Margaret Atwood Is Writing ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Book Sequel Due Out Next Year

Margaret Atwood is currently writing a sequel to her best-selling dystopian novel, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” it was announced Wednesday.

Due out in September 2019 from publishers Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, “The Testaments” is set 15 years after Offred’s final scene in the original book and will be narrated by three female characters, Atwood tweeted.

The new novel was inspired by readers’ questions about the fictional world of Gilead and by the “world we’ve been living in,” the Canadian author said.

Yes indeed to those who asked: I’m writing a sequel to The #HandmaidsTale. #TheTestaments is set 15 years after Offred’s final scene and is narrated by three female characters. It will be published in Sept 2019. More details: https://t.co/e1umh5FwpX pic.twitter.com/pePp0zpuif

– Margaret E. Atwood (@MargaretAtwood) November 28, 2018

Also Read: Bradley Whitford Promoted to Series Regular for ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Season 3

A hit when it was published in 1985, “The Handmaid’s Tale” took on new meaning after Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, with his vision of America often being compared to the imagined land of Gilead.

The novel has since been adapted into an award-winning TV series on Hulu starring Elisabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes and Yvonne Strahovski.

Also Read: Yvonne Strahovski Says ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ ‘Feels So Close to Home’ in Trump Era (Exclusive Video)

The second season, which diverted from Atwood’s original novel, concluded in July and the drama is due to return for a third.

Since it premiered in April 2017, “A Handmaid’s Tale” was won multiple awards, including eight Primetime Emmys after Season 1 and a Best Actress Golden Globe award for Moss.

Atwood’s most recent books include dark dystopian “The Heart Goes Last,” published in 2015, and “Hag-Seed,” a modern retelling of William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.”

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Margaret Atwood is currently writing a sequel to her best-selling dystopian novel, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” it was announced Wednesday.

Due out in September 2019 from publishers Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, “The Testaments” is set 15 years after Offred’s final scene in the original book and will be narrated by three female characters, Atwood tweeted.

The new novel was inspired by readers’ questions about the fictional world of Gilead and by the “world we’ve been living in,” the Canadian author said.

A hit when it was published in 1985, “The Handmaid’s Tale” took on new meaning after Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, with his vision of America often being compared to the imagined land of Gilead.

The novel has since been adapted into an award-winning TV series on Hulu starring Elisabeth Moss, Joseph Fiennes and Yvonne Strahovski.

The second season, which diverted from Atwood’s original novel, concluded in July and the drama is due to return for a third.

Since it premiered in April 2017, “A Handmaid’s Tale” was won multiple awards, including eight Primetime Emmys after Season 1 and a Best Actress Golden Globe award for Moss.

Atwood’s most recent books include dark dystopian “The Heart Goes Last,” published in 2015, and “Hag-Seed,” a modern retelling of William Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court Hearing Met With 'Handmaid's Tale' Protesters

'Handmaid's Tale': Joseph Fiennes on Exploring 'Warped Creatures,' 'Ugly Components of the Male Psyche'

How 'The Handmaid's Tale' Star Yvonne Strahovski Made 'Ice Queen' Serena Sympathetic

Silas Howard to Direct LGBTQ-Focused Horror Film ‘Moonshadow’ for Gunpowder & Sky

“A Kid Like Jake” director Silas Howard will direct an LGBTQ-focused horror film “Moonshadow” for Gunpowder & Sky, the content studio announced Monday.

Gunpower & Sky will partner with YOMYOMF and Nonetheless Productions to develop the film. Ernesto Foronda (“Better Luck Tomorrow”) and Daniel Foerster wrote the screenplay for “Moonshadow,” which was inspired by Daniel Foerster’s own experience with LGBTQ conversation therapy. The film will chronicle a transgender teen who is sent to a science-based conversation camp, where he quickly learns the youth are being transformed into something non-human.

“With a battle over transgender rights playing out on the national stage, and as a member and advocate of the trans community, I feel it is critical to be a part of the conversation,” said Howard. “The current generation of young people is living with entirely new expectations about gender and sexuality, and ‘Moonshadow’ is for them.”

See Video: ‘A Kid Like Jake’ Star Priyanka Chopra Says Gender Identity Story ‘Needs to be Told’

Howard’s other credits include “Pose” and “Transparent.”

Philip W. Chung, YOMYOMF’s creative director added, “What’s compelling about this project is that it works as a purely entertaining horror film that fans of the genre can enjoy on its own terms, while also providing insight into the struggles facing the trans community today. The most interesting horror films share a subversive streak; they use their fictional horrors to comment on the horrors of our real world and with our talented ‘Moonshadow’ collaborators, we hope to continue that tradition.”

Also Read: ‘A Kid Like Jake’ Film Review: Claire Danes’ and Jim Parsons’ Parental Problems Push the Kid Offstage

“When we first started developing ‘Moonshadow’ with Daniel, we knew this was a very important story,” said Ki Jin Kim and Giulia Caruso of Nonetheless Productions. “We are honored Daniel trusted us with it, and proud to be part of an incredible team who shares our sense of urgency and believes in the transformative power of this kind of work.”

Recently, Gunpowder & Sky acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” starring Elisabeth Moss, and also recently announced a partnership with Zelda Williams to adapt her short film, “Shrimp,” into a series.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Robin Williams’ Daughter to Develop New Series on BDSM for Gunpowder & Sky

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Elisabeth Moss Drama ‘Her Smell’ Lands at Gunpowder & Sky

“A Kid Like Jake” director Silas Howard will direct an LGBTQ-focused horror film “Moonshadow” for Gunpowder & Sky, the content studio announced Monday.

Gunpower & Sky will partner with YOMYOMF and Nonetheless Productions to develop the film. Ernesto Foronda (“Better Luck Tomorrow”) and Daniel Foerster wrote the screenplay for “Moonshadow,” which was inspired by Daniel Foerster’s own experience with LGBTQ conversation therapy. The film will chronicle a transgender teen who is sent to a science-based conversation camp, where he quickly learns the youth are being transformed into something non-human.

“With a battle over transgender rights playing out on the national stage, and as a member and advocate of the trans community, I feel it is critical to be a part of the conversation,” said Howard. “The current generation of young people is living with entirely new expectations about gender and sexuality, and ‘Moonshadow’ is for them.”

Howard’s other credits include “Pose” and “Transparent.”

Philip W. Chung, YOMYOMF’s creative director added, “What’s compelling about this project is that it works as a purely entertaining horror film that fans of the genre can enjoy on its own terms, while also providing insight into the struggles facing the trans community today. The most interesting horror films share a subversive streak; they use their fictional horrors to comment on the horrors of our real world and with our talented ‘Moonshadow’ collaborators, we hope to continue that tradition.”

“When we first started developing ‘Moonshadow’ with Daniel, we knew this was a very important story,” said Ki Jin Kim and Giulia Caruso of Nonetheless Productions. “We are honored Daniel trusted us with it, and proud to be part of an incredible team who shares our sense of urgency and believes in the transformative power of this kind of work.”

Recently, Gunpowder & Sky acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” starring Elisabeth Moss, and also recently announced a partnership with Zelda Williams to adapt her short film, “Shrimp,” into a series.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Elisabeth Moss Drama 'Her Smell' Lands at Gunpowder & Sky

Elisabeth Moss Drama ‘Her Smell’ Nabbed by Gunpowder & Sky

Gunpowder & Sky has acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s drama “Her Smell,” starring Elisabeth Moss as a tormented punk rock singer. The deal was announced Thursday following the film’s sold out screenings on the opening we…

Gunpowder & Sky has acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s drama “Her Smell,” starring Elisabeth Moss as a tormented punk rock singer. The deal was announced Thursday following the film’s sold out screenings on the opening weekend of the 56th New York Film Festival. “Her Smell” had its world premiere at the Toronto […]

Elisabeth Moss Drama ‘Her Smell’ Lands at Gunpowder & Sky

Gunpowder & Sky has acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” starring Elisabeth Moss, the content studio announced Thursday.

The punk rock epic also stars Cara Delevingne, Dan Stevens, Agyness Deyn, Gayle Rankin, Ashley Benson, Virginia Madsen, Eric Stoltz and Amber Heard.

The film, marking the third collaboration between Moss and Perry, chronicles the fall and rise of a ’90s riot grrrl. It had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

Also Read: Toronto Film Festival Books Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss Films for Platform Section

Gunpowder & Sky is planning a theatrical release in 2019, followed by an awards push for Moss.

“Her Smell” was produced by Bow and Arrow Entertainment and Faliro House Productions. Producers include Matthew Perniciaro, Michael Sherman, Adam Piotrowicz, Perry and Moss. Christos V. Konstantakopoulos executive produced.

“I am so intensely proud of this film and of everyone involved who stretched themselves beyond where we’d ever gone before artistically,” said Moss. “Having a home like Gunpowder & Sky is a perfect fit for the film and I’m really excited for people to go on this insane ride with us. It isn’t for the faint of heart, but it is for movie lovers and music lovers, and those who have ever had any experience with someone who was a tornado from whom they didn’t want to run away.”

Also Read: ‘Wild Rose’ Writer Explains How ‘X Factor’ Inspired Buzzy Drama (Exclusive Video)

“Having Elisabeth – one of the finest actors of our time – portray a female icon in the world of punk music, accompanied by some of the best young female actors, and directed by the visionary Alex Ross Perry is a dream come true for Gunpowder & Sky … and personally for my failed musician soul,” added Van Toffler, CEO of Gunpowder & Sky.  “This is such a passionately powerful and unique story steeped inside the world of music – the emotional highs and lows – so it’s a privilege for our studio, which is named after a song lyric, to bring ‘Her Smell’ out to the world.”

According to the studio, “Her Smell” examines the grit, grace and gravitas of an unforgettable fictional rock star crashing down to earth into the harsh realities of mid-life. Told across five scenes that span across 10 years, the film follows Becky Something (Moss), a ’90s punk rock superstar who once filled arenas with her grungy all-female trio Something She. Now she plays smaller venues while grappling with motherhood, exhausted band mates, nervous record company executives, and a new generation of rising talent eager to usurp her stardom. When Becky’s chaos and excesses derail a recording session and national tour, she finds herself shunned, isolated and alone. Forced to get sober, temper her demons, and reckon with the past, she retreats from the spotlight and tries to recapture the creative inspiration that led her band to success.

Related stories from TheWrap:

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Gunpowder & Sky has acquired the domestic rights to Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell” starring Elisabeth Moss, the content studio announced Thursday.

The punk rock epic also stars Cara Delevingne, Dan Stevens, Agyness Deyn, Gayle Rankin, Ashley Benson, Virginia Madsen, Eric Stoltz and Amber Heard.

The film, marking the third collaboration between Moss and Perry, chronicles the fall and rise of a ’90s riot grrrl. It had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

Gunpowder & Sky is planning a theatrical release in 2019, followed by an awards push for Moss.

“Her Smell” was produced by Bow and Arrow Entertainment and Faliro House Productions. Producers include Matthew Perniciaro, Michael Sherman, Adam Piotrowicz, Perry and Moss. Christos V. Konstantakopoulos executive produced.

“I am so intensely proud of this film and of everyone involved who stretched themselves beyond where we’d ever gone before artistically,” said Moss. “Having a home like Gunpowder & Sky is a perfect fit for the film and I’m really excited for people to go on this insane ride with us. It isn’t for the faint of heart, but it is for movie lovers and music lovers, and those who have ever had any experience with someone who was a tornado from whom they didn’t want to run away.”

“Having Elisabeth – one of the finest actors of our time – portray a female icon in the world of punk music, accompanied by some of the best young female actors, and directed by the visionary Alex Ross Perry is a dream come true for Gunpowder & Sky … and personally for my failed musician soul,” added Van Toffler, CEO of Gunpowder & Sky.  “This is such a passionately powerful and unique story steeped inside the world of music – the emotional highs and lows – so it’s a privilege for our studio, which is named after a song lyric, to bring ‘Her Smell’ out to the world.”

According to the studio, “Her Smell” examines the grit, grace and gravitas of an unforgettable fictional rock star crashing down to earth into the harsh realities of mid-life. Told across five scenes that span across 10 years, the film follows Becky Something (Moss), a ’90s punk rock superstar who once filled arenas with her grungy all-female trio Something She. Now she plays smaller venues while grappling with motherhood, exhausted band mates, nervous record company executives, and a new generation of rising talent eager to usurp her stardom. When Becky’s chaos and excesses derail a recording session and national tour, she finds herself shunned, isolated and alone. Forced to get sober, temper her demons, and reckon with the past, she retreats from the spotlight and tries to recapture the creative inspiration that led her band to success.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Green Book' Wins Toronto Film Festival's People's Choice Award

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Toronto 2018: Here's Every Movie Sold So Far, From 'Wild Rose' to 'Stan & Ollie'

Elisabeth Moss’ ‘Her Smell’ Acquired By Gunpowder & Sky For 2019 Bow

Gunpowder & Sky has acquired domestic rights to Her Smell, the punk-rock tie-up written and directed by Alex Ross Perry and starring Elisabeth Moss. The pic, which had its world premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, just had its U.S. premiere at t…

Gunpowder & Sky has acquired domestic rights to Her Smell, the punk-rock tie-up written and directed by Alex Ross Perry and starring Elisabeth Moss. The pic, which had its world premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, just had its U.S. premiere at the New York Film Festival. Gunpowder & Sky now plans a 2019 release with an awards push for Moss. The film, the third collaboration of Perry and Moss, centers on her Becky Something, a ’90s punk rock superstar who once filled…

Claire Foy Upsets Elisabeth Moss, Wins Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama

Foy is having a banner year.

Claire Foy has won the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series. Foy beat out Elisabeth Moss (“The Handmaid’s Tale”), Tatiana Maslany (“Orphan Black”), Sandra Oh (“Killing Eve”), Keri Russell (“The Americans”), and Evan Rachel Wood (“Westworld”) for the prize.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” has proven to be an Emmys powerhouse for Hulu, and Elisabeth Moss was widely expected to win her second Emmy in a row. Moss was nominated as one of 20 total nominations the series earned, making it one of the most nominated television shows. Moss’ co-stars Ann Dowd, Alexis Bledel, Yvonne Strahovski, and Joseph Fiennes all received nominations this year.

Foy is done playing the character of Elizabeth I on the series after starring in the lead role for two seasons. Foy earned an Emmy nomination for the first season. She will be replaced by Olivia Colman when “The Crown” returns for a third season after a time jump. The actress is having a banner year and will be seen on the big screen this fall in “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” and “First Man.”

“The Crown” is now available to stream on Netflix.

Emmy Predictions: Patten’s Last Minute Picks For Top Categories Winners

There’s a few more hours, a couple more parties and a Sunday Night Football clash between the New York Giants and the Dallas Cowboys still to go before they start handing out trophies at the 70th Primetime Emmys tomorrow on NBC but the winners&#8…

There’s a few more hours, a couple more parties and a Sunday Night Football clash between the New York Giants and the Dallas Cowboys still to go before they start handing out trophies at the 70th Primetime Emmys tomorrow on NBC but the winners’ names are already in the envelopes. With the countdown clock about to start to the Michael Che and Colin Jost hosted ceremony, here are some last minute predictions on who could be holding the gold on Monday at the Microsoft…

Emmy Predictions in All 26 Major Categories, From ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ to ‘Mrs Maisel’ (Photos)

“Game of Thrones” is back after a one-year absence in this year’s Emmy race as it tries to reclaim its title from “The Handmaid’s Tale” in the drama categories, and three-time winner “Veep” has dropped ou…

“Game of Thrones” is back after a one-year absence in this year’s Emmy race as it tries to reclaim its title from “The Handmaid’s Tale” in the drama categories, and three-time winner “Veep” has dropped out for the year, vacating the Outstanding Comedy Series for several first and second year shows, including “Atlanta” and “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel. The Emmys are the hardest of the major awards to accurately predict, but these are our best guesses in all 26 categories that will be handed out on this year’s show.

OUTSTANDING DRAMA SERIES

“The Americans”
“The Crown”
“Game of Thrones”
“The Handmaid’s Tale”
“Stranger Things”
“This Is Us”
“Westworld”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Jason Bateman, “Ozark”
Sterling K. Brown, “This Is Us”
Ed Harris, “Westworld”
Matthew Rhys, “The Americans”
Milo Ventimiglia, “This Is Us”
Jeffrey Wright, “Westworld”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES
Claire Foy, “The Crown”
Tatiana Maslany, “Orphan Black”
Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Sandra Oh, “Killing Eve”
Keri Russell, “The Americans”
Evan Rachel Wood, “Westworld”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A DRAMA SERIES

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, “Game of Thrones”
Mandy Patinkin, “Homeland”
Matt Smith, “The Crown”
Peter Dinklage, “Game of Thrones”
David Harbour, “Stranger Things”
Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A DRAMA SERIES

Lena Headey, “Game of Thrones”
Vanessa Kirby, “The Crown”
Ann Dowd, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Thandie Newton, “Westworld”
Millie Bobby Brown, “Stranger Things”
Alexis Bledel, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Yvonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES

“The Crown” (Episode: “Paterfamilias”), Stephen Daldry
“Game of Thrones” (Episode: “Beyond the Wall”), Alan Taylor
“Game of Thrones” (Episode: “The Dragon and the Wolf”), Jeremy Podeswa
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Episode: “After”), Kari Skogland
“Ozark” (Episode: “The Toll”), Jason Bateman
“Ozark” (Episode: “Tonight We Improvise”), Daniel Sackheim
“Stranger Things” (Episode: “Chapter Nine: The Gate”), the Duffer brothers

OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES

“The Americans” (Episode: “START”), Joel Fields and Joe Weisberg
“The Crown” (Episode: “Mystery Man”), Peter Morgan
“Game of Thrones” (Episode: “The Dragon and the Wolf”), David Benioff and D.B. Weiss
“The Handmaid’s Tale” (Episode: “June”), Bruce Miller
“Killing Eve” (Episode: “Nice Face”), Phoebe Waller-Bridge
“Stranger Things” (Episode: “Chapter Nine: The Gate”), the Duffer brothers

COMEDY SERIES CATEGORIES

OUTSTANDING COMEDY SERIES

“Atlanta”
“Barry”
“black-ish”
“Curb Your Enthusiasm”
“GLOW”
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
“Silicon Valley”
“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

Pamela Adlon, “Better Things”
Lily Tomlin, “Grace & Frankie”
Allison Janney, “Mom”
Tracee Ellis Ross, “Black-ish”
Issa Rae, “Insecure”
Rachel Brosnahan, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

Anthony Anderson, “Black-ish”
Ted Danson, “The Good Place”
Larry David, “Curb Your Enthusiasm”
Donald Glover, “Atlanta”
Bill Hader, “Barry”
William H. Macy, “Shameless”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A COMEDY SERIES

Zazie Beetz, “Atlanta”
Laurie Metcalf, “Roseanne”
Leslie Jones ,”Saturday Night Live”
Alex Borstein, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”
Betty Gilpin, “GLOW”
Aidy Bryant, “Saturday Night Live”
Kate McKinnon, “Saturday Night Live”
Megan Mullally, “Will & Grace”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A COMEDY SERIES

Brian Tyree Henry, “Atlanta”
Louie Anderson, “Baskets”
Kenan Thompson, “Saturday Night Live”
Tituss Burgess, “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”
Henry Winkler, “Barry”
Alec Baldwin, “Saturday Night Live”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A COMEDY SERIES

“Atlanta” (Episode: “FUBU”), Donald Glover
“Atlanta” (Episode: “Teddy Perkins”), Hiro Murai
“Barry” (Episode: “Chapter One: Make Your Mark”), Bill Hader
“The Big Bang Theory” (Episode: “The Bow Tie Asymmetry”), Mark Cendrowski
“GLOW” (Episode: Pilot), Jesse Peretz
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Episode: Pilot), Amy Sherman-Palladino
“Silicon Valley” (Episode: “Initial Coin Offering”), Mike Judge

OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A COMEDY SERIES

“Atlanta” (Episode: “Alligator Man”), Donald Glover
“Atlanta” (Episode: “Barbershop”), Stefani Robinson
“Barry” (Episode: “Chapter One: Make Your Mark”), Alec Berg and Bill Hader
“Barry” (Episode: “Chapter Seven: Loud, Fast and Keep Going”), Liz Sarnoff
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Episode: Pilot), Amy Sherman-Palladino
“Silicon Valley” (Episode: “Fifty-One Percent”), Alec Berg

OUTSTANDING LIMITED SERIES

“The Alienist”
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
“Genius: Picasso”
“Godless”
“Patrick Melrose”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

Antonio Banderas, “Genius: Picasso”
Darren Criss, “Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Benedict Cumberbatch, “Patrick Melrose”
Jeff Daniels, “The Looming Tower”
John Legend, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert”
Jesse Plemons, “USS Callister”/”Black Mirror”

OUTSTANDING LEAD ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

Jessica Biel, “The Sinner”
Laura Dern, “The Tale”
Michelle Dockery, “Godless”
Edie Falco, “Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders”
Regina King, “Seven Seconds”
Sarah Paulson, “American Horror Story: Cult”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

Jeff Daniels, “Godless”
Ricky Martin, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Finn Wittrock, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
John Leguizamo, “Waco”
Brandon Victor Dixon, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
Edgar Ramirez, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Michael Stuhlbarg, “The Looming Tower”

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR MOVIE

Adina Porter, “American Horror Story: Cult”
Merritt Wever, “Godless”
Penélope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Letitia Wright, “Black Museum”/”Black Mirror”
Sara Bareilles, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
Judith Light, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL

“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (Episode: “The Man Who Would Be Vogue”), Ryan Murphy
“Godless,” Scott Frank
“Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert,” David Leveaux and Alex Rudzinski
“The Looming Tower” (Episode: “9/11”), Craig Zisk
“Paterno,” Barry Levinson
“Patrick Melrose,” Edward Berger
“Twin Peaks,” David Lynch

OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A LIMITED SERIES, MOVIE OR DRAMATIC SPECIAL

“American Vandal” (Episode: “Clean Up”), Kevin McManus and Matthew McManus
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace – American Crime Story” (Episode: “House by the Lake”), Tom Rob Smith
“Black Mirror: USS Callister,” William Bridges and Charlie Brooker
“Godless,” Scott Frank 
“Patrick Melrose,” David Nicholls
“Twin Peaks,” Mark Frost and David Lynch

OUTSTANDING VARIETY SKETCH SERIES

“At Home with Amy Sedaris”
“Drunk History”
“I Love You, America with Sarah Silverman”
“Portlandia”
“Saturday Night Live”
“Tracey Ullman’s Show”

OUTSTANDING VARIETY TALK SERIES

“The Daily Show With Trevor Noah”
“Full Frontal With Samantha Bee”
“Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”
“The Late Late Show With James Corden”
“The Late Show With Stephen Colbert”

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL

“Dave Chappelle: Equanimity,” Stan Lathan
“Jerry Seinfeld: Jerry Before Seinfeld,” Michael Bonfiglio
“The Oscars,” Glenn Weiss
“Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Life,” Marcus Raboy
“Super Bowl LII Halftime Show Starring Justin Timberlake,” Hamish Hamilton

OUTSTANDING WRITING FOR A VARIETY SPECIAL

“Full Frontal With Samantha Bee: The Great American* Puerto Rico (*It’s Complicated),” Samantha Bee, Pat Cassels, Mike Drucker, Eric Drysdale, Mathan Erhardt, Miles Kahn and Nicole Silverberg
“John Mulaney: Kid Gorgeous at Radio City,” John Mulaney
“Michelle Wolf: Nice Lady,” Michelle Wolf
“Patton Oswalt: Annihilation,” Patton Oswalt
“Steve Martin & Martin Short: An Evening You Will Forget for the Rest of Your Life,” Steve Martin and Martin Short

OUTSTANDING REALITY-COMPETITION PROGRAM

“The Amazing Race”
“American Ninja Warrior”
“Project Runway”
“RuPaul’s Drag Race”
“Top Chef”
“The Voice”

Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’: Star Elisabeth Moss Promises Secretive Film Will Be Another ‘Thought-Provoking Popcorn Movie’

The star of the Oscar winner’s next social thriller can’t say much, but Moss did hint to IndieWire that the film is going to please plenty of “Get Out” fans.

Oscar winner Jordan Peele has been hammering away on the new projects after making his feature debut with last year’s critical and commercial hit “Get Out,” but few are as anticipated as his second film “Us,” a new “social-horror thriller” that has been kept under wraps since it was announced last May.

Even the film’s IMDb page notes that the plot is “unknown,” but there have been a handful of hints as to what’s to come, from early casting announcements of co-leads Elisabeth Moss and Lupita Nyong’o to an intriguing teaser poster. The pair will also be joined by “Black Panther” breakout Winston Duke, Kara Hayward, and Tim Heidecker.

Star Moss recently debuted “Her Smell” at TIFF this past week, where she was already getting hit with the inevitable queries about the film. While the actress is not able to say much about a project that has been secretive from the start, she was effusive in what she was able to share.

“All I can kind of say is, I’m obviously a huge fan of ‘Get Out,’ as is the rest of the world, and I think this movie’s gonna be really good,” Moss told IndieWire in a recent interview. “I just think it’s gonna be good. It’s just gonna be really good, and that’s it.”

Moss also assured fellow fans of “Get Out” that the film will likely feel like a companion piece to the Oscar nominee, as both films are a reflection of Peele’s unique vision. “It’s true to what Jordan wants to make, which are these thought-provoking popcorn movies,” she said.

The actress and rising producer has worked with a wide variety of directors over the course of her career, from her frequent collaborator Alex Ross Perry to Reed Morano and Lawrence Kasdan, but she seemed especially thrilled by Peele’s on-set style, particularly when it comes to the way he works with his actors.

“He really is a great director, like, a great actor’s director,” she said. “I think just being an [fellow] actor doesn’t even make you able to do that. It is a very specific skill, and it’s also the ability to not say things sometimes. He does this wonderful thing where he’s like, if you ask him a question, and you’re like, ‘Should I do it like this?’ and he doesn’t know, he’s just like, ‘I don’t know. Let’s try it.’ He makes it very safe and fun. He’s awesome.”

Universal Pictures will release “Us” on March 15, 2019.

Elisabeth Moss Studied Kurt Cobain, Amy Winehouse, and Marilyn Monroe to Play an Unleashed Rock Star in ‘Her Smell’ — TIFF

The actress and producer tells IndieWire she turned to some of Hollywood’s biggest tragedies to inspire her role in Alex Ross Perry’s hard-hitting rock drama.

It’s easy to hate Becky Something, the hurricane of rock n’ roll destruction at the center of Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell.” Played with ferocious intensity by actress and producer Elisabeth Moss, the star’s third teaming with Perry sees Moss hitting another high note after the pair’s vicious “Queen of Earth,” but it also comes with a timely addiction narrative that she was eager to get right.

Told in a five-act structure and interspersed with flashbacks, “Her Smell” unfolds over nearly a decade as Becky and her bandmates (Agyness Deyn and Gayle Rankin, worthy matches for Moss) struggle with the price of fame and creative freedom as their band, Something She, rises and falls, mostly due to Becky’s whims.

As the band cycles through bad gigs (three out of five of the film’s acts take place in grimy backstages) and even worse trips, Becky is forced to grapple with the havoc she’s wreaked on everyone around her, made still more frightening by her drug addiction and emotional unease.

It’s familiar territory for Moss and Perry, who previously used 2015’s “Queen of Earth” to stage another incisive view into the bonds between women threatened by mental illness, but “Her Smell” goes even deeper.

Moss remembers her “Queen of Earth” director texting her in 2015 with an idea: to follow “a rock star who was on the outs in her career and was an addict and had a baby, and dealing with that, what that would be like to have that kind of addiction and lifestyle and have a baby.” That’s all she needed, and she encouraged Perry to write so they could set about making it.

First, however, she had to prepare for the role that would be emotionally and physically draining, from her on-stage performances to some high-energy tantrums.

“I watched any music documentary I could get my hands on, honestly,” Moss told IndieWire in a recent interview. “All the usual suspects, ‘Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck,’ which I’d already seen but now I’ve seen a million times, ‘Amy,’ the Amy Winehouse documentary. And also things on Marilyn Monroe, like that kind of thing, just to get a grasp of that fame and that addiction. Anything I could find about somebody who was incredibly famous or successful, but also dealing with addiction, was very helpful.”

Some early reactions to the film compared Becky to Courtney Love, but Moss bristles a bit at the need to trade one blonde rocker for another. As she put it, “Why isn’t she Axl Rose?”

"Her Smell"

“Her Smell”

TIFF

Moss also looked beyond well-publicized stories of Hollywood tragedy, opting to spend time with recovering addicts who showed her “things that you can’t get from reading a book or watching a documentary, but things that were very real.”

“I have not, thankfully, dealt with addiction myself personally, but I tried as much as I could to, not just watch documentaries, but actually talk to people who’ve dealt with it and were now sober,” Moss said. “A couple of people that I spoke to, obviously who will remain anonymous, were so open and vulnerable about it. … You actually have to be able to talk about it, and you have to be able to face it.”

The film doesn’t glamorize drugs; instead, it drops the audience into Becky’s story long after she has gone off the rails. “It was very important for me to try to be as accurate and truthful about that as possible,” Moss said. “That’s why we don’t even show a lot of drugs being taken in the movie, because we do not want to glamorize it. We want to show the effects on the people around her, of that addiction.”

For Moss, those effects were the most informative element of the film. “I think that it’s one thing to be crazy and fun, and say crazy shit and talk really fast, but it’s specifically in Act Three, which is at the height of her demise, she’s cruel,” Moss said. “So much of the film deals with not only the person who is going through the addiction, but how it affects everyone in her orbit, her bandmates, her ex-husband, her child, her mother, and affects the people that are connected to them.”

She continued, “When you’re that fucked up and you’ve really lost yourself, you can go places that you would never think that somebody would be able to go.”

“Her Smell” premiered at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival. It is currently seeking U.S. distribution.

Deadline Studio at TIFF 2018 – Day 3 – Jonah Hill, Elisabeth Moss, Damien Chazelle, Melissa McCarthy & More

Deadline’s studio at the Toronto International Film Festival kicked off Day 3 by hosting fest-goers such as Jonah Hill of Mid90s; Elisabeth Moss of Her Smell; Melissa McCarthy of Can You Ever Forgive Me; Damien Chazelle of First Man; and many mor…

Deadline’s studio at the Toronto International Film Festival kicked off Day 3 by hosting fest-goers such as Jonah Hill of Mid90s; Elisabeth Moss of Her Smell; Melissa McCarthy of Can You Ever Forgive Me; Damien Chazelle of First Man; and many more. Click on the photo above to launch the gallery. Stay tuned for more photo galleries and video interviews from the Deadline Studio at TIFF 2018. Deadline Studio at TIFF 2018 is presented by eOne. Special thanks to sponsor Watford…

Toronto 2018: Here’s Every Movie Sold So Far, From ‘Wild Rose’ to ‘Stan & Ollie’

Buyers are putting down their Momofuku cookies and handing over the cash, as film sales are in full swing at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Saban Films and Neon, who have made waves this past year by acquiring several titles at previous festivals, each secured deals, while usual players Sony Pictures Classics, Magnolia, Focus Features and Netflix have also picked up some titles.

While “Wild Rose,” arguably one of the hottest titles for sale at TIFF, has been snatched up by Neon, there are still various hot films up for grabs. For example, Natalie Portman’s “Vox Lux” still has no distributor, neither does Elisabeth Moss’ “Her Smell.”

Also Read: Neon Acquires Buzzy Toronto Title ‘Wild Rose’

Additionally, many of TIFF’s biggest titles that are coming from immediate festival predecessors Venice and Telluride have distribution in place and are vying for awards attention: Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born,” Marielle Heller’s “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” Karyn Kusama and Nicole Kidman’s “Destroyer,” Robert Redford’s “The Old Man and the Gun,” Steve McQueen’s “Widows” and so on.

Here’s what’s been picked up in Toronto so far:

“Romans”

As one of the first acquisitions of the festival, Saban Films acquired the rights to the sexual abuse drama “Romans” starring Orlando Bloom.

Directed by Ludwig and Paul Shammasian, the film stars Bloom as a man struggling to cope with the sexual abuse he suffered as a child at the hands of a priest, and who now has the opportunity to demolish the church where his abuse occurred.

Also Read: Magnolia Pictures Acquires Epic Foreign Sci-Fi ‘Aniara’

“Stan & Ollie”

Entertainment One’s “Stan & Ollie” was acquired by Sony Pictures Classics for multiple territories including the United States.

Jon S. Baird directs from a script by Jeff Pope. Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly star as the famed comedic duo, Laurel and Hardy.

“Wild Rose”

Neon, the indie distributor that has been making waves at festivals, landed the domestic rights to “Wild Rose,” arguably the hottest sales title at the festival this year.

The company, co-founded by Tom Quinn and Tim League, landed the finished film in a competitive situation, for roughly $4 million. The movie follows an aspiring country singer who wants to leave her humdrum life in Scotland for a Southern-fried adventure in Nashville.

Tom Harper directs from a script by writer Nicole Taylor. Jessie Buckley, Sophie Okonedo and Julie Walters star.

“Lionheart”

Netflix acquired the global rights to Genevieve Nnaji’s “Lionheart” on Saturday.

Nnaji, a notable Nigerian film star, plays an enterprising daughter competing with her crude and eccentric uncle to control her family business when her father falls ill.

“Greta”

Focus Features landed Neil Jordan’s thriller “Greta” following the film’s premiere at TIFF. It stars Chloe Grace Moretz and Isabelle Huppert and is described as a film about female obsession. Jordan wrote and directed the film.

There were several companies interested in “Greta,” but Focus Features’ deal gives the distributor rights for the film in North America, Australia and China. Universal, Focus’ parent company, already has a deal for the U.K.

“Maiden”

Sony Pictures Classics picked up North American rights to Alex Holmes’ “Maiden,” after the documentary’s world premiere at the 2018 Toronto Film Festival.

“Maiden” tells the inspirational story of Tracy Edwards, a 24-year-old cook on charter boats, who became the skipper of the first all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1989.

Also Read: ‘First Man’ Gets Bigger and Bolder in Toronto IMAX Premiere

“Freaks”

Well Go USA landed the English language rights to “Freaks” for around $2 million at the festival. The film made its debut at the festival on Saturday and stars Emile Hirsch, Bruce Dern, Lexy Kolker and Amanda Crew. It follows a girl who discovers a bizarre and threatening new world behind her front door after she escapes from her paranoid father.

Zach Lipovsky and Adam Stein directed the psychological thriller from their script, and the distributor is planning a theatrical release for it.

“The Elephant Queen”

Apple acquired the global rights to the documentary feature film “The Elephant Queen,” directed by Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning wildlife documentarians Victoria Stone and Mark Deeble.

The nature film follows Athena, an elephant matriarch who will go to any length to protect her family when they are forced to leave their waterhole to survive.

Academy Award nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor narrates the film, which was screened Saturday at the Toronto Film Festival.

“Teen Spirit”

Elle Fanning’s “Teen Spirit” was sold to producer and CEO and founder of LD Entertainment Mickey Liddell at the festival. The film is the directorial debut for “Handmaid’s Tale” actor Max Minghella, who also wrote the film’s script.

Liddell will partner with a distributor for “Teen Spirit.” A source familiar with the deal told TheWrap it was in the $8 million range, and bidding was competitive.

“Teen Spirit” follows Violet (Fanning), a shy teenager living in the Isle of Wight, who dreams of pop stardom as an escape from her small town and shattered family life. With the help of an unlikely mentor, Violet enters an international singing competition that will test her integrity, talent and ambition.

Also Read: Apple Picks Up Global Rights to Wildlife Documentary ‘Elephant Queen’

“Aniara” 

Magnolia Pictures acquired rights to distribute Swedish science fiction thriller “Aniara” after the film’s world premiere at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

“Aniara” is meant to present a panoramic view of the possible fate of  the human race after they have destroyed the planet. The film tells the story of one of the many spaceships used for transporting Earth’s fleeing population to their new home-planet, Mars. As the ship, Aniara, leaves the ruined Earth, she collides with space debris and is knocked off course. As the passengers slowly realize that they’ll never be able to return, they continue onwards through an empty and cold universe. In Aniara’s inexorable journey towards destruction there is a warning that cannot be emphasized enough: there’s only one Earth.

“Divide and Conquer”

Magnolia Pictures landed the North American theatrical rights to A&E IndieFilms’ “Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes,” at TIFF. Magnolia is planning a Dec. 7 theatrical release date, and A&E will release the film on TV following its theatrical run.

The film, described as “no-holds-barred,” was directed by Alexis Bloom (“Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds”), who produced alongside Will Cohen of Jigsaw Productions.

“Gloria Bell”

Julianne Moore’s “Gloria Bell” was acquired by A24 ahead of the festival. Sebastian Lelio’s newest film also stars John Turturro, Brad Garrett, Rita Wilson and Michael Cera. Written and directed by Lelio, “Gloria Bell” is a remake of his 2013 breakout Chilean feature of the same name.

The film follows Gloria (Moore), a free-spirited divorcee who spends her days at her office job and her nights on the dance floor. When she meets Arnold (Turturro), she finds herself in the midst of an unexpected romance.

Lastly… “Knives Out”

It’s not a movie yet, sure, but Daniel Craig and Rian Johnson’s murder mystery package “Knives Out” sold to MRC at the festival.

Rian Johnson wrote the script with his producing partner Ram Bergman, and will direct the film that is now fully financed.

The film is described as a modern-day murder mystery in the classic whodunit style infused with Johnson’s original voice that informed films from “Brick” to “Looper.”  Daniel Craig will star as a detective assigned to solve the crime.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto So Far: ‘First Man’ and ‘A Star Is Born’ Lead a Crop of Films With Heart and Dazzle

Will Oscar Season’s Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

Buyers are putting down their Momofuku cookies and handing over the cash, as film sales are in full swing at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Saban Films and Neon, who have made waves this past year by acquiring several titles at previous festivals, each secured deals, while usual players Sony Pictures Classics, Magnolia, Focus Features and Netflix have also picked up some titles.

While “Wild Rose,” arguably one of the hottest titles for sale at TIFF, has been snatched up by Neon, there are still various hot films up for grabs. For example, Natalie Portman’s “Vox Lux” still has no distributor, neither does Elisabeth Moss’ “Her Smell.”

Additionally, many of TIFF’s biggest titles that are coming from immediate festival predecessors Venice and Telluride have distribution in place and are vying for awards attention: Damien Chazelle’s “First Man,” Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born,” Marielle Heller’s “Can You Ever Forgive Me?” Karyn Kusama and Nicole Kidman’s “Destroyer,” Robert Redford’s “The Old Man and the Gun,” Steve McQueen’s “Widows” and so on.

Here’s what’s been picked up in Toronto so far:

“Romans”

As one of the first acquisitions of the festival, Saban Films acquired the rights to the sexual abuse drama “Romans” starring Orlando Bloom.

Directed by Ludwig and Paul Shammasian, the film stars Bloom as a man struggling to cope with the sexual abuse he suffered as a child at the hands of a priest, and who now has the opportunity to demolish the church where his abuse occurred.

“Stan & Ollie”

Entertainment One’s “Stan & Ollie” was acquired by Sony Pictures Classics for multiple territories including the United States.

Jon S. Baird directs from a script by Jeff Pope. Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly star as the famed comedic duo, Laurel and Hardy.

“Wild Rose”

Neon, the indie distributor that has been making waves at festivals, landed the domestic rights to “Wild Rose,” arguably the hottest sales title at the festival this year.

The company, co-founded by Tom Quinn and Tim League, landed the finished film in a competitive situation, for roughly $4 million. The movie follows an aspiring country singer who wants to leave her humdrum life in Scotland for a Southern-fried adventure in Nashville.

Tom Harper directs from a script by writer Nicole Taylor. Jessie Buckley, Sophie Okonedo and Julie Walters star.

“Lionheart”

Netflix acquired the global rights to Genevieve Nnaji’s “Lionheart” on Saturday.

Nnaji, a notable Nigerian film star, plays an enterprising daughter competing with her crude and eccentric uncle to control her family business when her father falls ill.

“Greta”

Focus Features landed Neil Jordan’s thriller “Greta” following the film’s premiere at TIFF. It stars Chloe Grace Moretz and Isabelle Huppert and is described as a film about female obsession. Jordan wrote and directed the film.

There were several companies interested in “Greta,” but Focus Features’ deal gives the distributor rights for the film in North America, Australia and China. Universal, Focus’ parent company, already has a deal for the U.K.

“Maiden”

Sony Pictures Classics picked up North American rights to Alex Holmes’ “Maiden,” after the documentary’s world premiere at the 2018 Toronto Film Festival.

“Maiden” tells the inspirational story of Tracy Edwards, a 24-year-old cook on charter boats, who became the skipper of the first all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1989.

“Freaks”

Well Go USA landed the English language rights to “Freaks” for around $2 million at the festival. The film made its debut at the festival on Saturday and stars Emile Hirsch, Bruce Dern, Lexy Kolker and Amanda Crew. It follows a girl who discovers a bizarre and threatening new world behind her front door after she escapes from her paranoid father.

Zach Lipovsky and Adam Stein directed the psychological thriller from their script, and the distributor is planning a theatrical release for it.

“The Elephant Queen”

Apple acquired the global rights to the documentary feature film “The Elephant Queen,” directed by Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning wildlife documentarians Victoria Stone and Mark Deeble.

The nature film follows Athena, an elephant matriarch who will go to any length to protect her family when they are forced to leave their waterhole to survive.

Academy Award nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor narrates the film, which was screened Saturday at the Toronto Film Festival.

“Teen Spirit”

Elle Fanning’s “Teen Spirit” was sold to producer and CEO and founder of LD Entertainment Mickey Liddell at the festival. The film is the directorial debut for “Handmaid’s Tale” actor Max Minghella, who also wrote the film’s script.

Liddell will partner with a distributor for “Teen Spirit.” A source familiar with the deal told TheWrap it was in the $8 million range, and bidding was competitive.

“Teen Spirit” follows Violet (Fanning), a shy teenager living in the Isle of Wight, who dreams of pop stardom as an escape from her small town and shattered family life. With the help of an unlikely mentor, Violet enters an international singing competition that will test her integrity, talent and ambition.

“Aniara” 

Magnolia Pictures acquired rights to distribute Swedish science fiction thriller “Aniara” after the film’s world premiere at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

“Aniara” is meant to present a panoramic view of the possible fate of  the human race after they have destroyed the planet. The film tells the story of one of the many spaceships used for transporting Earth’s fleeing population to their new home-planet, Mars. As the ship, Aniara, leaves the ruined Earth, she collides with space debris and is knocked off course. As the passengers slowly realize that they’ll never be able to return, they continue onwards through an empty and cold universe. In Aniara’s inexorable journey towards destruction there is a warning that cannot be emphasized enough: there’s only one Earth.

“Divide and Conquer”

Magnolia Pictures landed the North American theatrical rights to A&E IndieFilms’ “Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes,” at TIFF. Magnolia is planning a Dec. 7 theatrical release date, and A&E will release the film on TV following its theatrical run.

The film, described as “no-holds-barred,” was directed by Alexis Bloom (“Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds”), who produced alongside Will Cohen of Jigsaw Productions.

“Gloria Bell”

Julianne Moore’s “Gloria Bell” was acquired by A24 ahead of the festival. Sebastian Lelio’s newest film also stars John Turturro, Brad Garrett, Rita Wilson and Michael Cera. Written and directed by Lelio, “Gloria Bell” is a remake of his 2013 breakout Chilean feature of the same name.

The film follows Gloria (Moore), a free-spirited divorcee who spends her days at her office job and her nights on the dance floor. When she meets Arnold (Turturro), she finds herself in the midst of an unexpected romance.

Lastly… “Knives Out”

It’s not a movie yet, sure, but Daniel Craig and Rian Johnson’s murder mystery package “Knives Out” sold to MRC at the festival.

Rian Johnson wrote the script with his producing partner Ram Bergman, and will direct the film that is now fully financed.

The film is described as a modern-day murder mystery in the classic whodunit style infused with Johnson’s original voice that informed films from “Brick” to “Looper.”  Daniel Craig will star as a detective assigned to solve the crime.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto So Far: 'First Man' and 'A Star Is Born' Lead a Crop of Films With Heart and Dazzle

Will Oscar Season's Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

‘Her Smell’s Elisabeth Moss Goes Down Rabbit Hole Of Manic Self-Destruction As ’90s Punk Rocker – Toronto Studio

In Her Smell, Elisabeth Moss’ third film with writer-director Alex Ross Perry, the Emmy and Golden Globe winner trades in dystopian hopelessness for a different kind of darkness, throwing herself entirely into the anarchy of the ’90s punk r…

In Her Smell, Elisabeth Moss’ third film with writer-director Alex Ross Perry, the Emmy and Golden Globe winner trades in dystopian hopelessness for a different kind of darkness, throwing herself entirely into the anarchy of the ’90s punk rock world. Starring alongside Cara Delevingne, Amber Heard, Ashley Benson, Dylan Gelula and more, Moss is Becky Something, the brilliant and brilliantly self-destructive front woman of ’90s rock band Something She, struggling with…

‘Her Smell’ First Trailer: Elisabeth Moss Shocks As a Destructive Punk Rocker in Alex Ross Perry’s Latest

The music drama is making its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.

If you thought Elisabeth Moss went off the deep end in Alex Ross Perry’s last film, “Queen of Earth,” just wait until you see what they’ve got cooking in their highly anticipated reunion, “Her Smell.” The drama is making its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival and has released a first look teaser showing off Moss’ unhinged side as a punk rocker.

“Her Small” casts Moss as Becky Something, a destructive musician who pushes her relationships with bandmates, family, and fans to the limit as she wages a years-long war against sobriety. Becky finds a creative reawakening when she becomes the mentor to a rising all-female band called The Akergirls, but pressure builds as she watches her former bandmate rise to megastardom as her own career falters. 

While Perry made a short detour to family-friendly fare by penning the script to Disney’s “Christopher Robin,” he’s back to his maniacal self in “Her Smell.” The first teaser features a scene of Becky unhinged backstage, and it’s clear few actors can match the actress when it comes to capturing intensity in an extreme close-up. The film’s supporting cast include Cara Delevingne and Amber Heard.

Moss is up for an Emmy this year for her lead role in “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a prize she won last year. “Her Smell” is one of the more high profile titles up for grabs at this year’s festival market. Watch the teaser below.

‘Her Smell’ First-Look Toronto Clip: Elisabeth Moss Punks Out In Alex Ross Perry’s Rocker Drama

EXCLUSIVE: Here is Elisabeth Moss as you’ve never seen her, looking and acting more like Hole-era Courtney Love than Mad Men-period Peggy Olson. In this first look at director Alex Ross Perry’s Her Smell, Moss plays a kohl-eyed punk rocker …

EXCLUSIVE: Here is Elisabeth Moss as you’ve never seen her, looking and acting more like Hole-era Courtney Love than Mad Men-period Peggy Olson. In this first look at director Alex Ross Perry’s Her Smell, Moss plays a kohl-eyed punk rocker (who seems to be having a very public backstage meltdown). The film has its world premiere Sunday in the Platform section of the Toronto Film Festival. Endeavor Content is handling U.S. sales, and Voltage Pictures international, on the…

‘Handmaid’s Tale’: Joseph Fiennes on Exploring ‘Warped Creatures,’ ‘Ugly Components of the Male Psyche’

Let’s get this straight right away: Joseph Fiennes knows Commander Fred Waterford is not a good guy. And he also knows it’s not his job to make you like his “Handmaid’s Tale” character.

But it is his job to “find pockets of humanity” in one of the “monsters” and “warped creatures” that inhabit the fictional world of Gilead, created by Margaret Atwood in her dystopian novel and now elaborated on in Season 2 by the Hulu adaptation’s creator, Bruce Miller.

“It’s a constant struggle with an antagonist like Fred,” Fiennes, whose first-ever Emmy nomination was one of eight acting noms for the show that won eight Emmys last year, including Outstanding Drama Series, tells TheWrap.

Also Read: How ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Star Yvonne Strahovski Made ‘Ice Queen’ Serena Sympathetic

(The other acting nominees: lead actress Elisabeth Moss, supporting actresses Yvonne Strahovski, Alexis Bledel and Ann Dowd and guests Samira Wiley, Cherry Jones and Kelly Jenrette.)

“One is never looking for sympathy, but one is looking for pockets of humanity,” he added. “And when I say humanity, I mean making him human and that’s difficult ’cause he is in many ways used as a device to show and illustrate the painful reality of Gilead.”

“So it’s about balancing and looking at the monsters like Fred and talking about how even those warped creatures like Fred, we have to start to look at them in the human complex, because they surround us in the real world,” Fiennes said. “And I think a lot of what we’re doing is a reflection of the real world. So I sort of welcome the prying out of the ugly components of the male psyche. “

Also Read: How ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Director Kari Skogland ‘Got Lucky’ With Her Key Season 2 Episode

In the second season of the “Handmaid’s Tale,” Fred moved further and further into villain territory, with his acts of emotional and physical abuse against Offred (Moss) and his wife Serena Joy (Strahovksi). But he also became a father — if you count taking the baby he assumed to be his and Offred’s to raise with Serena — who appears to genuinely love his daughter. And those conflicting storylines make for a more and more complex character for Fiennes.

“If there is a way to find the nuance and a multifaceted Fred, I search for that as much as I can,” Fiennes said. “But he has gone darker and I would love to look at a Season 3 where he doesn’t have to play the darkness because we know the type of creature he is already.”

But the Emmy nominated-series is based on “an extraordinary feminist novel,” Fiennes says they “want to keep authentic to that” and that’s why it’s “a delicate call to start investigating the male psyche in depth.”

Also Read: Ann Dowd: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Aunt Lydia Would Make ‘Mincemeat’ Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

“There is that balance between an extraordinary protagonist and all of the complexities of the female dynamics in different aspects and different characters,” Fiennes continued. “Investigating that, that is the importance of the show and what they are resisting and how they find their inspiration and how we understand their pain and their confusion and their contradiction. And if you start hooking that up with someone like Fred, I welcome that. But I think it’s a balance that is led by the writers.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

How ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Star Yvonne Strahovski Made ‘Ice Queen’ Serena Sympathetic

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Star Yvonne Strahovski Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

How ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Director Kari Skogland ‘Got Lucky’ With Her Key Season 2 Episode

Ann Dowd: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Aunt Lydia Would Make ‘Mincemeat’ Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

Let’s get this straight right away: Joseph Fiennes knows Commander Fred Waterford is not a good guy. And he also knows it’s not his job to make you like his “Handmaid’s Tale” character.

But it is his job to “find pockets of humanity” in one of the “monsters” and “warped creatures” that inhabit the fictional world of Gilead, created by Margaret Atwood in her dystopian novel and now elaborated on in Season 2 by the Hulu adaptation’s creator, Bruce Miller.

“It’s a constant struggle with an antagonist like Fred,” Fiennes, whose first-ever Emmy nomination was one of eight acting noms for the show that won eight Emmys last year, including Outstanding Drama Series, tells TheWrap.

(The other acting nominees: lead actress Elisabeth Moss, supporting actresses Yvonne Strahovski, Alexis Bledel and Ann Dowd and guests Samira Wiley, Cherry Jones and Kelly Jenrette.)

“One is never looking for sympathy, but one is looking for pockets of humanity,” he added. “And when I say humanity, I mean making him human and that’s difficult ’cause he is in many ways used as a device to show and illustrate the painful reality of Gilead.”

“So it’s about balancing and looking at the monsters like Fred and talking about how even those warped creatures like Fred, we have to start to look at them in the human complex, because they surround us in the real world,” Fiennes said. “And I think a lot of what we’re doing is a reflection of the real world. So I sort of welcome the prying out of the ugly components of the male psyche. “

In the second season of the “Handmaid’s Tale,” Fred moved further and further into villain territory, with his acts of emotional and physical abuse against Offred (Moss) and his wife Serena Joy (Strahovksi). But he also became a father — if you count taking the baby he assumed to be his and Offred’s to raise with Serena — who appears to genuinely love his daughter. And those conflicting storylines make for a more and more complex character for Fiennes.

“If there is a way to find the nuance and a multifaceted Fred, I search for that as much as I can,” Fiennes said. “But he has gone darker and I would love to look at a Season 3 where he doesn’t have to play the darkness because we know the type of creature he is already.”

But the Emmy nominated-series is based on “an extraordinary feminist novel,” Fiennes says they “want to keep authentic to that” and that’s why it’s “a delicate call to start investigating the male psyche in depth.”

“There is that balance between an extraordinary protagonist and all of the complexities of the female dynamics in different aspects and different characters,” Fiennes continued. “Investigating that, that is the importance of the show and what they are resisting and how they find their inspiration and how we understand their pain and their confusion and their contradiction. And if you start hooking that up with someone like Fred, I welcome that. But I think it’s a balance that is led by the writers.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

How 'The Handmaid's Tale' Star Yvonne Strahovski Made 'Ice Queen' Serena Sympathetic

'The Handmaid's Tale' Star Yvonne Strahovski Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

How 'Handmaid's Tale' Director Kari Skogland 'Got Lucky' With Her Key Season 2 Episode

Ann Dowd: 'The Handmaid's Tale' Aunt Lydia Would Make 'Mincemeat' Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

‘The Handmaid’s Tale’s Joseph Fiennes Discusses The Importance Of Understanding What Makes Monsters Tick

Over the past two seasons of Hulu’s dystopian drama The Handmaid’s Tale, first-time Emmy nominee Joseph Fiennes has had the thankless job of portraying the closest thing to an archetypal villain—a man who commits endless crimes against women&#821…

Over the past two seasons of Hulu's dystopian drama The Handmaid's Tale, first-time Emmy nominee Joseph Fiennes has had the thankless job of portraying the closest thing to an archetypal villain—a man who commits endless crimes against women—at a politically charged moment when society is up in arms against just such a man. While Season 2 offered Commander Waterford's venomous wife Serena Joy a humanizing path, revealing some semblance of compassion, Waterford himself…

How ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Star Yvonne Strahovski Made ‘Ice Queen’ Serena Sympathetic

This story about Yvonne Strahovski first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Serena Joy is one of the many wicked characters on “The Handmaid’s Tale,” but she’s also one that fans found more and more understandable as Season 2 went on. And viewers of the Hulu drama who struggle with their empathy for Serena can thank actress Yvonne Strahovski for their turmoil, as she worked hard to create that feeling.

“It’s important for me to try to make this character as relatable as possible, even though she’s despicable,” said Strahovski, whose first-ever Emmy nomination was one of eight acting noms for the show that won eight Emmys last year, including Outstanding Drama Series.

(The other acting nominees: lead actress Elisabeth Moss, supporting actor Joseph Fiennes, supporting actresses Alexis Bledel and Ann Dowd and guests Samira Wiley, Cherry Jones and Kelly Jenrette.)

Also Read: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Creator Says Serena Joy May Come to Regret Her Last-Minute Decision

For the actress, Season 2 was an extended case of what she called “navigating a really fine line between the Jekyll and Hyde of Serena — her ice queen fighting the sensitive, vulnerable side that was revealing itself slowly.”

Throughout the season, Serena, the wife of Commander Fred Waterford (Fiennes) would do something kind for the handmaiden Offred/June (Moss), who was carrying a child for the couple.

But in the next moment, driven by jealousy and fury, she would become more wicked than we’d ever seen her before. Episode after episode, Serena grappled with her desire to become a mother, which naturally put her at odds with June — the woman whose biological baby she was trying to snatch from her womb and mother herself.

Also Read: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Creator Explains Exactly What Is (and Isn’t) Part of Gilead

“I was really excited when I sat down with [creator] Bruce [Miller] before we started filming and he told me about the motherhood storyline that Serena was going to have this year,” Strahovski said.

“He did leave a few things out, so I was still surprised by some of the things that come up in the scripts. But I love that Serena has this unrealistic view of what motherhood means to her and it totally breaks down and changes towards the end. She basically does a 180 that has the worst outcome for her and the best outcome for the baby. Her journey this season was about learning what motherhood really means.”

And it finally changes the Offred-Serena relationship, which Strahovski said reminds her “of a volatile lovers’ affair where they would come together and break up again, and come together and break up again. Ultimately there are so many reasons why they can’t come together. But the baby is one big reason why they can.”

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ann Dowd: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Aunt Lydia Would Make ‘Mincemeat’ Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Season 2 Finale: Is Aunt Lydia OK After That, Um, Accident?

‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Creator Says Serena Joy May Come to Regret Her Last-Minute Decision

This story about Yvonne Strahovski first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

Serena Joy is one of the many wicked characters on “The Handmaid’s Tale,” but she’s also one that fans found more and more understandable as Season 2 went on. And viewers of the Hulu drama who struggle with their empathy for Serena can thank actress Yvonne Strahovski for their turmoil, as she worked hard to create that feeling.

“It’s important for me to try to make this character as relatable as possible, even though she’s despicable,” said Strahovski, whose first-ever Emmy nomination was one of eight acting noms for the show that won eight Emmys last year, including Outstanding Drama Series.

(The other acting nominees: lead actress Elisabeth Moss, supporting actor Joseph Fiennes, supporting actresses Alexis Bledel and Ann Dowd and guests Samira Wiley, Cherry Jones and Kelly Jenrette.)

For the actress, Season 2 was an extended case of what she called “navigating a really fine line between the Jekyll and Hyde of Serena — her ice queen fighting the sensitive, vulnerable side that was revealing itself slowly.”

Throughout the season, Serena, the wife of Commander Fred Waterford (Fiennes) would do something kind for the handmaiden Offred/June (Moss), who was carrying a child for the couple.

But in the next moment, driven by jealousy and fury, she would become more wicked than we’d ever seen her before. Episode after episode, Serena grappled with her desire to become a mother, which naturally put her at odds with June — the woman whose biological baby she was trying to snatch from her womb and mother herself.

“I was really excited when I sat down with [creator] Bruce [Miller] before we started filming and he told me about the motherhood storyline that Serena was going to have this year,” Strahovski said.

“He did leave a few things out, so I was still surprised by some of the things that come up in the scripts. But I love that Serena has this unrealistic view of what motherhood means to her and it totally breaks down and changes towards the end. She basically does a 180 that has the worst outcome for her and the best outcome for the baby. Her journey this season was about learning what motherhood really means.”

And it finally changes the Offred-Serena relationship, which Strahovski said reminds her “of a volatile lovers’ affair where they would come together and break up again, and come together and break up again. Ultimately there are so many reasons why they can’t come together. But the baby is one big reason why they can.”

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ann Dowd: 'The Handmaid's Tale' Aunt Lydia Would Make 'Mincemeat' Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

'Handmaid's Tale' Season 2 Finale: Is Aunt Lydia OK After That, Um, Accident?

'Handmaid's Tale' Creator Says Serena Joy May Come to Regret Her Last-Minute Decision

How ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Director Kari Skogland ‘Got Lucky’ With Her Key Season 2 Episode

A version of this story on Kari Skogland first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” had a tough, dramatic second season, and director Kari Skogland was in the thick of it. After directing the finale of Season 1, she oversaw four of the 10 episodes in Season 2, including the literally explosive episode in which 26 commanders from the repressive Gilead regime are killed by a bomb, along with 31 of their handmaids.

But the episode for which Skogland received her Emmy nomination is the one that followed that bombing episode and opened with a stark, beautiful memorial ceremony held in a snowy forest clearing.

The installment also featured Samira Wiley’s character, Moira, finally learning the fate of her lover, Odette, and Offred, the handmaid who was once known as June (Elisabeth Moss), reaching a cautious peace with Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski), for whom she’s carrying a child.

Also Read: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Creator Explains Exactly What Is (and Isn’t) Part of Gilead

You directed four of this season’s episodes. What appeals to you about “The Handmaid’s Tale?”
What’s not to appeal? It’s a very performance-oriented, visually arresting show, and that is the sweet spot for me in my work. And the other thing is how it is set up. [Showrunner] Bruce Miller really fosters your creative muscles and doesn’t micro-manage.

Television can be quite corporatized: There’s a pecking order and a process, and so many layers that it can take away some of the true creative spirit. And Bruce is adamant about that not happening. And Lizzie [star/producer Moss] is very supportive of that as well.

The “After” episode for which you were nominated begins with an extended, haunting funeral ritual in the snow. How was that envisioned and staged?
We talked about it for quite a while. Bruce had a sketch in his mind of what he wanted it to be–the handmaids kissing their handkerchiefs was something very particular that he wanted to see. The veils were also something that we worked on for a while.

I storyboarded it out, and the notion was to make these two circles and have a Busby Berkeley quality to it. I had also done a ritual in a previous episode, a baby shower, and it used the idea of a circle, the Celtic connection. I wanted to echo that as well. Bruce and I talked a lot about how to lead the handmaids in, and the lone drummer was just so sad that we had to use that. The walk through the forest, the stark black and white — we honestly got lucky and it snowed the night before.

And then I put some technology on it, a phantom camera and a drone, and we had a multiple camera set up. I wanted to capture the fragments of an hour-long ceremony, the most seminal moments, so it felt evocative and dreamlike, not linear.

Also Read: ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Finale: Creator Explains June’s Choice, Where Gilead Goes in Season 3

Any other particular challenges of that episode?
I had to go from that bleak opening, which was the follow-up to this horrific event, and then get to a place of… I don’t want to say hope, but there’s an almost giddy quality to the ending, when two women team up. The challenge was how to take that, and also Samira [Wiley]’s tremendously sad story of finding her dead lover, and keep the tension high without sinking into the sadness.

And then at the end, we had Lizzie touching paper and reading in Gilead for the first time in years. Offred had decided to kill June out of guilt, and this was the ultimate way of bringing her back, and showing that the pen is mightier than the sword. It was a really wild ride of an episode.

This year’s Emmys have 40 male directing nominees and only four women. What’s wrong with that picture?
It’s getting to be a very old story. The demoralizing thing about that statistic, four versus 40, is that it happened after such a banner year for women. I spent 15 years working on the DGA Women’s Steering Committee trying to move that needle, and the only way to change it is to actively change it.

It has to start with studios saying they’re going to even up the numbers. That takes time and training. The statistics come out, and we feel like nothing’s changed — but if we knew something was bubbling and percolating underneath those statistics, and there’s going to be more to choose from next year, that would put a tremendously positive spin on this. I would say that where it’s really changed is that we’re no longer afraid to be vocal. In the past, if you were too vocal, it was considered a negative. Now it’s encouraged.

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ann Dowd: ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Aunt Lydia Would Make ‘Mincemeat’ Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

The 17 Most Important Political TV Series of All Time, From ‘West Wing’ to ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ (Photos)

20 ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ Authoritarians, Ranked From Bad to Exceedingly Evil (Photos)

A version of this story on Kari Skogland first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“The Handmaid’s Tale” had a tough, dramatic second season, and director Kari Skogland was in the thick of it. After directing the finale of Season 1, she oversaw four of the 10 episodes in Season 2, including the literally explosive episode in which 26 commanders from the repressive Gilead regime are killed by a bomb, along with 31 of their handmaids.

But the episode for which Skogland received her Emmy nomination is the one that followed that bombing episode and opened with a stark, beautiful memorial ceremony held in a snowy forest clearing.

The installment also featured Samira Wiley’s character, Moira, finally learning the fate of her lover, Odette, and Offred, the handmaid who was once known as June (Elisabeth Moss), reaching a cautious peace with Serena Joy (Yvonne Strahovski), for whom she’s carrying a child.

You directed four of this season’s episodes. What appeals to you about “The Handmaid’s Tale?”
What’s not to appeal? It’s a very performance-oriented, visually arresting show, and that is the sweet spot for me in my work. And the other thing is how it is set up. [Showrunner] Bruce Miller really fosters your creative muscles and doesn’t micro-manage.

Television can be quite corporatized: There’s a pecking order and a process, and so many layers that it can take away some of the true creative spirit. And Bruce is adamant about that not happening. And Lizzie [star/producer Moss] is very supportive of that as well.

The “After” episode for which you were nominated begins with an extended, haunting funeral ritual in the snow. How was that envisioned and staged?
We talked about it for quite a while. Bruce had a sketch in his mind of what he wanted it to be–the handmaids kissing their handkerchiefs was something very particular that he wanted to see. The veils were also something that we worked on for a while.

I storyboarded it out, and the notion was to make these two circles and have a Busby Berkeley quality to it. I had also done a ritual in a previous episode, a baby shower, and it used the idea of a circle, the Celtic connection. I wanted to echo that as well. Bruce and I talked a lot about how to lead the handmaids in, and the lone drummer was just so sad that we had to use that. The walk through the forest, the stark black and white — we honestly got lucky and it snowed the night before.

And then I put some technology on it, a phantom camera and a drone, and we had a multiple camera set up. I wanted to capture the fragments of an hour-long ceremony, the most seminal moments, so it felt evocative and dreamlike, not linear.

Any other particular challenges of that episode?
I had to go from that bleak opening, which was the follow-up to this horrific event, and then get to a place of… I don’t want to say hope, but there’s an almost giddy quality to the ending, when two women team up. The challenge was how to take that, and also Samira [Wiley]’s tremendously sad story of finding her dead lover, and keep the tension high without sinking into the sadness.

And then at the end, we had Lizzie touching paper and reading in Gilead for the first time in years. Offred had decided to kill June out of guilt, and this was the ultimate way of bringing her back, and showing that the pen is mightier than the sword. It was a really wild ride of an episode.

This year’s Emmys have 40 male directing nominees and only four women. What’s wrong with that picture?
It’s getting to be a very old story. The demoralizing thing about that statistic, four versus 40, is that it happened after such a banner year for women. I spent 15 years working on the DGA Women’s Steering Committee trying to move that needle, and the only way to change it is to actively change it.

It has to start with studios saying they’re going to even up the numbers. That takes time and training. The statistics come out, and we feel like nothing’s changed — but if we knew something was bubbling and percolating underneath those statistics, and there’s going to be more to choose from next year, that would put a tremendously positive spin on this. I would say that where it’s really changed is that we’re no longer afraid to be vocal. In the past, if you were too vocal, it was considered a negative. Now it’s encouraged.

To read more of TheWrap’s Down to the Wire issue, click here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Ann Dowd: 'The Handmaid's Tale' Aunt Lydia Would Make 'Mincemeat' Out of Sarah Sanders (Video)

The 17 Most Important Political TV Series of All Time, From 'West Wing' to 'Handmaid's Tale' (Photos)

20 'Handmaid's Tale' Authoritarians, Ranked From Bad to Exceedingly Evil (Photos)

Emmy Predictions: Elisabeth Moss Likely To Repeat As Drama Series Actress But Claire Foy And Keri Russell Circling For The Win

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Two past winners in the category, versus four past Emmy nominees trying to break into that exclusive club—including the first ever Asian contender here—make up the extremely competitive lineup for …

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series Two past winners in the category, versus four past Emmy nominees trying to break into that exclusive club—including the first ever Asian contender here—make up the extremely competitive lineup for Drama Series Lead Actress this year. I could easily have seen slots go to Ozark's Laura Linney or Maggie Gyllenhaal of The Deuce, or This Is Us star Mandy Moore after her exemplary season, but the field turned out to be simply too…

Toronto Film Festival Books Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss Films for Platform Section

The Platform section of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will include adventurous films starring Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss, Frank Grillo and Patricia Clarkson, TIFF organizers announced on Wednesday.

Films in the section will include Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell,” with Moss and Amber Heard; Carol Morley’s Martin Amis adaptation “Out of Blue,” with Patricia Clarkson and Toby Jones; and Emmanuel Mouret’s period piece “Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” starring Cecile de France.

Tim Sutton’s “Donnybrook,” which stars Frank Grillo and James Badge Dale in the story of a down-on-his-luck veteran who gets involved in brutal bare-knuckle boxing, will serve as the opening-night film for Platform, while Caroline Poggi and Jonathan Vinel’s “Jessica Forever,” a directorial debut, will close it.

Also Read: ‘Beautiful Boy,’ ‘A Star Is Born’ Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

All of the films except Emir Baigazin’s “The River” and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” a crime thriller starring Nicole Kidman, are world premieres.

Four of the 12 films are directed or co-directed by women.

Platform is a four-year-old section of the festival devoted to a dozen films “with high artistic merit and a bold directorial vision,” according to a TIFF release. Barry Jenkins’ Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight” played in the section in 2016, while Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” and Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin” appeared in Platform lineups in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Platform is also a competitive section of the festival, with a three-person jury awarding a prize of $25,000 Canadian to the director of the winning film.

Also Read: Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6 through Sept. 16. Additional bookings will be announced throughout most of August.

The Platform lineup:

“Angelo,” Markus Schleinzer | Austria/Luxembourg
“Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding | Taiwan/China/USA/France
“Destroyer,” Karyn Kusama | USA
“Donnybrook,” Tim Sutton | USA
“The Good Girls,” (Las niñas bien) Alejandra Márquez Abella | Mexico
“Her Smell,” Alex Ross Perry | USA
“The Innocent,” Simon Jaquemet | Switzerland/Germany x
“Jessica Forever,” Caroline Poggi, Jonathan Vinel | France
“Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” Emmanuel Mouret | France
“Out of Blue,” Carol Morley | UK
“The River,” Emir Baigazin | Kazakhstan/Poland/Norway
“Rojo,” Benjamín Naishtat | Argentina/Brazil/France/Netherlands/Germany

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

‘Beautiful Boy,’ ‘A Star Is Born’ Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

Coen Brothers, Barry Jenkins’ New Films to Play at New York Film Festival

John DeLorean Biopic ‘Driven’ to Close Venice Film Festival

The Platform section of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will include adventurous films starring Nicole Kidman, Elisabeth Moss, Frank Grillo and Patricia Clarkson, TIFF organizers announced on Wednesday.

Films in the section will include Alex Ross Perry’s “Her Smell,” with Moss and Amber Heard; Carol Morley’s Martin Amis adaptation “Out of Blue,” with Patricia Clarkson and Toby Jones; and Emmanuel Mouret’s period piece “Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” starring Cecile de France.

Tim Sutton’s “Donnybrook,” which stars Frank Grillo and James Badge Dale in the story of a down-on-his-luck veteran who gets involved in brutal bare-knuckle boxing, will serve as the opening-night film for Platform, while Caroline Poggi and Jonathan Vinel’s “Jessica Forever,” a directorial debut, will close it.

All of the films except Emir Baigazin’s “The River” and Karyn Kusama’s “Destroyer,” a crime thriller starring Nicole Kidman, are world premieres.

Four of the 12 films are directed or co-directed by women.

Platform is a four-year-old section of the festival devoted to a dozen films “with high artistic merit and a bold directorial vision,” according to a TIFF release. Barry Jenkins’ Oscar Best Picture winner “Moonlight” played in the section in 2016, while Pablo Larrain’s “Jackie” and Armando Iannucci’s “The Death of Stalin” appeared in Platform lineups in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Platform is also a competitive section of the festival, with a three-person jury awarding a prize of $25,000 Canadian to the director of the winning film.

The 2018 Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6 through Sept. 16. Additional bookings will be announced throughout most of August.

The Platform lineup:

“Angelo,” Markus Schleinzer | Austria/Luxembourg
“Cities of Last Things,” Ho Wi Ding | Taiwan/China/USA/France
“Destroyer,” Karyn Kusama | USA
“Donnybrook,” Tim Sutton | USA
“The Good Girls,” (Las niñas bien) Alejandra Márquez Abella | Mexico
“Her Smell,” Alex Ross Perry | USA
“The Innocent,” Simon Jaquemet | Switzerland/Germany x
“Jessica Forever,” Caroline Poggi, Jonathan Vinel | France
“Mademoiselle de Joncquières,” Emmanuel Mouret | France
“Out of Blue,” Carol Morley | UK
“The River,” Emir Baigazin | Kazakhstan/Poland/Norway
“Rojo,” Benjamín Naishtat | Argentina/Brazil/France/Netherlands/Germany

Related stories from TheWrap:

Toronto Film Festival Adds 19 Canadian Films, 9 of Them Directed by Women

'Beautiful Boy,' 'A Star Is Born' Highlight Toronto Film Festival Lineup

Coen Brothers, Barry Jenkins' New Films to Play at New York Film Festival

John DeLorean Biopic 'Driven' to Close Venice Film Festival