Spider-Man, Aquaman, Dick Cheney: It’s a month of heroes and villains at the multiplex

So many movies, so little time. Every week brings a new crop of them, opening in multiplexes and arthouse theaters across the nation, and arriving in increasingly high volumes on streaming platforms like Netflix. How’s a voracious moviegoer to keep up?…

So many movies, so little time. Every week brings a new crop of them, opening in multiplexes and arthouse theaters across the nation, and arriving in increasingly high volumes on streaming platforms like Netflix. How’s a voracious moviegoer to keep up? That’s where The A.V. Club comes in. The first week of every

Read more...

Golden Globes 2019: See the Nominees (Photos)

Here is the full list of nominees in the Golden Globes for 2019 in all 25 categories. The awards will be handed out on Jan. 6.
Best Motion Picture – Drama

“BlacKkKlansman”;
“Bohemian Rhapsody”;
“First Man”;
&#…

Here is the full list of nominees in the Golden Globes for 2019 in all 25 categories. The awards will be handed out on Jan. 6.

Best Motion Picture – Drama

  • “BlacKkKlansman”;
  • “Bohemian Rhapsody”;
  • “First Man”;
  • “If Beale Street Could Talk”;
  • “A Star Is Born” (pictured)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born,”;
Willem Dafoe, “At Eternity’s Gate”;
Ryan Gosling, “First Man”;
Ethan Hawke, “First Reformed”;
Rami Malek, “Bohemian Rhapsody” (pictured)

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Lady Gaga, “A Star Is Born”;
Glenn Close, “The Wife” (pictured);
Melissa McCarthy, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”;
Viola Davis, “Widows”;
Nicole Kidman, “Destroyer”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

“Crazy Rich Asians” (pictured);
“The Favourite”;
“Green Book”;
“Mary Poppins Returns”;
“Vice”

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Viggo Mortensen, “Green Book” (pictured);
Christian Bale, “Vice”;
Robert Redford, “The Old Man and the Gun”;
Lin-Manuel Miranda, “Mary Poppins Returns”;
John C. Reilly, “Stan and Ollie”;

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Emily Blunt, “Mary Poppins Returns” (pictured)
Olivia Colman, “The Favourite”;
Kathryn Hahn, “Private Life”;
Elsie Fisher, “Eighth Grade”;
Constance Wu, “Crazy Rich Asians”;

Best Supporting Actor

Mahershala Ali, “Green Book”;
Timothee Chalamet, “Beautiful Boy” (pictured);
Sam Elliott, “A Star Is Born”;
Richard E. Grant, “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”;
Sam Rockwell, “Vice”;

Best Supporting Actress

Amy Adams, “Vice”;
Regina King, “If Beale Street Could Talk”;
Emma Stone, “The Favourite” (pictured);
Rachel Weisz, “The Favourite”;
Claire Foy, “First Man”

Best Director

Bradley Cooper, “A Star Is Born”;
Damien Chazelle, “First Man”;
Alfonso Cuaron, “Roma”;
Yorgos Lanthimos, “The Favourite”;
Spike Lee, “BlacKkKlansman” (pictured)

Best Screenplay

“BlacKkKlansman”;
“The Favourite”;
“First Reformed”;
“Green Book”;
“If Beale Street Could Talk” (pictured)

Best Original Score

“BlacKkKlansman” Terence Blanchard;
“First Man” Justin Hurwitz; (pictured)
“If Beale Street Could Talk” Nicholas Britell;
“Incredibles 2” Michael Giacchino;
“Suspiria” Thom Yorke

Best Original Song

“All the Stars” from “Black Panther”;
“The Girl in the Movies” from “Dumplin'”;
“The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns”;
“Requiem for A Private War” from “A Private War”;
“Shallow” from “A Star Is Born” (pictured)

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language

“Capernaum”;
“Cold War”;
“Everybody Knows”;
“Girl”;
“Roma” (pictured)

Best Television Series – Drama

“The Americans” (pictured);
“The Handmaid’s Tale”;
“Homecoming”;
“Killing Eve”;
“This Is Us”

Golden Globes 2019: The Complete List of Nominees

The nominees are in for next month’s 76th annual Golden Globes! Yes, Little Monsters: Lady Gaga got a nod. And also yes, Comic-Con dwellers: “Black Panther” has been nominated for Best Movie – Drama.

Find all of the nominees in each of the 25 categories below. “Vice” led the way for film, while “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story” collected the most chances for a trophy on the TV side of the business.

The 2019 Golden Globe Awards take place Sunday, Jan. 6 starting at 8/7c on NBC. Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh are set to host the ceremony.

Also Read: Golden Globes Unveil New Supersize Statuette for 2019 Ceremony

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Amy Adams – “Vice”
Claire Foy – “First Man”
Regina King – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone – “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz – “The Favourite”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alan Arkin – “The Kominsky Method”
Kieran Culkin – “Succession”
Edgar Ramirez – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Ben Whishaw – “A Very English Scandal”
Henry Winkler – “Barry”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Kristen Bell – “The Good Place”
Candice Bergen – “Murphy Brown”
Alison Brie – “GLOW”
Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Debra Messing – “Will & Grace”

Also Read: Golden Globes Nominations by the Numbers

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“The Alienist” – TNT
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” – FX
“Escape at Dannemora” – Showtime
“Sharp Objects” – HBO
“A Very English Scandal” – Prime Video

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“Barry” – HBO
“The Good Place” – NBC
“Kidding” – Showtime
“The Kominsky Method” – Netflix
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” – Prime Video

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
“A Quiet Place”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Black Panther”
“First Man”
“Mary Poppins Returns”

Also Read: Golden Globes Announce New Honorary Award for TV

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Amy Adams – “Sharp Objects”
Patricia Arquette – “Escape at Dannemora”
Connie Britton – “Dirty John”
Laura Dern – “The Tale”
Regina King – “Seven Seconds”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alex Bornstein – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Patricia Clarkson – “Sharp Objects”
Penelope Cruz – “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story”
Thandie Newton – “Westworld”
Yvonne Strahovski – “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Sacha Baron Cohen – “Who Is America”
Jim Carrey – “Kidding”
Michael Douglas – “The Kominsky Method”
Donald Glover – “Atlanta”
Bill Hader – “Barry”

Also Read: ‘Vice,’ ‘Assassination of Gianni Versace’ Lead 2019 Golden Globes Nominations

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Antonio Banderas – “Genius: Picasso”
Daniel Bruhl – “The Alienist”
Darren Criss – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Patrick Melrose”
Hugh Grant – “A Very English Scandal”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
“Capernaum” – Lebanon
“Girl” – Belgium
“Never Look Away” – Germany
“Roma” – Mexico
“Shoplifters” – Japan 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara – “The Favourite”
Barry Jenkins – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Adam McKay – “Vice”
Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”

Also Read: Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh to Host 2019 Golden Globes

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Black Panther”
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Motion Picture – Animated
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Mirai”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Also Read: MTV Studios Is Bringing Back ‘Celebrity Deathmatch’ With Ice Cube

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Glenn Close – “The Wife”
Lady Gaga – “A Star Is Born”
Nicole Kidman – “Destroyer”
Melissa McCarthy – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Rosamund Pike – “A Private War”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe – “At Eternity’s Gate”
Lucas Hedges – “Boy Erased”
Rami Malek – “Bohemian Rhapsody”
John David Washington – “BlacKkKlansman”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Emily Blunt – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Olivia Colman – “The Favourite”
Elsie Fisher – “Eighth Grade”
Charlize Theron – “Tully”
Constance Wu – “Crazy Rich Asians”

Also Read: ‘Saturday Night Live,’ ‘Roseanne’ Are 2018’s Most-Tweeted-About TV Shows

Best Director – Motion Picture
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”
Spike Lee – “BlacKkK
lansman”
Adam McKay – “Vice”

Best Television Series – Drama
“The Americans” – FX
“Bodyguard” – Netflix
“Homecoming” – Prime Video
“Killing Eve” – BBC America
“Pose” – FX

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe – “Outlander”
Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Sandra Oh – “Killing Eve”
Julia Roberts – “Homecoming”
Keri Russell – “The Americans”

Also Read: ‘Mary, Queen of Scots’ Film Review: Saoirse Ronan and Margot Robbie Make Worthy, Regal Adversaries

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Jason Bateman – “Ozark”
Stephan James – “Homecoming”
Richard Madden – “Bodyguard”
Billy Porter – “Pose”
Matthew Rhys – “The Americans”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Christian Bale – “Vice”
Lin-Manuel Miranda – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Viggo Mortensen – “Green Book”
Robert Redford – “The Old Man & The Gun”
John C. Reilly – “Stan & Ollie”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Mahershala Ali – “Green Book”
Timothee Chalamet – “Beautiful Boy”
Adam Driver – “BlacKkKlansman”
Richard E. Grant – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell – “Vice”

Also Read: ‘Ben Is Back’ Film Review: Julia Roberts Goes for Broke in Another Troubled Teen Movie

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“All the Stars” – “Black Panther”
“Girl in the Movies” – “Dumplin’”
“Requiem for a Private War” – “A Private War”
“Revelation” – “Boy Erased”
“Shallow” – “A Star Is Born”

Jennifer Maas contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Idris Elba’s Daughter Named 2019 Golden Globes Ambassador

NBC Inks Deal to Keep Golden Globes for 8 More Years

Brendan Fraser Says Golden Globes Organization Admits Member ‘Inappropriately Touched’ Him in 2003

The nominees are in for next month’s 76th annual Golden Globes! Yes, Little Monsters: Lady Gaga got a nod. And also yes, Comic-Con dwellers: “Black Panther” has been nominated for Best Movie – Drama.

Find all of the nominees in each of the 25 categories below. “Vice” led the way for film, while “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story” collected the most chances for a trophy on the TV side of the business.

The 2019 Golden Globe Awards take place Sunday, Jan. 6 starting at 8/7c on NBC. Andy Samberg and Sandra Oh are set to host the ceremony.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Amy Adams – “Vice”
Claire Foy – “First Man”
Regina King – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Emma Stone – “The Favourite”
Rachel Weisz – “The Favourite”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alan Arkin – “The Kominsky Method”
Kieran Culkin – “Succession”
Edgar Ramirez – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Ben Whishaw – “A Very English Scandal”
Henry Winkler – “Barry”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Kristen Bell – “The Good Place”
Candice Bergen – “Murphy Brown”
Alison Brie – “GLOW”
Rachel Brosnahan – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Debra Messing – “Will & Grace”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“The Alienist” – TNT
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” – FX
“Escape at Dannemora” – Showtime
“Sharp Objects” – HBO
“A Very English Scandal” – Prime Video

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
“Barry” – HBO
“The Good Place” – NBC
“Kidding” – Showtime
“The Kominsky Method” – Netflix
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” – Prime Video

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
“A Quiet Place”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Black Panther”
“First Man”
“Mary Poppins Returns”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Amy Adams – “Sharp Objects”
Patricia Arquette – “Escape at Dannemora”
Connie Britton – “Dirty John”
Laura Dern – “The Tale”
Regina King – “Seven Seconds”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alex Bornstein – “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Patricia Clarkson – “Sharp Objects”
Penelope Cruz – “The Assassination of Gianna Versace: American Crime Story”
Thandie Newton – “Westworld”
Yvonne Strahovski – “The Handmaid’s Tale”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Sacha Baron Cohen – “Who Is America”
Jim Carrey – “Kidding”
Michael Douglas – “The Kominsky Method”
Donald Glover – “Atlanta”
Bill Hader – “Barry”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Antonio Banderas – “Genius: Picasso”
Daniel Bruhl – “The Alienist”
Darren Criss – “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch – “Patrick Melrose”
Hugh Grant – “A Very English Scandal”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
“Capernaum” – Lebanon
“Girl” – Belgium
“Never Look Away” – Germany
“Roma” – Mexico
“Shoplifters” – Japan 

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Deborah Davis, Tony McNamara – “The Favourite”
Barry Jenkins – “If Beale Street Could Talk”
Adam McKay – “Vice”
Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie and Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Black Panther”
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Motion Picture – Animated
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Mirai”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Glenn Close – “The Wife”
Lady Gaga – “A Star Is Born”
Nicole Kidman – “Destroyer”
Melissa McCarthy – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Rosamund Pike – “A Private War”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Willem Dafoe – “At Eternity’s Gate”
Lucas Hedges – “Boy Erased”
Rami Malek – “Bohemian Rhapsody”
John David Washington – “BlacKkKlansman”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Emily Blunt – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Olivia Colman – “The Favourite”
Elsie Fisher – “Eighth Grade”
Charlize Theron – “Tully”
Constance Wu – “Crazy Rich Asians”

Best Director – Motion Picture
Bradley Cooper – “A Star Is Born”
Alfonso Cuaron – “Roma”
Peter Farrelly – “Green Book”
Spike Lee – “BlacKkK
lansman”
Adam McKay – “Vice”

Best Television Series – Drama
“The Americans” – FX
“Bodyguard” – Netflix
“Homecoming” – Prime Video
“Killing Eve” – BBC America
“Pose” – FX

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe – “Outlander”
Elisabeth Moss – “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Sandra Oh – “Killing Eve”
Julia Roberts – “Homecoming”
Keri Russell – “The Americans”

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Jason Bateman – “Ozark”
Stephan James – “Homecoming”
Richard Madden – “Bodyguard”
Billy Porter – “Pose”
Matthew Rhys – “The Americans”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Christian Bale – “Vice”
Lin-Manuel Miranda – “Mary Poppins Returns”
Viggo Mortensen – “Green Book”
Robert Redford – “The Old Man & The Gun”
John C. Reilly – “Stan & Ollie”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Mahershala Ali – “Green Book”
Timothee Chalamet – “Beautiful Boy”
Adam Driver – “BlacKkKlansman”
Richard E. Grant – “Can You Ever Forgive Me?”
Sam Rockwell – “Vice”

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“All the Stars” – “Black Panther”
“Girl in the Movies” – “Dumplin'”
“Requiem for a Private War” – “A Private War”
“Revelation” – “Boy Erased”
“Shallow” – “A Star Is Born”

Jennifer Maas contributed to this report.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Idris Elba's Daughter Named 2019 Golden Globes Ambassador

NBC Inks Deal to Keep Golden Globes for 8 More Years

Brendan Fraser Says Golden Globes Organization Admits Member 'Inappropriately Touched' Him in 2003

‘Beale Street,’ ‘First Man,’ ‘Mary Poppins’ Shine in Artisan Oscar Races

As 2018 draws to a close and various critics groups and deliberating bodies measure the year in movie superlatives, a look below the line at the Academy’s crafts races reveals an art form invigorated by many of today’s most brilliant cinema…

As 2018 draws to a close and various critics groups and deliberating bodies measure the year in movie superlatives, a look below the line at the Academy’s crafts races reveals an art form invigorated by many of today’s most brilliant cinematic minds. Perhaps the most fully realized visual effort is director Barry Jenkins’ follow-up to […]

New Hollywood Podcast: ‘Beale Street’ Star Stephan James Continues To Rise And Represent

Stephan James is quickly becoming an actor known for notable prestige projects. With starring roles in award season favorite If Beale Street Could Talk and Amazon’s Homecoming, the Canadian native is easily becoming a breakout star of 2018 and th…

Stephan James is quickly becoming an actor known for notable prestige projects. With starring roles in award season favorite If Beale Street Could Talk and Amazon’s Homecoming, the Canadian native is easily becoming a breakout star of 2018 and there is no sign of stopping for him — except for a recent stop he made at the New Hollywood Podcast. James is not new to the Hollywood scene. He starred in various TV series starting in 2010 including the popular teen drama series D…

Regina King to Receive Chairman’s Award From Palm Springs International Film Festival

Regina King will receive the Chairman’s Award at the 2019 Palm Springs International Film Festival, organizers announced on Tuesday.

King is being recognized for her role in Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s “If Beale Street Could Talk.”

“Whether she’s acting, producing or directing, Regina King is an amazing creative talent,” PSIFF chairman Harold Matzner said in a statement. “In her latest film ‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’ she gives an outstanding performance as Sharon Rivers, a mother supportive of her daughter whose fiancé is thrown in jail for a crime he didn’t commit.  For her performance in this challenging role, which has received much critical acclaim, it is our honor to present the Chairman’s Award to Regina King.”

Also Read: New York Film Critics Circle Winners: ‘Roma’ Named 2018’s Best Picture

The awards gala will be held on Thursday, Jan. 3 at the Palm Springs Convention Center.

Past recipients of the Chairman’s Award include Amy Adams, Jessica Chastain, George Clooney, Richard Gere, Tom Hanks, Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon. King joins previously announced 2019 PSIFF honorees Glenn Close, Bradley Cooper, Alfonso Cuarón, Rami Malek, Melissa McCarthy and the film “Green Book.”

“If Beale Street Could Talk” tells the story of Tish, a newly engaged young woman in Harlem, who races against the clock to prove her lover’s innocence while carrying their first-born child to term.

The film, from Annapurna Pictures, was written and directed by Barry Jenkins and stars KiKi Layne, Stephan James Colman Domingo, Teyonah Parris, Michael Beach, Dave Franco, Diego Luna, Pedro Pascal, Ed Skrein, Bryan Tyree Henry and King.

Also Read: ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Review: Barry Jenkins Delivers Stunning Romance With Aftertaste of Injustice

For her role in “If Beale Street Could Talk,” King was awarded best-supporting actress by the New York Film Critics Circle and National Board of Review and a Best Supporting Female nomination for the Independent Spirit Awards.

King has had a long film career, with roles in “Boyz n the Hood,” “Poetic Justice,” “Higher Learning,” “Friday,” “A Thin Line Between Love and Hate,” “Jerry Maguire” and “How Stella Got Her Groove Back,” among others. Her TV credits include “American Crime,” for which she won two Emmy Awards, “Southland,” “The Leftovers” and “Seven Seconds,” which earned her an Emmy for outstanding actress in a TV Movie or Limited Series.

King has also directed episodes of NBC’s hit drama series “This Is Us,” “The Good Doctor,” “Shameless,” “Animal Kingdom,” “Being Mary Jane” and “Scandal.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Regina King Reveals Secret Weapon for Her Emmy-Nominated ‘Seven Seconds’ Performance (Video)

HBO’s ‘Watchmen’ Pilot Casts Regina King, Don Johnson

‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’ ‘Leave No Trace’ Nominated for Top Independent Spirit Awards

Regina King will receive the Chairman’s Award at the 2019 Palm Springs International Film Festival, organizers announced on Tuesday.

King is being recognized for her role in Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s “If Beale Street Could Talk.”

“Whether she’s acting, producing or directing, Regina King is an amazing creative talent,” PSIFF chairman Harold Matzner said in a statement. “In her latest film ‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’ she gives an outstanding performance as Sharon Rivers, a mother supportive of her daughter whose fiancé is thrown in jail for a crime he didn’t commit.  For her performance in this challenging role, which has received much critical acclaim, it is our honor to present the Chairman’s Award to Regina King.”

The awards gala will be held on Thursday, Jan. 3 at the Palm Springs Convention Center.

Past recipients of the Chairman’s Award include Amy Adams, Jessica Chastain, George Clooney, Richard Gere, Tom Hanks, Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon. King joins previously announced 2019 PSIFF honorees Glenn Close, Bradley Cooper, Alfonso Cuarón, Rami Malek, Melissa McCarthy and the film “Green Book.”

“If Beale Street Could Talk” tells the story of Tish, a newly engaged young woman in Harlem, who races against the clock to prove her lover’s innocence while carrying their first-born child to term.

The film, from Annapurna Pictures, was written and directed by Barry Jenkins and stars KiKi Layne, Stephan James Colman Domingo, Teyonah Parris, Michael Beach, Dave Franco, Diego Luna, Pedro Pascal, Ed Skrein, Bryan Tyree Henry and King.

For her role in “If Beale Street Could Talk,” King was awarded best-supporting actress by the New York Film Critics Circle and National Board of Review and a Best Supporting Female nomination for the Independent Spirit Awards.

King has had a long film career, with roles in “Boyz n the Hood,” “Poetic Justice,” “Higher Learning,” “Friday,” “A Thin Line Between Love and Hate,” “Jerry Maguire” and “How Stella Got Her Groove Back,” among others. Her TV credits include “American Crime,” for which she won two Emmy Awards, “Southland,” “The Leftovers” and “Seven Seconds,” which earned her an Emmy for outstanding actress in a TV Movie or Limited Series.

King has also directed episodes of NBC’s hit drama series “This Is Us,” “The Good Doctor,” “Shameless,” “Animal Kingdom,” “Being Mary Jane” and “Scandal.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Regina King Reveals Secret Weapon for Her Emmy-Nominated 'Seven Seconds' Performance (Video)

HBO's 'Watchmen' Pilot Casts Regina King, Don Johnson

'If Beale Street Could Talk,' 'Leave No Trace' Nominated for Top Independent Spirit Awards

Palm Springs Festival to Honor Regina King for ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’

The Palm Springs International Film Festival will present Regina King with the Chairman’s Award for her role in the drama “If Beale Street Could Talk.” The festival will make the presentation at its film awards gala on Jan. 3 at the Palm Sp…

The Palm Springs International Film Festival will present Regina King with the Chairman’s Award for her role in the drama “If Beale Street Could Talk.” The festival will make the presentation at its film awards gala on Jan. 3 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The festival, now in its 30th year, runs from Jan. […]

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Cast And Crew On Finding The “Interior Life” Of James Baldwin’s Novel – The Contenders NY

For writer-director Barry Jenkins, the story of If Beale Street Could Talk isn’t entirely found in its plot, but rather in its impressionistic, sometimes dialogue-free scenes that unfold for minutes at a time.
“I think they advance the emot…

For writer-director Barry Jenkins, the story of If Beale Street Could Talk isn’t entirely found in its plot, but rather in its impressionistic, sometimes dialogue-free scenes that unfold for minutes at a time. “I think they advance the emotion in a very concrete way,” he said at Deadline’s Contenders New York event. “When you read a novel, you read the dialogue between characters but then the author will go on this riff. That’s the interior life of these characters…

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’: Barry Jenkins Reveres Baldwin, Yet ‘The Movie Is a Movie’

Mostly faithful to the novel, the filmmaker still aimed to put his own signature on this adaptation of the accomplished work.

For writer-director Barry Jenkins, the question wasn’t whether to adapt James Baldwin, but which of his novels to adapt. A student of Baldwin, humble enough to recognize that he may not have been equipped with the necessary experience to tackle the heft of much of the culture critic’s dense work, Jenkins settled on the relative simplicity that is the love story in “If Beale Street Could Talk,” which came to him via a trusted friend who envisioned the novel’s cinematic potential in his hands. Still mostly unknown at the time, Jenkins had to contend with how a relatively green feature filmmaker would adapt a distinguished work by a widely-admired author.

“I hadn’t read it at that point, which was a blindspot for me as far as Baldwin goes,” said Jenkins, who found what he felt was a perfect fusion of the essayistic Baldwin and his strengths as an observant storyteller. “I was really excited about two things: One, before I read it, I didn’t realize it was basically like James Baldwin writing a thriller, which I thought was cool. Then I was really moved by how romantic it is on one hand, and then how biting it is on the other.”

A most important first step was the seemingly daunting task of getting permission from Baldwin’s notoriously protective estate. Luckily for Jenkins, who wrote the screenplay before seeking approval, he didn’t have to be aggressive in his pursuit, although patience was essential.

“There was so much going on in their world and they like to be diligent, and they move as a committee,” said Jenkins of a process that took around three years, wrapping up the deal just ahead of “Moonlight’s” premiere. “It wasn’t that one person gave me the okay. All the sisters had to give me the okay, and then the extended family. So it took a while, but we got there.”

Mostly faithful to Baldwin’s original work, audiences familiar with the novel will immediately recognize where and how the film differs. Although Jenkins made it clear that just about every scene in the book was filmed, even though they didn’t all make the final cut.

An allure to adapting a novel is that the writer has something concrete to start from, but as Jenkins said, “While it was the first time Baldwin has been adapted for an English-language feature film, and there was some pressure to keep as much of it the same as possible, what it ultimately comes down to is: the book is the book, and the movie is the movie.”

"If Beale Street Could Talk"

“If Beale Street Could Talk”

Annapurna/YouTube

It was a realization that relieved him of much of the stress that would expectedly come with this kind of momentous undertaking. “I didn’t expect it to go well,” the filmmaker said. “And so I took the burden of doing it well, off my shoulders. And then I felt like I had freedom to make the film I wanted to make.”

Wrestling to find its narrative spine, the screenplay would go through several of what he described as radical iterations that would eventually lead to a key revelation: “We finally hit on this idea that the first act need not flow the same way the second act does,” said Jenkins. “There’s a really hard delineation between the storytelling style between them. The first act is procedural, going back and forth between the past and present with Tish and Fonny. And the second is looser, jumping between characters, more poetic in tone.”

Baldwin’s fifth novel, published in 1974, “If Beale Street Could Talk” is a love story set in Harlem in the early 1970s. Although he considered setting his adaptation in the present day, thinking it would be easier, Jenkins chose to leave the story in the past, believing that the timelessness of the themes, and the power of the author’s voice as delivered by the story’s first-person narrator, would ensure contemporary emotional resonance. And thus, although relying on voiceover is looked down upon, Jenkins decided from the start that Tish’s running narration was vital.

“It was one of the very first choices I made, because, part of that was, shit, Baldwin’s voice is amazing,” he said. “I mean, it’s Tish’s voice we’re hearing, but really, ultimately it’s Baldwin’s. And I had it in my head of having this young woman speaking these very potent, considered words.”

Jenkins was reassured of his choice when he screened another Baldwin film released before “Beale Street,” which used a similar technique: “‘I Am Not Your Negro’ came out, and I was like, this is really good! Let me make sure I’m doing this the right way.”

Directed by Raoul Peck, based on an unfinished Baldwin manuscript, “I Am Not Your Negro” (2016) features a narration of the author’s own words, spoken by Samuel L. Jackson. “And he [Peck] worked with the estate for a long time on that film,” Jenkins said. “He actually got to the archives, which I barely touched.”

What Jenkins did get his hands on was access to Baldwin’s “Beale Street” notes. Prior to the start of production, the filmmaker received a package from the executor of Baldwin’s estate, his sister Gloria Karefa-Smart, which included an old notebook. Inside were handwritten notes that Baldwin made in 1978, on how he’d approach a film adaptation of “Beale Street,” including his casting choices and wish list of directors. “I had already finished my draft of the script by the time I got the notebook, so I was really pleased to read his notes confirming some of the choices I had made,” said Jenkins. “But I do wish there was more. I would’ve loved to see how his mind would have worked out more of the adaptation.”

Additionally, as a man telling a story from the point of view of a young woman, Baldwin was aware of the potential minefield he was stepping into, and sought the opinions of women writer friends, notably the equally esteemed Toni Morrison. “He was super nervous about what the response to the book would be, and he did face some criticism,” Jenkins said, who had similar concerns while adapting the novel.

“It was terrifying,” he said, adding that he was warned by women filmmaker friends about certain problematic “male gaze” scenes. “I’m glad they felt comfortable to tell me, because there were changes we made to rectify them,” he said.

Considering the question of whether it would have been more appropriate, even if only symbolically, that a black woman filmmaker should have been the first to adapt the novel, Jenkins said, “If it had been written by a woman, then I think it might have been a step too far for me to, not necessarily take ownership of it, but I could see how maybe I would not be the most ideal person to be the first director to adapt it. But that wasn’t the case, and I felt a level of comfort doing it.”

Approaching the adaptation like a jigsaw puzzle, the filmmaker relished Baldwin’s fractured, non-linear approach, which gave him permission to generously move scenes around in his script, experimenting with juxtaposition, until he was satisfied with the narrative flow. It also made it less painful to eliminate pieces.

“We had to cut out a lot of scenes,” said Jenkins, listing some of them, including what he described as a “really lovely conversation about unity between black and brown” with Tish (Kiki Layne) and Pedrocito (Diego Luna). About 40-minutes of filmed scene-work was cut but the most difficult to remove was the death of Fonny’s (Stephan James) father Frank (Michael Beach). “The omission of Frank committing suicide was a really big one,” he said. “We don’t say that it didn’t happen, we just don’t say or show that it does.”

It’s an occurrence in Baldwin’s novel that is of significant impact, and Jenkins believes that while the decision to eliminate it wasn’t an easy one, he felt it was necessary given the story he wanted to tell. “The way I approached it mentally is that, in a certain way, Frank commits suicide so that Tish and Fonny’s baby can be born,” the filmmaker said.  “And also significant for me was that, at that point in the film, I didn’t want to represent the death of another black father, with Fonny already seeming like he’s going off the deep end, even with his baby about to be born. I especially didn’t want any mention of Frank’s death to affect what I think is the hope that we see in the child actually being born. So I decided to take it out to clear the path for the tableaux that we end the film on.”

Teasing that discarded scenes will be included as extras on the eventual home video release of “Beale Street,” Jenkins said, although it took him a while to get there, he’s proud of the final version of his adaptation, but is tuning out awards season chatter around it. Recalling his Best Picture Oscar win for “Moonlight” in 2017, he said, “How could I ever expect anything like that to happen with the very next film? I mean adapting ‘Beale Street’ demanded my full attention, and to have had these other things at the back of my head, like whether or not it would win an Oscar, would have tainted it.”

With back-to-back high caliber Baldwin films in “I Am Not Your Negro” and now “If Beale Street Could Talk,” the filmmaker hopes it’s momentum that will lead to other adaptations, and a reintroduction of the late novelist and social critic, especially to younger audiences. “That is my hope, because I do think we’re not reading as much as we used to,” Jenkins said. “And I think these films can serve as vessels that get people back into the writing of Baldwin.”

“If Beale Street Could Talk” opens in theaters on December 14 from Annapurna Pictures.

Composer Nicholas Britell Reunites With Past Collaborators on ‘Beale Street’ and ‘Vice’

Composer Nicholas Britell reunited with two past collaborators for high-profile December releases: Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”) on “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Adam McKay (“The Big Short”) on “Vice.” &…

Composer Nicholas Britell reunited with two past collaborators for high-profile December releases: Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”) on “If Beale Street Could Talk” and Adam McKay (“The Big Short”) on “Vice.” “If Beale Street Could Talk,” based on the James Baldwin novel of young lovers in 1970s Harlem, is “a really powerful take on modern American injustice,” […]

Listen: Barry Jenkins Details the Craft of ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ and Reflects on #EnvelopeGate

PLAYBACK is a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films. New episodes air every Thursday. After the soaring success of “Moonlight,” writer-director Barry Jenkins is …

PLAYBACK is a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films. New episodes air every Thursday. After the soaring success of “Moonlight,” writer-director Barry Jenkins is back this year with the lush, penetrating James Baldwin adaptation “If Beale Street Could Talk.” It’s very much an extension of […]

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Actor Colman Domingo on Why James Baldwin’s Work Still Resonates

Colman Domingo says he enjoys pursuing a wide range of projects. Between writing recent musicals about Donna Summer and Nat King Cole and starring in Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel “If Beale Street Could Talk,” the multihyphenate mu…

Colman Domingo says he enjoys pursuing a wide range of projects. Between writing recent musicals about Donna Summer and Nat King Cole and starring in Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel “If Beale Street Could Talk,” the multihyphenate must be having a hell of a time. How does the film bring James Baldwin’s world […]

Independent Film Awards Circuit Livens Up Studio-Heavy Oscar Race

With this year’s best picture Oscar race set to feature a number of major studio releases, the independent film awards circuit is making for a lively sidebar affair. As ever, it’s an opportunity for bubble contenders to find their corner of…

With this year’s best picture Oscar race set to feature a number of major studio releases, the independent film awards circuit is making for a lively sidebar affair. As ever, it’s an opportunity for bubble contenders to find their corner of the spotlight ahead of the holiday rush, when voters will hopefully be diligent about […]

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Editors Grapple With Structure, Narrative Expectations & The Weight Of History

Spoiler Alert: This story alludes to crucial plot details from Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk.
On Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk—the Oscar winner’s follow-up to Moonlight—editors Nat Sanders and Joi McMillon came…

Spoiler Alert: This story alludes to crucial plot details from Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk. On Barry Jenkins' If Beale Street Could Talk—the Oscar winner's follow-up to Moonlight—editors Nat Sanders and Joi McMillon came up against an age-old question. With a narrative based on existing material—spoiled by awareness or historical fact—what is the best approach? How can a story be brought to life with such emotional vitality that facts become an…

‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Moves to December 14 as Annapurna Juggles 3 Awards Titles

Barry Jenkins’ film will now go wide on December 25, the same day that Annapurna releases “Vice” and “Destroyer,” but there’s a master plan.

Annapurna Releasing will now open Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” December 14 in New York and Los Angeles, with expansion December 25. Previously, the distributor planned to release the James Baldwin adaptation on November 30 in New York, followed by December 7 in Los Angeles, with expansions to follow.

It’s still in the core four specialty theaters: Lincoln Square and Angelika in New York, and the Landmark and Arclight Hollywood in Los Angeles. Changing release plans a few weeks out isn’t unusual, but draws greater attention in the highly charged and carefully calibrated world of year-end awards films.

According to Erik Lomis, distribution president at Annapurna, the change was simple cause and effect. When the company decided that expansion should begin Christmas Day, that made December 14 a logical opening date. Earlier expansion would be challenging, since the period leading up to the holiday is not a strong one for adult-audience films.

"If Beale Street Could Talk"

“If Beale Street Could Talk”

Annapurna/YouTube

The December 14 opening also gives “Beale Street” breathing room. Films that open too early before Christmas are prone to exhibitor pressure to move out by the holiday, and lose huge grossing days. And with “Roma” moving from December 14 to November 21, “Beale Street” will have little competition for review attention. (Its Metacritic currently stands at 88.)

On December 25, Annapurna plans to add around 120 theaters, both specialized and in African-American neighborhoods, in the top 25 to 30 markets. Then it will add screens in stages, starting January 4, with up to 600 the first week in the top 75 markets. Increases will follow on the next two weekends, with the aim of 1,500 theaters.

Christian Bale, "Vice"

Vice

Greig Fraser/Annapurna Pictures

“Beale Street” will go wider the same day that Annapurna releases two other significant titles: Adam McKay’s “Vice” and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer.” However, neither of these December 25 titles are direct conflicts with Jenkins’ film.

McKay’s Dick Cheney biopic, which will open wide, is considered a potential awards contender (as was “The Big Short” three years ago). And Kusama’s thriller will open in three theaters: the Arclight in Los Angeles, and in New York Landmark 57th St., and a downtown theater to be determined. It’s an awards run for Nicole Kidman, who gives an acclaimed performance, and the dates that follow allow Annapurna to capitalize on any attention with additional theaters January 4 in advance of a wider national break January 25.

Lots of moving parts here, but that’s the game when trying to manage awards titles for maximum impact. While Annapurna has three films in a tight timeframe (and a fourth with MGM’s “Creed II,” which opens wide on Thanksgiving), each has a distinct plan that doesn’t cannibalize the others. Still, for the Annapurna crew this will be the busiest of holiday seasons.

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Annapurna’s ‘Vice’ & ‘Beale Street’: The American Dream Warped And Deferred – The Contenders LA

At Deadline’s The Contenders Los Angeles today, Annapurna Pictures showed off two dramas from their impressive awards-season slate, and a unifying concern emerged: The American Dream, and the ways it has changed over time. While members of the pr…

At Deadline’s The Contenders Los Angeles today, Annapurna Pictures showed off two dramas from their impressive awards-season slate, and a unifying concern emerged: The American Dream, and the ways it has changed over time. While members of the privileged class have bent it into a new, baser shape, for those less fortunate, it’s often denied altogether. The first of the two films at hand was Adam McKay’s Vice, his follow-up to The Big Short, which took on the 2008…

Kiki Layne’s Lupita Nyong’o Moment: The ‘Beale Street’ Breakout Is Following a Smart Formula to Stardom

Kiki Layne and Lupita Nyong’o share similar stories of entry into Hollywood, although Layne’s still unpaved path might be less bumpy.

After graduating from the Yale School of Drama with an MFA, unknown Lupita Nyong’o landed her breakthrough role in Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave.” That performance earned her critical acclaim, and an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress — only the sixth black actress to win that award — and put her on the path to Hollywood stardom. Nyong’o’s trajectory may be an unusual model for overnight success, but it’s one that “If Beale Street Could Talk” star Kiki Layne is poised to adapt.

Both women were unknown young actresses of color before they scored prominent roles in acclaimed films from African-American directors. While their stories are separated by five years, they both  contend with a film industry working through its diversity challenges. And like Nyong’o, Layne scored her first feature role in a high-profile picture that was adapted from a period novel and directed by a revered, high-profile black filmmaker — and has placed her at the center of Oscar conversation even as she remains virtually unknown.

“I’ve wanted to act since I was a little girl, and I’ve done the necessary work to get to this point, so I believe it’s all happening right when it’s supposed to,” said Layne. “I can see that my life is changing, but things haven’t gotten really crazy yet, like I’m not recognized when I’m walking down the street. So you can say that I’m just enjoying that anonymity while I still have it.”

She added that she had anticipated this moment a long time ago. “The way I look at it is that, well, I signed up for this when I decided to pursue a career as an actress,” she said, “so whatever comes with that, I have to be prepared for it.”

While “Beale Street” benefited from film festival exposure in Toronto and New York ahead of its November 30 release, the 26-year-old Layne is still a relative mystery to audiences, much in the same way Nyong’o was prior to the release of “12 Years A Slave.” Early notices heaped praise on “Beale Street,” which Jenkins adapted from the 1974 novel by James Baldwin. It casts Layne as 19-year-old Tish, whose idyllic New York romance with her childhood friend Fonny (Stephan James) is jeopardized when Fonny is arrested on false charges by a vindictive white police officer.

After Tish learns she’s carrying Fonny’s child, she’s thrust into adulthood as she becomes the stabilizing force when she and her family dedicate their lives to ensuring Fonny’s release from prison. Layne depicts that journey from wholesome innocence to exhausting responsibility with utter conviction.

Both Layne and Nyong’o were selected out of hundreds of young actresses who auditioned for their parts, many of whom had appeared in a feature film before. Neither actress had tackled such complex, substantial roles in film, and both called for them to portray young black women having to survive extraordinary circumstances.

Both women had backgrounds in theater. Nyong’o began her career as part of a Nairobi-based repertory company; Layne attended a performance arts high school in Cincinnati, and spent her post-college years working through the competitive Chicago theater scene. Prior to “Beale Street,” her screen credits were limited to one episode of the NBC medical drama series “Chicago Med.”

Presumably, she’ll get better offers now. Unlike Nyong’o, Layne’s moment comes as the industry appears to be on the cusp of real progressive change in terms of opportunities for women and people of color.

After her Oscar win, Nyong’o wasn’t considered for the kinds of roles offered to her white contemporaries with similar resumes. Four years after her Oscar win, the actress was initially relegated to playing a computer-generated alien in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” voicing a character in Jon Favreau’s “The Jungle Book,” and a supporting role in Disney’s “The Queen of Katwe.”

Things have picked up of late: After playing Nakia in “Black Panther,” Nyong’o booked lead roles in Jordan Peele’s mysterious socio-thriller “Us,” John Woo’s English-language remake of his revered 1989 action movie “The Killer,” and the untitled Simon Kinberg spy thriller in which she’ll star opposite Oscar winners Marion Cotillard and Penélope Cruz, and Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain. She’ll also star with fellow Oscar winner Viola Davis in “The Woman King,” which tells the story of the all-female military unit known as the Dahomey Amazons.

But this all took place prior to #OscarsSoWhite and other industry-inclusive initiatives, and Layne said she recognizes that the cultural moment is in her favor. “I’m really very thankful to be entering the business at this time,” she said. “I think it’s not only that Hollywood is now starting to pay attention to our stories. It’s also that we are starting to take control. We’re not waiting for permission anymore. More of us are just finding ways to get our work produced and seen, and I think that’s how it had to be. We know we’ve always had the talent, and we’re now in an environment that is more open to us expressing ourselves fully. It’s truly a great time for us.”

She singled out her “Beale Street” co-star Regina King, who plays her mother in the film, as a personal idol. “I just think the way Regina King carries herself in this industry is something to strive for,” Layne said. “Even though she’s been in the business as long as she has, she’s still just one of the most genuine, realest people I’ve met so far. And so watching her, I realize that I don’t have to change who I am at the core in order to have a career.”

Unlike Nyong’o, Layne isn’t considered a frontrunner in her category, but if the exposure brings her new opportunities, they may come faster. She recently signed with WME and has already booked a series of high-profile projects, including co-starring in A24’s adaptation of another novel by a seminal black author, Richard Wright’s “Native Son.” She’ll also appear in the forthcoming Rupert Wyatt-directed sci-fi thriller “Captive State.” Both films are set to open in 2019.

Nevertheless, she’s managing expectations. “I’ve already shot my next film, which isn’t a big-time Hollywood blockbuster,” she said, referring to the Wright adaptation. “I’m not really chasing that. I’ve been working to get to this level for so long, and I just want to act and do good work with talented people. And I have to trust that God will always have me right where he wants me to be.”

She added that she wasn’t waiting for the industry to tell her what to do. “I’m not going to sit around and wait for some old studio executive to decide my career path,” she said. “I want to have the kind of career in which I’m accomplished and respected enough that I’m able to open doors for other people, especially those who look like me. That’s what happiness and success could look like for me.”

In the meantime, awards season has begun, and Layne continues to move in front of the pack: Earlier this month, she landed a nomination for Breakthrough Actor from the Gotham Awards, set to take place in December. Coincidentally, Nyong’o was also a nominee in the same category, for her performance in “12 Years a Slave,” in 2013. She lost, but it was to another rising star on a notable upswing — her future “Black Panther” co-star Michael B. Jordan.

Annapurna Pictures opens “If Beale Street Could Talk” on November 30.

The Big Three Fall Film Festivals Dominate Awards Season

Once again, the Oscar race is being dominated by the Big Three fall film festivals: Venice, Telluride and Toronto. Should we congratulate this as a successful partnership between these three and Oscar? Or do we lament the fact that the fest circuit has…

Once again, the Oscar race is being dominated by the Big Three fall film festivals: Venice, Telluride and Toronto. Should we congratulate this as a successful partnership between these three and Oscar? Or do we lament the fact that the fest circuit has turned into the schoolyard bully, knocking down quality movies that opened between […]

‘First Reformed,’ ‘The Favourite’ Lead Gotham Awards Nominations for Independent Film

Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Favourite,” Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Joseph Decker’s “Madeline’s Madeline” and Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider” have been nominated for the top award at the IFP Gotham Awards, the Independent Filmmaker Project announced on Thursday.

In nominations that were evenly distributed among 19 independent movies, “First Reformed” led all films with three nominations – one for the film, one for lead actor Ethan Hawke and one for Schrader’s screenplay about a pastor tortured by the death of his son in Iraq.

“The Favourite,” a twisted period piece set in early 18th century England, received nominations for film and screenplay, as well as a special Gotham Awards voted to its three leading actresses: Olivia Colman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz.

Also Read: ‘First Reformed’ Film Review: Paul Schrader and Ethan Hawke Channel Robert Bresson

Other films with multiple nominations included “Beale Street,” “Madeline,” “Hereditary,” “Eighth Grade,” “Sorry to Bother You,” “Private Life,” “Support the Girls” and “Leave No Trace.”

In the acting categories, the nominees ranged from such likely Oscar contenders as Glenn Close in “The Wife” and Richard E. Grant in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” to Toni Collette in “Hereditary,” Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life” and Lakeith Sanfield in Sorry to Bother You.”

Some of the most high profile movies to be nominated – including “Roma,” “BlacKkKlansman” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” – were nominated for acting categories but bypassed in the Best Feature category.

Documentary nominees were “Bisbee ’17,” “Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” “Minding the Gap,” “Shirkers” and “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

Also Read: ‘The Favourite’ Film Review: Emma Stone Plays an 18th Century Eve Harrington in a Twisted Historical Farce

In the Gotham Awards’ two television categories, nominations went to “Alias Grace,” “Big Mouth,” “The End of the F***ing World,” “Killing Eve,” “Pose” and “Sharp Objects” in long form TV and “195 Lewis,” “Cleaner Daze,” “Distance,” “The F Word” and “She’s the Ticket” in short form.

The winners will be announced at the 28th annual awards ceremony on Nov. 26 at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.

Previously announced tributes will go to director Paul Greengrass, actors Willem Dafoe and Rachel Weisz, and RadicalMedia chairman Jon Kamen.

The New York-based Gotham Awards are one of the two major honors for independent film, and are presented early in awards season. The other major indie awards show, the Film Independent Spirit Awards, takes place in Los Angeles at the end of the season, the day before the Oscars. Its nominations will be announced on Nov. 16.

Also Read: ‘A Star Is Born’ Is a Legit Oscar Contender – And Here’s What Else Is

Gotham nominees are selected by a number of different juries consisting largely of film critics. Films must meet a variety of fairly nebulous requirements, including being “filmmaking with a point of view” that is “made with an economy of means” and is directed and/or produced by a filmmaker born or based in the United States.

Last year, two of the Gotham Best Feature nominees, “Get Out” and “Call Me by Your Name,” went on to receive Academy Award Best Picture nominations, while the Oscars also recognized six Gotham acting nominees, four screenplay nominees and one documentary nominee.

Over the 14 years since the Gotham Awards introduced the Best Feature category, the winner has subsequently won the Oscar only four times — but those four have all come in the last decade, including three years in a row with “Birdman” in 2014, “Spotlight” in 2015 and “Moonlight” in 2016. Last year’s winner, “Call Me by Your Name,” ended that streak.

Also Read: Willem Dafoe, Paul Greengrass to Receive Tributes at 2018 IFP Gotham Awards

The nominees:

Best Feature

“The Favourite”
Yorgos Lanthimos, director; Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Yorgos Lanthimos, producers (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

“First Reformed”
Paul Schrader, director; Jack Binder, Greg Clark, Victoria Hill, Gary Hamilton, Deepak Sikka, Christine Vachon, David Hinojosa, Frank Murray, producers (A24)

“If Beale Street Could Talk”
Barry Jenkins, director; Adele Romanski, Sara Murphy, Barry Jenkins, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Megan Ellison, producers (Annapurna Pictures)

“Madeline’s Madeline”
Josephine Decker, director; Krista Parris, Elizabeth Rao, producers (Oscilloscope Laboratories)

“The Rider”
Chloé Zhao, director; Bert Hamelinck, Sacha Ben Harroche, Mollye Asher, Chloé Zhao, producers (Sony Pictures Classics)

Best Documentary

“Bisbee ’17”
Robert Greene, producer; Douglas Tirola, Susan Bedusa, Bennett Elliott, producers (4th Row Films)

“Hale County This Morning, This Evening”
RaMell Ross, director; RaMell Ross, Joslyn Barnes, Su Kim, producers (The Cinema Guild)

“Minding the Gap”
Bing Liu, director; Diane Quon, Bing Liu, producers (Hulu & Magnolia Pictures)

“Shirkers”
Sandi Tan, director; Sandi Tan, Jessica Levin, Maya Rudolph, producers (Netflix)

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”
Morgan Neville, director; Morgan Neville, Caryn Capotosto, Nicholas Ma, producers (Focus Features)

Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award
Ari Aster for “Hereditary” (A24)
Bo Burnham for “Eighth Grade” (A24)
Jennifer Fox for “The Tale” (HBO)
Crystal Moselle for “Skate Kitchen” (Magnolia Pictures)
Boots Riley for “Sorry to Bother You” (Annapurna Pictures)

Best Screenplay
The Favourite,” Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
“First Reformed,” Paul Schrader (A24)
“Private Life,” Tamara Jenkins (Netflix)
“Support the Girls,” Andrew Bujalski (Magnolia Pictures)
“Thoroughbreds,” Cory Finley (Focus Features)

Best Actor
Adam Driver in “BlacKkKlansman” (Focus Features)
Ben Foster in “Leave No Trace” (Bleecker Street)
Richard E. Grant in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
Ethan Hawke in “First Reformed” (A24)
Lakeith Stanfield in “Sorry to Bother You” (Annapurna Pictures)

Best Actress*
Glenn Close in “The Wife” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Toni Collette in “Hereditary” (A24)
Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life” (Netflix)
Regina Hall in “Support the Girls” (Magnolia Pictures)
Michelle Pfeiffer in “Where is Kyra?” (Paladin and Great Point Media)

*The 2018 Best Actress nominating committee also voted to award a special Gotham Jury Award to Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz for their ensemble performance in “The Favourite.” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

Breakthrough Actor
Yalitza Aparicio in “Roma” (Netflix)
Elsie Fisher in “Eighth Grade” (A24)
Helena Howard in “Madeline’s Madeline” (Oscilloscope Laboratories)
KiKi Layne in “If Beale Street Could Talk” (Annapurna Pictures)
Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie in “Leave No Trace” (Bleecker Street)

Breakthrough Series – Long Form
“Alias Grace,” Sarah Polley, Mary Harron, Noreen Halpern, executive producers (Netflix)

“Big Mouth,” Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Jennifer Flackett, Mark Levin, creators; Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Mark Levin & Jennifer Flackett, executive producers (Netflix)

“The End of the F***ing World,” Andy Baker, Murray Ferguson, Petra Fried, Ed MacDonald, Dominic Buchanan, Jonathan Entwistle, executive producers (Netflix)

“Killing Eve,” Sally Woodward Gentle, Lee Morris, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, executive producers (BBC America)

“Pose,” Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Steven Canals, creators; Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson, Alexis Martin Woodall, Sherry Marsh, executive producers (FX Networks)

“Sharp Objects,” Marti Noxon, creator; Marti Noxon, Jason Blum, Gillian Flynn, Amy Adams, Jean-Marc Vallée, Nathan Ross, Gregg Fienberg, Charles Layton, Marci Wiseman, Jessica Rhoades, executive producers (HBO)

Breakthrough Series – Short Form
“195 Lewis,” Chanelle Aponte Pearson and Rae Leone Allen, creators
“Cleaner Daze,” Tess Sweet and Daniel Gambelin, creators
“Distance,” Alex Dobrenko, creator
“The F Word,” Nicole Opper, creator
“She’s the Ticket,” Nadia Hallgren, creator

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Fox to Produce Oscars Academy’s 2018 Governors Awards

‘Free Solo’ Leads Critics’ Choice Documentary Awards Nominations

USC, NYU, CalArts and Florida State Win Top Honors at Student Academy Awards

Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed,” Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Favourite,” Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk,” Joseph Decker’s “Madeline’s Madeline” and Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider” have been nominated for the top award at the IFP Gotham Awards, the Independent Filmmaker Project announced on Thursday.

In nominations that were evenly distributed among 19 independent movies, “First Reformed” led all films with three nominations – one for the film, one for lead actor Ethan Hawke and one for Schrader’s screenplay about a pastor tortured by the death of his son in Iraq.

“The Favourite,” a twisted period piece set in early 18th century England, received nominations for film and screenplay, as well as a special Gotham Awards voted to its three leading actresses: Olivia Colman, Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz.

Other films with multiple nominations included “Beale Street,” “Madeline,” “Hereditary,” “Eighth Grade,” “Sorry to Bother You,” “Private Life,” “Support the Girls” and “Leave No Trace.”

In the acting categories, the nominees ranged from such likely Oscar contenders as Glenn Close in “The Wife” and Richard E. Grant in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” to Toni Collette in “Hereditary,” Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life” and Lakeith Sanfield in Sorry to Bother You.”

Some of the most high profile movies to be nominated – including “Roma,” “BlacKkKlansman” and “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” – were nominated for acting categories but bypassed in the Best Feature category.

Documentary nominees were “Bisbee ’17,” “Hale County This Morning, This Evening,” “Minding the Gap,” “Shirkers” and “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

In the Gotham Awards’ two television categories, nominations went to “Alias Grace,” “Big Mouth,” “The End of the F***ing World,” “Killing Eve,” “Pose” and “Sharp Objects” in long form TV and “195 Lewis,” “Cleaner Daze,” “Distance,” “The F Word” and “She’s the Ticket” in short form.

The winners will be announced at the 28th annual awards ceremony on Nov. 26 at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.

Previously announced tributes will go to director Paul Greengrass, actors Willem Dafoe and Rachel Weisz, and RadicalMedia chairman Jon Kamen.

The New York-based Gotham Awards are one of the two major honors for independent film, and are presented early in awards season. The other major indie awards show, the Film Independent Spirit Awards, takes place in Los Angeles at the end of the season, the day before the Oscars. Its nominations will be announced on Nov. 16.

Gotham nominees are selected by a number of different juries consisting largely of film critics. Films must meet a variety of fairly nebulous requirements, including being “filmmaking with a point of view” that is “made with an economy of means” and is directed and/or produced by a filmmaker born or based in the United States.

Last year, two of the Gotham Best Feature nominees, “Get Out” and “Call Me by Your Name,” went on to receive Academy Award Best Picture nominations, while the Oscars also recognized six Gotham acting nominees, four screenplay nominees and one documentary nominee.

Over the 14 years since the Gotham Awards introduced the Best Feature category, the winner has subsequently won the Oscar only four times — but those four have all come in the last decade, including three years in a row with “Birdman” in 2014, “Spotlight” in 2015 and “Moonlight” in 2016. Last year’s winner, “Call Me by Your Name,” ended that streak.

The nominees:

Best Feature

“The Favourite”
Yorgos Lanthimos, director; Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Yorgos Lanthimos, producers (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

“First Reformed”
Paul Schrader, director; Jack Binder, Greg Clark, Victoria Hill, Gary Hamilton, Deepak Sikka, Christine Vachon, David Hinojosa, Frank Murray, producers (A24)

“If Beale Street Could Talk”
Barry Jenkins, director; Adele Romanski, Sara Murphy, Barry Jenkins, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Megan Ellison, producers (Annapurna Pictures)

“Madeline’s Madeline”
Josephine Decker, director; Krista Parris, Elizabeth Rao, producers (Oscilloscope Laboratories)

“The Rider”
Chloé Zhao, director; Bert Hamelinck, Sacha Ben Harroche, Mollye Asher, Chloé Zhao, producers (Sony Pictures Classics)

Best Documentary

“Bisbee ’17”
Robert Greene, producer; Douglas Tirola, Susan Bedusa, Bennett Elliott, producers (4th Row Films)

“Hale County This Morning, This Evening”
RaMell Ross, director; RaMell Ross, Joslyn Barnes, Su Kim, producers (The Cinema Guild)

“Minding the Gap”
Bing Liu, director; Diane Quon, Bing Liu, producers (Hulu & Magnolia Pictures)

“Shirkers”
Sandi Tan, director; Sandi Tan, Jessica Levin, Maya Rudolph, producers (Netflix)

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”
Morgan Neville, director; Morgan Neville, Caryn Capotosto, Nicholas Ma, producers (Focus Features)

Bingham Ray Breakthrough Director Award
Ari Aster for “Hereditary” (A24)
Bo Burnham for “Eighth Grade” (A24)
Jennifer Fox for “The Tale” (HBO)
Crystal Moselle for “Skate Kitchen” (Magnolia Pictures)
Boots Riley for “Sorry to Bother You” (Annapurna Pictures)

Best Screenplay
The Favourite,” Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
“First Reformed,” Paul Schrader (A24)
“Private Life,” Tamara Jenkins (Netflix)
“Support the Girls,” Andrew Bujalski (Magnolia Pictures)
“Thoroughbreds,” Cory Finley (Focus Features)

Best Actor
Adam Driver in “BlacKkKlansman” (Focus Features)
Ben Foster in “Leave No Trace” (Bleecker Street)
Richard E. Grant in “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)
Ethan Hawke in “First Reformed” (A24)
Lakeith Stanfield in “Sorry to Bother You” (Annapurna Pictures)

Best Actress*
Glenn Close in “The Wife” (Sony Pictures Classics)
Toni Collette in “Hereditary” (A24)
Kathryn Hahn in “Private Life” (Netflix)
Regina Hall in “Support the Girls” (Magnolia Pictures)
Michelle Pfeiffer in “Where is Kyra?” (Paladin and Great Point Media)

*The 2018 Best Actress nominating committee also voted to award a special Gotham Jury Award to Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz for their ensemble performance in “The Favourite.” (Fox Searchlight Pictures)

Breakthrough Actor
Yalitza Aparicio in “Roma” (Netflix)
Elsie Fisher in “Eighth Grade” (A24)
Helena Howard in “Madeline’s Madeline” (Oscilloscope Laboratories)
KiKi Layne in “If Beale Street Could Talk” (Annapurna Pictures)
Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie in “Leave No Trace” (Bleecker Street)

Breakthrough Series – Long Form
“Alias Grace,” Sarah Polley, Mary Harron, Noreen Halpern, executive producers (Netflix)

“Big Mouth,” Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Jennifer Flackett, Mark Levin, creators; Nick Kroll, Andrew Goldberg, Mark Levin & Jennifer Flackett, executive producers (Netflix)

“The End of the F***ing World,” Andy Baker, Murray Ferguson, Petra Fried, Ed MacDonald, Dominic Buchanan, Jonathan Entwistle, executive producers (Netflix)

“Killing Eve,” Sally Woodward Gentle, Lee Morris, Phoebe Waller-Bridge, executive producers (BBC America)

“Pose,” Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Steven Canals, creators; Ryan Murphy, Brad Falchuk, Nina Jacobson, Brad Simpson, Alexis Martin Woodall, Sherry Marsh, executive producers (FX Networks)

“Sharp Objects,” Marti Noxon, creator; Marti Noxon, Jason Blum, Gillian Flynn, Amy Adams, Jean-Marc Vallée, Nathan Ross, Gregg Fienberg, Charles Layton, Marci Wiseman, Jessica Rhoades, executive producers (HBO)

Breakthrough Series – Short Form
“195 Lewis,” Chanelle Aponte Pearson and Rae Leone Allen, creators
“Cleaner Daze,” Tess Sweet and Daniel Gambelin, creators
“Distance,” Alex Dobrenko, creator
“The F Word,” Nicole Opper, creator
“She’s the Ticket,” Nadia Hallgren, creator

Related stories from TheWrap:

Jennifer Fox to Produce Oscars Academy's 2018 Governors Awards

'Free Solo' Leads Critics' Choice Documentary Awards Nominations

USC, NYU, CalArts and Florida State Win Top Honors at Student Academy Awards

As Annapurna Stumbles, Billionaire Larry Ellison Exerts Control

Oracle founder Larry Ellison is swooping in to engineer a major reorganization of his daughter Megan Ellison’s struggling Annapurna Pictures, according to several people familiar with the situation. The studio has been hemorrhaging money for year…

Oracle founder Larry Ellison is swooping in to engineer a major reorganization of his daughter Megan Ellison’s struggling Annapurna Pictures, according to several people familiar with the situation. The studio has been hemorrhaging money for years and continues to suffer an exodus of top executives who have either been forced out or who left on […]

James Baldwin’s Family Explains Why They Gave Barry Jenkins Permission to Adapt ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’

Years before “Moonlight,” Jenkins’ first feature went a long way toward making “Beale Street” happen.

It was already an emotional night at the Apollo as the iconic Harlem venue was filled by over 1,000 people for the U.S. premiere of “If Beale Street Could Talk,” writer-director Barry Jenkins’ adaptation of James Baldwin’s 1974 novel. Then the Baldwin family joined Jenkins and the film’s cast onstage for the off-site New York Film Festival event to explain why they gave their permission for the first adaptation of the late writer’s work.

Baldwin’s nephew, Trevor Baldwin, took the microphone first. “My Baldwin family, wassup?” he greeted an ecstatic crowd, establishing a tone that fit the celebratory occasion. Jenkins’ first movie since Oscar winner “Moonlight” premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in September, but the Apollo screening represented a homecoming: As NYFF director Kent Jones noted at the start of the night, Baldwin was born in Harlem Hospital and lived on 128th Street and Fifth Avenue, just a few blocks from the theater.

Prior to the event, the cast beamed about the implications of the screening. “I pulled up to the red carpet, and looked up at the marquee, and I was breathless,” said Colman Domingo, who plays the supportive father figure in the film, on the red carpet. “I was almost brought to tears, because I understood that I am in the middle of history with Baldwin’s work.”

He wasn’t alone. “James Baldwin’s voice is such an important voice, period, but also for the black community,” said KiKi Layne, who plays the young woman at the center of the movie, in an interview before the screening. Stephan James, who plays Layne’s incarcerated boyfriend in the film, echoed that sentiment by acknowledging the setting. “It’s like a total full-circle moment,” he told IndieWire. “We literally shot on these streets, and to be back here, finally giving this place a story from where this story was born, is a crazy, special feeling.”

While “Moonlight” transformed Jenkins into a venerated filmmaker and scored him an Oscar for best adapted screenplay, his efforts to nab the rights to the movie stretched back to a much earlier date. In December 2013, “I was broke and tired,” he said during the Q&A. Adele Romanski, his producer and old film school peer, sent him off to Europe. He spent 10 days in Brussels writing the screenplay to “Moonlight,” then took a train to Berlin, where he wrote an adaptation of the Baldwin novel. “I did not have the rights to this novel!” he said, as the audience chuckled. “But I got ‘em now.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

The cast of IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK at the film’s U.S. premiere at the @apollotheater. #NYFF56 @annapurnapics @bealestreet

A post shared by IndieWire (@indiewire) on

By then, however, Jenkins was already on the Baldwin family’s radar. The filmmaker initially contacted Gloria Karefa-Smart, James Baldwin’s sister and the executor of the estate, with a DVD of his 2008 directorial debut “Medicine for Melancholy.” She watched the movie with her daughter, Aisha Karefa-Smart, who joined the other Baldwins onstage. “I came home from a trip and my mom handed me this DVD,” she said. The movie, a sleeper hit at SXSW, co-stars Wyatt Cenac and Tracey Heggins as characters wandering the city and talking through their lives after a one-night stand. “It was amazing,” Karefa-Smart said. “It was a quirky, funny, black love story. I just said to myself, ‘Give the OK, because my mom says no to everyone.’ So I’m just happy this happened.” (Cenac, who became a correspondent for “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” shortly after his starring role in “Medicine,” was in the audience for the Apollo event.)

Karefa-Smart singled out the cultural significance of the “Beale Street” plot, which revolves around the experiences of Tish (Layne), a pregnant young woman attempting to exonerate her boyfriend Fonny (James) after he’s arrested on trumped-up rape charges. The narrative shifts between these efforts and flashbacks to the history of their relationship. “The story is a revolutionary story about black love,” Karefa-Smart said. “Loving while black is a revolutionary act. It’s an act of resistance to love under the conditions in which we live, to raise children, to maintain family, and just continue the resistance and stay strong.”

In his opening statement, Trevor Baldwin quoted from his uncle’s short story, “Sonny’s Blue”:

All they really knew were two darknesses, the darkness of their lives, which was now closing in on them, and the darkness of the movies, which had blinded them to that other darkness.

From there, Trevor Baldwin concluded: “As we gather this evening to witness the product of Jimmy’s words from yesterday, through the lens of Barry today — with the amazing cast of tomorrow, together creating a contemporary period piece that touches the soul — there is no darkness, because the lights are bright on Beale Street.”

Annapurna Pictures will release “If Beale Street Could Talk” on November 30.