drama premiered on Sept. 9.

Also Read: ‘The Deuce’ Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as ‘F–bonnet for Our Time’

“The Deuce” is from Simon and co-creator George Pelecanos. Franco, Nina Noble and Richard Price are executive producers, with Gyllenhaal and Marc Henry Johnson as producers.

Simon, who also created HBO’s “The Wire” and “Treme” has a habit of wrapping up his series quickly. “The Wire” ran for five seasons, with the fifth getting a shorter run, while the New Orleans-based “Treme” had just 36 episodes over four seasons.

On Twitter, Simon thanked HBO for “the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story.”

We’re always conjuring the last scene before we write the first. So much the better when we work for people who allow us to consistently plan, arc and execute as intended. Thanks, @HBO, for the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story. pic.twitter.com/B1cOuady1X

— David Simon (@AoDespair) September 20, 2018

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‘The Deuce’ Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as ‘F—bonnet for Our Time’

HBO ‘Felt Comfortable’ Proceeding With ‘The Deuce’ After Reviewing James Franco Accusations

‘The Deuce’ Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our ‘Broken, Misogynistic Culture’

HBO has renewed its David Simon-helmed drama, “The Deuce” for a third and final season.

Starring James Franco and Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce” follows the story of the legalization and subsequent rise of the porn industry in New York’s Times Square from the early 1970s through the mid-1980s, exploring the rough-and-tumble world that existed there until the rise of HIV, the violence of the cocaine epidemic and the renewed real estate market all ended the bawdy turbulence.

The second season of the drama premiered on Sept. 9.

“The Deuce” is from Simon and co-creator George Pelecanos. Franco, Nina Noble and Richard Price are executive producers, with Gyllenhaal and Marc Henry Johnson as producers.

Simon, who also created HBO’s “The Wire” and “Treme” has a habit of wrapping up his series quickly. “The Wire” ran for five seasons, with the fifth getting a shorter run, while the New Orleans-based “Treme” had just 36 episodes over four seasons.

On Twitter, Simon thanked HBO for “the third and final season renewal and the chance for #thedeuce to tell its full story.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Deuce' Creator Slams Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey as 'F—bonnet for Our Time'

HBO 'Felt Comfortable' Proceeding With 'The Deuce' After Reviewing James Franco Accusations

'The Deuce' Star Maggie Gyllenhaal Says Show Exposes Our 'Broken, Misogynistic Culture'

‘The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs’ Trailer: James Franco Hangs Out In Coen Bros’ Netflix Western Anthology

Joel and Ethan Coen’s Netflix six-parter The Ballad of Buster Scruggs took the Best Screenplay award at the Venice Film Festival last weekend, and this new trailer shows what the buzz was about.
“First time?” asks an about-to-be-hange…

Joel and Ethan Coen’s Netflix six-parter The Ballad of Buster Scruggs took the Best Screenplay award at the Venice Film Festival last weekend, and this new trailer shows what the buzz was about. “First time?” asks an about-to-be-hanged James Franco (at his glib and goofy best) to the doomed, sobbing prisoner next to him. The Western anthology is a series of tales about the American frontier, each chapter offering a distinct story about the West. As one character says in…

‘The Ballad of Buster Scruggs’ Film Review: Coen Brothers Western Anthology Makes for an Uneven Binge

The Coen Brothers turned their anthology TV series into an anthology feature film, so it’s only natural that this forced-binge experience will be premiering on Netflix.

And while the Coens claim in the press notes for “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” that they were inspired by “those films made in Italy in the ’60s which set side-by-side the work of different directors on a common theme,” they were apparently so inspired that they made an anthology movie as wildly uneven as the ones they’re aping. (The 1968 “Spirits of the Dead” gave us Fellini’s sublime “Toby Dammit,” yes, but no one ever talks about Roger Vadim’s silly contribution “Metzengerstein.”)

None of the Coens’ tales of the Old West is an outright dud, but the movie never matches the eponymous opening sequence, starring Tim Blake Nelson as a white-hatted singing cowboy with a tune in his heart, a kind word for everyone he meets, and an exceedingly itchy trigger finger. It’s like the collaboration Gene Autry and Sam Peckinpah never made, and it captures the Coens at their best: self-reflexive, absurdist, witty and outrageous.

See Photos: Hollywood Filmmaker Brothers, From the Russos to the Weinsteins

The rest of the film struggles to match this opening bit’s delightful energy, but there are delights to be discovered along the way: James Franco’s would-be bank robber cheats death, only to have death cheat back; a traveling theatrical producer (Liam Neeson) reaches a crossroads with his unusual but talented orator (Harry Melling, “The Lost City of Z”); a grizzled prospector (Tom Waits, who can do “grizzled” with one hand tied behind his back) makes a discovery and must protect it; an unmarried pioneer woman (Zoe Kazan) tentatively explores romance with the wagonmaster (Bill Heck, “Pit Stop”) on her way to Oregon; a quintet of passengers (including Brendan Gleeson, Tyne Daly and Saul Rubinek) take a stagecoach to an uncertain destination.

The fact that these vignettes were originally conceived as discrete TV episodes comes through pretty clearly, as there don’t seem to be many unifying themes or ideas at play, except maybe for a running gag that randomly inserts a French person into almost every story for no apparent reason. Some of them make the case that the American West was settled almost entirely by rogues, thieves and murderers, while others contradict that notion.

Also Read: Coen Brothers, Barry Jenkins’ New Films to Play at New York Film Festival

The change in perspective does allow the Coens to explore different facets of their own interests in Westerns as a genre; the wagon-train sequence calls to mind John Ford, while the James Franco tale (mainly a shaggy-dog story that builds to a nifty punchline) has more of the spiky humor of Sergio Leone. And they’ve perhaps never leaned into the grandeur of nature as they do with the prospector story, laden with big sky and tall trees and rushing rivers.

The Coens and casting director Ellen Chenoweth (“Suburbicon”) skillfully blend familiar faces with relatively new ones. Among the names to remember here are Melling (giving a great performance as a performer, and you’d never guess he used to play Dudley Dursley in the “Harry Potter” movies) and Heck, as well as Irish actor Jonjo O’Neill (“On Chesil Beach”), who plays Gleeson’s business partner; he’s got a skill for that specific brand of Coen acting — almost but not quite overdoing it, invisible pivots from comedy to menace — that suggest they’ll be using him again soon.

Also Read: ‘Murphy Brown’ Revival Casts Tyne Daly as Pat Corley’s Sister

Not that the marquee names aren’t terrific as well. Daly and Rubinek (and Chelcie Ross, as an eccentric old trapper) have a hilarious anti-chemistry, made all the more amusing by the close quarters of the stagecoach. And Kazan has perhaps never been better, playing a woman unafraid to venture deeper into the untamed West because she reckons it can’t be any worse than what she’s leaving behind.

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” will be, at best, a charming footnote in the Coens’ career, a project they enjoyed doing, and possibly even more enjoyed turning into a film so they can keep their résumé free of episodic television. As Netflix binges go, it’s a pretty good one, but be ready to love some episodes more than others.

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The Coen Brothers turned their anthology TV series into an anthology feature film, so it’s only natural that this forced-binge experience will be premiering on Netflix.

And while the Coens claim in the press notes for “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” that they were inspired by “those films made in Italy in the ’60s which set side-by-side the work of different directors on a common theme,” they were apparently so inspired that they made an anthology movie as wildly uneven as the ones they’re aping. (The 1968 “Spirits of the Dead” gave us Fellini’s sublime “Toby Dammit,” yes, but no one ever talks about Roger Vadim’s silly contribution “Metzengerstein.”)

None of the Coens’ tales of the Old West is an outright dud, but the movie never matches the eponymous opening sequence, starring Tim Blake Nelson as a white-hatted singing cowboy with a tune in his heart, a kind word for everyone he meets, and an exceedingly itchy trigger finger. It’s like the collaboration Gene Autry and Sam Peckinpah never made, and it captures the Coens at their best: self-reflexive, absurdist, witty and outrageous.

The rest of the film struggles to match this opening bit’s delightful energy, but there are delights to be discovered along the way: James Franco’s would-be bank robber cheats death, only to have death cheat back; a traveling theatrical producer (Liam Neeson) reaches a crossroads with his unusual but talented orator (Harry Melling, “The Lost City of Z”); a grizzled prospector (Tom Waits, who can do “grizzled” with one hand tied behind his back) makes a discovery and must protect it; an unmarried pioneer woman (Zoe Kazan) tentatively explores romance with the wagonmaster (Bill Heck, “Pit Stop”) on her way to Oregon; a quintet of passengers (including Brendan Gleeson, Tyne Daly and Saul Rubinek) take a stagecoach to an uncertain destination.

The fact that these vignettes were originally conceived as discrete TV episodes comes through pretty clearly, as there don’t seem to be many unifying themes or ideas at play, except maybe for a running gag that randomly inserts a French person into almost every story for no apparent reason. Some of them make the case that the American West was settled almost entirely by rogues, thieves and murderers, while others contradict that notion.

The change in perspective does allow the Coens to explore different facets of their own interests in Westerns as a genre; the wagon-train sequence calls to mind John Ford, while the James Franco tale (mainly a shaggy-dog story that builds to a nifty punchline) has more of the spiky humor of Sergio Leone. And they’ve perhaps never leaned into the grandeur of nature as they do with the prospector story, laden with big sky and tall trees and rushing rivers.

The Coens and casting director Ellen Chenoweth (“Suburbicon”) skillfully blend familiar faces with relatively new ones. Among the names to remember here are Melling (giving a great performance as a performer, and you’d never guess he used to play Dudley Dursley in the “Harry Potter” movies) and Heck, as well as Irish actor Jonjo O’Neill (“On Chesil Beach”), who plays Gleeson’s business partner; he’s got a skill for that specific brand of Coen acting — almost but not quite overdoing it, invisible pivots from comedy to menace — that suggest they’ll be using him again soon.

Not that the marquee names aren’t terrific as well. Daly and Rubinek (and Chelcie Ross, as an eccentric old trapper) have a hilarious anti-chemistry, made all the more amusing by the close quarters of the stagecoach. And Kazan has perhaps never been better, playing a woman unafraid to venture deeper into the untamed West because she reckons it can’t be any worse than what she’s leaving behind.

“The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” will be, at best, a charming footnote in the Coens’ career, a project they enjoyed doing, and possibly even more enjoyed turning into a film so they can keep their résumé free of episodic television. As Netflix binges go, it’s a pretty good one, but be ready to love some episodes more than others.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Venice Film Festival 2018: Coen Brothers, Alfonso Cuaron, Julian Schnabel to Unveil New Work

Coen Brother Asks Trump to Name Him US Poet Laureate

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‘Kin’ Film Review: Genre Mashup About an Alien Weapon Shoots Itself in the Foot

On television, “Kin” could have been a successful backdoor pilot about two estranged brothers, two motorcycle-riding Daft Punk copycats, a heavily-tattooed James Franco, and the road trip that brings them all together.

On film, it has all of the weird, irresponsible potential of a “Boondock Saints” franchise, insisting that there’s something substantial, cultural climate be damned, in its punky adolescent fantasy about an orphaned black kid who finds a laser pistol. Featuring Dennis Quaid, Zoe Kravitz and Carrie Coon in roles that define “thankless” as Jack Reynor (“Sing Street”) and newcomer Miles Truitt (“Queen Sugar”) soldier bravely through misshapen rhythms of quasi-futuristic fraternal bonding, “Kin” feels like a level up for its co-directors from a short film that was too ambitiously envisioned as a franchise.

Truitt plays Elijah Solinski, the adopted son of Hal (Quaid) and brother of Jimmy (Reynor), an ex-con whose recent stint in prison racked up $60,000 in debt to Taylor Bolek (Franco), a local gun runner. Suspended from school for fighting, Elijah earns money stripping wiring from the walls of local buildings, where one day he finds what looks like a laser pistol, and only he seems to be able to operate it.

Also Read: Jack Reynor Joins Ruth Bader Ginsburg Biopic ‘On The Basis of Sex’

Hal finds out and goes apoplectic; he doesn’t want his adopted son to follow Jimmy’s path, and he’s replaced tenderness and understanding with strict discipline in the wake of his wife’s death. But while doling out a life lesson to Elijah in the hopes of keeping him on the straight and narrow, Hal intercepts Jimmy and Taylor stealing from his safe, and in an ensuing firefight Jimmy, gets out — but Hal doesn’t.

With Taylor hot on their heels, Jimmy tells Elijah that they’re going on a family vacation, and Hal will join them later. Making off with his father’s money, the two of them head towards Lake Tahoe and begin to bond, simultaneously crossing paths with Milly (Kravitz), a stripper happy to liberate herself from an unhappy job. But as the authorities begin to investigate the robbery at Hal’s office, Jimmy grows less and less sure how to tell Elijah that their father is dead, especially given the fact that Taylor is determined to kill them even if they aren’t apprehended by police.

Also Read: ‘Big Little Lies’: Shailene Woodley, Laura Dern, Zoe Kravitz to Return for Season 2

But after Elijah uses the laser pistol to get the trio out of a jam, it alerts two mysterious leather-clad strangers to their location, leading to an intense confrontation — between the three fugitives, Taylor and his crew, the cops, and these new pursuers — that has ramifications far deeper than Jimmy, or especially Elijah, could ever imagine.

Notwithstanding the questionable optics of a 14-year-old black kid wielding (what looks like) a toy gun while cops chase him across the country, most of the race-related issues in “Kin” are either driven by naïveté or overshadowed by much more significant narrative or performance problems. Primarily, there’s the issue of an adopted kid, Elijah, whose birth parents he never knew, raised by an adoptive mother who died and a father who seems pathologically incapable of compassion, who them himself dies. Jimmy is one of those movie screw-ups where everything he does is really not so bad, uh, except for getting their father killed, and then deceiving his little brother about it for several days, not long after his mother died.

The movie at least acknowledges that this is big news, but first-time writer-directors Jonathan and Josh Baker scarcely seem aware of the larger psychological repercussions of either Elijah’s background or his current circumstances, and they handle Jimmy’s revelation in such a cowardly way that somehow, by comparison, Taylor is the only character in the ensemble who emerges with any dignity.

Also Read: HBO ‘Felt Comfortable’ Proceeding With ‘The Deuce’ After Reviewing James Franco Accusations

After “Transformers: Age of Extinction” and “Sing Street,” Reynor has peaked as an actor playing ne’er-do-well characters we’re supposed to love, and here he just seems like a complete a-hole: after being directly responsible for Hal’s death, he steals his money, spends it until he gets in trouble, steals some more, and shepherds Elijah through an odyssey of trouble for which he is not in any way ready, laser pistol or no.

Truitt demonstrates a quiet intensity that audiences will immediately identify with, and which promises terrific things from the young actor, but he’s forced to make believable a sequence of events that barely seem interconnected; the Baker brothers want this to be both a gritty family drama and a sci-fi-laced adventure, but through no fault of Triutt’s — and in fact, despite his admirable effort — the underlying emotions simply do not track. Meanwhile, there’s little else to do while Kravitz is on screen than wonder why someone as talented as she sought the role of a stripper-turned-babysitter whose biggest scene involves taking a personal inventory of abuse to bond with a teenager.

Then of course there’s the Daft Punk duo, mysterious individuals riding motorcycles like a couple of maniacs and whose involvement in Elijah’s journey hints at a wild and operatic future storyline should this first film be a success. But much like Carrie Coon, who shows up as the film is ending to provide one female character who isn’t either dead, a stripper or a junkie, the Bakers seem to have telegraphed their expectations of a bigger and more impressive ending without thinking enough about the journey to get there.

Ultimately, “Kin” probably could have worked as a straightforward drama about two troubled brothers and the parental deaths that bonded them, or maybe it would have succeeded as a “Flight of the Navigator”-style road trip that slowly and skillfully takes on mythic sci-fi proportions. But its chocolate-and-peanut-butter combination of the two feels disjointed and unsatisfying, mostly because it never feels complete or thought through enough, either as a story or more crucially, an emotional experience — which is exactly what audiences would need in order to want to see more.



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Zoe Kravitz on ‘Mad Max’ Desert Set Infighting: ‘You Go Crazy’ (Video)

Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones Together Again for Amazon’s ‘The Aeronauts’

David Harbour Teases ‘Stranger Things’ Season 3 Challenge ‘More Terrifying Than Any Demogorgon’ (Video)

On television, “Kin” could have been a successful backdoor pilot about two estranged brothers, two motorcycle-riding Daft Punk copycats, a heavily-tattooed James Franco, and the road trip that brings them all together.

On film, it has all of the weird, irresponsible potential of a “Boondock Saints” franchise, insisting that there’s something substantial, cultural climate be damned, in its punky adolescent fantasy about an orphaned black kid who finds a laser pistol. Featuring Dennis Quaid, Zoe Kravitz and Carrie Coon in roles that define “thankless” as Jack Reynor (“Sing Street”) and newcomer Miles Truitt (“Queen Sugar”) soldier bravely through misshapen rhythms of quasi-futuristic fraternal bonding, “Kin” feels like a level up for its co-directors from a short film that was too ambitiously envisioned as a franchise.

Truitt plays Elijah Solinski, the adopted son of Hal (Quaid) and brother of Jimmy (Reynor), an ex-con whose recent stint in prison racked up $60,000 in debt to Taylor Bolek (Franco), a local gun runner. Suspended from school for fighting, Elijah earns money stripping wiring from the walls of local buildings, where one day he finds what looks like a laser pistol, and only he seems to be able to operate it.

Hal finds out and goes apoplectic; he doesn’t want his adopted son to follow Jimmy’s path, and he’s replaced tenderness and understanding with strict discipline in the wake of his wife’s death. But while doling out a life lesson to Elijah in the hopes of keeping him on the straight and narrow, Hal intercepts Jimmy and Taylor stealing from his safe, and in an ensuing firefight Jimmy, gets out — but Hal doesn’t.

With Taylor hot on their heels, Jimmy tells Elijah that they’re going on a family vacation, and Hal will join them later. Making off with his father’s money, the two of them head towards Lake Tahoe and begin to bond, simultaneously crossing paths with Milly (Kravitz), a stripper happy to liberate herself from an unhappy job. But as the authorities begin to investigate the robbery at Hal’s office, Jimmy grows less and less sure how to tell Elijah that their father is dead, especially given the fact that Taylor is determined to kill them even if they aren’t apprehended by police.

But after Elijah uses the laser pistol to get the trio out of a jam, it alerts two mysterious leather-clad strangers to their location, leading to an intense confrontation — between the three fugitives, Taylor and his crew, the cops, and these new pursuers — that has ramifications far deeper than Jimmy, or especially Elijah, could ever imagine.

Notwithstanding the questionable optics of a 14-year-old black kid wielding (what looks like) a toy gun while cops chase him across the country, most of the race-related issues in “Kin” are either driven by naïveté or overshadowed by much more significant narrative or performance problems. Primarily, there’s the issue of an adopted kid, Elijah, whose birth parents he never knew, raised by an adoptive mother who died and a father who seems pathologically incapable of compassion, who them himself dies. Jimmy is one of those movie screw-ups where everything he does is really not so bad, uh, except for getting their father killed, and then deceiving his little brother about it for several days, not long after his mother died.

The movie at least acknowledges that this is big news, but first-time writer-directors Jonathan and Josh Baker scarcely seem aware of the larger psychological repercussions of either Elijah’s background or his current circumstances, and they handle Jimmy’s revelation in such a cowardly way that somehow, by comparison, Taylor is the only character in the ensemble who emerges with any dignity.

After “Transformers: Age of Extinction” and “Sing Street,” Reynor has peaked as an actor playing ne’er-do-well characters we’re supposed to love, and here he just seems like a complete a-hole: after being directly responsible for Hal’s death, he steals his money, spends it until he gets in trouble, steals some more, and shepherds Elijah through an odyssey of trouble for which he is not in any way ready, laser pistol or no.

Truitt demonstrates a quiet intensity that audiences will immediately identify with, and which promises terrific things from the young actor, but he’s forced to make believable a sequence of events that barely seem interconnected; the Baker brothers want this to be both a gritty family drama and a sci-fi-laced adventure, but through no fault of Triutt’s — and in fact, despite his admirable effort — the underlying emotions simply do not track. Meanwhile, there’s little else to do while Kravitz is on screen than wonder why someone as talented as she sought the role of a stripper-turned-babysitter whose biggest scene involves taking a personal inventory of abuse to bond with a teenager.

Then of course there’s the Daft Punk duo, mysterious individuals riding motorcycles like a couple of maniacs and whose involvement in Elijah’s journey hints at a wild and operatic future storyline should this first film be a success. But much like Carrie Coon, who shows up as the film is ending to provide one female character who isn’t either dead, a stripper or a junkie, the Bakers seem to have telegraphed their expectations of a bigger and more impressive ending without thinking enough about the journey to get there.

Ultimately, “Kin” probably could have worked as a straightforward drama about two troubled brothers and the parental deaths that bonded them, or maybe it would have succeeded as a “Flight of the Navigator”-style road trip that slowly and skillfully takes on mythic sci-fi proportions. But its chocolate-and-peanut-butter combination of the two feels disjointed and unsatisfying, mostly because it never feels complete or thought through enough, either as a story or more crucially, an emotional experience — which is exactly what audiences would need in order to want to see more.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Seth Rogen on James Franco After Misconduct Accusations: 'Yes' I'll Still Work With Him

Zoe Kravitz on 'Mad Max' Desert Set Infighting: 'You Go Crazy' (Video)

Eddie Redmayne, Felicity Jones Together Again for Amazon's 'The Aeronauts'

David Harbour Teases 'Stranger Things' Season 3 Challenge 'More Terrifying Than Any Demogorgon' (Video)

Will Les Moonves Hang On? Here’s Who Did and Didn’t Keep Their Jobs After #MeToo Accusations (Chart)

Friday marks three weeks since six women accused CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual misconduct in a New Yorker story. But unlike many of the men accused since the start of the #MeToo movement last year, Moonves has held on to his job so far.

What happens next for Moonves depends on a CBS investigation being conducted by two outside law firms. But as our list below shows, losing his job is neither a certainty nor an impossibility. The #MeToo movement that began with the October 2017 accusations against Harvey Weinstein has toppled some of the most powerful men in America, from Charlie Rose to Sen. Al Franken. Others have held on despite serious accusations against them.

Here is a list of a few of the most high-profile men who have been accused of sexual misconduct over the past 10 months, followed by more detail about each case.

Lost All Jobs

Louis C.K.

Five women accused comedian Louis C.K. of exposing himself and masturbating in front of them more than a decade ago.

“These stories are true,” C.K. said in response. “The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.”

HBO, Netflix, and FX severed their ties With C.K. The release of his then-upcoming film, “I Love You, Daddy,” was canceled. In January, TBS announced it would not go forward with C.K.’s animated comedy “The Cops.”

Al Franken

Former Minnesota Sen. Al Franken was accused by eight women of unwanted kissing and groping. Franken issued several statements apologizing in some instances and saying that he did not recall specific details surrounding other accusations. He resigned from the U.S. Senate on Jan. 2.

 

Also Read: Casey Affleck: ‘Trying to Find My Own Culpability’ After #MeToo

Matt Lauer

Several women accused “Today” co-host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct. They included three women who said he made sexual advances, a woman who said she had a consensual sexual relationship with Matt Lauer, which she described as an “abuse of power” and another woman who said she passed out as Lauer assaulted her.

Soon after the first accusations came to light, Lauer issued a statement expressing “sorrow” and “regret.” In April, Lauer issued another statement saying: “Any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false.”

Lauer was fired from NBC in November. 

Brett Ratner

Six women accused director Brett Ranter of sexual misconduct, including harassment, groping and forced oral sex in a Nov. 1, 2017 Los Angeles Times story. Four more women accused him off sexual misconduct in a subsequent L.A. Times story, which said two women accused Ratner of working with Russell Simmons to harass or assault them. Variety reported last November that Beverly Hills police had investigated Ratner and music exec Russell Simmons in 2001 after a woman filed a report alleging that she was a victim of sexual battery. The district attorney’s office declined to file criminal charges due to “insufficient evidence.”

Ratner denied the accusations. He later sued one woman, accusing her of libeling him by accusing him of rape.

Ratner was dropped by Warner Bros., Playboy announced it was putting his Hugh Hefner biopic on hold and liquor giant Diageo discontinued Ratner’s Hilhaven Lodge whiskey.

Charlie Rose

Thirty-five women accused longtime journalist Charlie Rose of sexual misconduct, including obscene phone calls, groping and exposing himself. Rose has apologized for any “inappropriate behavior” but denied the accuracy of the allegations. On Nov. 21, CBS News, PBS and Bloomberg cut ties with Rose.

Also Read: #MeToo Blowback Over the Winds of Change in Hollywood

Russell Simmons

More than a dozen women have accused music mogul Russell Simmons of sexual misconduct, including rape. Simmons has denied the accusations. In November, Simmons stepped down from his companies. Soon after, HBO announced that it was removing his name from “all Def Comedy” shows. In January, Oprah Winfrey said she was deleting Simmons from her new self-help book.

Kevin Spacey

More than 30 men accused Kevin Spacey of sexual of sexual misconduct, including actor Anthony Rapp, who said Spacey made a sexual advance on him when he was 14.

Spacey said he did not “remember the encounter,” and came out as gay. A representative later said Spacey was taking “the time necessary to seek evaluation and treatment.”

In November, Netflix fired Spacey from his hit series “House of Cards.” The streaming service also scrapped his Gore Vidal biopic. Spacey was also cut from Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World,” and replaced with Christopher Plummer. In February, Spacey’s foundation in the U.K. shut down

Spacey’s film “Billionaire Boys Club,” which was shot before the accusations came to light, had a digital and VOD rollout on July 17.

Also Read: ‘Brooklyn Nine Nine’ Writers Are ‘Actively Talking About’ a #MeToo Episode

James Toback

Nearly 400 women have accused director James Toback of sexual misconduct, including actresses Selma Blair, Rachel McAdams and Julianne Moore. Toback denied the allegations. He was dropped by his agent and has not released any work since the Los Angeles Times first reported on the accusations in October. 

Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein has been accused by more than more than 80 women of sexual misconduct. In May, he was indicted on charges of rape in the first and third degrees as well as criminal sexual act in the first degree. In July, Weinstein he was indicted on an additional count of criminal sexual act in the first degree and two counts of predatory sexual assault.

Weinstein has denied “any allegations of non-consensual sex.”

After the first accusations against him were reported by The New York Times, he was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company. Apple axed TWC’s series about Elvis Presley; Amazon canceled an in-development series from David O. Russell that was set to star Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. Weinstein was later ejected from Motion Picture Academy and other major industry guilds.

Steve Wynn

Dozens of women accused casino mogul Steve Wynn of sexual misconduct. The accusations included sexual harassment, exposing himself and one woman who accused him of rape, which prompted a $7.5 million settlement payment from Wynn. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing.

Wynn resigned from his post as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee and as chairman and chief executive of his company, Wynn Resorts.

Lost Some Jobs

Morgan Freeman

Eight women came forward to CNN to accuse actor Morgan Freeman of sexual harassment, including the co-writer of the article, who described a pattern of inappropriate comments and unwanted touching. Freeman apologized, but denied accusations of sexual misconduct.

Visa, which featured Freeman’s voice in its commercials, pulled his ads. In May, TransLink announced it was dropping the idea of using Freeman’s voice for some announcements. He was later replaced with Seth Rogen. 

Morgan continues to appear in films, including Disney’s “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” slated for release in November.

Chris Hardwick

On June 14, Chris Hardwick’s ex-girlfriend, actress Chloe Dykstra, said she suffered sexual and emotional abuse from an unnamed ex-boyfriend in a Medium post. Hardwick denied the allegations. He was suspended from AMC, NBC, and the website Nerdist pending an investigation. During his suspension, AMC announced Hardwick would “step aside” from moderating planned AMC and BBC America panels at Comic-Con International in San Diego in July. 

On July 25, AMC announced Hardwick was cleared to return to work. NBC and Nerdist also reinstated Hardwick.

Garrison Keillor

On Nov. 29, Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” was fired by Minnesota Public Radio following sexual misconduct accusations. Keillor later said he had been fired for putting his hand “on a woman’s bare back.” But an investigation by MPR News, published in January, said Keillor had engaged in “years-long pattern of behavior that left several women who worked for Keillor feeling mistreated, sexualized or belittled.”

Keillor denied the accusations.

MPR announced in November it was firing Keillor and would no longer distribute his show “The Writer’s Almanac.” The company also said it was rebranding his former show, “A Prairie Home Companion” under a new name, “Live From Here.” In January, the University of Minnesota removed a plaque bearing his name from its Scholars Walk. In April, Keillor wrote that he was “ready to start up both shows again.” Keillor continues to writes a column for the Union Leader newspaper in New Hampshire.

R. Kelly

Parents of three women said that Kelly was keeping them from their daughters, according to BuzzFeed, which used the word “cult” in quotation marks to describe their living conditions. Another woman later told BuzzFeed that Kelly had sexually abused her. Kelly, who was found not guilty on child pornography charges in 2008, has denied all of the most recent accusations.

A #MuteRKelly hashtag led to the cancellation of several of his concerts. After banning Kelly from its official playlists in May under its “Hate Content and Hateful Conduct policy,” Spotify began streaming his music again in June, following intense backlash from users. Apple Music and Pandora also pulled Kelly’s music from their editorial playlists but his music is still available on all these platforms.

Kelly, who has been touring with singer Charlie Wilson, also dismissed the accusations last month in a song entitled “I Admit.” According to Spin, he is scheduled to perform at the Hulu Theatre at New York City’s Madison Square Garden next month.

John Lasseter

The Hollywood Reporter said “multiple” Pixar insiders accused John Lasseter, then the most powerful man in animation, of unwanted touching, kissing, and comments about people’s physical attributes. Lasseter apologized for what he called “missteps.” 

After a six-month leave of absence, Lasseter announced he was leaving Disney at the end of 2018.

Jeremy Piven

Eight women have accused actor Jeremy Piven of sexual misconduct, including assault. 

Piven denied the accusations, saying he had passed a lie detector test. “As evidenced by the lie detector test I took and passed, I have never forced myself on anyone, nor have I ever exposed myself or restrained anyone against their will,” he told BuzzFeed.

“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” killed a pre-recorded Piven interview. CBS announced it was pulling the plug on Piven’s show, “Wisdom of the Crowd,” citing poor ratings. In July, Piven told Fox 11’s “Good Day L.A.” he was trying his hand at comedy.

Also Read: Anita Hill Calls on Men to ‘Step Up’ in #MeToo Era: ‘There Are No Innocent Bystanders’ (Video)

Tavis Smiley

In December, talk show host Tavis Smiley was suspended by PBS following a sexual misconduct investigation which concluded that Smiley had engaged in sexual relationships with multiple subordinates and created an abusive and threatening environment.

Smiley admitted to past relationships but denied any misconduct. But Public Radio International ended its relationship with Smiley, as did Mills Entertainment, which had been producing his theatrical retelling of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; the production was suspended.

In January, Smiley announced a new show, “The Upside with Tavis Smiley,” on The Word Network. He later went on a five-city tour discussing relationships between men and women in the workplace. He is also working on an upcoming book, “Leading by Listening.”

In February, Smiley filed a lawsuit accusing PBS of acting in “a racially hostile manner” over the years. PBS countersued. 

Jeffrey Tambor

Three women accused actor Jeffrey Tambor of sexual misconduct. Tabor apologized for “mean” and “difficult” behavior, but denied the accusations.

In February, Tambor was fired from his hit Amazon show “Transparent.” That same month, he was removed from a promotional poster for the movie, “The Death of Stalin.” But Tambor remained in the film itself. In June, he was replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park.”

In May, Tambor returned to Netflix’s “Arrested Development” for its fifth season.

Kept All Jobs

John Bailey

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said it received three claims of sexual harassment against its president, John Bailey. No details about the nature of the claims has been released.

Bailey denied the accusations. “That did not happen,” he wrote in a memo to staff obtained by TheWrap.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced in March that an internal investigation had cleared Bailey.

David Copperfield

In January, model Brittney Lewis accused magician David Copperfield of drugging and raping her in 1988, when she was 17.

Copperfield did not address the rape accusations directly. Instead, he tweeted support for the #MeToo movement and asked people not to “rush to judgment.” He continues to perform his magic show at Las Vegas’ MGM Grand.

James Franco

Five women accused James Franco of subjecting them to sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior. 

Franco’s attorney denied Paley’s allegations, calling them “not accurate.”

The actor returns next month for the second season of HBO’s ’70s-set series “The Deuce.”

Nev Schulman

In May, a woman who appeared in his MTV series “Catfish” accused the show’s host, Nev Schulman, of pressuring her into having sex with him. Schulman called the accusations “false.”

After initially halting production on his show “Catfish,”  MTV announced it would resume production after an investigation found the claims “not credible and without merit.”

Ryan Seacrest

Ryan Seacrest was accused of sexual misconduct by his former stylist, Suzie Hardy, who said that the abuse included “grinding his erect penis against her while clad only in his underwear, groping her vagina, and at one point slapping her buttock so hard that it left a large welt still visible hours later.” 

Seacrest denied the accusations. 

In February, E! announced an investigation into allegations of misconduct by Seacrest found “insufficient evidence to support the claims.” He continued to host a wide range of shows on radio and TV, including ABC’s “American Idol” and the daily talk show “Live With Kelly & Ryan.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stephen Colbert Says He Got No Pushback From CBS on Les Moonves Monologue (Video)

CBS to Fold Charlie Rose Investigation Into Les Moonves Probe

‘Murphy Brown’ Revival Will Have #MeToo Episode; Diane English Addresses Les Moonves Accusations

Friday marks three weeks since six women accused CBS CEO Leslie Moonves of sexual misconduct in a New Yorker story. But unlike many of the men accused since the start of the #MeToo movement last year, Moonves has held on to his job so far.

What happens next for Moonves depends on a CBS investigation being conducted by two outside law firms. But as our list below shows, losing his job is neither a certainty nor an impossibility. The #MeToo movement that began with the October 2017 accusations against Harvey Weinstein has toppled some of the most powerful men in America, from Charlie Rose to Sen. Al Franken. Others have held on despite serious accusations against them.

Here is a list of a few of the most high-profile men who have been accused of sexual misconduct over the past 10 months, followed by more detail about each case.

Lost All Jobs

Louis C.K.

Five women accused comedian Louis C.K. of exposing himself and masturbating in front of them more than a decade ago.

“These stories are true,” C.K. said in response. “The power I had over these women is that they admired me. And I wielded that power irresponsibly.”

HBO, Netflix, and FX severed their ties With C.K. The release of his then-upcoming film, “I Love You, Daddy,” was canceled. In January, TBS announced it would not go forward with C.K.’s animated comedy “The Cops.”

Al Franken

Former Minnesota Sen. Al Franken was accused by eight women of unwanted kissing and groping. Franken issued several statements apologizing in some instances and saying that he did not recall specific details surrounding other accusations. He resigned from the U.S. Senate on Jan. 2.

 

Matt Lauer

Several women accused “Today” co-host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct. They included three women who said he made sexual advances, a woman who said she had a consensual sexual relationship with Matt Lauer, which she described as an “abuse of power” and another woman who said she passed out as Lauer assaulted her.

Soon after the first accusations came to light, Lauer issued a statement expressing “sorrow” and “regret.” In April, Lauer issued another statement saying: “Any allegations or reports of coercive, aggressive or abusive actions on my part, at any time, are absolutely false.”

Lauer was fired from NBC in November. 

Brett Ratner

Six women accused director Brett Ranter of sexual misconduct, including harassment, groping and forced oral sex in a Nov. 1, 2017 Los Angeles Times story. Four more women accused him off sexual misconduct in a subsequent L.A. Times story, which said two women accused Ratner of working with Russell Simmons to harass or assault them. Variety reported last November that Beverly Hills police had investigated Ratner and music exec Russell Simmons in 2001 after a woman filed a report alleging that she was a victim of sexual battery. The district attorney’s office declined to file criminal charges due to “insufficient evidence.”

Ratner denied the accusations. He later sued one woman, accusing her of libeling him by accusing him of rape.

Ratner was dropped by Warner Bros., Playboy announced it was putting his Hugh Hefner biopic on hold and liquor giant Diageo discontinued Ratner’s Hilhaven Lodge whiskey.

Charlie Rose

Thirty-five women accused longtime journalist Charlie Rose of sexual misconduct, including obscene phone calls, groping and exposing himself. Rose has apologized for any “inappropriate behavior” but denied the accuracy of the allegations. On Nov. 21, CBS News, PBS and Bloomberg cut ties with Rose.

Russell Simmons

More than a dozen women have accused music mogul Russell Simmons of sexual misconduct, including rape. Simmons has denied the accusations. In November, Simmons stepped down from his companies. Soon after, HBO announced that it was removing his name from “all Def Comedy” shows. In January, Oprah Winfrey said she was deleting Simmons from her new self-help book.

Kevin Spacey

More than 30 men accused Kevin Spacey of sexual of sexual misconduct, including actor Anthony Rapp, who said Spacey made a sexual advance on him when he was 14.

Spacey said he did not “remember the encounter,” and came out as gay. A representative later said Spacey was taking “the time necessary to seek evaluation and treatment.”

In November, Netflix fired Spacey from his hit series “House of Cards.” The streaming service also scrapped his Gore Vidal biopic. Spacey was also cut from Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World,” and replaced with Christopher Plummer. In February, Spacey’s foundation in the U.K. shut down

Spacey’s film “Billionaire Boys Club,” which was shot before the accusations came to light, had a digital and VOD rollout on July 17.

James Toback

Nearly 400 women have accused director James Toback of sexual misconduct, including actresses Selma Blair, Rachel McAdams and Julianne Moore. Toback denied the allegations. He was dropped by his agent and has not released any work since the Los Angeles Times first reported on the accusations in October. 

Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein has been accused by more than more than 80 women of sexual misconduct. In May, he was indicted on charges of rape in the first and third degrees as well as criminal sexual act in the first degree. In July, Weinstein he was indicted on an additional count of criminal sexual act in the first degree and two counts of predatory sexual assault.

Weinstein has denied “any allegations of non-consensual sex.”

After the first accusations against him were reported by The New York Times, he was fired by the board of The Weinstein Company. Apple axed TWC’s series about Elvis Presley; Amazon canceled an in-development series from David O. Russell that was set to star Robert De Niro and Julianne Moore. Weinstein was later ejected from Motion Picture Academy and other major industry guilds.

Steve Wynn

Dozens of women accused casino mogul Steve Wynn of sexual misconduct. The accusations included sexual harassment, exposing himself and one woman who accused him of rape, which prompted a $7.5 million settlement payment from Wynn. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing.

Wynn resigned from his post as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee and as chairman and chief executive of his company, Wynn Resorts.

Lost Some Jobs

Morgan Freeman

Eight women came forward to CNN to accuse actor Morgan Freeman of sexual harassment, including the co-writer of the article, who described a pattern of inappropriate comments and unwanted touching. Freeman apologized, but denied accusations of sexual misconduct.

Visa, which featured Freeman’s voice in its commercials, pulled his ads. In May, TransLink announced it was dropping the idea of using Freeman’s voice for some announcements. He was later replaced with Seth Rogen. 

Morgan continues to appear in films, including Disney’s “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” slated for release in November.

Chris Hardwick

On June 14, Chris Hardwick’s ex-girlfriend, actress Chloe Dykstra, said she suffered sexual and emotional abuse from an unnamed ex-boyfriend in a Medium post. Hardwick denied the allegations. He was suspended from AMC, NBC, and the website Nerdist pending an investigation. During his suspension, AMC announced Hardwick would “step aside” from moderating planned AMC and BBC America panels at Comic-Con International in San Diego in July. 

On July 25, AMC announced Hardwick was cleared to return to work. NBC and Nerdist also reinstated Hardwick.

Garrison Keillor

On Nov. 29, Garrison Keillor, the creator and former host of “A Prairie Home Companion,” was fired by Minnesota Public Radio following sexual misconduct accusations. Keillor later said he had been fired for putting his hand “on a woman’s bare back.” But an investigation by MPR News, published in January, said Keillor had engaged in “years-long pattern of behavior that left several women who worked for Keillor feeling mistreated, sexualized or belittled.”

Keillor denied the accusations.

MPR announced in November it was firing Keillor and would no longer distribute his show “The Writer’s Almanac.” The company also said it was rebranding his former show, “A Prairie Home Companion” under a new name, “Live From Here.” In January, the University of Minnesota removed a plaque bearing his name from its Scholars Walk. In April, Keillor wrote that he was “ready to start up both shows again.” Keillor continues to writes a column for the Union Leader newspaper in New Hampshire.

R. Kelly

Parents of three women said that Kelly was keeping them from their daughters, according to BuzzFeed, which used the word “cult” in quotation marks to describe their living conditions. Another woman later told BuzzFeed that Kelly had sexually abused her. Kelly, who was found not guilty on child pornography charges in 2008, has denied all of the most recent accusations.

A #MuteRKelly hashtag led to the cancellation of several of his concerts. After banning Kelly from its official playlists in May under its “Hate Content and Hateful Conduct policy,” Spotify began streaming his music again in June, following intense backlash from users. Apple Music and Pandora also pulled Kelly’s music from their editorial playlists but his music is still available on all these platforms.

Kelly, who has been touring with singer Charlie Wilson, also dismissed the accusations last month in a song entitled “I Admit.” According to Spin, he is scheduled to perform at the Hulu Theatre at New York City’s Madison Square Garden next month.

John Lasseter

The Hollywood Reporter said “multiple” Pixar insiders accused John Lasseter, then the most powerful man in animation, of unwanted touching, kissing, and comments about people’s physical attributes. Lasseter apologized for what he called “missteps.” 

After a six-month leave of absence, Lasseter announced he was leaving Disney at the end of 2018.

Jeremy Piven

Eight women have accused actor Jeremy Piven of sexual misconduct, including assault. 

Piven denied the accusations, saying he had passed a lie detector test. “As evidenced by the lie detector test I took and passed, I have never forced myself on anyone, nor have I ever exposed myself or restrained anyone against their will,” he told BuzzFeed.

“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” killed a pre-recorded Piven interview. CBS announced it was pulling the plug on Piven’s show, “Wisdom of the Crowd,” citing poor ratings. In July, Piven told Fox 11’s “Good Day L.A.” he was trying his hand at comedy.

Tavis Smiley

In December, talk show host Tavis Smiley was suspended by PBS following a sexual misconduct investigation which concluded that Smiley had engaged in sexual relationships with multiple subordinates and created an abusive and threatening environment.

Smiley admitted to past relationships but denied any misconduct. But Public Radio International ended its relationship with Smiley, as did Mills Entertainment, which had been producing his theatrical retelling of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.; the production was suspended.

In January, Smiley announced a new show, “The Upside with Tavis Smiley,” on The Word Network. He later went on a five-city tour discussing relationships between men and women in the workplace. He is also working on an upcoming book, “Leading by Listening.”

In February, Smiley filed a lawsuit accusing PBS of acting in “a racially hostile manner” over the years. PBS countersued. 

Jeffrey Tambor

Three women accused actor Jeffrey Tambor of sexual misconduct. Tabor apologized for “mean” and “difficult” behavior, but denied the accusations.

In February, Tambor was fired from his hit Amazon show “Transparent.” That same month, he was removed from a promotional poster for the movie, “The Death of Stalin.” But Tambor remained in the film itself. In June, he was replaced as voice talent in Paramount’s upcoming animated offering “Wonder Park.”

In May, Tambor returned to Netflix’s “Arrested Development” for its fifth season.

Kept All Jobs

John Bailey

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences said it received three claims of sexual harassment against its president, John Bailey. No details about the nature of the claims has been released.

Bailey denied the accusations. “That did not happen,” he wrote in a memo to staff obtained by TheWrap.

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced in March that an internal investigation had cleared Bailey.

David Copperfield

In January, model Brittney Lewis accused magician David Copperfield of drugging and raping her in 1988, when she was 17.

Copperfield did not address the rape accusations directly. Instead, he tweeted support for the #MeToo movement and asked people not to “rush to judgment.” He continues to perform his magic show at Las Vegas’ MGM Grand.

James Franco

Five women accused James Franco of subjecting them to sexually exploitative or inappropriate behavior. 

Franco’s attorney denied Paley’s allegations, calling them “not accurate.”

The actor returns next month for the second season of HBO’s ’70s-set series “The Deuce.”

Nev Schulman

In May, a woman who appeared in his MTV series “Catfish” accused the show’s host, Nev Schulman, of pressuring her into having sex with him. Schulman called the accusations “false.”

After initially halting production on his show “Catfish,”  MTV announced it would resume production after an investigation found the claims “not credible and without merit.”

Ryan Seacrest

Ryan Seacrest was accused of sexual misconduct by his former stylist, Suzie Hardy, who said that the abuse included “grinding his erect penis against her while clad only in his underwear, groping her vagina, and at one point slapping her buttock so hard that it left a large welt still visible hours later.” 

Seacrest denied the accusations. 

In February, E! announced an investigation into allegations of misconduct by Seacrest found “insufficient evidence to support the claims.” He continued to host a wide range of shows on radio and TV, including ABC’s “American Idol” and the daily talk show “Live With Kelly & Ryan.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stephen Colbert Says He Got No Pushback From CBS on Les Moonves Monologue (Video)

CBS to Fold Charlie Rose Investigation Into Les Moonves Probe

'Murphy Brown' Revival Will Have #MeToo Episode; Diane English Addresses Les Moonves Accusations

Seth Rogen Shares ‘Pineapple Express’ Facts on Its 10th Anniversary

On the 10th anniversary of Seth Rogen and Judd Apatow’s action-comedy film “Pineapple Express,” Rogen took to Twitter to share with his fans some fun facts about the cannabis-packed film’s production. See some of the highlights …

On the 10th anniversary of Seth Rogen and Judd Apatow’s action-comedy film “Pineapple Express,” Rogen took to Twitter to share with his fans some fun facts about the cannabis-packed film’s production. See some of the highlights below. Rogen and Co-Writer Evan Goldberg Rolled 100 Joints for the Film According to Rogen’s Twitter account, the 100 […]

Seth Rogen Tweets ‘Pineapple Express’ Facts on 10-Year Anniversary of Stoner Comedy

Seth Rogen blessed “Pineapple Express” fans with an impressive array of “fun facts” about the stoner comedy which celebrated its 10th anniversary Monday.

Rogen, who co-wrote the film, took to Twitter to confirm facts tweeted by fans of the film and to offer his own. For example, the origin of its title.

“There was NO strain of weed called #PineappleExpress when we made the movie,” he wrote. “We said ‘if one day, people are out there selling weed called Pineapple Express, it worked.’”

Mission accomplished.

Also Read: Joe Arpaio Tells Sacha Baron Cohen ‘It Wouldn’t Surprise Me’ If Trump Had a ‘Golden Shower’

He said that “Pineapple Express” was actually the name of a Hawaiian weather system — co-writer Evan Goldberg thought it would be a good name for a movie and saved it for the perfect one.

Rogen also revealed that him and co-star James Franco were originally written in to play each other’s roles, marijuana user Dale and marijuana dealer Saul, respectively. Franco asked to switch roles, and Rogen nonchalantly agreed.

In another casting surprise, Stormy Daniels played the ex-wife of dealer Red (Danny McBride), and the two are seen together in a photograph.

Also Read: Seth Rogen Says Stormy Daniels Told Him About Trump Affair 10 Years Ago (Video)

Here are some highlights from Rogen’s Twitter feed:

Kanye came to the premiere of #PineappleExpress. pic.twitter.com/VpOMXHoiJI

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

The song Paper Planes by MIA does not actually appear in the movie #PineappleExpress, just the trailer.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

We DID have a smoking billboard for #PineappleExpress that got shut down by the fire department because people keep thinking it was on fire. https://t.co/UslrDgNyuN

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

While we were filming the scene where Red is taped to the chair in #PineappleExpress, Danny had to actually be taped in the chair all day and we couldn’t let him out because it took too long to put him back. pic.twitter.com/vBmmcRTuiL

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

I did my 99% of my own stunts in #PineappleExpress, (which might explain all the injuries) including this one: pic.twitter.com/DrV9jF1wIS

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

We wrote #PineappleExpress express for me to play Saul and Franco to play Dale. James wanted to switch roles, and I didn’t care that much, so we did.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

The reason Saul wears a headband in #PineappleExpress is the result of another injury. There’s a shot (that’s in the movie) when we are running through the woods, Franco hits his head on a tree. He actually hit his head on a screw that was holding a pad in place and got stitches.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

There was NO strain of weed called #PineappleExpress when we made the movie. We said “if one day, people are out there selling weed called Pineapple Express, it worked”.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

The name #PineappleExpress was around for years before the movie. It’s a Hawaiian weather system that sometimes hits the Pacific Northwest, which is where we’re from. Evan heard the name and said “that would be a great name for a movie.” Years later we found a perfect fit.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

In #PineappleExpress, Red refers to his ex wife having gotten out of jail recently. There’s a pic of Red and his ex wife, who was played by Stormy Daniels.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

In #PineappleExpress, me and my co-writer Evan had to roll all the cross joints needed to film (about 100) ourselves because nobody else on the crew could roll them properly.

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) August 6, 2018

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Seth Rogen blessed “Pineapple Express” fans with an impressive array of “fun facts” about the stoner comedy which celebrated its 10th anniversary Monday.

Rogen, who co-wrote the film, took to Twitter to confirm facts tweeted by fans of the film and to offer his own. For example, the origin of its title.

“There was NO strain of weed called #PineappleExpress when we made the movie,” he wrote. “We said ‘if one day, people are out there selling weed called Pineapple Express, it worked.'”

Mission accomplished.

He said that “Pineapple Express” was actually the name of a Hawaiian weather system — co-writer Evan Goldberg thought it would be a good name for a movie and saved it for the perfect one.

Rogen also revealed that him and co-star James Franco were originally written in to play each other’s roles, marijuana user Dale and marijuana dealer Saul, respectively. Franco asked to switch roles, and Rogen nonchalantly agreed.

In another casting surprise, Stormy Daniels played the ex-wife of dealer Red (Danny McBride), and the two are seen together in a photograph.

Here are some highlights from Rogen’s Twitter feed:

Related stories from TheWrap:

Seth Rogen Apologizes for Blackface Use on 'Good Boys' Stand-in

Seth Rogen Once Informed Tom Cruise About the Existence of Internet Porn, Says Judd Apatow (Video)

Seth Rogen Says Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey 'Does Not Seem to Give a F—' About White Supremacists

‘Pineapple Express’ 10th Anniversary: Seth Rogen Rolled 100 Joints for the Movie and 16 More Facts You Don’t Know

Rogen celebrated the stoner classic’s 10th anniversary by revealing some of his favorite behind-the-scenes stories, including the story about a smoking billboard advertisement.

Columbia Pictures opened David Gordon Green’s “Pineapple Express” in 3,072 theaters on August 6, 2008. Ten years later, the film remains one of the most classic stoner movies ever made. Seth Rogen, who co-wrote the comedy with Evan Goldberg and starred on screen opposite James Franco and Danny McBride, celebrated the film’s 10th anniversary by revealing a handful of amazing fun facts about making “Pineapple Express.”

Rogen kicked off his look back at “Pineapple Express” with the revelation that it was him and Goldberg who rolled all out of the joints seen on screen during the film. The actor explained that the two writers had to roll the joints because no one else on set could roll a joint properly. Rogen also cleared up the rumor about the film’s title: “Pineapple Express” was not named after a strain of weed (in fact, the strain did not exist before the film premiered) but after a Hawaiian weather system that sometimes hits the Pacific Northwest.

“Pineapple Express” ended up grossing $101 million worldwide opposite a $27 million budget, making it a huge victory for Columbia. The movie was produced by Judd Apatow. Celebrate the film’s 10th anniversary with the facts below.

‘The Deuce’ Season 2 Trailer: Maggie Gyllenhaal and James Franco Shake up the Porn Industry

HBO doubles down on James Franco, who plays two characters in the show, despite multiple sexual harassment allegations.

One of the most exciting new television dramas of 2017, “The Deuce,” is returning for a second season, and the foundation laid in an excellent first season has opened up a whole new world for the series. Set in the crime-ridden Times Square of 1970s New York City, “The Deuce” charts the legalization of the porn industry and its dramatic effect on the sex industry and sex workers. Created by “The Wire” duo David Simon and George Pelecanos, the series draws on period research to present a gritty, no-holds-barred portrayal of this explosive time in history.

In the first glimpse of Season 2, we see our intrepid entrepreneurs advance five years. The time is now 1977, and Candy Darling’s (Maggie Gyllenhaal, also a producer on the show) burgeoning directorial career is in full swing, with a little help from James Franco’s Vincent — or is that Frankie? No matter, he’s still on the show.

Franco, who plays identical twin brothers and is an executive producer on the series, was accused of sexual harassment and misconduct by six women earlier this year. The actor denied the allegations. In a statement to Variety, Simon said: “We have no complainant or complaint or any awareness of any incident of concern involving Mr. Franco. Nor has HBO been approached with any complaint. In our experience, he was entirely professional as an actor, director, and producer.”

Nevertheless, HBO seems resolute that, as one character says (quite optimistically) in the trailer: “Everything is changed. It’s not like how it was when we started. It’s like a free world.”

“The Deuce” returns to HBO on September 9. Check out the new trailer below.

Comedy Central’s Bruce Willis Roast Lands More Viewers Than Roseanne, James Franco

“The Comedy Central Roast of Bruce Willis” drew 3.2 million total viewers across multiple Viacom platforms Sunday, which makes it more-watched than the roasts of Roseanne Barr (2012), James Franco (2013), Rob Lowe (2016), Bob Saget (2008) and Joan Rivers (2009).

Willis’ basic-cable thrashing did not top the respective audiences for Charlie Sheen (2011), Jeff Foxworthy (2005), Justin Bieber (2015), Pamela Anderson (2005), Larry the Cable Guy (2009), Flavor Flav (2007), William Shatner (2006), David Hasselhoff (2010), Donald Trump (2011) and Denis Leary (2003).

See how each of those did here.

Also Read: Justin Bieber Scores 4.4 Million Viewers: See Comedy Central’s Top Roast Rankings of All-Time (Infographic)

Sunday’s all-in sum, which had the benefit of a simulcast and a re-air, brought in 17 percent more overall audience members than Lowe’s roast, which was the last one Comedy Central did. Among adults 18-49, last night’s special grew 21 percent from the “Code Black” star’s.

On Comedy Central alone, Willis performed 23 percent better in the advertiser-coveted demographic than Lowe had on Labor Day 2016.

The “Die Hard” star’s turn was big on social, as ad-supported cable’s top entertainment program on Twitter, with #BruceWillisRoast trending at the very top. The special reached 15 million people on Facebook.

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Sunday’s simulcast included MTV, VH1 and BET. It re-ran once last night, and just on Comedy Central.

Immediately after the “Roast of Bruce Willis” debut, the Season 3 start for “Jeff Ross Presents: Roast Battle” scored an all-time high of 810,000 viewers, up 63 percent compared to the prior season premiere and marking Comedy Central’s highest-rated season premiere of 2018.

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“The Comedy Central Roast of Bruce Willis” drew 3.2 million total viewers across multiple Viacom platforms Sunday, which makes it more-watched than the roasts of Roseanne Barr (2012), James Franco (2013), Rob Lowe (2016), Bob Saget (2008) and Joan Rivers (2009).

Willis’ basic-cable thrashing did not top the respective audiences for Charlie Sheen (2011), Jeff Foxworthy (2005), Justin Bieber (2015), Pamela Anderson (2005), Larry the Cable Guy (2009), Flavor Flav (2007), William Shatner (2006), David Hasselhoff (2010), Donald Trump (2011) and Denis Leary (2003).

See how each of those did here.

Sunday’s all-in sum, which had the benefit of a simulcast and a re-air, brought in 17 percent more overall audience members than Lowe’s roast, which was the last one Comedy Central did. Among adults 18-49, last night’s special grew 21 percent from the “Code Black” star’s.

On Comedy Central alone, Willis performed 23 percent better in the advertiser-coveted demographic than Lowe had on Labor Day 2016.

The “Die Hard” star’s turn was big on social, as ad-supported cable’s top entertainment program on Twitter, with #BruceWillisRoast trending at the very top. The special reached 15 million people on Facebook.

Sunday’s simulcast included MTV, VH1 and BET. It re-ran once last night, and just on Comedy Central.

Immediately after the “Roast of Bruce Willis” debut, the Season 3 start for “Jeff Ross Presents: Roast Battle” scored an all-time high of 810,000 viewers, up 63 percent compared to the prior season premiere and marking Comedy Central’s highest-rated season premiere of 2018.

Related stories from TheWrap:

10 Best Jabs at Bruce Willis in Comedy Central's Roast, From Demi Moore to Cybill Shepherd (Photos)

Dennis Rodman Jokes Land With a Thud at Comedy Central's Bruce Willis Roast

Comedy Central Grabs 'BoJack Horseman' Reruns

James Franco in Talks to Direct ESPN Movie ‘Those Guys Have All the Fun’

James Franco is in negotiations to direct the movie “Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN” for Focus Features. The project is based on the 2011 book of the same name by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales, which recapped the…

James Franco is in negotiations to direct the movie “Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN” for Focus Features. The project is based on the 2011 book of the same name by James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales, which recapped the formation of the sports network, based on interviews with more […]

James Franco Eyes First Major Directing Job Since Sexual Misconduct Claims With ‘Inside the World of ESPN’ — Report

Franco will appear in front of the camera in the upcoming second season of “The Deuce,” which debuts on HBO this September.

James Franco is reportedly in talks to direct an upcoming adaptation of James Andrew Miller and Tom Shales’ 2011 nonfiction book “Those Guys Have All the Fun: Inside the World of ESPN” (via Collider). The book provides an oral history of the creation of ESPN, the network that has dominated sports news since its creation in 1979. Collider reports Focus Features is behind the project.

In addition to Franco being eyed to direct, “Halt and Catch Fire” co-creator Christopher C. Rogers is being tapped to rewrite the script. The story centers around the efforts made by ESPN creator Bill Rasmussen and his son, Scott, to launch the 24-hour sports network. Bennett Miller was originally hired to write the screenplay in 2015, which is described as being in the same vein as “Moneyball” and “The Social Network.”

The report is notable since Franco has not announced any major directing projects since being accused of sexual misconduct in January. The actor has remained virtually silent in the months since five women came forward accusing him of inappropriate sexual behavior. Franco previously directed “The Disaster Artist,” which earned rave reviews last year but fizzled out of the awards season as the allegations against Franco took center stage.

The actor is set to appear in the second season of HBO’s “The Deuce,” which returns September 9. While the potential “ESPN” film would be Franco’s first major directing gig since the allegations against him went public, the actor has numerous filmmaking projects in post-production, including “Zeroville” and “The Long Home.” Franco’s friend Seth Rogen said earlier this year that “getting back to work” was a sign Franco was starting to feel OK.

IndieWire has reached out to Focus Features for further comment.