Here’s Everything That’s Coming to and Leaving Hulu in May

Next month, enjoy plenty of sports-related flicks with the addition of the Oscar-nominated “I, Tonya,” on May 31 and all the “Rocky” movies on May 1.

Other highlights include the Hulu original series “All Night,” out May 11, which chronicles teens trying to make their high school dreams come true during an all-night grad party, and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s 2017  remake of “Baywatch,” available May 12.

Catch Season 4 of FX’s “The Strain” on May 16 and the complete first season of TNT’s “Claws” on May 11.

Also Read: Kyle Chandler Replaces George Clooney as Lead in Hulu’s ‘Catch-22’

See everything that’s coming and leaving below:

Available May 1

3 Ways to Get a Husband (2010)

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge (1985)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors (1987)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (1989)

A Very Brady Sequel (1996)

The Brady Bunch Movie (1995)

Baby Boom (1987)

Back to School (1986)

Barefoot (2014)

201 (2017)

The Box (2009)

Booty Call (1997)

Breakable You (2018)

Bride and Prejudice (2004)

Bull Durham (1988)

The Counterfeit Traitor (1962)

The Crow (1994)

The Crow II: City of Angels (1996)

The Crow III: Salvation (2000)

The Crow IV: Wicked Prayer (2005)

Demolition Man (1993)

Dirty Pretty Things (2002)

Eight Men Out (1988)

Elizabethtown (2005)

Emperor (2012)

Executive Decision (1996)

Foxfire (1996)

Gator (1976)

Godzilla (1998)

The Hangman (2017)

Also Read: Hulu, Spotify Launch $13 Bundled Subscriptions

Here to be Heard: The Story of the Slits (2017)

Hot Boyz (2000)

The House I Live In (2012)

Immigration Tango (2010)

Iron Eagle IV: On the Attack (1995)

Kalifornia (1993)

Lost in Vagueness (2017)

Love is a Gun (1994)

Malena (2000)

Man of the House (2005)

Manhunter (1986)

Mansfield Park (1999)

The Matrix (1999)

The Matrix Reloaded (2003)

The Matrix Revolutions (2003)

Men in Black II (2002)

Men with Brooms (2002)

Never Back Down (2008)

New Guy (2002)

New Rose Hotel (1998)

Ninja Masters (2009)

No Greater Love (2015)

The Pallbearer (1996)

Pink Panther 2 (2009)

Pret-A-Porter (1994)

Priest (2011)

Race for your Life, Charlie Brown (1977)

Rocky (1976)

Rocky II (1979)

Rocky III (1982)

Rocky IV (1985)

Rocky V (1990)

School Ties (1992)

Set Up (2011)

She’s All That (1999)

Starting out the Evening (2007)

Strategic Air Command (1955)

The Swan Princess Christmas (2012)

Also Read: Hugh Laurie Joins Hulu ‘Catch-22’ Adaptation With George Clooney

The Swan Princess: The Mystery of the Enchanted Treasure (1998)

Thief (1981)

To Rome with Love (2012)

Traffic (2000)

Untamed Heart (1993)

Valkyrie (2008)

Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (1994)

Available May 5

Drunk History: Complete Season 5A (Comedy Central)

Mobile Suit Gundam The Origin: Complete Season 1 (Sunrise)

The Longest Week (2014)

Warrior (2011)

Available May 6

I’m Dying Up Here: Season 2 Premiere (*Showtime)

Available May 7

Star vs. The Forces of Evil: Complete Season 3 (Disney XD)

Available May 8

Running Wild with Bear Grylls: Season 4 Premiere (NBC)

Available May 9

T@gged: Complete Season 2 (AwesomenessTV)

Also Read: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Season 2 Trailer: Her Name Is June and She’s Free, Thank You Very Much (Video)

Available May 11

All Night: Complete Season 1 (Hulu Original)

Claws: Complete Season 1 (TNT)

Bleeding Heart (2015)

Into the Fade (2018)

Available May 12

Patrick Melrose: Series Premiere (*Showtime)

Baywatch (2017)

Frank Serpico (2017)

Jane (2017)

Still Mine (2012)

Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006)

Available May 13

Tonight She Comes (2016)

Available May 15

Animals (2015)

How to be a Latin Lover (2017)

It’s A Disaster (2012)

Periods. (2012)

Soul of a Banquet (2014)

Take Every Wave (2017)

The Other F Word (2011)

The Snapper (1993)

The Strange Ones (2018)

Available May 16

12 Monkeys: Complete Season 3 (Syfy)

The Strain: Complete Season 4 (FX)

Knights of the Damned (2018)

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (2008)

Also Read: Here’s Everything Coming to and Leaving Hulu in April

Available May 19

Beatriz at Dinner (2017)

Shooters (2002)

Available May 21

American Folk (2017)

Neat (2017)

Available May 23

Half Magic (2018)

Available May 24

Curvature (2017)

Available May 25

Hollywood Game Night: Red Nose Dat Special (NBC)

Mad to be Normal (2017)

Available May 27

The Wedding Plan (2016)

Available May 30

America’s Got Talent: Season 13 Premiere (NBC)

World of Dance: Season 2 Premiere (NBC)

Available May 31

American Ninja Warrior: Season 10 Premiere (NBC)

I, Tonya (2017)

Please Stand By (2018)

Rain Man (1988)

And here’s everything that’s leaving: 

May 31

1984 (1985)

The Accused (1988)

A Feast at Midnight (1997)

Antitrust (2001)

The Big Wedding (2013)

Boulevard (2015)

Branded (2012)

Breakdown (1997)

Captivity (2007)

Chaplin (1992)

Diablo (2016)

The Doors (1991)

Earth Girls are Easy (1988)

Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007)

Finder’s Fee (2003)

Fluke (1995)

Forces of Nature (1999)

Fred: The Movie (2010)

Fred: Night of the Living Fred (2011)

Fred 3: Camp Fred (2012)

The Glass Shield (1994)

Glitter (2001)

Gordy (1995)

Happythankyoumoreplease (2010)

Harriot the Spy (1996)

Hart’s War (2002)

Also Read: Hulu Nabs Streaming Content From Kids Mindfulness App ‘Stop, Breathe & Think’ (Exclusive)

He Named Me Malala (2015)

Hesher (2010)

High School (2010)

Honey (2003)

Honey 2 (2011)

Jack Goes Boating (2010)

Jennifer 8 (1992)

John Q (2002)

Kingpin (1996)

Love Crimes (1992)

Show of Force (1990)

Manhattan (1979)

Manny (2015)

The Million Dollar Hotel (2001)

National Lampoon’s Dirty Movie (2011)

National Lampoon’s Dorm Daze 2: College @ Sea (2006)

No Stranger Than Love (2016)

Outlaws and Angels (2016)

The Pick-up Artist (1987)

Regarding Henry (1991)

The Secret of N.I.M.H. (1982)

Southie (1998)

Sprung (1997)

The Thomas Crown Affair (1999)

Wristcutters: A Love Story (2006)

Related stories from TheWrap:

Kyle Chandler Replaces George Clooney as Lead in Hulu’s ‘Catch-22’

Hulu, Spotify Launch $13 Bundled Subscriptions

Hugh Laurie Joins Hulu ‘Catch-22’ Adaptation With George Clooney

Here’s Everything Coming to and Leaving Hulu in April

Next month, enjoy plenty of sports-related flicks with the addition of the Oscar-nominated “I, Tonya,” on May 31 and all the “Rocky” movies on May 1.

Other highlights include the Hulu original series “All Night,” out May 11, which chronicles teens trying to make their high school dreams come true during an all-night grad party, and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s 2017  remake of “Baywatch,” available May 12.

Catch Season 4 of FX’s “The Strain” on May 16 and the complete first season of TNT’s “Claws” on May 11.

See everything that’s coming and leaving below:

Available May 1

3 Ways to Get a Husband (2010)

A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge (1985)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors (1987)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (1989)

A Very Brady Sequel (1996)

The Brady Bunch Movie (1995)

Baby Boom (1987)

Back to School (1986)

Barefoot (2014)

201 (2017)

The Box (2009)

Booty Call (1997)

Breakable You (2018)

Bride and Prejudice (2004)

Bull Durham (1988)

The Counterfeit Traitor (1962)

The Crow (1994)

The Crow II: City of Angels (1996)

The Crow III: Salvation (2000)

The Crow IV: Wicked Prayer (2005)

Demolition Man (1993)

Dirty Pretty Things (2002)

Eight Men Out (1988)

Elizabethtown (2005)

Emperor (2012)

Executive Decision (1996)

Foxfire (1996)

Gator (1976)

Godzilla (1998)

The Hangman (2017)

Here to be Heard: The Story of the Slits (2017)

Hot Boyz (2000)

The House I Live In (2012)

Immigration Tango (2010)

Iron Eagle IV: On the Attack (1995)

Kalifornia (1993)

Lost in Vagueness (2017)

Love is a Gun (1994)

Malena (2000)

Man of the House (2005)

Manhunter (1986)

Mansfield Park (1999)

The Matrix (1999)

The Matrix Reloaded (2003)

The Matrix Revolutions (2003)

Men in Black II (2002)

Men with Brooms (2002)

Never Back Down (2008)

New Guy (2002)

New Rose Hotel (1998)

Ninja Masters (2009)

No Greater Love (2015)

The Pallbearer (1996)

Pink Panther 2 (2009)

Pret-A-Porter (1994)

Priest (2011)

Race for your Life, Charlie Brown (1977)

Rocky (1976)

Rocky II (1979)

Rocky III (1982)

Rocky IV (1985)

Rocky V (1990)

School Ties (1992)

Set Up (2011)

She’s All That (1999)

Starting out the Evening (2007)

Strategic Air Command (1955)

The Swan Princess Christmas (2012)

The Swan Princess: The Mystery of the Enchanted Treasure (1998)

Thief (1981)

To Rome with Love (2012)

Traffic (2000)

Untamed Heart (1993)

Valkyrie (2008)

Wes Craven’s New Nightmare (1994)

Available May 5

Drunk History: Complete Season 5A (Comedy Central)

Mobile Suit Gundam The Origin: Complete Season 1 (Sunrise)

The Longest Week (2014)

Warrior (2011)

Available May 6

I’m Dying Up Here: Season 2 Premiere (*Showtime)

Available May 7

Star vs. The Forces of Evil: Complete Season 3 (Disney XD)

Available May 8

Running Wild with Bear Grylls: Season 4 Premiere (NBC)

Available May 9

T@gged: Complete Season 2 (AwesomenessTV)

Available May 11

All Night: Complete Season 1 (Hulu Original)

Claws: Complete Season 1 (TNT)

Bleeding Heart (2015)

Into the Fade (2018)

Available May 12

Patrick Melrose: Series Premiere (*Showtime)

Baywatch (2017)

Frank Serpico (2017)

Jane (2017)

Still Mine (2012)

Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006)

Available May 13

Tonight She Comes (2016)

Available May 15

Animals (2015)

How to be a Latin Lover (2017)

It’s A Disaster (2012)

Periods. (2012)

Soul of a Banquet (2014)

Take Every Wave (2017)

The Other F Word (2011)

The Snapper (1993)

The Strange Ones (2018)

Available May 16

12 Monkeys: Complete Season 3 (Syfy)

The Strain: Complete Season 4 (FX)

Knights of the Damned (2018)

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor (2008)

Available May 19

Beatriz at Dinner (2017)

Shooters (2002)

Available May 21

American Folk (2017)

Neat (2017)

Available May 23

Half Magic (2018)

Available May 24

Curvature (2017)

Available May 25

Hollywood Game Night: Red Nose Dat Special (NBC)

Mad to be Normal (2017)

Available May 27

The Wedding Plan (2016)

Available May 30

America’s Got Talent: Season 13 Premiere (NBC)

World of Dance: Season 2 Premiere (NBC)

Available May 31

American Ninja Warrior: Season 10 Premiere (NBC)

I, Tonya (2017)

Please Stand By (2018)

Rain Man (1988)

And here’s everything that’s leaving: 

May 31

1984 (1985)

The Accused (1988)

A Feast at Midnight (1997)

Antitrust (2001)

The Big Wedding (2013)

Boulevard (2015)

Branded (2012)

Breakdown (1997)

Captivity (2007)

Chaplin (1992)

Diablo (2016)

The Doors (1991)

Earth Girls are Easy (1988)

Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer (2007)

Finder’s Fee (2003)

Fluke (1995)

Forces of Nature (1999)

Fred: The Movie (2010)

Fred: Night of the Living Fred (2011)

Fred 3: Camp Fred (2012)

The Glass Shield (1994)

Glitter (2001)

Gordy (1995)

Happythankyoumoreplease (2010)

Harriot the Spy (1996)

Hart’s War (2002)

He Named Me Malala (2015)

Hesher (2010)

High School (2010)

Honey (2003)

Honey 2 (2011)

Jack Goes Boating (2010)

Jennifer 8 (1992)

John Q (2002)

Kingpin (1996)

Love Crimes (1992)

Show of Force (1990)

Manhattan (1979)

Manny (2015)

The Million Dollar Hotel (2001)

National Lampoon’s Dirty Movie (2011)

National Lampoon’s Dorm Daze 2: College @ Sea (2006)

No Stranger Than Love (2016)

Outlaws and Angels (2016)

The Pick-up Artist (1987)

Regarding Henry (1991)

The Secret of N.I.M.H. (1982)

Southie (1998)

Sprung (1997)

The Thomas Crown Affair (1999)

Wristcutters: A Love Story (2006)

Related stories from TheWrap:

Kyle Chandler Replaces George Clooney as Lead in Hulu's 'Catch-22'

Hulu, Spotify Launch $13 Bundled Subscriptions

Hugh Laurie Joins Hulu 'Catch-22' Adaptation With George Clooney

Here's Everything Coming to and Leaving Hulu in April

‘Justice League’ Storms to Top of DVD, Blu-ray Disc Sales Charts

Warner’s “Justice League” led a slew of newcomers that debuted in the top 20 of the national home video sales charts the week ended March 17. The superhero team-up adventure, which earned $229 million at the domestic box office, came in at No. 1 on both the NPD VideoScan overall disc sales chart, which tracks […]

Warner’s “Justice League” led a slew of newcomers that debuted in the top 20 of the national home video sales charts the week ended March 17. The superhero team-up adventure, which earned $229 million at the domestic box office, came in at No. 1 on both the NPD VideoScan overall disc sales chart, which tracks […]

‘Get Out’ and ‘I, Tonya’: Enter to Win a Blu-ray Combo Prize Pack of the Oscar-Winning Films

Enter for a chance to win a Blu-ray prize pack, which includes a copy of Oscar-winning films “Get Out” and “I, Tonya.”

This year’s Academy Awards were full of some great surprises, like Jordan Peele’s historic Best Original Screenplay win for “Get Out.” Allison Janney also wrapped up a fantastic awards season with a Best Supporting Actress Oscar win for her role as Tonya Harding’s acerbic mother, Lavona. “Get Out” also picked up nominations for Best Director and Best Picture, while “I, Tonya” was nominated for Best Editing and Best Actress.

To celebrate the Blu-ray release of “I, Tonya,” and the Oscar wins of both it and “Get Out,” we’re giving away two prize packs, which include a Blu-ray copy of both films, to two lucky IndieWire readers based in the U.S. These Blu-rays are a must-have for any cinephile’s collection so you don’t want to miss this!

Now through Wednesday, March 21 at noon ET, readers in the U.S. can enter to win by filling out the registration form below. All that is required is your full name, a valid email address and follows on our various social media pages. If you already follow us, then you’re already half way there. The winner will be notified via the registered email address on Wednesday, March 21 at or around 3pm ET.

‘I, Tonya’ VFX Team Escapades

The look, movement and subtle signals from a human face are things we all know on a deep, even subconscious level. The face of someone we know personally or the face of a famous person is even more ingrained in our memories. And this is exactly what made the visual effects on “I, Tonya” such […]

The look, movement and subtle signals from a human face are things we all know on a deep, even subconscious level. The face of someone we know personally or the face of a famous person is even more ingrained in our memories. And this is exactly what made the visual effects on “I, Tonya” such […]

Costume Designers Guild Awards 2018: ‘The Shape of Water’ Takes Surprise Period Prize

“The Shape of Water” factor prevailed Tuesday night, as costume designer Luis Sequeira pulled an upset over Oscar frontrunner Mark Bridges from “Phantom Thread.”

In the battle of period costume design, “The Shape of Water’s” Luis Sequeira upset “Phantom Thread’s” Mark Bridges at the 20th annual Costume Designer Guild Awards at the Beverly Hilton.

In a further victory for the Best Picture Oscar frontrunner, DGA winner Guillermo del Toro was honored with the Distinguished Collaborator Award. While Bridges remains the Oscar favorite for Paul Thomas Anderson’s love poem to London fashion statements of the 1950s, the race has just tightened for Sequeira’s Cold War meets movie fashion statements of the 1960s.

The sci-fi/fantasy award surprisingly went to “Wonder Woman’s” Lindy Hemming over Oscar-nominated Jacqueline Durran for “Beauty and the Beast.” The contemporary award, meanwhile, went to “I, Tonya’s” Jennifer Johnson, beating the much flashier “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” designed by Arianne Phillips.

For TV, Jane Petrie won for “The Crown” (period), Michele Clapton took home the prize for “Game of Thrones” (sci-fi/fantasy), and Ane Crabtree earned the award for “The Handmaid’s Tale” (contemporary). Short form honors went to Kim Bowen’s music video for for P!NK: “Beautiful Trauma.”

In addition, “Star Wars” costume designer John Mollo was inducted into the Hall of Fame, actor Kerry Washington (“Scandal”) won the Spotlight Award, the Achievement Award went to Oscar-nominated costume designer Joanna Johnston (“Allied,” “Lincoln”), and Maggie Schpak, expert jeweler/metalworker, received the Distinguished Service Award.

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

Maternal Conflict a Common Theme in This Year’s Oscar Screenplay Contenders

As pretty much anyone who has ever spent time either watching a movie or in a therapist’s office can attest, mothers aren’t always perceived in the best light. “When I first read the screenplay, I was really struck by the complexity of the role of the mother,” says “Lady Bird’s” Laurie Metcalf. She is nominated […]

As pretty much anyone who has ever spent time either watching a movie or in a therapist’s office can attest, mothers aren’t always perceived in the best light. “When I first read the screenplay, I was really struck by the complexity of the role of the mother,” says “Lady Bird’s” Laurie Metcalf. She is nominated […]

8 Exhilarating Winter Olympics Movies, From ‘I, Tonya’ to ‘Cool Runnings’

As this year’s Winter Olympics kick off this Friday, we look at the best cinematic takes on the world’s biggest sports event, from the from dramatic feats to comedic riffs.

There’s nothing quite like the drama (and, on occasion, trauma) of Olympic-level sports to rally even the most relaxed of audience members. When this year’s Winter Olympics — the 23rd in the contemporary iteration of the event — stages its opening ceremony this Friday in Pyeongchang, South Korea, it will herald in over two weeks of the very best that the athletic world has to offer. Even better: it’s all real.

But for those interested in cinematic renditions of stories of grit, determination, and often a metric ton of sequins, the movie world has provided a few choice picks. From the drama of such classics as “Downhill Racer” to the joy of “Cool Runnings” and the wacky happenstance of “I, Tonya,” check out eight solid gold picks for some Olympics-centric binge-watching below (if you can find the time during watching the actual events unfold in the coming weeks).

“I, Tonya”

I Tonya Margot Robbie

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

The current Oscar contender dramatizes the wild true story of iceskating champ Tonya Harding (Best Actress nominee Margot Robbie) and the insanely ill-fated criminal act that derailed her hopes of dominating the 1994 games. Directed by Craig Gillespie (“Lars and the Real Girl”), the rollicking narrative follows the wild real-life exploits of Harding as she claws her way to the top of the sport, despite a fraught personal life and a big-time bias against her “white trash” background. Hobbled by a dismissive mom (Best Supporting Actress nominee Janney) and her abusive and criminally stupid husband Jeff Gilloly (Sebastian Stan), Harding watches her hard work crumble after getting mixed up in a tabloid-ready story of human fallibility. Everyone knows what happened next: the attempted “whacking” (like, with a baton, not an actual murder) of her Olympic rival Nancy Kerrigan that exploded the 24-hour news cycle and ended Harding’s career. But Gillespie’s film digs deeper to find the real human in the middle of the mess, a pitch-black comedy that indicts everyone, including Tonya.  (It’s also not the only awards season feature to chronicle the dashing of Olympic dreams: Aaron Sorkin’s “Molly’s Game” also hinges on a key Olympic subplot. Consider a double feature?) Currently in theaters.

“The Price of Gold”

“The Price of Gold”

Before there was “I, Tonya,” there was Nanette Burstein’s ESPN 30 For 30 documentary “The Price of Gold,” which similarly explores what will always be the defining incident in Harding’s life. Burstein takes a subtle, insightful approach to the material, including contemporary interviews with Harding and other important talking heads. The documentary served as a major touchstone for many of the “I, Tonya” subjects, who watched it for both inspiration and motivation. It’s easy to see why. Available for purchase on Amazon.

“Blades of Glory”

“Blades of Glory”

On the other end of the spectrum, there’s this 2007 Will Ferrell and Jon Heder comedy from directors Josh Gordon and Will Speck, which takes a mostly outsized idea — two men competing as a skating pair?! — and turns it into a weirdly clever send-up of the stranger elements of the competitive skating world. Populated by some eerily recognizable characters, like Will Arnett and Amy Poehler as a demented sibling skating pair and Craig T. Nelson as a gruff coach, the specifics of the film amuse, but the wacky relatability of it provides an added punch. This movie is silly, but damn if we don’t see people like this zipping and zinging around each and every Olympic-sized rink. (Of very important note: it’s not actually the Olympics portrayed in the film as the essential “big competition,” but the “World Winter Sport Games”; the jokes still land). Available for rent or purchase on Amazon or for rent or purchase on iTunes.

“The Cutting Edge”

“The Cutting Edge”

A contemporary rom-com classic of the highest order, the 1992 original — written by Tony Gilroy! — has spawned a ton of knockoff sequels, including two meant to follow the exploits of the offspring of the star’s of the first film, but the Paul Michael Glaser feature remains the gold standard. It’s a classic romance, heightened by all the drama of a beautiful sport fully capable of killing even its most skilled practitioners (not to mention: ice skates are sharp). Moira Kelly and D.B. Sweeney exude the kind of ’90s-era chemistry so often lacking in today’s romances, made all the more biting by their initial disdain of each other and the wacky circumstances that throw them (an iceskating queen and an injured hockey player, naturally) together into one heck of a mismatched skating pair. Inevitably, they fall in love, but the film doesn’t skimp on the skating drama, building up into a major Olympic event that hinges on their ability to pull off an actually deadly stunt. Available to stream on Amazon Prime or Hulu.

“Cool Runnings”

“Cool Runnings”

Surely the most charming of all Winter Olympics films, Jon Turteltaub’s 1993 Disney hit vividly dramatizes the wild real-life story of the 1988 debut of Jamaica’s first-ever bobsled team. Told through a decidedly Disney lens, the film blends comedy, sports action, and a healthy dose of drama to deliver an inspirational and entertaining story about how making your own way in the face of tremendous adversity (not to mention super hot temperatures). Originally envisioned as a far darker film, “Cool Runnings” ultimately got moving once its script was changed to lean more into the feel-good and comedic elements of the real story, versus attempting a hard-and-fast biopic about the actual men who served on the team. It’s not all entirely true, but it’s all good. Available for rent or purchase on Amazon or for purchase or rent on iTunes.

“Miracle”

“Miracle”

A David and Goliath story that seems almost too good to be true (or, at least, too good not to have been written entirely for the screen), Gavin O’Connor’s stirring 2004 drama follows the initially insane quest of the U.S. hockey to defeat the Russian team at the 1980 Games. The Americans are scrappy, young, inexperienced, and headed up by a forward-thinking coach (the legendary Herb Brooks, played by Kurt Russell), who offers a very different philosophy on how they can win than they’re used to. Anything that could go wrong for the team did, from injuries to in-fighting, odds-making that placed them as huge underdogs, and a mish-mash cadre of players initially resistant to unifying as a single team. The actual hockey scenes are stellar, as are absolutely grinding depictions of the team’s many practices, all of it leading up to an eye-popping dramatization of that key final match. “Do you believe in miracles?! Yes!” Available for rent or purchase on Amazon and for rent or purchase on iTunes.

“Downhill Racer”

No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only. No Book Cover Usage.Mandatory Credit: Photo by Paramount/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock (5880383m) Robert Redford Downhill Racer - 1969 Director: Michael Ritchie Paramount USA Scene Still Drama La Descente infernale

“Downhill Racer”

Paramount/Kobal/REX/Shutterstock

Michael Ritchie’s 1969 directorial debut — which was given the Criterion Collection treatment in 2009 — is an artful take on the sports drama genre and features Robert Redford in one of his earliest roles, a driven downhill racer who is obsessed with his life-long desire to be an Olympic champion. Yet all the trappings seemingly necessary to achieving that dream, from bonding with the team to dealing with overeager would-be sponsors, fail to excite Redford’s David Chappellet, and his singular desires take center stage. Ritchie deftly blends thrilling ski sequences with the minutiae of being a high-valued athlete to provide a full picture of athletic life that remains an indelible classic. (Small wonder that Roger Ebert called it “the best movie ever made about sports.”) Available for rent or purchase on Amazon.

Special Bonus: “Icarus”

“Icarus”

Courtesy of Netflix

Bryan Fogel’s documentary isn’t exactly about the Winter Olympics, but its impact on this year’s games (and perhaps beyond) has so far been immeasurable. In December 2016, the I.O.C. began disciplinary proceedings against 28 athletes who represented Russia at the previous Winter Games; a year later, they banned the country from the event. The decision was at least partially aided by information provided by Dr. Grigory Rodchenko, a chemist who said he helped the Russian government execute a widespread doping scheme at the 2014 Winter Olympics before becoming a whistleblower. Fogle documented Rodchenko’s journey from state doctor to whistleblower in “Icarus,” which provides an unsettling look inside Russia’s sports complex. Available to stream on Netflix.

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MoviePass Drives Close To $130M Toward Oscar-Nominated Films

MoviePass reports this morning that the monthly movie ticket service has generated $128.7 million for select film nominees since November 2017.
Among the Oscar nominated films promoted by MoviePass are all of the Best Picture nominees, nominees for Best Animated Film, Best Foreign Film and other films featuring nominees for Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress.
MoviePass’ percentage of domestic box office sales for Best Picture…

MoviePass reports this morning that the monthly movie ticket service has generated $128.7 million for select film nominees since November 2017. Among the Oscar nominated films promoted by MoviePass are all of the Best Picture nominees, nominees for Best Animated Film, Best Foreign Film and other films featuring nominees for Best Actress, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor and Best Supporting Actress. MoviePass' percentage of domestic box office sales for Best Picture…

‘I, Tonya’ Bodyguard Explains Why He Was Kicked Out of Alamo Drafthouse in Funny PSA — Exclusive

In this “Don’t Talk” PSA, Shawn Eckhardt explains why he was ejected from the movie chain.

Anyone who has seen the raucous biopic “I, Tonya” knows that one of the film’s highlights is Shawn Eckhardt, Jeff Gillooly’s aloof best friend and “bodyguard” to Tonya Harding. Throughout the film, Eckhardt, often squinting and covered in food, talks about how he’s trained in “recognizance,” eventually telling Gillooly that he “knows a guy” who can scare Nancy Kerrigan, which sets “The Incident” into action.

While actor Paul Walter Hauser’s portrayal of Eckhardt almost seems too comical to be real, the film smartly shows real video evidence of the man in question during the film’s credits, showing Hauser really did stick the landing, nailing the voice, the squinting, and the ridiculous, unbelievable bragging.

“I, Tonya” landed its own big triple axel last month, picking up three key Oscar nominations including Best Supporting Actress for Allison Janney’s hilariously bitter performance as Harding’s mother, Lavona; a Best Actress nod for Margot Robbie’s transformative portrayal of Harding from ages 15 to 44; and a Best Editing nod for Tatiana Riegel.

To celebrate the film’s success, Alamo Drafthouse have paired up with Paul Walter Hauser for a special “Don’t Talk” PSA, which highlights the movie chain’s strict “no talking” policy during films. On the grainy evidence tape, Hauser, in character as Shawn Eckardt, fumbles his way through another FBI interview, and explains how trailing as suspect once got him kicked out of an Alamo Drafthouse. The suspect in question? Donnie Wahlberg. But he doesn’t want to talk about it, okay?

Watch the hilarious exclusive “Don’t Talk” PSA below:

How Oscar-Nominated ‘I, Tonya’ Editor Tatiana Riegel Broke the Fourth Wall

Oscar nominee and ACE winner Tatiana Riegel breaks down how she intricately edited the buzzy Tanya Harding biopic.

I, Tonya” has become the surprising wild card in the editing race, with Tatiana Riegel snagging both an Oscar nomination and an ACE Eddie win Friday night. That’s because director Craig Gillespe went with a fascinating mockumentary-like approach to notorious figure skater Tanya Harding (Oscar-nominated Margot Robbie, who also produced) that skates tonally between absurdity and tragedy. Allison Janney also received a Best Supporting Actress nod as Harding’s acerbic and abusive mother, LaVona Fay Golden.

“It’s a film you don’t expect to see about Tanya Harding and you don’t feel the same at the end,” said Riegel. “There are a lot of interesting elements dealing with [violence] and class issues and not being allowed to be yourself.”

Breaking the Fourth Wall

It also serves as a kind of Rorschach test, adopting an unorthodox structure in exploring Harding’s tabloid-like rise and fall as a figure-skating sensation and implication in the criminal assault plot on Olympic rival, Nancy Kerrigan. There are on-camera interviews, voice-overs, and breaking the fourth wall (an element not in the script),

“The mechanical part of it with all of these different elements was to see what worked best and why,” added Riegel. “Is it better to see them on camera saying it? Is it better to hear it and see the action underneath? Is it better to break the fourth wall and give you this odd distance from what’s taking place? Craig shot everything both ways for that exact reason. He came up with the idea originally of breaking the fourth wall and I liked it a lot.”

Janney in “I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

Cutting “I, Tonya” became a dance between tragedy and absurdity. But the trick was to avoid going over the top. “I think the secret to that is always play for what feels real and genuine and always go for the emotion,” Riegel said.

The inspiration for breaking the fourth wall came when the director saw a documentary about Harding when she was 15 and was intrigued with the matter-of-fact way that she described how her mother hit her. Gillespe then wanted to utilize this detached emotional response to the violence in her life by speaking directly to the audience. “And it was a way for the 45-year-old Tanya to be telling us what happened actually in that scene,” Riegel said. “It also lets you know that she survived these incidents.”

Each component offered a different challenge: the skating scenes contained their own personality, from an early one full of energy done to ZZ Top, to the history-making triple axel (achieved with visual effects), to the harrowing Olympic performance, with the shoe lace breaking, forcing Harding to stop in the middle.

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

By contrast, a quiet scene in the diner provides a different side to the mother-daughter tension, where LaVona tells Tonya that being a nice mom isn’t going to get her anywhere. “It’s just two people talking and I find it extremely powerful,” Riegel said.

The Knife and Eskimo Pies

However, violence permeates Harding’s life, perpetuated by her mother and her husband, Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan). The pivotal scene starts quietly over dinner and suddenly escalates into a full-blown fight, with LaVona hurling objects at her daughter, including a knife. “It’s shocking for the audience and for the characters,” said Riegel

“And then it becomes a question of stretching and ratcheting up the tension by cutting back and forth between them, where you don’t know as an audience member what these characters are going to do. They don’t even know what they’re going to do in that moment.

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

“And Tanya very calmly puts down the knife and all you hear is LaVona breathing. And I just held and held and held in that moment until it demanded a break. And then, not only do we cut to something else, but to this ridiculously powerful joke by LaVona that all families have problems, which is a huge tension release and allows us to move forward.”

Also out of nowhere, Harding’s husband attacks her with a head of lettuce when she protests that he got her Eskimo pies instead of Dove bars. “And then a few scenes later, they’re walking in with rose pedals on the floor and they open the freezer and its packed with Dove bars. This is the whole problem with domestic abuse: You are being seduced right into it because he’s being nice now,” said Riegel.

Allison Janney in “I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

The final irony: Harding turned to boxing after being banned from figure skating. And the final shot provides the perfect metaphor, when she’s pummeled but gets right back up, proving that she’s a survivor. “That was not the original ending of the script, but it was a brilliant call by Craig,” Riegel said.

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How Much Of A Box Office Boost Will The Nominees Get By Oscar Night?

By the time March 4 arrives when Oscars are handed out, those lauded pics still in play at the box office are projected to amass close to $150M, that is from the time since nominations were announced last Tuesday.
Of that figure, 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight combined with five titles —The Shape of Water (13 noms), Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (7), The Greatest Showman (1), Ferdinand (1) and The Post (2)- will drive close to 65% of that figure.
Too…

By the time March 4 arrives when Oscars are handed out, those lauded pics still in play at the box office are projected to amass close to $150M, that is from the time since nominations were announced last Tuesday. Of that figure, 20th Century Fox and Fox Searchlight combined with five titles —The Shape of Water (13 noms), Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (7), The Greatest Showman (1), Ferdinand (1) and The Post (2)- will drive close to 65% of that figure. Too…

‘I, Tonya’ Gets Torn to Shreds by a Reporter Who Covered the Real-Life Incident: ‘This Fantasy Film Is Harding’s Dream Come True’

J.E. Vader calls the biopic a portrait of “an unrepentant felon.”

“It was painful to hand over the money for a ticket, knowing that some of it would go to an unrepentant felon, and knowing all too well how much money means to her.” That’s quite the way to open a piece on “I, Tonya,” but it’s hard to argue with the source: J.E. Vader, who reported on the Tonya Harding/Nancy Kerrigan incident when it actually happened.

The biopic starring Margot Robbie (who received an Oscar nomination for her performance) has led to renewed interest in (and sympathy for) Harding, which Vader can’t abide — in fact, she picks the film apart, detail by detail, in her piece for the Oregonian.

“Harding has changed her story over and over in the past 24 years, but it’s always that she is a victim and everyone else is horrible. She is habitually ‘truth-challenged’ — this fantasy film is Harding’s dream come true,” writes Vader. All of this is at the expense of Kerrigan, the actual victim in the story, who’s reduced to “comic relief” in Craig Gillespie’s film.

There’s also the fact that, according to Vader, several of the most important scenes are complete fabrications meant to portray its heroine as something she wasn’t then and isn’t then: a hapless bystander to the infamous attack. Vader writes that initial plans for the attack “included killing Kerrigan, or cutting her Achilles’ tendon, before settling for breaking her landing leg and leaving her injured wearing a duct-tape gag in her hotel room — and that Tonya Harding was well in on the plans and impatient when Kerrigan wasn’t disabled right away. (Makes Tonya a tad less sympathetic, no?)”

This newfound obsession with Harding appears to reflect our truth-challenged times, according to Vader: “We live in a world where people line up for selfies with O.J. Simpson and heavyweight rapist Mike Tyson; where vaccines are said to be harmful for children and global warming is a hoax, and where the president tells whopper lies several times a day. Why shouldn’t Tonya Harding be a new folk hero?” Read the full story here.

ACE Eddies 2018: ‘Dunkirk,’ ‘I, Tonya,’ ‘Coco’ Win Editing Awards

Lee Smith is now the favorite to win the Editing Oscar for Christopher Nolan’s experimental World War II actioner.

Dunkirk,” Christopher Nolan’s trippy, clock-ticking experiment in pure cinema, “I, Tonya,” the black comedy about notorious figure skater Tonya Harding (Oscar nominee Margo Robbie), and “Coco,” Pixar’s ode to Día de los Muertos, took top editing honors in drama, comedy, and animation respectively at the 68th ACE Eddie Awards Friday at the Beverly Hilton.

ACE is a great Oscar predictor for editing (23 out of the last 27 years ), which now makes “Dunkirk” the favorite for editor Lee Smith. It beat Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water,” the Best Picture Oscar frontrunner, edited by Sidney Wolinsky. And, surprisingly, for comedy,  “I Tonya” (Tatiana Riegel) triumphed over “Baby Driver” (Jonathan Amos & Paul Machliss) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Jon Gregory). These are the five Oscar nominees for Best Film Editing. However, as a Best Picture predictor, ACE hasn’t fared as well, picking the winner 16 out of the last 27 years.

I Tonya Margot Robbie

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

Meanwhile, the PGA-winning “Jane,” about Jane Goodall’s trailblazing chimpanzee research, took the documentary feature prize (but did not score an Oscar nomination). And “Five Came Back: The Price of Victory,” about Hollywood directors who served in World War II, earned the non-theatrical doc prize.

“Coco”

TV winners included “The Handmaid’s Tale”: “Offred” (non-commercial drama series), “Fargo”: “Who Rules the Land of Denial” (commercial drama series), Genius: Einstein “Chapter One” (mini-series or movie), “Black-ish: “Lemons” (comedy series). and “Curb Your Enthusiasm”: “The Shucker” (non-commercial comedy series).

A full list of winners:

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMATIC):

“Dunkirk”

Lee Smith, ACE

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):

“I, Tonya”

Tatiana S. Riegel, ACE

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:

“Coco”

Steve Bloom

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):

“Jane”

Joe Beshenkovsky, ACE, Will Znidaric, Brett Morgen

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):

“Five Came Back: The Price of Victory”

Will Znidaric

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

“Black-ish”: “Lemons”

John Peter Bernardo, Jamie Pedroza

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

“Curb Your Enthusiasm”: “The Shucker”

Jonathan Corn, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

“Fargo”: “Who Rules the Land of Denial”

Andrew Seklir, ACE

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

“The Handmaid’s Tale”: “Offred”

Julian Clarke, ACE & Wendy Hallam Martin

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:

“Genius”: “Einstein Chapter One”

James D. Wilcox

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:

“VICE News Tonight”: “Charlottesville: Race & Terror”

Tim Clancy, Cameron Dennis, John Chimples & Denny Thomas

STUDENT COMPETITION WINNER

Mariah Zenk – Missouri State University

Oscar Contenders’ Box-Office Bump: ‘The Shape of Water’ Has the Most to Gain from Nominations

All Oscar nominees are winners at future box office — but this year, films like ‘I Tonya’ and ‘Phantom Thread’ stand to benefit most.

Distributors spend millions in pursuit of Oscar glory, not solely for bragging rights and ego; success means long-term ancillary value, especially overseas. And in the nominations afterglow, this year’s slate of Oscar contenders stands to gain even more than usual.

Guillermo del Toro’s fantasy romance “The Shape of Water,” already a success for Fox Searchlight with $34 million domestic, looks to gain the most after nabbing 13 Oscar nominations. That’s five more than its closest rival, “Dunkirk.” “The Shape of Water” is positioned to make the most money because, unlike most nominees, its widest break is still ahead.

4106_D023_00001_R_CROPLily James stars as Elizabeth Layton and Gary Oldman as Winston Churchill in director Joe Wright's DARKEST HOUR, a Focus Features release.Credit: Jack English / Focus Features

“Darkest Hour”

Jack English

Three other late-year platform releases have already done that much or more — “Darkest Hour” (Focus/$41 million), “Lady Bird” (A24/$39 million) and “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (Fox Searchlight/$32 million).

These are impressive totals. Prior to this year, few nominees had reached these levels by nominations day. Three years ago, “The Imitation Game”had made $40 million; last year, “Manchester By the Sea” had reached $38 million nomination morning.

By comparison, none of the last three Best Picture winners had done so well by mid-January, despite playing for 10 weeks or more — “Birdman” $26 million, “Spotlight” $29 million, and “Moonlight” $14 million. All were home streaming by Oscar night, which reduced additional grosses somewhat.

"Lady Bird"

“Lady Bird”

Courtesy of A24/Color Collective

Unlike “Darkest Hour,” “Lady Bird,” and “Three Billboards,” have more than 1,000 prints in release. Best Picture nominees”Phantom Thread” (Focus) and “Call Me By Your Name” (Sony Pictures Classics), as well as “I, Tonya” (up for two acting awards) have yet to exceed 1,000 prints. All will shortly. Meanwhile, the three high-flying early releases each will get a short-term boost, which will likely add $10 million-$15 million more.

Other releases have already done a high level of business, with a chance to more. A24 now looks very smart with the early push for “The Disaster Artist;” ditto STX and “Molly’s Game.” Both earned only screenplay nominations, but accumulated decent totals.

“Shape” has hovered at the low-700 to mid-800 theater range the last five weeks, with its highest number (856) coming last weekend. Now Fox Searchlight is positioned to push it deeper in the country while holding on to most current theaters. An advertising campaign touting its Oscar nominations and awards should push the film to its best three-day weekend of $4 million or more, but it could wind up doubling its current total.

That would be impressive in Oscar terms for recent years. Since “The King’s Speech” in 2010, no winner (other than the wide-release “Argo”) has grossed as much as $60 million. The awards are specialized territory, but results have fallen significantly from early successes like “Slumdog Millionaire,” “Shakespeare in Love,” and “No Country for All Men.”

Timothée Chalamet stars as Elio in <em>Call Me By Your Name</em>

“Call Me by Your Name”

“Call Me By Your Name,” which with its 1980s Italian setting and gay romance has more-limited potential despite its acclaim. Three nominations for Picture, Actor (22-year-old Timothee Chalamet), Song, and Original Screenplay (its best chance for a win) should be enough to give it a boost. At a minimum, it will do substantially more SPC’s “Whiplash” three years ago, which only grossed $14 million total despite three Oscar wins.

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

Not up for Best Picture but still getting attention (with a likely Supporting Actress win for Allison Janney) is “I,Tonya.” With a film that has more potential for middle-American appeal than some other contenders, Neon is now positioned to add considerably to its $14 million total as it expands beyond its current theater count of 799. It’s a reasonable guess that it will reach $30 million or more by Oscar night.

Even earlier in its run is Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread.” His first Best Picture nominee since “There Will Be Blood” joined “The Post” as a Christmas Day platform release with its expansion weeks later. “Phantom” has made a little over $6.4 million, with about half of that this last weekend in 896 theaters (up from 69). It will grow to more than 1,000 screens this weekend. “Phantom” should be a real test of Oscar’s box-office value: This more-cerebral contender could now make $20 million-$25 million — not a huge haul, but considerably more than it would have managed otherwise.

“The Post”

Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

“The Post” has had a credible run so far, but the combination of Spielberg, Streep, and Hanks would appealed at any point. Its two nominations, for Picture and Actress, are significant, which should help it hold. That could lead to an ultimate gross above $80 million — compared to the $70 million or so it might make otherwise.

Among other top category nominees, “Get Out” and “Dunkirk” are both long removed from theaters. Sole acting nominations for “The Florida Project,” “All the Money in the World,” and “Roman J. Israel, Esq.” will likely have minimal theatrical impact.

Now, distributors need to worry about Oscar-nominated films fighting for the same screens. That will reduce the totals for some, and could also encourage earlier home-viewing dates for several titles.

Oscar Contenders Dominate Robust Specialty Box Office

New openers face a formidable field of marquee titles still drawing impressive crowds.

Led by an expansion of “The Post” (20th Century Fox), Oscar contenders grossed a combined $40 million-plus this weekend. This continues to be a high-end year for awards hopefuls, as six have already topped $10 million and four have passed the $20-million mark.

This compares well to recent years when titles like “Whiplash,” “Foxcatcher,” “The Danish Girl” and “Room” never reached those highs despite their strong awards presence. This year Amazon’s Sundance buy “The Big Sick” followed “Manchester by the Sea” as a robust awards contender, which could yield elevated acquisitions bidding at the upcoming Sundance Film Festival.

With such a crowded field of established titles, new openings faced intense competition. Lebanese Oscar contender “The Insult” (Cohen) led the field of openers, which all grossed under $10,000 per theater in initial dates.

Opening

The Insult (Cohen) – Metacritic: 71; Festivals include: Venice, Telluride, Toronto, AFI 2017

$24,957 in 3 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $8,319

This Lebanese courtroom drama is one of the nine shortlisted Oscar Foreign Language submissions, and the last of the group to open. Its date was advanced in order to land an opening at soon-to-shutter Lincoln Plaza Theater, which is usually the top New York theater for similar subtitled films. Its initial dates also included Los Angeles, with the usual muted response for subtitled films these days (but more than double the numbers for German contender “In the Fade” two weeks ago).

What comes next: Irrespective of whether it makes the final five, this is expected to expand to top cities over the next few weeks.

Lover for a Day

“Lover for a Day”

Mubi

Lover for a Day (MUBI) – Metacritic: 68; Festivals include: Cannes, New York 2017

$(est.) 7,500 in 1 theater; PTA: $(est.) 7,500

Veteran French director Philippe Garrell’s black-and-white romantic drama about an older man dealing with a 23-year-old girlfriend who is the same age as his a daughter. The film opened with an exclusive date at New York’s Film Society of Lincoln Center with a respectable initial response.

What comes next: Los Angeles opens on Jan. 26 with other big city dates to follow.

Vazante (Music Box) – Metacritic: 64; Festivals include: Berlin 2017

$3,511 in 1 theater; PTA: $3,511

This black-and-white drama set in the early 19th-century slave era in Brazil opened in one Manhattan theater to minor initial results.

What comes next: Los Angeles, San Francisco and Washington open by the end of the month.

Also available on Video on Demand:

Saturday Church (Goldwyn/Tribeca 2017) – $(est.) 7,000 in 2 theaters

Freak Show (IFC/Berlin 2017) – $6,024 in 1 theater

“The Post”

Courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Ongoing/expanding (grosses over $50,000)

The Post (20th Century Fox) Week 4

$18,600,000 in 2,819 theaters (+2,793); Cumulative: $23,089,000

While it hardly feels like a specialty film, Steven Spielberg’s newspaper drama “The Post” is acting like one with its adult appeal, initial platform dates and awards pursuit. Its gross is about $4 million less than the successful “Hidden Figures” last year when it expanded post-Christmas, though much below similar patterns for earlier-year openings “American Sniper” and “The Revenant.” The movie scored #2 overall this weekend, the best of the new wide-release titles despite heavy competition from similar adult titles. It performed $3 million better than Spielberg’s last historical drama, “Bridge of Spies” which went wide from the start, boasting a nearly five times multiple as a fall release. This could get a welcome push from Oscar nominations, boosting its its business at a crucial time.

Darkest Hour (Focus) Week 8

$4,525,000 in 1,693 theaters (-40); Cumulative: $35,738,000

Still flying high, this Churchill 1940 historical drama has hit its marks at every step of its release so far. It dropped only 25 per cent this weekend, and it’s set to compete with “The Shape of Water” and “Lady Bird” at the high end of specialized non-studio awards releases.

Molly’s Game (STX) Week 3

$3,885,000 in 1,708 theaters (+100); Cumulative: $20,715,000

Aaron Sorkin’s retelling of a ski Olympian who found herself running high stakes poker games didn’t have the hold that many other recent adult-aimed films are finding. It dropped 43 per cent this weekend; its quick wider run has already pushed it past $20 million. Its future in a very competitive market will be effected by how well it fares with nominations.

I, Tonya

Courtesy of NEON

I, Tonya (Neon) Week 6

$3,302,000 in 517 theaters (+261); Cumulative: $10,001,000

Neon’s first major hit is still early in its run and looks positioned to place among the better awards-enhanced titles. Its wider break is timed for January 23 nominations, with signs of significant crossover interest. This has already grossed more than all Neon’s previous releases combined — not bad for a film they acquired less than five months ago.

The Shape of Water (Fox Searchlight) Week 7

$2,700,000 in 723 theaters (-81); Cumulative: $26,421,000

Holding very well (this PTA is actually about the same as last week), Guillermo del Toro’s 1960s science-fiction romance has yet to get to over 1,000 theaters. That comes soon, with a terrific total so far suggesting that its total might as much as double with expected Oscar attention.

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri (Fox Searchlight) Week 10

$2,300,000 in 1,022 theaters (+712); Cumulative: $28,509,000

Searchlight is balancing two films competing for many of the same screens, and in this case returning again to over 1,000 theaters (it had been over 1,600 earlier) after recent awards wins. And that’s before the nominations arrive to boost it more.

Lady Bird (A24) Week 11

$1,686,000 in 652 theaters (+90); Cumulative: $36,902,000

Not quite back up to its likely wider break when the Oscar nominations come, Greta Gerwig’s breakout hit shows every sign of getting to $50 million or more.

Phantom Thread (Focus) Week 3

$1,145,000 in 62 theaters (+56); Cumulative: $2,227,000

In its first expansion, Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1950s London set fashion story has a good PTA of over $18,000. That’s not that far below what “The Shape of Water” grossed when it first added new cities. Anderson has a strong base of support, so these numbers aren’t surprising with reviews in new cities still propelling this ahead of most other recent releases. This will have a measured expansion ahead parallel to expected Oscar attention.

“Call Me By Your Name”

Sony Pictures Classics

Call Me By Your Name (Sony Pictures Classics) Week 8

$715,559 in 174 theaters (+57); Cumulative: $7,231,000

Luca Guadagnino’s highly acclaimed 1980s romance scored decent numbers as it readies for wider release starting this Friday. This is already SPC’s biggest-grossing film in two years, and looks likely to top any of their films since “Blue Jasmine” in 2013.

The Disaster Artist (A24) Week 7

$448,475 in 371 theaters (-107); Cumulative: $20,312,000

James Franco’s award-winning portrayal is still in play, with most of its gross in after an aggressive early push.

Hostiles (Entertainment Studios) Week 4

$276,000 in 42 theaters (-4); Cumulative: $821,468

Continued support for this Christian Bale western pays off as grosses remain consistent if not high end in advance of its national break this Friday.

The Florida Project (A24) Week 14

$51,100 in 51 theaters (+14); Cumulative: $5,499,000

Sean Baker’s Orlando childs’ world drama continues to add to its total later in the run.

“Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool”

Also noted:

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (Sony Pictures Classics) – $33,322 in 9 theaters; Cumulative: $130,438

Happy End (Sony Pictures Classics) – $24,590 in 11 theaters; Cumulative: $118,085

In the Fade (Magnolia) – (est.) 16,000 in 9 theaters; Cumulative: $(est.) 66,000

Jane (Abramorama) –  $19,239 in 18 theaters; Cumulative: $1,588,000

Faces Places (Cohen) – $9,327 in 8 theaters; Cumulative: $670,448

Nancy Kerrigan on Why She Hasn’t Seen ‘I, Tonya’: ‘I Was the Victim, That’s My Role in This Whole Thing’

Nancy Kerrigan has not yet seen acclaimed biopic “I, Tonya”  — and she’s not in any rush to, either.

While the Golden Globes were abuzz on Sunday with Allison Janney’s Best Supporting Actress win and Tonya Harding’s high profile appearance, Kerrigan has simply been getting on with her life.

“Not right now,” she told Boston Globe sports writer Dan Shaughnessy in a report published Thursday when asked if she’s seen the movie. “I really have nothing to say about it. I haven’t seen anything. I haven’t watched anything.

Also Read: Tonya Harding on 1994 Nancy Kerrigan Attack: ‘I Knew Something Was Up’ (Video)

“I’ve been busy. I was at the national [figure skating] championships this week so I didn’t watch the Golden Globes. I haven’t seen the movie. I’m just busy living my life,” she added.

Starring Margot Robbie as Harding and Caitlin Carver as Kerrigan, the Oscar hopeful centers on the infamous night on the eve of the Lillehammer games in 1994 when Kerrigan was struck on the knee with a baton by Shane Stant — a man hired by Harding’s former husband, Jeff Gillooly. Harding wasn’t officially charged in the attack, but pleaded guilty to conspiring to hinder the prosecution.

Also Read: ‘I, Tonya’ Film Review: Margot Robbie Dazzles in a Biopic That Freezes Up

Harding has made public appearances promoting the film and sat down for a two-hour interview with ABC News set to air Thursday night, but so far, Kerrigan has stayed mum until speaking with Shaughnessy.

Shaughnessy has a long professional relationship with Kerrigan, who is from Stoneham, Massachusetts, having covered her early career and kept her phone number in a “a 20-year-old at-a-glance phone book.”

“At this point, it’s so much easier and better to just be … it’s not really part of my life,” she told him. “As you say, I was the victim. Like, that’s my role in this whole thing. That’s it.

“It is weird, that’s for sure. A bizarre thing. The whole thing was crazy, being that it’s a story. I mean, come on,” she added.

Later in the day, Kerrigan’s husband/agent, Jerry Solomon called the Boston Globe writer, according to the report, and said, “Our position at this point is to say nothing. When we collectively, or Nancy individually, decide what to do, when we are ready to say something, we will.

Also Read: ‘I, Tonya’ First Trailer Shows Margot Robbie Skating Around Tough Childhood, Relationships (Video)

“But until that time, we’ve been very consistent — and as you can imagine I’m getting calls from everybody under the sun from all around the world — so just to be consistent we’re really not saying anything at this point.”

“I, Tonya” is currently in theaters.

ABC will air the special “Truth and Lies: The Tonya Harding Story” at 9 p.m. ET on Jan. 11.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Awards Box Office: ‘I, Tonya’ and ‘Molly’s Game’ Expand on Golden Globes Weekend

Tonya Harding on 1994 Nancy Kerrigan Attack: ‘I Knew Something Was Up’ (Video)

‘I, Tonya’ Film Review: Margot Robbie Dazzles in a Biopic That Freezes Up

Nancy Kerrigan has not yet seen acclaimed biopic “I, Tonya”  — and she’s not in any rush to, either.

While the Golden Globes were abuzz on Sunday with Allison Janney’s Best Supporting Actress win and Tonya Harding’s high profile appearance, Kerrigan has simply been getting on with her life.

“Not right now,” she told Boston Globe sports writer Dan Shaughnessy in a report published Thursday when asked if she’s seen the movie. “I really have nothing to say about it. I haven’t seen anything. I haven’t watched anything.

“I’ve been busy. I was at the national [figure skating] championships this week so I didn’t watch the Golden Globes. I haven’t seen the movie. I’m just busy living my life,” she added.

Starring Margot Robbie as Harding and Caitlin Carver as Kerrigan, the Oscar hopeful centers on the infamous night on the eve of the Lillehammer games in 1994 when Kerrigan was struck on the knee with a baton by Shane Stant — a man hired by Harding’s former husband, Jeff Gillooly. Harding wasn’t officially charged in the attack, but pleaded guilty to conspiring to hinder the prosecution.

Harding has made public appearances promoting the film and sat down for a two-hour interview with ABC News set to air Thursday night, but so far, Kerrigan has stayed mum until speaking with Shaughnessy.

Shaughnessy has a long professional relationship with Kerrigan, who is from Stoneham, Massachusetts, having covered her early career and kept her phone number in a “a 20-year-old at-a-glance phone book.”

“At this point, it’s so much easier and better to just be … it’s not really part of my life,” she told him. “As you say, I was the victim. Like, that’s my role in this whole thing. That’s it.

“It is weird, that’s for sure. A bizarre thing. The whole thing was crazy, being that it’s a story. I mean, come on,” she added.

Later in the day, Kerrigan’s husband/agent, Jerry Solomon called the Boston Globe writer, according to the report, and said, “Our position at this point is to say nothing. When we collectively, or Nancy individually, decide what to do, when we are ready to say something, we will.

“But until that time, we’ve been very consistent — and as you can imagine I’m getting calls from everybody under the sun from all around the world — so just to be consistent we’re really not saying anything at this point.”

“I, Tonya” is currently in theaters.

ABC will air the special “Truth and Lies: The Tonya Harding Story” at 9 p.m. ET on Jan. 11.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Awards Box Office: 'I, Tonya' and 'Molly's Game' Expand on Golden Globes Weekend

Tonya Harding on 1994 Nancy Kerrigan Attack: 'I Knew Something Was Up' (Video)

'I, Tonya' Film Review: Margot Robbie Dazzles in a Biopic That Freezes Up

‘I, Tonya’ Star Sebastian Stan On Moving Past Marvel to Take on a Genuinely ‘Scary’ Role

As the criminally stupid Jeff Gillooly, Stan takes on his meatiest role yet — and he’s eager take more risks.

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Most audiences may not associate Sebastian Stan, best known for his role as Bucky Barnes — aka The Winter Soldier — in the multi-billion-dollar Marvel Cinematic Universe, as an actor prone to taking risks. But “I, Tonya” provides a very different showcase for his talents than the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It’s exactly the kind of role he’s eager to sink his teeth into.

Directed by Craig Gillespie, the unique biopic follows the wild real-life exploits of iceskating champ (Margot Robbie, in a breakout role) as she claws her way to the top of the sport, despite a fraught personal life and a big-time bias against her “white trash” background. Hobbled by a dismissive mom (Allison Janney) and her abusive Jeff Gillooly (Stan), Harding watches her hard work crumble after getting mixed up in a tabloid-ready story of human fallibility.

Everyone knows what happened next: the Gillooly-designed attempted “whacking” of Harding’s Olympic rival Nancy Kerrigan that exploded the 24-hour news cycle and ended Harding’s career. It’s an unexpectedly funny movie considering the dark context, and Gillooly – criminally stupid, clearly violent – sits at the center of that complicated tonal balance.

“It scared me, and every time I get scared by something in the sense of like, I don’t know if I can do it as an actor, then I’m drawn to it because that’s the challenge,” Stan said of his first impressions of the part.

The actor, who spent part of his childhood in Europe, didn’t remember the Harding incident (he did, however, recall the O.J. Simpson trial, which briefly surfaces in “I, Tonya”). A fan of ESPN’s “30 For 30” documentary series, the actor just so happened to catch the Harding-centric “The Price of Gold” right around the same time he got sent Steven Rogers’ unique script.

“I, Tonya”

Courtesy of NEON

“It was all very fresh in my mind,” he said of the incident. “It reminded me of a Coen brothers movie, it reminded me of ‘Fargo,’ except it was real. I was like, ‘oh my God, I don’t know I if I should laugh, or be terrified, or what I should do.’ When I read the script, I got a little more obsessed with it just because it was so weird and crazy.”

Stan’s obsession didn’t abate, even while he waited to hear back after an initial Skype chat with director Gillespie. (And, yes, he was sporting a Gillooly-styled ‘stache when he and Gillespie first spoke.) It took Stan nearly a month to officially nail down the role, but he never quite gave up hope: he kept his facial hair in the interim. “I didn’t shave because I didn’t know what they wanted to do, and I just wanted to have the option,” he said with a laugh.

The physical demands of the role were appealing to Stan, even beyond facial hair that’s so heinous that his character actually apologizes for it during the first act of “I, Tonya.” (It’s a weirdly crowd-pleasing moment in a film filled with them.)

“He had a specific way he sounded, he looked a certain way, there were questions I had as to how does someone end up possibly doing something like that, what leads to that behavior?,” Stan said. “I just love that stuff, I love when I get excited about kind of like being a detective, and then I have to go back and piece things together and find out.”

Deep in his detective work, Stan couldn’t find much about Gillooly online – after all, Rogers was his first big interview in years – and when he asked the screenwriter for a little help, Rogers offered to send the actor his full interview with Gillooly. The initial blessings (like being able to hear Gilloly speak) soon gave way to a headier new kind of understanding: this stuff was real.  

“When I heard that interview, I realized how close [it] was to the script, it was crazy,” Stan said. “It was crazy that they even talked to him and he could get in touch with them. There were all these other things that were in these interviews that were never talked about before.”

Still, Stan admits that he initially approached the role with some judgment for Gillooly – how could you not? – mostly rooted in his total disbelief that anyone could be as stupid as Gillooly and his lackey Shawn Eckhardt. “I was like, oh my God, how could anyone sort of think this was a good idea? How did they even think that this was going to just sort of happen and it would just be okay?,” he said. “That I couldn’t understand.”

And he also grappled with Gillooly and Harding’s fraught relationship, one marked by mutual physical and emotional abuse that “I, Tonya” doesn’t shy away from portraying. As Jeff and Tonya, Stan and Robbie get into knock-down, drag-out fights with startling regularity, a turn made all the more wrenching by Tonya’s similarly abusive relationship with her mother, played by Allison Janney.

Sebastian Stan, Margot Robbie, Allison Janney. Sebastian Stan, from left, Margot Robbie and Allison Janney arrive at the Los Angeles premiere of "I, Tonya" at the Egyptian Theatre onLA Premiere of "I, Tonya", Los Angeles, USA - 05 Dec 2017

Stan, Robbie, and Janney at the LA premiere of “I, Tonya”

Str/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock

Late in the film, Jeff accidentally shoots Tonya (technically, in real life, Gillooly shot at the pavement Harding was standing on, and a piece of it broke loose and hit her in the face, but still). 

“It was very scary to me, because I didn’t know what to do with it,” Stan said. “I didn’t know if I could play a part like that. But it was intriguing.” Stan knew he couldn’t effectively play Gillooly unless he could move past some of his reservations and worries. He had to find the real person in all that insanity.

“After a certain point, I had to stop, you have to let go of your judgments, you have to put it aside,” he said. “There was so much noise around this story. When you take away all that noise, one thing that was in the script that Steven did so brilliantly and that helped me was that there was still a very bizarre, unfortunately very tragic, very sort of toxic love story.”

He added, “I had to continue to tell myself that that’s essentially what a perspective of it could be, and once I started going from that angle, then I was able to find some understanding.”

The role was a big, transformative one for Stan – beyond just that mustache – and he’s returned the favor, turning out in force for publicity events, post-screening Q&As, and awards shows to support the film and its oft-nominated stars Robbie and Janney. On Golden Globes night, he presented alongside eventual best supporting actress winner Janney, who hit the stage with a fake bird on her shoulder, a nod to her own “I, Tonya” character. No one looked happier to be there.

Stan’s work in the film has yet to gain much traction in the awards race, but as the film’s stature (and box office returns) continue to grow, it’s become increasingly difficult to deny that he should at least be part of the best supporting actor conversation alongside the likes of current frontrunners Willem Dafoe, Sam Rockwell, and Armie Hammer.

“What excites me is finding a character that’s so far removed from who I am,” Stan said. “That’s why if there’s a part and they call me and they say, ‘Listen, you’re going to have to shave your head, you’re going to have to gain 10 pounds, you’re going to have to have a handlebar mustache and a mullet,’ I’m like, ‘Great, do it, let’s do it.'”

“I, Tonya” is currently in theaters.

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Specialty Box Office Soars with ‘Molly’s Game,’ ‘Darkest Hour,’ ‘The Post,’ and ‘I, Tonya’

Over the Golden Globe weekend, awards movies are scoring big as they expand to more theaters ahead of Oscar nominations.

Holiday momentum boosted “The Post” (20th Century Fox) as it expanded over the Golden Globes weekend ahead of its national release next week — the best platform expansion in over a year. “I, Tonya” (Neon) also generated a strong response as holdovers “Molly’s Game” (STX) and “Darkest Hour” (Focus Features) went wider to place in the Top Ten. Longer-running “The Shape of Water” (Fox Searchlight) and “Lady Bird” (A24) are still attracting large crowds.

Strong word of mouth is pushing both established titles and fresh players to thrive against other wide release films drawing adult and upscale audience attention. Apart from this revival of interest in specialized film titles, what stands out is the way distributors placed their films for maximum impact against intense peak holiday competition. Their need is to keep the films vital through the looming January 23 Oscar nominations. Most of the awards contenders have been maximized, with few notable stumbles.

Opening

In Between (Film Movement) – Metacritic: 79; Festivals include: Toronto 2016

$5,435 in 2 theaters; PTA (per theater allowance): $2,718

This Israeli drama about the budding feminist movement among Palestinians nabbed by far the best reviews of the week’s limited releases. (It was the only one to report grosses.) This opened at two Landmark locations in Manhattan (the new theater on the Upper West Side will pick up demand after the closure of the Lincoln Plaza). These are minor grosses, but set up the film for national attention at niche locations.

What comes next: A national big market roll out expected to hit most major cities starts this month.

“Molly’s Game”

Week Two

Molly’s Game (STX)

$7,000,000 in 1,608 theaters (+1,337); PTA (per theater average): $4,356; Cumulative: $14,220,000

STX’s strategy of limited specialized initial play starting Christmas Day followed by a big national release on a slow week for new films has paid off with a decent if not spectacular second week. Aaron Sorkin’s true story about how an Olympic skier became a private gambling entrepreneur gets credit for breaking through to an audience already saturated with sophisticated releases. The ultimate test will be if the results (again, good not great) can sustain in weeks ahead, with Oscar attention including potential Best Actress and Best Adapted Screenplay nominations critical in this plan. But the timing of the release can only help its cause.

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“Phantom Thread”

Photo : Laurie Sparham / Focus Features

Phantom Thread (Focus)

$245,000 in 6 theaters (+2); PTA: $40,833; Cumulative: $952,000

Paul Thomas Anderson’s 1950s London fashion world drama added Toronto and a third New York date for its second weekend. The PTA remains healthy even if it falls behind the director’s prior films. This could be another of his niche films to struggle to gain mass appeal. It needs awards nominations ahead to give it a chance in further expansion in upcoming weeks.

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (Sony Pictures Classics)

$24,268 in 4 theaters (no change); PTA: $6,067; Cumulative: $83,702

Annette Bening’s turn as actress Gloria Grahame late in life dropped about 30 per cent on its second weekend in limited New York/Los Angeles dates. That’s a fall from an already mediocre start despite major support from SPC.

“In the Fade”

In the Fade (Magnolia)

$(est.) 13,000 in 6 theaters (+3); PTA: $; Cumulative: $(est.) 36,000

Fatih Akin’s German drama about a woman fighting back after right wing terrorists destroy her family had a small expansion in its second weekend but is still struggling to gain traction. All eyes are on whether this shortlisted foreign-language title lands an Oscar nomination.

Ongoing/expanding (Grosses over $50,000)

Darkest Hour (Focus) Week 7

$6,355,000 in 1,733 theaters (+790); Cumulative: $28,391,000

The near doubling of its theater count led to a 16 per cent increase in gross, providing Joe Wright’s film with another strong weekend. Focus has done a terrific job of timing the release, and a middle-American audience is responding well.

“The Shape of Water”

The Shape of Water (Fox Searchlight) Week 6

$3,100,000 in 804 theaters (+48); Cumulative: $21,653,000

Guillermo del Toro’s romantic fantasy continues to thrive, down only slightly after a strong holiday weekend and looking to add much more ahead. Searchlight has played this perfectly so far.

I, Tonya (Neon) Week 5   49  /2868

$2,426,000 in 242 theaters (+193 theaters); Cumulative: $5,295,000

A strong result for the first broadening of the Tonya Harding story. The theater average of some $10,000 is around the level of similar results for breakout successes like “Lady Bird” and “The Shape of Water.” Neon’s gamble of a slower release and  timing their still wider exposure in January is working.

“The Post”

The Post  (20th Century Fox) Week 3

$1,700,000 in 36 theaters (+27); Cumulative: $3,850,000

We’re looking at an over $47,000 per theater average for the significant limited expansion of Steven Spielberg’s Pentagon Papers drama. That’s significantly bigger than either “Lady Bird” or “The Shape of Water” at a similar number of theaters early in their respective runs. As it breaks out wide next weekend, “The Post” will get a strong box office push alongside an expected awards crescendo that could reach wide popular interest.

Lady Bird (A24) Week 10

$1,559,000 in 562 theaters (+170); Cumulative: $34,115,000

A small uptick in gross from the holiday weekend (with more theaters) builds on a strong total. Greta Gerwig’s comedy has now grossed far more than “Moonlight” in total last year, and is ahead of what recent Oscar winners “Spotlight,” “12 Years a Slave,” “Birdman” and “The Artist” each had taken in at this date in their runs. With a bounty of awards attention ahead, expect it to surge ahead of all those totals even if it doesn’t win.

The Disaster Artist  A24) Week 6

$781,530 in 478 theaters (-29); Cumulative: $19,467,000

A big drop from last weekend as James Franco’s film looks like it has taken in most of its still impressive total prior to its potential awards attention.

“Call Me By Your Name”

Call Me By Your Name (Sony Pictures Classics) Week 7

$758,726 in 117 theaters (+2); Cumulative: $6,085,000

Though it has not yet shown the appeal of other rival recent releases, early in its slower release Luca Guadignano’s period gay romance is holding well in initial limited dates. With a wider release timed to parallel its expected significant Oscar nomination haul, it has already reached a significant gross in its early stages.

Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri (Fox Searchlight) Week 9

$705,000 in 310 theaters (+44); Cumulative: $25,393,000

Martin McDonagh’s black comedy is alive and kicking after a strong run. This could have plenty of steam left. With a theater total increase, the gross climbed a little from last weekend.

Christian Bale in Hostiles

“Hostiles”

Hostiles (Entertainment Studios) Week 3

$310,000 in 46 theaters (+41); Cumulative: $435,192

Scott Cooper’s festival launched and initially platformed western with Christian Bale hit top markets this week in advance of its national expansion this week with a performance a bit better than its initial two city holiday dates. It still faces a struggle to gain a foothold, but at least this weekend shows it has some life in it.

Loving Vincent (Good Deed) Week 16

$64,397 in 58 theaters (+3); Cumulative: $6,381,000

The film that will not die still adds to its impressive totals, with a shot at an Oscar Animated Feature nomination just ahead.

The Florida Project  (A24) Week 14

$60,734 in 37 theaters (+4); Cumulative: $5,410,000

Sean Baker’s long-running acclaimed Orlando motel drama keeps its presence alive again in its fourth month with hopes for further attention still alive. This could pop up for more play ahead.

Also noted:

The Man Who Invented Christmas (Bleecker Street) – $21,449 in 70 theaters ; Cumulative: $5,653,000

Jane (Abramorama) – $20,405 in 19 theaters; Cumulative: $1,540,000

Happy End (Sony Pictures Classics) – $14,044 in 6 theaters; Cumulative: $83,637

Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild 2018 Nominees: ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘I, Tonya’ and More

Every feature on the Oscar shortlist except “Victoria & Abdul” has been included in this year’s MUAHS nominations.

The Make-Up Artists and Hair Stylists Guild (MUAHS) have announced nominations for outstanding achievements in motion pictures, television, commercials and live theater during 2017. Winners will be announced on Saturday, February 24 at The Novo by Microsoft at L.A. Live.

This year’s nominees include six of the seven films short listed for the Best Make-Up and Hairstyling Oscar, including “I, Tonya,” “Ghost in the Shell,” and the Netflix tentpole “Bright.” The only Oscar shortlisted film not to earn a MUAHS nomination is “Victoria & Abdul.”

The full nominations list is included below.

Feature-Length Motion Picture – Best Contemporary Make-Up
BABY DRIVER
Fionagh Cush, Phyllis Temple
THE BIG SICK
Leo Won, Kirsten Sylvester
GHOST IN THE SHELL
Deborah La Mia Denaver, Jane O’Kane
PITCH PERFECT 3
Melanie Hughes-Weaver, Judy Yonemoto, Erica Kyker
WONDER
Naomi Bakstad, Jean Black, Megan Harkness

Feature-Length Motion Picture – Best Contemporary Hair
THE BIG SICK
Tonia Ciccone, Toni Roman-Grimm
GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY-VOL. 2
Camille Friend, Louisa Anthony, Jules Holdren
THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI
Cydney Cornell, Susan Buffington
PITCH PERFECT 3
Cheryl Marks, Melissa Malkasian, Andrea Bowman
WONDER
Robert Pandini, Alisa Macmillian

Feature-Length Motion Picture – Best Period and/or Character Make-Up
BLADE RUNNER 2049
Donald Mowat, Jo-Ann MacNeil, Csilla Horvath Blake
BRIGHT
Alessandro Bertolazzi, Cristina Waltz, Judy Murdock
DARKEST HOUR
Ivana Primorac, Flora Moody
THE GREATEST SHOWMAN
Nicki Ledermann, Tania Ribalow, Sunday Englis
I, TONYA
Deborah La Mia Denaver, Teresa Vest, Bill Myer

Feature-Length Motion Picture – Best Period and/or Character Hair
ATOMIC BLONDE
Enzo Angileri
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST
Jenny Shircore, Marc Pilcher, Charlotte Hayward
BLADE RUNNER 2049
Kerry Warn, Lizzie Lawson Zeiss, Jaime Leigh McIntosh
DARKEST HOUR
Ivana Primorac, Flora Moody
I, TONYA
Adruitha Lee, Mary Everett

Feature-Length Motion Picture – Best Special Make-Up Effects
GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY-VOL. 2
John Blake, Brian Sipe
DARKEST HOUR
Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, Lucy Sibbick
THE SHAPE OF WATER
Mike Hill, Shane Mahan
STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI
Neal Scanlan, Peter Swords King
WONDER
Arjen Tuiten, Michael Nickiforek

TV and New Media Series – Best Contemporary Make-Up
DANCING WITH THE STARS
Zena Shteysel Green, Angela Moos, Sarah Woolf
GRACE AND FRANKIE
Robin Siegel, David De Leon, Bonita DeHaven
THE HANDMAID’S TALE
Burton LeBlanc, Talia Reinhold, Erika Caceres
RuPAUL’S DRAG RACE
David Petruschin, Jen Fregozo, Natasha Marcelina De Poyo
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Louie Zakarian, Amy Tagliamonti, Jason Milani

TV and New Media Series – Best Contemporary Hair
DANCING WITH THE STARS
Mary Guerrero, Kimi Messina, Gail Ryan
EMPIRE
Melissa Forney, Theresa Fleming, Nolan Kelly
GRACE AND FRANKIE
Julie Rea, Jonathan Hanousek, Marlene Williams
RuPAUL’S DRAG RACE
Gabriel Villarreal, Hector Yovani Pocasangre
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Jodi Mancuso, Jennifer Serio, Inga Thrasher

TV and New Media Series – Best Period or Character Make-Up
THE CROWN
Ivana Primorac
GAME OF THRONES
Jane Walker, Nicola Matthews
GLOW
Lana Horochowski, Maurine Burke
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Louie Zakarian, Amy Tagliamonti, Jason Milani
STRANGER THINGS
Amy Forsythe, Jillian Erickson

TV and New Media Series – Best Period or Character Hair Styling
THE CROWN
Ivana Primorac
GAME OF THRONES
Kevin Alexander, Candice Banks
GLOW
Theraesa Rivers, Valerie Jackson
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Jodi Mancuso, Jennifer Serio, Inga Thrasher
VIKINGS
Dee Corcoran, Zuelika Delaney, Peter Burke

TV and New Media Series – Best Special Make-Up Effects
GAME OF THRONES
Barrie Gower, Sarah Gower
THE ORVILLE
Howard Berger, Tami Lane, Garett Immell
SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
Louie Zakarian, Jason Milani, Tom Denier
STRANGER THINGS
Amy Forsythe, Jillian Erickson
THE WALKING DEAD
Greg Nicotero

TV Mini Series or Movie Made for Television – Best Contemporary Make-Up
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT
Eryn Krueger Mekash, Kim Ayers, Silvina Knight
BIG LITTLE LIES
Steve Artmont, Nicole Artmont
FARGO
Gail Kennedy, Joanne Preece, Danielle Hanson
MICHAEL JACKSON: SEARCHING FOR NEVERLAND
Geneva Nash Morgan, Sue Laprelle, April Chaney
TWIN PEAKS
Debbie Zoller, Richard Redlefsen, Mandi Crane

TV Mini Series or Movie Made for Television – Best Contemporary Hair Styling
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT
Michelle Ceglia, Samantha Wade, Brittany Madrigal
BIG LITTLE LIES
Michelle Ceglia, Nickole Jones, Jocelyn Carpenter
FARGO
Chris Glimsdale, Penny Thompson, Judy Durbacz
MICHAEL JACKSON: SEARCHING FOR NEVERLAND
Karen Dick, Liz Ferguson
MTV VIDEO MUSIC AWARDS 2017
Jerilynn Stephens, Meagan Herrera-Schaaf, Maria Sandoval

TV Mini Series or Movie Made for Television – Best Period or Character Make-Up
A CHRISTMAS STORY LIVE
Tonia Green, Silvia Leczel
FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
Eryn Krueger Mekash, Robin Beauchesne
MUDBOUND
Angie Wells, Carla Brenholtz, Emily Tatum
TWIN PEAKS
Debbie Zoller, Richard Redlefsen, Mandi Crane
WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER: TEN YEARS LATER
Lindsay Garrison, Laura Peyer, Alex Perrone

TV Mini Series or Movie Made for Television – Best Period or Character Hair Styling
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT
Michelle Ceglia, Samantha Wade, Julie Rael
A CHRISTMAS STORY LIVE
Dean Banowetz, Lotus Seki, Derrick Spruill
FARGO
Chris Glimsdale, Carol Doran
FEUD: BETTE AND JOAN
Chris Clark, Ralph Abalos, Wendy Southard
MUDBOUND
Lawrence Davis, Dana Boisseau

TV Mini Series or Movie Made for Television – Best Special Effects Make-Up
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT
Eryn Krueger Mekash, Michael Mekash, David Anderson
BLACK MIRROR: “USS CALLISTER”
Tanya Lodge
FARGO
Gail Kennedy, Dave Trainor, Christina Tea Scott
GENIUS
Davina Lamont, Goran Lundstrom
TWIN PEAKS
Debbie Zoller, Richard Redlefsen, Jamie Kelman

Commercials and Music Videos – Best Make-Up
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT PROMOTIONAL CAMPAIGN
Kerry Herta, Jason Collins, Christina Waltz
FOO FIGHTERS “RUN”
Tony Gardner, Thomas Floutz
KATY PERRY “SWISH SWISH”
Koji Ohmura, April Hutchinson
PINK FEAT. EMINEM “REVENGE” MUSIC VIDEO
KC Mussman, Kathy Jeung
SPECTRUM TV COMMERCIAL “PARENT TEACHER NIGHT”
Edward French, Margaret Beserra-Prentice, Bart Mixon

Commercials and Music Videos – Best Hair Styling
AMERICAN HORROR STORY: CULT PROMOTIONAL CAMPAIGN
Nicki Alkire, Fernando Navarro, Stephanie Rives
iPHONE X, DAVID BECKHAM AND SPRINT: GAME CHANGERS
Jerilynn Stephens, Meagan Herrera-Schaaf, Ken Paves
KATY PERRY “SWISH SWISH”
Audrey Futterman-Stern, Tom Opitz
SELENA GOMEZ “BAD LIAR”
Linda Flowers, Anna Rose Kern, James Sartain
HONDA CAR COMMERCIAL WITH SEAN HAYES “JACK GOES BIG”
Tim Burke, Renee Vaca, Ken Paves

Theatrical Production – Best Make-Up
KING CHARLES lll
Raenae Kuaea; Jazmyn Aubrey
MAMMA MIA
Vanessa Dionne, Christina Tracey, Romaine Markus Myers
NIXON IN CHINA
Vanessa Dionne, Rheanne Garcia, Donna Levy
SALOME
Darren Jinks, Brandi Strona
THE TALE OF HOFFMAN
Darren Jinks, Brandi Strona, Renee Horner

Theatrical Production – Best Hair Styling
LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES
Jessica Mills
MAMMA MIA
Vanessa Dionne, Cassie Russek, Rheanne Garcia
NIXON IN CHINA
Vanessa Dionne, Rheanne Garcia, Tim Bohle
THE TALES OF HOFFMAN
Darren Jinks, Raquel Bianchini, Linda Cardenas
ZOOT SUIT
Jessica Mills, Rick Geyer, Mario Duran

Children and Teen Programming – Best Make-Up
ANNE WITH AN E
Diane Mazur, Larissa Palaszczuk
HENRY DANGER
Michael Johnston, Patti Brand-Reese, Melanie Mills
JUST ADD MAGIC
Myriam Arougheti, Merry Lee Traum
THE THUNDERMANS
Michelle Keck Smith, Chelsea Jolton
WALK THE PRANK
Jennifer Aspinall, Ned Neidhardt

Children and Teen Programming – Best Hair Styling
AN AMERICAN GIRL STORY – IVY & JULIE 1976: A HAPPY BALANCE
Josie Peng, Jennie Lechleidner
HENRY DANGER
Joe Matke, Roma Goddard, Dwayne Ross
JUST ADD MAGIC
Gabrielle Suarez, Desiree Ponce
THE THUNDERMANS
Jeanette (Jani) Kleinbard, Janet Moore
WALK THE PRANK
Ursula Hawks, Mary Howd

Daytime Television – Best Make-Up
THE BOLD AND THE BEAUTIFUL
Christine Lai Johnson, Chris Escobosa, Jenna Wittman
THE REAL DAYTIME TALKSHOW
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‘The Disaster Artist’ Leads Specialty Box Office vs. ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’

Amazingly, seven specialized films have amassed a combined gross of $210 million against the mighty “The Last Jedi.”

A24’s “The Disaster Artist” and “Lady Bird” led the pack of specialized successes, again landing in the weekend’s Top 10 chart. Both had to hold off the usual pre-holiday dip as well as the massive draw across all audiences for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.”

A total of eight recent limited releases expanded this weekend –all their theaters combined add up to about the same number of theaters as “The Last Jedi,” which earned 22 times as much as Woody Allen’s laggard “Wonder Wheel” (Amazon), with less than $10 million this weekend.

To a large extent grosses this week are gravy on top of past totals and more importantly a build-up to the most lucrative time of the year for adult moviegoing. That starts in earnest on Christmas Day. More viable titles are competing than most years, and not all will be optimally available. But distributors hope to regain their momentum with the return of the award circuit in January.

The top specialty news this week was the shocking announcement of the imminent end of current operation of Manhattan’s Lincoln Plaza Theater. By far the most important platform theater for foreign language and many other top arthouse fare, its uncertain future bodes badly for the state of the market.

Heading into initial limited release this Friday is 20th Century Fox’s Steven Spielberg valentine to journalism, “The Post.” Also in limited initial runs are Entertainment Studio’s Christian Bale western “Hostiles” and Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” (Sony Pictures Classics) this week. Winding up the year are “Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool” (Sony Pictures Classics) and the Oscar Foreign Language shortlisted German entry “In the Fade.”

No grosses were reported for Errol Morris’ documentary-fiction hybrid “Wormwood” (released in theaters as a four-hour feature rather than the multi-episode version already available on Netflix) and the one-week qualifying run for “The Leisure Seeker” (Sony Pictures Classics), starring Golden Globe Comedy Actress nominee Helen Mirren.

Opening

Birdboy: The Forgotten Children (GKids) – Metacritic: 74; Festivals include: San Sebastian 15

$5,684 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $1,442

This Spanish animated film festival veteran is the latest to qualify for 2017 domestic awards with its four theater New York/Los Angeles release. The initial response to this dark story about children struggling to survive in a post-apocalyptic dystopia was minimal.

What comes next: This doesn’t look to be one of GKids bigger hits, with future bookings likely tied to a long-shot Oscar nomination.

Available on Video on Demand:

The Ballad of Lefty Brown (A24/South by Southwest 2017) – $6,115 in 2 theaters

International releases:

Youth (China Lion/Toronto 2017) – $260,000 in 30 theaters

I, Tonya

Courtesy of NEON

Week Two

I, Tonya (Neon)

$176,189 in 5 theaters (+1); PTA: $35,238, Cumulative: $553,554

Margot Robbie and Allison Janney’s multiple award nominations boosted a strong second weekend. Being the last of a string of pre-Christmas platform openers set the movie up to more competition, less seat availability in prime theaters, general lower grosses these pre-holiday weeks, and now “The Last Jedi.” So the movie’s continuing strength bodes well for its slow rollout ahead; its wide national break is tied in to certain mid-January Oscar action.

Ongoing/expanding (Grosses over $50,000)

The Disaster Artist (A24) Week 3

$2,637,000 in 1,010 theaters (+170); Cumulative: $12,932,000

Globe and SAG nominee James Franco’s good film about a bad film continues to show interest. Despite adding more theaters, it fell close to 60 per cent, however. Among the recent platform releases, it likely was most vulnerable to “The Last Jedi” with overlapping younger adult appeal. Still the show business comedy has quickly amassed strong numbers, and with Franco’s anticipated Best Actor Oscar nomination ahead after more holiday business the movie has a lot more gross ahead.

Lady Bird (A24) Week 7

$2,108,000 in 947 theaters (-610); Cumulative: $25,978,000

The movie lost a number of theaters, with A24 threading the needle to sustain two films at once as “Disaster” expands. A per theater average of over $2,000 at this point this wide is still strong, and gives them a strong case to continue onward. With strong Oscar support ahead, this has the potential to soar over $40 million, way past A24’s “Moonlight” peak $27 million.

Sally Hawkins and Richard Jenkins in the film THE SHAPE OF WATER. Photo by Kerry Hayes. © 2017 Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved

“The Shape of Water”

Kerry Hayes

The Shape of Water (Fox Searchlight) Week 3

$1,738,000 in 158 theaters (+117); Cumulative: $3,621,000

Excellent third weekend results for the calibrated expansion of Guillermo del Toro’s 1960s fantasy sci-fi romance. For this time of year and with multiple alternatives for moviegoers, a per theater average at this number of theaters of over $11,000 is quite credible. This is positioned to expand further over the prime holiday period ahead and prosper beyond, with expected nominations giving it a further boost in mid-January. Before then it expands to over 700 theaters this Friday.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Fox Searchlight) Week 6

$1,625,000 in 944 theaters (-676 ); Cumulative: $21,374,000

Fox Searchlight has already accumulated a strong total — nearing their best for any release this year other than their more general audience “The Gift,” which it will soon exceed. The Ozark comedy/drama lost a large chunk of theaters this weekend, but should continue at many of the better grossing ones through the holidays. Then with certain nominations ahead expect a January rebound and a chance to reach the level substantially higher than its current total.

Darkest Hour (Focus) Week 4

$850,000 in 84 theaters (+31); Cumulative: $2,341,000

More than respectable results for this older-audience skewing historical drama spotlighting Churchill in 1940 at a moment of crisis. Focus has set this up for awards (most likely Gary Oldman’s Best Actor nod) and elevated results over Christmas, with over 600 new theaters added this Friday.

"Call Me By Your Name"

“Call Me by Your Name”

Call Me By Your Name (Sony Pictures Classics) Week 4

$491,933 in 30 theaters (+21); Cumulative: $2,005,000

The careful handling of this high-end acclaimed gay romance, with more evidence this week of its strong awards draw, continued with its still limited expansion in the face of a tricky calendar. Films which include a strong draw for older audiences often delay their wider runs this time of year. Next Friday sees a selection of new city openings, with some further expansion on Jan. 12 with its wider national break the following week right after its expected significant Oscar nomination haul.

Wonder Wheel (Amazon) Week 3  47-379

$472,216 in 536 theaters (+489); Cumulative: $851,469

Woody Allen’s 1950s Coney Island-set drama expanded quickly in the heart of weak playtime and massive competition. The grosses came in at less that $1,000 per theater. That will make it very tough to get sustained runs going into the difficult time of the year to find screen space. Amazon’s first stand-alone theatrical release won’t be Allen’s worst grossing film — even with adjusted numbers “Cassandra’s Dream” and “September” only managed a little over $1 million. But it is a major drop from his recent work, nowhere near the level of “Midnight in Paris” and “Blue Jasmine.” His films have normally prospered in non-prime specialized periods, with the high level of current alternatives among the problems “Wonder Wheel” is facing.

The Man Who Invented Christmas (Bleecker Street) Week 4

$263,819 in 319 theaters (-401); Cumulative: $5,010,000

The seasonal tie-in isn’t giving much of a boost to this story of Charles Dickens creating “A Christmas Carol.”

Roman J. Israel, Esq. (Sony) Week 5

$140,000 in 213 theaters (-1,215); Cumulative: $11,730,000

Popular star Denzel Washington’s surprise Golden Globe and SAG lead actor nominations did little to boost this legal drama, which lost most of its theaters and will likely retain even fewer ahead.

Loving Vincent (Good Deed) Week 12

$79,626 in 82 theaters (-63); Cumulative: $5,970,000

This early September animated release is still in play, with $6 million in sight this week. If it can find screens to hold over Christmas (a tough assignment) this still could soar higher.

The Florida Project (A24) Week 11

$57,552 in 66 theaters (-35); Cumulative: $5,133,000

Late in its run, Sean Baker’s  acclaimed film about transient Orlando kids is still getting some play after a respectable run for a non-star indie project. Upcoming awards attention should enhance the visibility of the title, which will also get early home viewing exposure.

Also noted:

My Friend Dahmer (FilmRise) – $40,000 in 40 theaters; Cumulative: $1,246,000

Victoria & Abdul (Focus) – $20,000 in 56 theaters; Cumulative: $22,178,000

Jane (Abramorama) – $27,686 in 27 theaters; Cumulative: $1,377,000

The Breadwinner (GKids) – $13,311 in theaters; Cumulative: $184,080

Faces Places (Cohen) – $11,613 in 9 theaters; Cumulative: $566,116

Tom of Finland (Kino Lorber) – $11,500 in 10 theaters; $288,136

‘I, Tonya’ is a Hit for Neon, While A24 Thrives With ‘The Disaster Artist’ and ‘Lady Bird’

Upstart distributor Neon made a big bet when it paid $5 million for “I, Tonya” at Toronto, and it’s paying off.

Over the last six weekends, six new specialized releases have opened to a per-theater average of over $60,000. “I, Tonya” is the latest, and comes at a time when seats at prime theaters are at a premium.

Still, it isn’t necessarily a bad weekend to open. Last year, “La La Land” launched to $881,000 in five theaters, a nearly $170,000-per-theater result. But it had far less competition, ecstatic reviews, top stars, and signs of early appeal that propelled it to over $100 million and much more worldwide.

This year has more strong titles; even better, most show early success with wider audiences. “The Disaster Artist” expanded quickly in its second weekend to place #4 overall, while A24 had a second Top 10 hit again with “Lady Bird.” That film, coming off critics’ group wins, is thriving and easily the leader among fall releases so far. In fact, it already is the second-biggest specialized release of the year in only six weeks, trailing only “The Big Sick.”

“The Shape of Water” in a strong second weekend gives Fox Searchlight, similar to A24, its second breakout initial limited release along with “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” The more limited “Call Me By Your Name,” though expanding more slowly, is showing strong interest.

Not reported here are one-week qualifying runs for the mostly acclaimed “Foxtrot,” which is playing for seven days in New York and Los Angeles.

Opening

I, Tonya (Neon) — Metacritic: 74; Festivals include: Toronto, AFI 2017
$245,602 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $61,400

Excellent opening for this look at the infamous mid-’90s figure skating rivalry involving Tonya Harding. Opening in theaters already crowded with other top limited films, it’s getting good but not quite as ecstatic reviews as some other recent releases (though Margot Robbie is getting consistent praise). It’s an impressive breakout for Neon — even more so at short notice, since they acquired this three months ago at Toronto. (30 West partnered for the acquisition, reported for around $5 million, the biggest sale of the festival).

This had a nine percent Saturday increase, which suggests a good initial response. With all the strong films in play, it likely also saw the gross reduced a bit by limited seating with some sold-out shows. It’s a tough market at the moment, but the film hits its initial marks and then some.

What comes next: The major expansion will be January, where this could be a crossover success based on initial results.

"The Disaster Artist"

“The Disaster Artist”

Week Two

The Disaster Artist (A24)
$6,436,000 in 840 theaters (+821); PTA: $7,661; Cumulative: $8,032,000

James Franco’s homage to the making of cult film “The Room” made a major leap to a national result with strong results. At #4 overall, it’s the biggest single-weekend gross for any A24 title (past successes have included “Ex Machina” and “Spring Breakers,” as well as “Moonlight”) as well as their highest position in any Top 10.

Based on second-day results (down 17 percent, not unusual for a younger-appeal film with strong initial interest), this might not yet be a draw for important older specialized viewers. For now, it’s been a remarkable success with plenty of upside ahead.

The Shape of Water (Fox Searchlight)
$1,100,000 in 41 theaters (+39); PTA: $26,829; Cumulative: $1,331,000

The second weekend of Guillermo del Toro’s fantasy monster romance, aided by its initial Los Angeles dates including Q&As at key theaters, finds it flying high. The numbers come in roughly just lower than the second weekend of Greta Gerwig’s breakout “Lady Bird” (which had far less competition and no pre-holiday doldrums to worry about), and about equal to “Manchester By the Sea.”

These are strong overall results, placing #1 at most of its theaters, including both in Los Angeles (the Arclight is heading to close to $200,000 for the weekend). Overall grosses went up a bit Saturday — not automatic with its younger appeal, and since del Toro’s strong fanbase comes out early.

 

Wonder Wheel

“Wonder Wheel”

Wonder Wheel (Amazon)

$155,805 in 47 theaters (+42); PTA: $3,315; Cumulative: $321,984

Woody Allen’s latest is struggling against\ competition as well as consensus mediocre reviews. At slightly more theaters, the per-theater gross is little more than 10 percent of “The Shape of Water” in its second-weekend expansion.

The Other Side of Hope (Janus)

$(est.) 27,000 in 17 theaters (+14); PTA: $(est.) 1,588; Cumulative: $(est.) 52,000

Finnish master Aki Kaurismaki’s latest added other top cities to marginal results as it continues to amass strong reviews.

Ongoing/expanding (Grosses over $50,000)

Lady Bird (A24) Week 6
$3,547,000 in 1,557 theaters (+363); Cumulative: $22,331,000

After six weeks, this has already outgrossed all A24 initial limited-release titles, and will top its biggest success (“Moonlight,” $27.8 million) by Christmas. And with likely awards and nominations ahead, it should top that by a wide margin. This weekend also saw it outdo “Three Billboards,” which is also strong — but not as strong as this.

“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri””

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
(
Fox Searchlight) Week 5 $2,860,000 in 1,620 theaters (+190); Cumulative: $18,310,000

Martin McDonagh’s Ozarks-set satirical drama continues to thrive. It is likely at its widest point, with enough heft to continue at many of its theaters through the lucrative holidays. Though it opened two weeks later, “Three Billboards” is already $4 million ahead of Fox Searchlight’s 2015 “Brooklyn.” That film made $14 million through its second December weekend, on its way to a $38 million total.

Darkest Hour (Focus) Week 3

$777,000 in 53 theaters (+49); Cumulative: $1,232,000

A credible showing for Joe Wright’s film about Churchill at the most crucial point of his political career. With its audience older and not as likely to come out as quickly as some other top titles, this looks to have a decent future ahead.

The Man Who Invented Christmas (Bleecker Street) Week 3
$687,381 in 720 theaters (+54); Cumulative: $4,325,000

What’s more seasonal than Ebenezer Scrooge? This hasn’t thrived in wider release, but more screens were added this week. Expect continued if lesser play in the weeks ahead.

Call Me By Your Name (Sony Pictures Classics) Week 3
$291,101 in nine theaters (+5); Cumulative: $1,372,000

The first expansion for Luca Guadagnino’s acclaimed ’80s Italy-set romance showed continued strength as a wider audience gets its initial exposure. Five additional theaters in New York and Los Angeles continued strong results. More top markets open by Christmas, with a wider rollout planned for mid-January.

Loving Vincent (Good Deed) Week 11
$137,574 in 120 theaters (-43); Cumulative: $5,770,000

This Polish origin animated film keeps adding to its already impressive totals.

 

“My Friend Dahmer”

My Friend Dahmer (FilmRise) Week 6
$130,000 in 110 theaters (+20); Cumulative: $1,129,000

The cannibal killer’s graphic novel adaptation continues to due steady niche business.

The Florida Project (A24) Week 10
$96,177 in 101 theaters (-19); Cumulative: $5,024,000

Sean Baker’s Orlando-set film continues to build awards momentum. Late in its run, it’s already more than $4 million better than his acclaimed “Tangerine.”

 

Also noted

Last Flag Flying (Lionsgate) – $47,000 in 85 theaters; Cumulative: $922,966

The Square (Magnolia) – $(est.) 45,000 in 42 theaters; Cumulative: $(est.) 1,038,000

Jane (Abramorama) – $42,901 in 42 theaters; Cumulative: $1,323,000

Victoria & Abdul (Focus) – $41,000 in 104 theaters; Cumulative: $22,125,000

Tom of Finland (Kino Lorber) – $28,600 in 11 theaters; Cumulative: $259,733

Novitiate (Sony Pictures Classics) – $23,699 in 90 theaters; Cumulative: $530,867

The Breadwinner (GKids) – $20,074 in 5 theaters; Cumulative: $153,181

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story (Zeitgeist/Kino Lorber) – $19,500 in 5 theaters; Cumulative: $72,648

Thelma (The Orchard) – $17,784 in 40 theaters; Cumulative: $108,530

God’s Own Country (Goldwyn) – $12,079 in 10 theaters; Cumulative: $279,620

Faces Places (Cohen) – $11,942 in 14 theaters; Cumulative: $541,422