Hear Frank Sinatra’s Unfinished ‘Lush Life,’ Finally Released After 60 Years (EXCLUSIVE)

Frank Sinatra spent a lot of time pining for the one that got away on “Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely,” the 1958 album that many consider the finest of his career. And, legendarily, the recording sessions for the collection included the song t…

Frank Sinatra spent a lot of time pining for the one that got away on “Frank Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely,” the 1958 album that many consider the finest of his career. And, legendarily, the recording sessions for the collection included the song that got away — the classic “Lush Life,” which Sinatra took […]

Woody Allen Thinks Ronan Farrow Is His Son – ‘But I Wouldn’t Bet My Life on It’

Woody Allen says although in his eyes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ronan Farrow is his son, he “wouldn’t bet my life on it.”

Allen joined his wife, Soon-Yi Previn, during an interview for New York magazine posted Sunday when writer Daphne Merkin slipped him a question about the Farrow’s paternity. Although he and Mia Farrow raised him, it has long been speculated that Ronan’s biological father was Frank Sinatra, whom Mia was married to the ’60s.

“In my opinion, he’s my child,” Allen answered. “I think he is, but I wouldn’t bet my life on it. I paid for child support for him for his whole childhood, and I don’t think that’s very fair if he’s not mine. Also, she represented herself as a faithful person, and she certainly wasn’t. Whether she actually became pregnant in an affair she had…??…”

Also Read: Soon-Yi Previn Defends Woody Allen, Says Mia Farrow ‘Has Taken Advantage of the #MeToo Movement’

Farrow’s resemblance to the late crooner has sparked speculative chatter, which the Pulitzer Prize-winning author has taken in stride. And Mia Farrow has not only not discouraged the rumor, she has added fuel to it. When Vanity Fair asked her in 2013 if Sinatra was Ronan Farrow’s father, she replied simply, “Possibly.”

Woody Allen says although in his eyes Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ronan Farrow is his son, he “wouldn’t bet my life on it.”

Allen joined his wife, Soon-Yi Previn, during an interview for New York magazine posted Sunday when writer Daphne Merkin slipped him a question about the Farrow’s paternity. Although he and Mia Farrow raised him, it has long been speculated that Ronan’s biological father was Frank Sinatra, whom Mia was married to the ’60s.

“In my opinion, he’s my child,” Allen answered. “I think he is, but I wouldn’t bet my life on it. I paid for child support for him for his whole childhood, and I don’t think that’s very fair if he’s not mine. Also, she represented herself as a faithful person, and she certainly wasn’t. Whether she actually became pregnant in an affair she had…??…”

Farrow’s resemblance to the late crooner has sparked speculative chatter, which the Pulitzer Prize-winning author has taken in stride. And Mia Farrow has not only not discouraged the rumor, she has added fuel to it. When Vanity Fair asked her in 2013 if Sinatra was Ronan Farrow’s father, she replied simply, “Possibly.”

10 Notable Emmy Hosting Teams: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Photos)

Because they co-host the “Weekend Update” segment on “Saturday Night Live,” it makes perfect sense for Colin Jost and Michael Che to host the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards together on September 17. But over the last 20 years, this …

Because they co-host the “Weekend Update” segment on “Saturday Night Live,” it makes perfect sense for Colin Jost and Michael Che to host the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards together on September 17. But over the last 20 years, this will be only the third time the Emmys have used more than one host, even though two or more hosts were the norm in the show’s first half-century. Here are 10 other notable hosting teams, some that make perfect sense and some that don’t.

1952: Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz

Lucy and Desi were clearly the first couple of television in its early days, so it was natural that they’d be co-hosts only the fourth time the Emmys were handed out – a show on which their show “I Love Lucy” also won the top comedy award.

1962: David Brinkley, Johnny Carson and Bob Newhart

Why three hosts? Because the 1962 show took place simultaneously in three locations: Los Angeles (Newhart), New York (Carson) and Washington, D.C. (Brinkley).

1968: Frank Sinatra and Dick Van Dyke

Sinatra handled the L.A. show, Van Dyke the N.Y. one, and they had one thing in common in 1968: They both barely survived a snafu-ridden Emmys show.

1976: Mary Tyler Moore and John Denver

Mary had been a TV icon for a more than decade, and the night she hosted in 1976 her show would win five top awards. So why saddle her with a country-pop singer who was criticized for saying “far out!” too much? Only the TV Academy knows.

1980: Steve Allen and Dick Clark

Allen famously hated rock ‘n’ roll; Clark popularized it on “American Bandstand.” But they were both TV icons, so that was good enough.

1983: Eddie Murphy and Joan Rivers

By the standards of the time, “Saturday Night Live” cast member Murphy and “Tonight Show” regular Rivers were pretty rude and transgressive comics – and they didn’t disappoint on Emmy night, delivering the bawdiest (and, some thought, most offensive) Emmys ever.

1986: Shelley Long and David Letterman

Letterman was only in his third year as a late-night host, while Long was already on her fourth nomination for her role in “Cheers.” But the show was on NBC and they were two of the network’s biggest stars, so they became co-hosts.

1990: Candice Bergen, Jay Leno and Jane Pauley

Bergen played a Pauley-like newswoman on “Murphy Brown,” and Leno was the change of pace in the middle of a three-hour show in which each of the hosts handled duties for an hour.

1995: Jason Alexander and Cybill Shepherd

Alexander was in the sixth year of the comedy series “Seinfeld,” Shepherd in the first year of her series “Cybill.” One of those shows would go on to be iconic, and the other wouldn’t.

2008: Tom Bergeron, Heidi Klum, Howie Mandel, Jeff Probst and Ryan Seacrest

“It sounded like a good idea,” Probst told TheWrap of the ill-fated plan to put the five nominees in the reality-host category in charge of the Emmys. “[We] were supposed to be the best hosts, and yet we did the worst hosting in the history of the Emmys.”

Willie Nelson to Release Frank Sinatra Tribute Album ‘My Way’

At 85, Willie Nelson’ isn’t letting any grass grow under him: The legendary singer and songwriter is releasing his second album of the year in September, a Frank Sinatra tribute outing called “My Way” on Sony’s Legacy label. The 11-track album was prod…

At 85, Willie Nelson’ isn’t letting any grass grow under him: The legendary singer and songwriter is releasing his second album of the year in September, a Frank Sinatra tribute outing called “My Way” on Sony’s Legacy label. The 11-track album was produced by Buddy Cannon and Matt Rollings and will be released on Sept. […]

Nancy Sinatra Sr., Frank Sinatra’s First Wife, Dies at 101

Nancy Sinatra Sr., the first wife of legendary crooner Frank Sinatra and mother of singers Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra Jr. and singer and film producer Tina Sinatra, has died. She was 101.
Her daughter, Nancy Sinatra, broke the news on Twitter Frid…

Nancy Sinatra Sr., the first wife of legendary crooner Frank Sinatra and mother of singers Nancy Sinatra and Frank Sinatra Jr. and singer and film producer Tina Sinatra, has died. She was 101.

Her daughter, Nancy Sinatra, broke the news on Twitter Friday night, calling her mother “a blessing and the light of my life.”

Born Nancy Barbato in 1917 in Jersey City, New Jersey, she met Frank Sinatra when they were teenagers, and they married in 1939. Daughter Nancy was born a year later. Frank Jr. was born in 1944, and Tina Sinatra was born in 1948.

Frank and Nancy Sinatra Sr. divorced in 1951, when Frank left her to marry actress Ava Gardner. Frank Sinatra divorced Gardner in 1957. He was married to Mia Farrow from 1966 to 1968, and to Barbara Marx from 1976 until his death in 1998. Nancy Sr. never remarried.

Frank Sinatra Jr. died in 2016 at age 72. Nancy Sr. is survived by her daughters, and two grandchildren.

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Nancy Sinatra Sr. Dies: Frank’s First Wife And Mother Of Three Was 101

Nancy Sinatra Sr., the first of Frank Sinatra’s four wives and mother of his three children, has died. She was 101 and passed peacefully, according to her daughter, Nancy Sinatra Jr., via Twitter. No cause of death was given.
Frank and the former…

Nancy Sinatra Sr., the first of Frank Sinatra’s four wives and mother of his three children, has died. She was 101 and passed peacefully, according to her daughter, Nancy Sinatra Jr., via Twitter. No cause of death was given. Frank and the former Nancy Barbato were New Jersey natives and married from 1939-1951. “My mother passed away peacefully tonight at the age of 101. She was a blessing and the light of my life. Godspeed, Momma. Thank you for everything,” Nancy Jr. …

What a Wonderful World: Louis Armstrong Is Getting a Bio Podcast From the ‘Inside Jaws’ Team

What a wonderful world indeed: “Pops,” a podcast about the life of music legend Louis Armstrong, is the next project from the team behind the “Inside Jaws” podcast. “Good Girls” actor Reno Wilson will play Armstrong,…

What a wonderful world indeed: “Pops,” a podcast about the life of music legend Louis Armstrong, is the next project from the team behind the “Inside Jaws” podcast. “Good Girls” actor Reno Wilson will play Armstrong, narrating his life story, in the series expected to premiere in early 2019.

The six-part series is written by Mark Ramsey, writer and host of “Inside Jaws,” “Inside Psycho” and “Inside The Exorcist,” with sound design by his production partner, Jeff Schmidt. Ramsey told us about the project at the 20-minute mark of our latest “Shoot This Now” podcast, which you can listen to on Apple or right here:

“Pops” will tell the story of how Armstrong, who was born poor in New Orleans in 1901, became one of the most famous musicians in the world despite vicious segregation. He started as a trumpeter and cornetist, but also became famous for his growly, supple delivery of songs including “What a Wonderful World” and “Hello, Dolly.”

The project comes from the audio production studio Workhouse Connect.

Wilson, who will also play Armstrong in the upcoming indie film “Bolden,” will voice Armstrong at every stage of his life, as he grows from a struggling trumpet and cornet player to a revered celebrity who appeared in films like “High Society” and performed with fellow icons like Frank Sinatra.

“This is an amazing life,” said Ramsey. “Orson Welles once wanted to make Louis Armstrong’s life into a movie. Such an interesting guy.”

The rise of Armstrong, nicknamed “Satchmo,” “Satch” and “Pops,” was all the more striking because of the prejudice at the time that made it almost impossible for African-American stars to break through. He was also bedeviled by the mafia, which controlled many of the nightclubs where he tried to perform.

His life was far from easy, or simple. His efforts not to say much about politics sometimes earned him criticism from African-Americans, but he used his celebrity to promote Civil Rights. 

In an excerpt from “Pops,” below, Armstrong describes his mother telling him about white men hunting his uncle and other slaves like animals. It’s grotesque and painful, and promises that “Pops” will hold nothing back.

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Robert Davi’s Frank Sinatra Tribute ‘Davi’s Way’ Sets July Release With 2BFilms Deal

EXCLUSIVE: 2BFilms has acquired distribution rights to Davi’s Way, its second pickup after the launch of its debut feature First We Take Brooklyn in February this year. The documentary will debut in theaters July 13 from 2BFilms and Appian Way Pr…

EXCLUSIVE: 2BFilms has acquired distribution rights to Davi’s Way, its second pickup after the launch of its debut feature First We Take Brooklyn in February this year. The documentary will debut in theaters July 13 from 2BFilms and Appian Way Productions, and the company is doing a reception at Cannes next week for international buyers. 2BFilms sibling 2B Productions produced the doc, which had its world premiere as a rough cut at the Hamptons Film Festival. The company…

As ‘ Stardust’ Turns 40, Willie Nelson Talks About the Great American Songbook

It will likely come as no surprise that, 40 years after the release of his classic album of standards “Stardust,” Willie Nelson will be releasing another standards-filled new collection, this one devoted to the repertoire of Frank Sinatra. “Sinatra and…

It will likely come as no surprise that, 40 years after the release of his classic album of standards “Stardust,” Willie Nelson will be releasing another standards-filled new collection, this one devoted to the repertoire of Frank Sinatra. “Sinatra and I were very good friends,” Nelson says by way of explanation. “He was my favorite […]

Lionel Richie Talks Influences, Legacy and Coming to Terms With Having ‘Never Been Hip’

He had us at “Hello,” and we never can say goodbye to Lionel Richie. He was an American idol almost four decades before the show of that name thought to have him on as a judge for the reboot, which premieres March 11 on ABC. A few days prior, on March 7, he’ll be setting […]

He had us at “Hello,” and we never can say goodbye to Lionel Richie. He was an American idol almost four decades before the show of that name thought to have him on as a judge for the reboot, which premieres March 11 on ABC. A few days prior, on March 7, he’ll be setting […]

Marty Allen, Comedian and Game Show Regular, Dies at 95

Marty Allen, a beloved comedian and staple for TV variety shows and game shows, has died. He was 95.

Allen’s death was confirmed to the Associated Press on Monday by his spokeswoman Candi Cazau. He passed away from complications from pneumonia in Las Vegas with his wife and longtime performing partner, Karon Kate Blackwell, by his side.

Best known for his greeting and catchphrase “hello dere,” Allen had shared the stage with classic entertainers such as Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne and Elvis Presley.

Also Read: Daryle Singletary, Country Singer, Dies at 46

Born in Pittsburgh, Allen served in Italy in the Army Air Corps in World War II — earning a Soldier’s medal for valor — before turning to entertainment.

He first found success in the duo Allen & Rossi with late partner Steve Rossi. They were favorites on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” and appeared on the same episodes as the Beatles before breaking up in 1968.

Described as “baby-faced, bug-eyed comic,” he later became a regular on “The Hollywood Squares” and other popular game shows.

Also Read: Reg E. Cathey, ‘Wire’ and ‘House of Cards’ Actor, Dies at 59

His first wife Lorraine “Frenchy” Allen died in 1976 and he went on to marry singer-songwriter Blackwell in 1984.

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Marty Allen, a beloved comedian and staple for TV variety shows and game shows, has died. He was 95.

Allen’s death was confirmed to the Associated Press on Monday by his spokeswoman Candi Cazau. He passed away from complications from pneumonia in Las Vegas with his wife and longtime performing partner, Karon Kate Blackwell, by his side.

Best known for his greeting and catchphrase “hello dere,” Allen had shared the stage with classic entertainers such as Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Lena Horne and Elvis Presley.

Born in Pittsburgh, Allen served in Italy in the Army Air Corps in World War II — earning a Soldier’s medal for valor — before turning to entertainment.

He first found success in the duo Allen & Rossi with late partner Steve Rossi. They were favorites on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” and appeared on the same episodes as the Beatles before breaking up in 1968.

Described as “baby-faced, bug-eyed comic,” he later became a regular on “The Hollywood Squares” and other popular game shows.

His first wife Lorraine “Frenchy” Allen died in 1976 and he went on to marry singer-songwriter Blackwell in 1984.

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Gina Lollobrigida on Stardom, Humphrey Bogart and Errol Flynn

Gina Lollobrigida, now 90, gained global fame in an era when movie stardom took actors to different heights. “I was born at a time when the cinema was really, really powerful; more than it is today,” notes the iconic Italian actress, who, starting in the 1950s, rapidly became one of Europe’s biggest divas and worked […]

Gina Lollobrigida, now 90, gained global fame in an era when movie stardom took actors to different heights. “I was born at a time when the cinema was really, really powerful; more than it is today,” notes the iconic Italian actress, who, starting in the 1950s, rapidly became one of Europe’s biggest divas and worked […]

That Time Frank Sinatra Tried to Stop a Serial Killer (Podcast)

In 1981, Sammy Davis Jr. enlisted his friend Frank Sinatra to help stop a serial killer.

Someone was killing African-American boys in Atlanta, and the city was burning through money trying to capture him. Davis convinced Sinatra to join him for a benefit concert at the Atlanta Civic Center, where police thought their efforts might have another benefit — drawing out the killer.

That’s one of the surreal stories told in the second episode of the excellent new podcast “Atlanta Monster,” and it’s the focus of our latest “Shoot This Now,” in which Matt Donnelly and I talk about incredible stories we want to see made into movies.

Also Read: Shoot This Now: Why the Anti-Hitchcock Story ‘The Living Room’ Should Be a Movie

As “Atlanta Monster” explains, many celebrities expressed solidarity with Atlanta. (Today we learned that Robert De Niro wore a green ribbon at the 1981 Academy Awards to honor the victims — long before ribbons were de rigueur at awards ceremonies.)

The FBI turned out in force at the concert because of certainty that the killer would make an appearance. He didn’t — but the suspect’s father did. Soon after Homer Williams photographed the concert, his son, Wayne Williams, was arrested in the murders.

The story only gets stranger from there. As “Atlanta Monster” will discuss in future episodes, many believe the Ku Klux Klan, not Williams, was to blame for at least some of the killings.

Here’s our podcast for iTunes listeners

And normal people.

Or you can just check it out here:



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In 1981, Sammy Davis Jr. enlisted his friend Frank Sinatra to help stop a serial killer.

Someone was killing African-American boys in Atlanta, and the city was burning through money trying to capture him. Davis convinced Sinatra to join him for a benefit concert at the Atlanta Civic Center, where police thought their efforts might have another benefit — drawing out the killer.

That’s one of the surreal stories told in the second episode of the excellent new podcast “Atlanta Monster,” and it’s the focus of our latest “Shoot This Now,” in which Matt Donnelly and I talk about incredible stories we want to see made into movies.

As “Atlanta Monster” explains, many celebrities expressed solidarity with Atlanta. (Today we learned that Robert De Niro wore a green ribbon at the 1981 Academy Awards to honor the victims — long before ribbons were de rigueur at awards ceremonies.)

The FBI turned out in force at the concert because of certainty that the killer would make an appearance. He didn’t — but the suspect’s father did. Soon after Homer Williams photographed the concert, his son, Wayne Williams, was arrested in the murders.

The story only gets stranger from there. As “Atlanta Monster” will discuss in future episodes, many believe the Ku Klux Klan, not Williams, was to blame for at least some of the killings.

Here’s our podcast for iTunes listeners

And normal people.

Or you can just check it out here:

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Frank Sinatra’s Daughters Nancy and Tina Share Family Christmas Memories, Talk ‘Ultimate’ Holiday Album

At Christmas time in America, “We Three Kings” could take on a different connotation. The royal triumvirate of traditional Christmas music consists of Nat King Cole, King Bing (Crosby), and the chairman of the board of Christmas music monarchs, Frank Sinatra. The Cole and Crosby catalogs haven’t been so heavily mined for holiday nuggets recently, […]

At Christmas time in America, “We Three Kings” could take on a different connotation. The royal triumvirate of traditional Christmas music consists of Nat King Cole, King Bing (Crosby), and the chairman of the board of Christmas music monarchs, Frank Sinatra. The Cole and Crosby catalogs haven’t been so heavily mined for holiday nuggets recently, […]

Barbara Sinatra, Wife of Frank Sinatra, Dies at 90

Barbara Sinatra, the fourth wife of deceased singing legend Frank Sinatra, died Tuesday at her Rancho Mirage, California, home after “months of declining health,” the Desert Sun reports. She was 90.

Sinatra married the “Strangers in the Night” singer in 1976 and remained married to him until his death in 1998. The nearly 22-year marriage was the longest of the singer’s four unions.

John Thoresen, director of the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center, told the Desert Sun that Sinatra “died comfortably surrounded by family and friends at her home.”

Also Read: Nancy Sinatra Walks All Over Troll Who Says Frank Sinatra Would have Voted for Trump

Sinatra founded the center, which provides counseling for child-abuse victims, with her husband in 1986. The center was supported by the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament. The tournament included performances by Sinatra from 1989 until 1995, in a show that marked the crooner’s final performance ever.

Following her husband’s death, Barbara hosted the tournament and other events through 2016.

Born Barbara Blakeley in Bosworth, Missouri, Sinatra described her parents as “broke” in her autobiography “Lady Blue Eyes: My Life With Frank.”

Also Read: Nancy Sinatra Throws Epic Zinger at Trump Over ‘My Way’ Inauguration Report

After she and her mother moved to Long Beach, California, she took up modeling, eventually opening her own modeling school.

Prior to her marriage to Sinatra, Barbara was married twice, to singer Robert Oliver and Marx Brothers actor Herbert “Zeppo” Marx.

Family friend Jamie Kabler told the Desert Sun that Sinatra’s funeral will take place August 1. She is survived by son Robert Marx and a granddaughter.

.

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Barbara Sinatra, the fourth wife of deceased singing legend Frank Sinatra, died Tuesday at her Rancho Mirage, California, home after “months of declining health,” the Desert Sun reports. She was 90.

Sinatra married the “Strangers in the Night” singer in 1976 and remained married to him until his death in 1998. The nearly 22-year marriage was the longest of the singer’s four unions.

John Thoresen, director of the Barbara Sinatra Children’s Center, told the Desert Sun that Sinatra “died comfortably surrounded by family and friends at her home.”

Sinatra founded the center, which provides counseling for child-abuse victims, with her husband in 1986. The center was supported by the Frank Sinatra Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament. The tournament included performances by Sinatra from 1989 until 1995, in a show that marked the crooner’s final performance ever.

Following her husband’s death, Barbara hosted the tournament and other events through 2016.

Born Barbara Blakeley in Bosworth, Missouri, Sinatra described her parents as “broke” in her autobiography “Lady Blue Eyes: My Life With Frank.”

After she and her mother moved to Long Beach, California, she took up modeling, eventually opening her own modeling school.

Prior to her marriage to Sinatra, Barbara was married twice, to singer Robert Oliver and Marx Brothers actor Herbert “Zeppo” Marx.

Family friend Jamie Kabler told the Desert Sun that Sinatra’s funeral will take place August 1. She is survived by son Robert Marx and a granddaughter.

.

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Brad Grey Mourned by Steven Spielberg, Leo DiCaprio, Robert Downey Jr. in Private Service

Steven Spielberg, Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert Downey Jr. and his wife Susan Downey were among the Hollywood luminaries who gathered to mourn Brad Grey in a private service on Thursday.

Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Eva Mendes, Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen and Gwen Stefani were also present, one attendee said.

The private reception was held at Grey’s home, the person told TheWrap. A public memorial is expected to follow in the coming weeks.

Also Read: Brad Grey’s Death Leaves Paramount Staffers ‘Shellshocked’

Grey died of cancer on Sunday surrounded by his children and wife Cassandra. His estate, once owned by Frank Sinatra, sits in the Holmby Hills enclave of Los Angeles.

The manager-mogul’s death shocked the entertainment community. The news inspired stunned and saddened reactions from colleagues like Disney CEO Bob Iger, current Paramount Pictures CEO Jim Gianopulos and Universal Vice Chairman Ron Meyer, as well as famed directors like Martin Scorsese.

Also Read: Brad Grey: RIP to Hollywood’s Savviest Player-Mogul

Grey got his start in Hollywood while studying at the University of Buffalo, where he met Miramax founder Harvey Weinstein and assisted him with his concert promotion business. From there, he moved into stand-up comedy promotions, during which time he met Bernie Brillstein, the man with whom Grey would co-found Brillstein-Grey Entertainment.

Through Brillstein-Grey, Grey started a career as a producer that put his name on some of the best-known programs on television, including HBO megahits like “The Sopranos” and “Real Time with Bill Maher.” He earned multiple Golden Globes, BAFTAs, PGAs and Emmy Awards, as well as  four Peabody Awards.

Grey was Paramount Picutres Chairman and CEO from 2005 to 2017.

He is survived by his wife, their son Jules, his three children Sam, Max and Emily from his marriage to Jill (nee Gutterson) Grey, his mother Barbara Schumsky, his brother Michael Grey and his sister Robin Grey.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine of USC.

Ryan Gajewski contributed to this story. 

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Steven Spielberg, Leonardo DiCaprio and Robert Downey Jr. and his wife Susan Downey were among the Hollywood luminaries who gathered to mourn Brad Grey in a private service on Thursday.

Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Eva Mendes, Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen and Gwen Stefani were also present, one attendee said.

The private reception was held at Grey’s home, the person told TheWrap. A public memorial is expected to follow in the coming weeks.

Grey died of cancer on Sunday surrounded by his children and wife Cassandra. His estate, once owned by Frank Sinatra, sits in the Holmby Hills enclave of Los Angeles.

The manager-mogul’s death shocked the entertainment community. The news inspired stunned and saddened reactions from colleagues like Disney CEO Bob Iger, current Paramount Pictures CEO Jim Gianopulos and Universal Vice Chairman Ron Meyer, as well as famed directors like Martin Scorsese.

Grey got his start in Hollywood while studying at the University of Buffalo, where he met Miramax founder Harvey Weinstein and assisted him with his concert promotion business. From there, he moved into stand-up comedy promotions, during which time he met Bernie Brillstein, the man with whom Grey would co-found Brillstein-Grey Entertainment.

Through Brillstein-Grey, Grey started a career as a producer that put his name on some of the best-known programs on television, including HBO megahits like “The Sopranos” and “Real Time with Bill Maher.” He earned multiple Golden Globes, BAFTAs, PGAs and Emmy Awards, as well as  four Peabody Awards.

Grey was Paramount Picutres Chairman and CEO from 2005 to 2017.

He is survived by his wife, their son Jules, his three children Sam, Max and Emily from his marriage to Jill (nee Gutterson) Grey, his mother Barbara Schumsky, his brother Michael Grey and his sister Robin Grey.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to the Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine of USC.

Ryan Gajewski contributed to this story. 

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Sandy Gallin, Producer and Talent Manager, Dies at 76

Sandy Gallin — producer of the “Father of the Bride” films, and talent manager to Cher and Barbra Streisand — has died. He was 76.

According to his close friend Bruce Bozzi, who took to Instagram Friday morning to share the news, Gallin passed away Friday after a long battle with multiple myeloma.

Gallin managed the careers of Cher, Streisand, Dolly Parton, Michael Jackson, Neil Diamond, Mariah Carey and Whoopi Goldberg. As a manager, he represented Nicole Kidman, Renee Zellweger, Lily Tomlin, Roseanne, Martin Lawrence, Paul Lynde and Howie Mandell, among others.

Also Read: Cuba Gooding Sr, Soul Singer, Dies at 72

He served as executive producer on 1991’s “Father of the Bride” and its sequel, 1992’s “A Stranger Among Us,” 1992’s “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and 1995’s “Kicking and Screaming.” His TV credits include “Buffy,” “Angel,” “All-American Girl” and “Dolly.”

Gallin also ventured into the home-design business. He sold properties to Marvin Hamlisch, Frank Sinatra and Mark Burnett, while in the past decade the did luxury renovations for Jeffrey Katzenberg, Irving Azoff and Jimmy lovine.

Also Read: JC Spink, ‘The Hangover’ Producer, Dies at 45

Gallin was born in Brooklyn in 1940 and graduated from Boston University in 1962. He then joined the mailroom of General Artists Corporation and eventually became a senior vice president and board member. After less than a year there, he became a junior agent, where he represented the likes Nelson, Paul Anka, Phyllis Diller, Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme, Dr. Joyce Brothers, Laura Nero and Joni Mitchell. He also signed Richard Pryor at the time, and booked The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show.

In 1970, he left GAC to partner with his cousin, Raymond Katz, on a personal management company called Katz Gallin, which lasted for 14 years.

In 1985, Gallin launched Sandollar Productions with Parton, that produced the Oscar-winning feature documentary “Common Threads: Stories From the Quilt” (1989) — a film that raised global awareness about AIDS.

In 1998, Gallin created Mirage Entertainment & Sports with Steve Wynn.

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Charlie Murphy, Actor and Comedian, Dies at 57

Sandy Gallin — producer of the “Father of the Bride” films, and talent manager to Cher and Barbra Streisand — has died. He was 76.

According to his close friend Bruce Bozzi, who took to Instagram Friday morning to share the news, Gallin passed away Friday after a long battle with multiple myeloma.

Gallin managed the careers of Cher, Streisand, Dolly Parton, Michael Jackson, Neil Diamond, Mariah Carey and Whoopi Goldberg. As a manager, he represented Nicole Kidman, Renee Zellweger, Lily Tomlin, Roseanne, Martin Lawrence, Paul Lynde and Howie Mandell, among others.

He served as executive producer on 1991’s “Father of the Bride” and its sequel, 1992’s “A Stranger Among Us,” 1992’s “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and 1995’s “Kicking and Screaming.” His TV credits include “Buffy,” “Angel,” “All-American Girl” and “Dolly.”

Gallin also ventured into the home-design business. He sold properties to Marvin Hamlisch, Frank Sinatra and Mark Burnett, while in the past decade the did luxury renovations for Jeffrey Katzenberg, Irving Azoff and Jimmy lovine.

Gallin was born in Brooklyn in 1940 and graduated from Boston University in 1962. He then joined the mailroom of General Artists Corporation and eventually became a senior vice president and board member. After less than a year there, he became a junior agent, where he represented the likes Nelson, Paul Anka, Phyllis Diller, Steve Lawrence & Eydie Gorme, Dr. Joyce Brothers, Laura Nero and Joni Mitchell. He also signed Richard Pryor at the time, and booked The Beatles on the Ed Sullivan Show.

In 1970, he left GAC to partner with his cousin, Raymond Katz, on a personal management company called Katz Gallin, which lasted for 14 years.

In 1985, Gallin launched Sandollar Productions with Parton, that produced the Oscar-winning feature documentary “Common Threads: Stories From the Quilt” (1989) — a film that raised global awareness about AIDS.

In 1998, Gallin created Mirage Entertainment & Sports with Steve Wynn.

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Peter Bart: Gay Talese’s Famed “Frank Sinatra Has A Cold” Becomes Hot Movie Project

It is every journalist’s dream: Publish an article and movie producers start chasing the film rights. That’s the situation Gay Talese finds himself in, but there’s a twist: He wrote the article for Esquire over 50 years ago. It was called “Frank Sinatra Has A Cold” – not a very promising title, but the piece acquired its own mythology, becoming a model for a breakout genre called “The New Journalism.”
I came upon the Talese-Sinatra deal saga (details later) in a…

It is every journalist's dream: Publish an article and movie producers start chasing the film rights. That's the situation Gay Talese finds himself in, but there's a twist: He wrote the article for Esquire over 50 years ago. It was called "Frank Sinatra Has A Cold" – not a very promising title, but the piece acquired its own mythology, becoming a model for a breakout genre called "The New Journalism." I came upon the Talese-Sinatra deal saga (details later) in a…

Nancy Sinatra Throws Epic Zinger at Trump Over ‘My Way’ Inauguration Report

Nancy Sinatra’s boots might be made for walking, but her Twitter account is apparently made for lobbing epic zingers.

Sinatra, the daughter of singer Frank Sinatra, landed a perfect jab at president-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday night, following news that Trump would be using the song “My Way” — immortalized by her father — during his inauguration festivities.

“You good w/ this guy using the iconic ‘My Way’ for Friday night?’ Sinatra was asked.

Also Read: Watch Trump’s Pre-Inauguration ‘Make America Great Again’ Concert (Live Stream Video)

“Just remember the first line of the song,” Sinatra replied.

For the three people in the world who are perhaps unfamiliar with the song, “My Way” begins, “And now the end is near…”

Sinatra later clarified that her comment “was really just a joke,” and wished the president-elect luck.

Also Read: Will President-elect Trump Have a ‘Designated Survivor’ for the Inauguration?

“Actually I’m wishing him the best. A good president helps the entire world. I don’t believe anyone tries to be a bad president,” Sinatra wrote.

The Washington Examiner reported on Wednesday that Trump will share his first dance as president with wife Melania to the song “My Way,” performed by jazz singer Erin Boehme at the Liberty Ball. The Examiner cited “a source with knowledge of the official inaugural balls.”

Just remember the first line of the song. https://t.co/dYrXv818i9

– Nancy Sinatra (@NancySinatra) January 19, 2017

Actually I’m wishing him the best. A good president helps the entire world. I don’t believe anyone tries to be a bad president. https://t.co/BePN3n8otn

– Nancy Sinatra (@NancySinatra) January 19, 2017

Related stories from TheWrap:

62 Politicians Boycotting Donald Trump’s Inauguration – and Why (Updating)

Watch Trump’s Pre-Inauguration ‘Make America Great Again’ Concert (Live Stream Video)

Will President-elect Trump Have a ‘Designated Survivor’ for the Inauguration?

Nancy Sinatra’s boots might be made for walking, but her Twitter account is apparently made for lobbing epic zingers.

Sinatra, the daughter of singer Frank Sinatra, landed a perfect jab at president-elect Donald Trump on Wednesday night, following news that Trump would be using the song “My Way” — immortalized by her father — during his inauguration festivities.

“You good w/ this guy using the iconic ‘My Way’ for Friday night?’ Sinatra was asked.

“Just remember the first line of the song,” Sinatra replied.

For the three people in the world who are perhaps unfamiliar with the song, “My Way” begins, “And now the end is near…”

Sinatra later clarified that her comment “was really just a joke,” and wished the president-elect luck.

“Actually I’m wishing him the best. A good president helps the entire world. I don’t believe anyone tries to be a bad president,” Sinatra wrote.

The Washington Examiner reported on Wednesday that Trump will share his first dance as president with wife Melania to the song “My Way,” performed by jazz singer Erin Boehme at the Liberty Ball. The Examiner cited “a source with knowledge of the official inaugural balls.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

62 Politicians Boycotting Donald Trump's Inauguration – and Why (Updating)

Watch Trump's Pre-Inauguration 'Make America Great Again' Concert (Live Stream Video)

Will President-elect Trump Have a 'Designated Survivor' for the Inauguration?

Frank Sinatra Would ‘Never’ Have Performed at Trump’s Inauguration, Daughter Says

Nancy Sinatra did not mince words when she was asked if her father, the legendary Frank Sinatra, would have agreed to perform at Donald Trump’s inauguration ceremony.

“He would never support a bigot,” Nancy wrote on her official Twitter feed. The comment drew a flurry of reactions, both in support and against her statement.

As TheWrap first reported, Trump’s team is struggling to book A-list performers for his inaugural festivities, with two talent bookers saying they were offered ambassadorships if they could deliver marquee names.

Also Read: Donald Trump Finally Books a Star for His Inauguration: Hillary Clinton

The inauguration team has its sights set on top-tier talents like Justin Timberlake, Bruno Mars, Katy Perry and Aretha Franklin, and are willing to pay steep fees for the performers.

Several high-caliber performers have already publicly rejected requests to take part in the Jan. 20 festivities, including Celine Dion, Garth Brooks, Elton John and opera singer Andrea Bocelli.

Trump’s team has managed to enlist 16-year-old former “America’s Got Talent” star Jackie Evancho to sing the national anthem. They’ve also booked the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Radio City Rockettes. Hillary and Bill Clinton will attend the swearing-in ceremony, along with members of the Bush family.

In addition, the marching band from the historically black university Talladega College has agreed to perform.

Also Read: Rebecca Ferguson to Play Trump Inauguration — On One Condition

He would never support a bigot. https://t.co/lVECmwNnDz

– Nancy Sinatra (@NancySinatra) January 6, 2017

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Nancy Sinatra did not mince words when she was asked if her father, the legendary Frank Sinatra, would have agreed to perform at Donald Trump’s inauguration ceremony.

“He would never support a bigot,” Nancy wrote on her official Twitter feed. The comment drew a flurry of reactions, both in support and against her statement.

As TheWrap first reported, Trump’s team is struggling to book A-list performers for his inaugural festivities, with two talent bookers saying they were offered ambassadorships if they could deliver marquee names.

The inauguration team has its sights set on top-tier talents like Justin Timberlake, Bruno Mars, Katy Perry and Aretha Franklin, and are willing to pay steep fees for the performers.

Several high-caliber performers have already publicly rejected requests to take part in the Jan. 20 festivities, including Celine Dion, Garth Brooks, Elton John and opera singer Andrea Bocelli.

Trump’s team has managed to enlist 16-year-old former “America’s Got Talent” star Jackie Evancho to sing the national anthem. They’ve also booked the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and the Radio City Rockettes. Hillary and Bill Clinton will attend the swearing-in ceremony, along with members of the Bush family.

In addition, the marching band from the historically black university Talladega College has agreed to perform.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Donald Trump to Meet With Vanity Fair Editor Who Called Him 'Short-Fingered Vulgarian'

Trump Mocks Arnold's 'Apprentice' TV Ratings: 'So Much for Being a Movie Star'

National Enquirer's Pro-Trump, Anti-Hillary 'News' Draws Rachel Maddow's Ire

Common Reveals the Origin of His Trump Lyric in ‘A Letter to the Free’ From Ava DuVernay’s ’13th’

Academy Award winning rapper Common was among the guests at TheWrap’s “An Evening of Best Song Contenders” this week, where he talked about the origin of his lyric referring to Donald Trump in the song “A Letter to the Free” from the documentary “13th.”

The line in question — “Shot me with your ray-gun. And now you want to trump me. Prison is a business, America’s the company” — appears to be a direct shot at the president-elect, and Common revealed his feelings behind it while talking with TheWrap’s Steve Pond during the panel celebrating Oscar song contenders at the Landmark Theater in Los Angeles.

“Mass incarceration is a specific struggle,” the “Glory” songwriter said. “Just to write a song only about that … I felt there are bigger things that we are struggling with in our country.

“So I just really tried to get into the crux of what is the theme, what is the heart of what’s being said, and then kind of try to take it from that chord and let it be a universal theme like, ‘I will address America in a bigger way and talk about other issues.’”

Also Read: “OJ: Made in America,” “13th” and “Gleason” Lead Critics’ Choice Documentary Nominations

The hard-hitting song is featured in Ava DuVernay’s Netflix documentary film “13th,” which argues that slavery is being effectively perpetuated through the mass incarceration of African Americans in the U.S. It is named after the 13th Amendment, which made slavery illegal in 1864 except as “punishment of crime.”

“13th” marks Common’s second collaboration with DuVernay, following his song “Glory” for the Martin Luther King, Jr. biopic “Selma,” which was awarded the Oscar for Best Original Song in 2015.

Also Read: ‘Arrival’ Director Denis Villeneuve on How It Feels Relevant Post-Election

The rapper was among a trio of songwriters and composers who joined TheWrap for “An Evening of Best Song Contenders.” Justin Hurwitz, composer of “City of Stars” and “Audition” from “La La Land” participated along with Eddie Arkin, composer of “The Rules Don’t Apply” from Warren Beatty “Rules Don’t Apply.”

Talking about the catchy tunes sung by Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in “La La Land,” Hurwitz told Pond that “there are a lot of inspirations for the movie. There are a couple of French musicals from the ’60s like ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg,’ ‘The Young Girls of Rochefort,’ which we loved, some of the MGM musicals and Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers musicals are big inspirations.”

At the same time as feeling inspired by classic soundtracks, “I was trying not to listen to anything really while I was actually composing or orchestrating because Damien [“La La Land” director Damien Chazelle] didn’t want to sound old fashioned or like any of those movies,” Hurwitz said.

Also Read: ‘Moonlight’ Director Barry Jenkins Refused to Sanitize Film for ‘Respectability’ (Video)

Meanwhile, composer Eddie Arkin explained the origins of his song, “The Rules Don’t Apply” (which is set in 1958 and centered around Howard Hughes) telling the audience: “The late ’50s were sort of the beginnings of Rock n Roll so that was one choice. But Frank Sinatra and the Great American Songbook were still very prevalent.

“If you read about this film, I think Warren [Beatty] has been thinking about this idea for at least 30 years,” Arkin added. “We wrote it [the song] many years ago — probably around eight years ago — and at the time, we wrote in one sitting and then I hated the bridge … so it took a couple of weeks to write, and we presented it to him and he loved it,” the composer explained.

Also Read: Oscars Set New Record With 91 Song Contenders

When he finally delivered the song, Beatty kept it pretty much intact, “We haven’t to this day changed a note or a lyric on the song,” Arkin said.

See the full list of 91 songs 91 songs that have qualified for the Oscars race for Best Original Song here.

A highlight of “An Evening of Best Song Contenders” came when Common performed the second verse of “A Letter to the Free” for the audience in attendance, sparking a rousing applause.

Read the lyrics below.

The caged birds sings for freedom to ring
Black bodies being lost in the American dream
Blood of black being, a pastoral scene
Slavery’s still alive, check Amendment 13
Not whips and chains, eye subliminal
Instead of ‘nigga’ they use the word ‘criminal’
Sweet land of liberty, incarcerated country
Shot me with your ray-gun
And now you want to trump me
Prison is a business, America’s the company
Investing in injustice, fear and long suffering
We staring in the face of hate again
The same hate they say will make America great again
No consolation prize for the dehumanized
For America to rise it’s a matter of Black Lives
And we gonna free them, so we can free us
America’s moment to come to Jesus

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TheWrap’s 2015 Screening Series Exclusive Portraits (photos)

Academy Award winning rapper Common was among the guests at TheWrap’s “An Evening of Best Song Contenders” this week, where he talked about the origin of his lyric referring to Donald Trump in the song “A Letter to the Free” from the documentary “13th.”

The line in question — “Shot me with your ray-gun. And now you want to trump me. Prison is a business, America’s the company” — appears to be a direct shot at the president-elect, and Common revealed his feelings behind it while talking with TheWrap’s Steve Pond during the panel celebrating Oscar song contenders at the Landmark Theater in Los Angeles.

“Mass incarceration is a specific struggle,” the “Glory” songwriter said. “Just to write a song only about that … I felt there are bigger things that we are struggling with in our country.

“So I just really tried to get into the crux of what is the theme, what is the heart of what’s being said, and then kind of try to take it from that chord and let it be a universal theme like, ‘I will address America in a bigger way and talk about other issues.'”

The hard-hitting song is featured in Ava DuVernay’s Netflix documentary film “13th,” which argues that slavery is being effectively perpetuated through the mass incarceration of African Americans in the U.S. It is named after the 13th Amendment, which made slavery illegal in 1864 except as “punishment of crime.”

“13th” marks Common’s second collaboration with DuVernay, following his song “Glory” for the Martin Luther King, Jr. biopic “Selma,” which was awarded the Oscar for Best Original Song in 2015.

The rapper was among a trio of songwriters and composers who joined TheWrap for “An Evening of Best Song Contenders.” Justin Hurwitz, composer of “City of Stars” and “Audition” from “La La Land” participated along with Eddie Arkin, composer of “The Rules Don’t Apply” from Warren Beatty “Rules Don’t Apply.”

Talking about the catchy tunes sung by Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling in “La La Land,” Hurwitz told Pond that “there are a lot of inspirations for the movie. There are a couple of French musicals from the ’60s like ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg,’ ‘The Young Girls of Rochefort,’ which we loved, some of the MGM musicals and Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers musicals are big inspirations.”

At the same time as feeling inspired by classic soundtracks, “I was trying not to listen to anything really while I was actually composing or orchestrating because Damien [“La La Land” director Damien Chazelle] didn’t want to sound old fashioned or like any of those movies,” Hurwitz said.

Meanwhile, composer Eddie Arkin explained the origins of his song, “The Rules Don’t Apply” (which is set in 1958 and centered around Howard Hughes) telling the audience: “The late ’50s were sort of the beginnings of Rock n Roll so that was one choice. But Frank Sinatra and the Great American Songbook were still very prevalent.

“If you read about this film, I think Warren [Beatty] has been thinking about this idea for at least 30 years,” Arkin added. “We wrote it [the song] many years ago — probably around eight years ago — and at the time, we wrote in one sitting and then I hated the bridge … so it took a couple of weeks to write, and we presented it to him and he loved it,” the composer explained.

When he finally delivered the song, Beatty kept it pretty much intact, “We haven’t to this day changed a note or a lyric on the song,” Arkin said.

See the full list of 91 songs 91 songs that have qualified for the Oscars race for Best Original Song here.

A highlight of “An Evening of Best Song Contenders” came when Common performed the second verse of “A Letter to the Free” for the audience in attendance, sparking a rousing applause.

Read the lyrics below.

The caged birds sings for freedom to ring
Black bodies being lost in the American dream
Blood of black being, a pastoral scene
Slavery’s still alive, check Amendment 13
Not whips and chains, eye subliminal
Instead of ‘nigga’ they use the word ‘criminal’
Sweet land of liberty, incarcerated country
Shot me with your ray-gun
And now you want to trump me
Prison is a business, America’s the company
Investing in injustice, fear and long suffering
We staring in the face of hate again
The same hate they say will make America great again
No consolation prize for the dehumanized
For America to rise it’s a matter of Black Lives
And we gonna free them, so we can free us
America’s moment to come to Jesus

Related stories from TheWrap:

TheWrap Launches 2016 Awards and Foreign Screening Series With Pedro Almodovar's 'Julieta'

'OJ: Made In America,' 'Amanda Knox' Among International Documentary Association's Screening Series Lineup

TheWrap's 2015 Screening Series Exclusive Portraits (photos)