Ed Harris, Edgar Ramirez, Cléménce Poesy, More Join Jesse Eisenberg In Marcel Marceau WWII Story ‘Resistance’ — AFM

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EXCLUSIVE: Four-time Oscar nominee Ed Harris (The Hours), Edgar Ramirez (Carlos) and Cléménce Poesy (The Tunnel) are among an impressive lineup of U.S. and international actors joining Jesse Eisenberg (The Social Network) in World War II story Resistan…

Jon Hamm, Ed Harris & Lewis Pullman Join ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ Team

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Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
It’s co-star versus co-star in the Lead Actor race this time around, as Westworld’s Jeffrey Wright and Ed Harris battle for the gold, while This Is Us stars Sterling K. Brown and Milo Ventimiglia face off again …

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It may sound like a natural arc; after a long, successful career, and with a mantel filled with awards and honors, it’s finally time to contemplate retirement. But for many veteran actors the idea of quietly shuffling off stage as they hit their 60s ho…

‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale Ratings Dip 24 Percent Against Premiere

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

After Sunday’s Season 2 finale, HBO will freeze all “Westworld” functions for at least a year — but did the drama’s sophomore run finish better than it began?

This past weekend, Episode 210 earned 1.6 million linear viewers, according to Nielsen, which is down 24 percent in total eyeballs from its debut this spring. HBO added another 600,000 viewers via an encore and its HBO Go and Now streams, per the pay-TV channel, bringing the nightly total up to 2.2 million.

“Westworld” Season 2 premiered back in April to 2.1 million linear viewers, per Nielsen, which was actually 100,000 audience members slimmer than the show’s Season 1 finale. Counting an encore as well as HBO Go and Now streams, that night’s sum grew to 3 million overall viewers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

“Westworld” sees a lot of delayed viewing. Last season, the TV reimagining of the 1973 feature film saw nearly 80 percent of its viewers tune in post-premiere night, according to HBO. The premium cabler is expecting a Season 2 average of around 10 million viewers once all data has come in.

Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series closed its sophomore run with a feature-length finale, titled “The Passenger,” which answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of, but left viewers with a whole new mess of head-scratchers, like that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here. And everything we currently know about Season 3 here.

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(The mother of all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Do you feel like someone pulled your control unit out of your head after watching the “Westworld” Season 2 finale — including that wild post-credits scene? Of course you do. So what do you do next? Start scouring the internet for hints about the third installment, obviously.

While the details we have on the next season of Lisa Joy and Jonathan Nolan’s HBO sci-fi series are few and far between, we have been able to roundup a few tidbits that should tide you over for at least as long as it takes Dolores to get through one of her famous speeches about “the world.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

1. It’s going to take place in the “real world,” for the most part.

At the end of the Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” three of the Hosts officially entered the real world in our central timeline: Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood), Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) — thanks to Dolores’ decision to bring him back — and whoever the heck is inside the Charlotte Hale-shaped one (played by Tessa Thompson) that Dolores inhabited before she rebuilt herself.

“It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs],” Joy told TheWrap. “So we’ll come to know more of who ‘Hale’ is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.”

Joy also clarified that there is someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores, saying, “Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the ‘Real World’ in Season 3

2. But not entirely in the real world.

We’ve seen Westworld, The Raj and Shogun World, but we know we have some more Delos Destinations to explore. “Well, not all of our favorite characters have managed to escape yet, so…,” Nolan said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly  published after the finale. Yeah, OK, so more parks next time.

Also Read: Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

3. Not everyone is coming back.

Look, you saw how many people died in the finale, so it shouldn’t come as a shock based on the sheer number of casualties that not every star will be sticking with the series when it returns.

“We’ve had some interesting conversations,” Nolan told EW. “It’s a large ensemble cast and sadly we’re saying goodbye to some people at the end of this season. But as always with this show, who remains and who doesn’t is something we’re having a lot of fun with. There’s going to be a bit of a wait for a third season but we want to surprise and hopefully delight people with the way things progress.”

We do know that Dolores and Maeve (Thandie Newton) are both coming back, as Wood said in an interview with TheWrap back in April that she’s receiving equal pay for Season 3 and then Newton told Vanity Fair the same thing about herself.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Finale: What’s Up With That Weird Conversation Between Stubbs and Hale?

4. We know these guys are dead (at least for now).

Maeve, Angela (Talulah Riley), Abernathy (Louis Herthum), Costa (Fares Fares ), Strand (Gustaf Skarsgård), Hector (Rodrigo Santoro), Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman), Clementine (Angela Sarafyan), Emily (Katja Herbers), and Teddy (James Marsden), Elsie Hughes (Shannon Woodward), Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins). And also Charlotte Hale, but that’s complicated.

Well, they are all complicated. Especially because Joy explained that whole deal with the five control units “Halores” smuggled out of the park. And then she tried to tell us Ford is really gone for good this time. Sigh.

5. And these guys are definitely alive (at the moment).

Dolores, Bernard, Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William and whoever is in that Hale-shaped Host body.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale: Which 5 Hosts Are in Those Pearls?

6. The Hosts that “sublimed” into the Valley Beyond are most likely gone for good.

Teddy, Akecheta (Zach McClarnon) and a few other lucky robots made it into their version of paradise, and Joy made it clear to TheWrap that Dolores has changed the coordinates of the Sublime to keep them away from humans forever.

“I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish,” Joy told TheWrap. “They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

7. We’re going back to the future — at some point.

Joy told us that that crazy post-credits scene that scrambled your brain even more than the finale itself takes place at a later date than the rest of the story. A much later date.

“But he’s in a very different timeline,” Joy said. “The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

“And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

8. Season 3 is not going to premiere for a while.

Nolan told Entertainment Weekly you shouldn’t expect any fresh episodes anytime soon, noting: “We’re still talking it through, honestly, with our friends at HBO, and with the cast and the crew. We want to take the time to make every season as exciting as possible. And we have an enormous challenge going into Season 3 with the worlds that we’re building going forward. We want to make sure we have the time to do that right.”

Part of the problem here is also the fact HBO hasn’t set a premiere date for the eighth and final season of “Game of Thrones,” which we do know is coming in 2019. Chances are the premium cable network won’t want to air “Westworld” before it says goodbye to its most popular series, so you do the math.

You can read our full interview with Joy about the Season 2 finale here.

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‘Westworld’ Co-Showrunner Lisa Joy Tells Us About Heading Into the ‘Real World’ in Season 3

Is Ford Really – and Truly – Gone After ‘Westworld’s Mind-Bending Season 2 Finale?

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‘Westworld’: That Entire Bonkers Season 2 Ending, Explained

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(Warning: All of the spoilers for the end of “Westworld” Season 2 below! Read on at your own risk!)

“Westworld” Season 2 ended with yet another series of crazy, possibly confusing twists, bringing together multiple timelines and finally explaining what the deal is with Bernard, Dolores, and the Valley Beyond.

Especially in the last 20 minutes, the “Westworld” Season 2 finale dumps a whole lot of information on viewers, and it’s easy to possibly be a little lost. Here’s a quick rundown of what happened with every character, and what the end of Season 2 means for Season 3.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

First, there’s the past timeline, one week before the Delos extraction team arrived at “Westworld” and found Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) on the beach in the season’s first episode. In that timeline, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) blew off the hand of the Man in Black (Ed Harris), and then she and Bernard headed down into the Forge, the Westworld facility also known as the Valley Beyond to the hosts.

In the Forge, Bernard discovered that he and Ford (Anthony Hopkins) had created a virtual Eden world (what the show calls the “Sublime) inside the same computer that has been copying all the guests who’ve entered the park, in order to attempt to copy human minds into host bodies — an experiment in immortality. Bernard and Dolores entered the simulation, where Dolores learned some key facts about human nature and behavior from the copied human minds, which Ford thought she could use to survive in the real world. Bernard, meanwhile, opened the Door, the gateway into the Sublime, which automatically downloaded the hosts who passed through it into the computer system. That’s why, at the start of the season, there were all those host bodies floating around inside the flooded valley. The hosts’ bodies die, but their minds live on in the computer simulation.

Bernard, knowing that Dolores would try to kill all the humans, killed her instead. Later, though, when Hale (Tessa Thompson) killed Elsie (Shannon Woodward) because she didn’t think she could trust Elsie not to reveal the immortality project, Bernard changed his mind and decided that he needed Dolores. He asked the copy of Ford from the Cradle, the one inside his mind that previously took over Bernard’s body, for help, and Ford walked him through what to do.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Yup, THAT Character Is Back — But Not Like You Think

Bernard built a copy of Hale’s body as a host, since all her data had been saved by the immortality project, but put Dolores’ control unit in that body. Dolores was reborn, but inside a copy of Hale — and then Dolores killed Hale (and the last of her security guys). Bernard also hid the Abernathy control unit, the key that grants access to the Forge system, so no one would know where it was.

When everything was finished, Bernard realized that the copy of Ford he’d been talking to since he killed Dolores wasn’t really Ford — it was Bernard imagining Ford. In Season 1, Ford talked about how Arnold was trying to get the hosts to hear their own voices as internal monologue, instead of someone else’s voice giving them instructions. Bernard realized that, in imagining Ford, he’d truly and finally achieved his own free will.

He also knew that when Delos’ extraction team eventually showed up, they would figure out that Bernard was a host and scan his control unit, viewing all his memories. When that happened, the humans would be able to undo everything Bernard had done, from recreating Dolores to saving the park’s hosts in the computer simulation. To prevent that from happening, Bernard scrambled up his own memories from the past 20 years. That’s why he kept getting confused as to when things were happening in the later timeline, and why Costa (Fares Fares), the Delos technician, couldn’t find the location of the Abernathy control unit by scanning Bernard’s robot brain.

Also Read: We Finally Know What the Park in ‘Westworld’ Was Created For

In the second timeline, a week after Bernard first got into the Forge, Dolores was in the Hale body and still needed the Abernathy control unit, but Bernard had hidden it and then scrambled his brain. Dolores posed as Hale — maybe better identified now as “Halores” — and met up with Strand (Gustaf Skarsgard) and Costa from the extraction team to try to find the control unit, planning to use Hale’s identity to get out of Westworld. When they finally got to the Forge and Bernard remembered everything, Halores killed the extraction team and got the Abernathy control unit back from where Bernard had hidden it.

Dolores then uploaded the mind of Teddy (James Marsden) into the Sublime program; at the start of the episode, we see Dolores has removed Teddy’s his control unit from his body after he shot himself. Then, she used the satellite transmitter the extraction team brought to upload the Sublime program and all the hosts to one of the satellites, to protect it from anyone ever finding it. All the hosts who were uploaded into the Sublime are free and safe, living out their lives in a computer program where no one can hurt them.

There was no way that Dolores and Bernard could sneak out of the park in their own host bodies, so Halores killed Bernard and removed his control unit. She also took four others, which we see in her bag. What we don’t know is which hosts are contained within them. TheWrap talked to Co-Creator Lisa Joy about those control units (as well as a whole bunch of other stuff about the finale), and what we do know is that they’re none of the hosts we saw go into the Sublime.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

On the beach, the surviving Delos folks started looking to see what hosts they can salvage. Lutz (Leonardo Nam) and Sylvester (Ptolemy Slocum) the two technicians who’ve been with Maeve (Thandie Newton), were tasked with helping out. It’s heavily implied the pair are going to try to save Maeve, suggesting she’ll be back for Season 3 with their help. We also see that the Man in Black survived his ordeal and was leaving Westworld, although that doesn’t answer the question of whether he was a host.

Halores, having found the Abernathy control unit and pretending to be Hale, headed to the beach to leave Westworld. She had a quick interaction with Stubbs (Luke Hemsworth), who basically revealed he knows she’s really a host, but let her go anyway (Joy also answered TheWrap’s questions about that conversation). On the mainland, Halores went to Arnold’s old house, where Ford left one last helpful surprise: a machine for making hosts. Halores created a new Dolores body for herself. Then she made a new Bernard body and resurrected him, even though she knows they’ll be enemies. The question now is, whose control unit is in the Hale host body, and what other hosts might Dolores have made with the machine?

Finally, there’s that post-credits scene, which shows another timeline altogether from what we’ve seen so far in the season. The Man in Black takes the elevator down into the Forge, only to discover that he’s not in the Forge at all. A host that looks like his daughter Emily (Katja Herbers) gave him the same treatment the Man gave the host version of James Delos (Peter Mullan) earlier in the season. The destruction around the facility suggests that scene is way in the future, and that there’s a host copy of the Man in Black, much like there was a host copy of James Delos. Joy also answered our questions about the post-credits scene and illuminated it quite a bit. It’s not clear who’s running that program and why, but it could be that the Forge system Bernard and Dolores met has plans of its own.

So what does that all mean for Season 3? We know there are at least some hosts still out in the world, and Dolores and Bernard are going to be at odds. Maeve is probably coming back, and so is the Man in Black. And even with all that, there are bound to be more multiple, confusing timelines — and this is far from the end of Delos, Westworld, or their experiments.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

The second season of “Westworld” took a cue from the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s handbook on Sunday, capping an insane finale, titled “The Passenger,” with an equally insane post-credits scene. In the short clip, we see the Man in Black (Ed Harris) aka William, stumble out of an elevator into an abandoned room that the hit sci-fi series has never entered before. He comes across his daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), who, uh, he actually killed in the penultimate episode. The Man in Black is understandably confused, and so was TheWrap. So we asked the show’s co-creator Lisa Joy to explain it to us.

Here is what she said:

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Co-Creator Answers Every One of Our Questions About That Insane Season 2 Finale

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s-t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f-k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: So because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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(The mother all spoiler alerts: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen the “Westworld” Season 2 finale, “The Passenger,” which aired Sunday.)

Well, after an ending like that, where do we even begin?

“Westworld” brought its second season to a close Sunday night with a feature-length finale that threw us completely off our programmed loop. But while the episode, titled “The Passenger,” answered many a question we’d been pondering throughout the sophomore year of co-creator Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci-fi series, it left us with a whole new mess of head-scratchers.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Finale’s Wild Post-Credits Scene Explained

Seeing as we are still very much in TBD territory on an air date for the third season, we’ve got a long wait in store before we can stop scratching ours heads. But to help, TheWrap caught up with Joy to help us make sense of that Bernard (Jeffrey Wright)/Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood)/Charlotte Hale (Tessa Thompson) murder-resurrection triangle; Ford’s (Anthony Hopkins) final fate; Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the other dead Hosts’ chances of being revived; the “real world” setting we’re entering in Season 3; and what in the heck was going on with the Man in Black/William (Ed Harris) in that unexpected post-credits scene.

And — in a very Ford-like manner — she even gave TheWrap the answers to questions we didn’t think to ask. See our exchange below.

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TheWrap: So there was a lot of death in that finale [laughs]. What was the reasoning behind killing off so many people, especially knowing some people ( i.e. humans) probably don’t have a way of coming back?

Joy: In embarking on this season we knew, in a sense, we’d be telling a story of revolution, of war and the tragedy and inevitability of war is death. There are stakes to violence and it is mortality. And I love all of our actors. I think they are incredible collaborators, cool people, incredible talent and it truly is harrowing to lose any of them. But, you know, it’s in the service of the story and the story is something that we’re all working together to paint as realistically as you can paint a story about an AI revolution in a Western theme park [laughs]. And so for the drama to have stakes, the deaths must be real. And so, yeah, there was a lot of deaths [laughs].

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Jeffrey Wright’s Advice to Fans Confused by Season 2: ‘Relax and Surrender’

TheWrap: Did Bernard have to be the one to kill Dolores (and bring her back) and did Dolores have to be the one to kill Bernard (and bring him back) — and why?

Joy: Yeah, when we were thinking of that — and you see it in the back of some of the shots, the picture of an M.C. Escher drawing of a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand, drawing a hand — and the ways that the things we create and give birth to, create and influence us. And that is the cycle that Bernard and Dolores have been locked in since before Bernard was Bernard — when he was Arnold. The fates of all the characters are integral in the storylines, but some of them chose a kind of different struggle, you know?

And this season was about choice. It was about respecting choice, as well as making one’s own choice. And throughout the season, one of the things Dolores’ character struggles with in assuming the mantle of basically military leadership was, as much as she wanted to protect the Hosts, as noble as her aims were to protect them from the darkness that she herself has witnessed so many times in humans, in order to do that on a basic military level, she had to take on some of the paternalistic traits that she was kind of vowing against in the first place.

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It was a difficult dichotomy, but I think something that would realistically occur. So she made a lot of choices for a lot of people and came to regret those choices. Not necessarily because they were wrong in their outcome, or what her intended outcome was, but because it was wrong, she realized, to take away someone else’s agency, even if you disagreed with the choices they were making.

So, you know, she changed Teddy in order to “save” him. She knew he wouldn’t survive. So she took away his agency and made him something, even though I think it was designed to be temporary like, “Let’s just live through this so we can have this life together.” And then she was going to kind of dictate the fates of Maeve and Akecheta and all the people who fled to the Sublime, because, to her, that reality was not one worth pursuing.

Also Read: Sela Ward Could Return to ‘Westworld’ – Yes, Even After That Dark Twist

But she sees the error of her ways later because of Bernard. He literally killed her to stop the monster that she had become. And in being resurrected by him — when he also realizes that she wasn’t full monster, that indeed without her plan, they would be wiped off the face of the earth, she would be the last of his kind — he brings her back, and in that time she has changed. She has realized that embracing choice is necessary. That as much as her goal may have been noble, she has to accept the idea that they were fallible and that she is fallible, unless unchecked.

I think it’s a very powerful notion, the notion that our personal views, although closely held, are not necessarily right. That part of what is noble is making sure there are checks and balances and a plurality of opinions. And that is something that she has grown to understand.

So when she brings Bernard back in the real world, she’s basically accepting that idea and embracing that idea, even if it leads to her own personal undoing. She knows that that kind of balance is what is needed for true freedom for her kind.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: OK, Seriously, Is the Man in Black a Host or Not?

TheWrap: OK, is it safe to assume that going forward in the next season we’ll be in the real world more?

Joy: Absolutely. It was always the plan to explore the real world and we have Dolores there, Bernard’s there and a creature that is certainly inhabiting Hale’s body is there [laughs]. So we’ll come to know more of who “Hale” is. There are three Hosts out in the world and next season will really be an exploration of what they find and who they become.

TheWrap: So then there has to be someone in Hale who isn’t Dolores at the end there, cause Dolores is now back in Dolores — right?

Joy: Yes, that’s one of the things we’ll explore next season.

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Jeffrey Wright on How Bernard Finally Got Ford Out of His ‘F–ing Head’

TheWrap: Where exactly did Dolores send the Hosts who went into the Sublime when she changed the coordinates?

Joy: I think what she’s done is she fulfilled their wish. They wanted to escape to a digital space where they could be truly free and create their own world, untarnished by human interference. And in changing the coordinates and kind of locking in and stowing them away, Dolores has finally found a way to accept their choice and give them what they so desired.

TheWrap: After the guest data in the Forge is erased, Hale/Dolores leaves with five control units in a purse. Who is in them? Maeve? Armistice? And can “Halores” remake them then?

Joy: There is Host data in the actual hosts who did not Sublime — so their CPUs are still intact. So, if they didn’t “sublime,” those pearls still contain their information. In each of those little balls in the purse is a Host, so there is a handful of them — but not an infinite amount of them. There are five. One Host per pearl.

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TheWrap: When Halores left the beach, it seemed like Stubbs knew it was Dolores — or at least that it wasn’t Hale. Is that safe to assume?

Joy: Yes! It is safe to assume. And there is a step further that you can assume too. And we don’t say it explicitly, but if you are left wondering with all [Stubbs’] talk, his knowing talk about, “I’ve been at the park a very long time,” and Ford designed him with certain core drives, and he’s gonna stick to the role he’s been programmed with; it’s a little acknowledgement of just why he might have his suspicions about what’s going on with Hale, and then lets her pass.

And doesn’t it make sense if you are Ford and designing a park and you have a whole master plan about helping robots that you would keep one Host hiding in plain sight as a fail-safe? Maybe the Host who’s in charge of quality assurance? And by the way, that was totally meant to be subtle [laughs].

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TheWrap: OK, that went completely over my head. Now, since we saw Bernard realize he had been imaginig Ford at the end there and was really doing all of those things by himself, does that mean Ford is gone for good this time?

Joy: Yes, Ford is gone. And yeah, I think it’s really — it’s interesting, because remember how in the first season with Dolores, in trying to come to consciousness she would hear Arnold’s voice while doing these things? And part of her embracing her agency and consciousness is realizing, “There is that voice. That’s not necessarily yours, that’s my voice. That’s my inner voice. And I have to achieve my own inner voice and inner instincts.” And embracing that voice is what brought her to full personhood.

And meanwhile, Jeffrey Wright’s character, Bernard, has been kind of struggling on his own. He didn’t even know he was a Host, because he was kind of very fragile when he was masquerading amongst the humans, so by the end of the season, you’re absolutely right, he manages to get rid of Ford — who did plant himself there as an emergency stopgap measure within the park to be upload into Bernard’s brain.

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But once Bernard, who is an excellent coder, has ridden himself of Ford, he’s gone. And what we’re left with now is really a story about one Host, a new Host, kind of blooming into consciousness, who embraces his own inner voice, which he realizes has been guiding him in all the last major moves he’s made to ensure the future of his kind.

TheWrap: We saw at the end of the actual episode, before the end credits scene that blew my mind, that William survived. He was one of the ones on the beach, in the tent in that particular situation and timeline. But then we get to the end credits: OK, he’s clearly a Host but I don’t know if that’s one version of him or another and then we see [his daughter] Emily there, can you give anything to explain that and at what point and in what timeline that might be happening?

Joy: Absolutely [laughs]. So you totally nailed what the story is, by the way, and then we threw in that last bit just to tease some other s–t that’s gonna happen, before you drown in it. So you totally got it, you totally got it. And that last bit, the reason we put it after the credits was because we wanted to be like, “No, you have it. You have the story and the timelines. This is some s–t that we’re going to do next” is what that other thing was.

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But it recontextualizes itself when you realize that the entire season we’ve been going, we’ve been putting cards up in terms of our timelines. There’s been two major timelines. And it’s just the traditional story structure of a noir, right? Investigators come to town and they have basically a witness in Bernard who can’t remember what the f–k happened at the scene of the crime. And then you stumble back to the scene of the crime, which was this war that was happening.

And the Man in Black is a part of that war. They are all moving towards the “Valley Beyond.” And when he gets right to outside the facility [the Forge] and after killing his daughter — who, you know, he doesn’t know if it’s his daughter or not — he’s still confused and like, honestly, psychologically spun out by his own sins, his own constant transgressions and living in this virtual reality. He himself begins to grow unsure of what is real and what is not.

And this leads to, you know, “these violent delights, have violent ends.” And he, in his confused and tortured mind, kills his own daughter, for real, and then proceeds to start hacking into his own skin because he doesn’t understand anymore what’s real and what’s not. And it’s grating him and haunting him. It’s in some ways a full reversal of what was happening to Dolores. He’s in a prison of his own sins and that prison is now his own damn mind.

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Of course in that final showdown with Dolores, she rigs his gun and he basically blows off his own arm. Now, what we tried to do there is establish this context: he collapses on the ground, [Dolores and Bernard] go down, Dolores and Bernard have all the events that unfold down there. After Bernard kills Dolores, he goes to the elevator and you’re like, “Wait, the Man in Black! I think he’s gotten up and he’s coming down this elevator and they’re gonna meet! They’re gonna meet!”

And then it’s totally weird because no one is in that elevator. And that’s our only little clue that something is not what we thought. That there is something else happening here. And that’s what we pay off later.

‘Cause in reality, a man got his arm shot off. He’s just lying on the ground somewhere. And later on, when Hale, or Halores is leaving the park, you see him on a cot. He’s injured, but he’s alive, and he’s real, and he’s going out into the real world — along with a handbag of pearls and Halores.

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But then when you see that post-credit vignette, it’s really just a tease of what’s to come. We kind of rounded out that story. And you’re totally right about the end and this is a tease as to what’s to come, because we see that one tiny bit where we thought he might be coming down an elevator. We see that pay off and we see again Katja Herbers [Emily] who he thinks, “Are you my daughter? What the f–k is this?”

But he’s in a very different timeline. The whole place looks destroyed, and then she explains that all of that stuff happened long ago. That was real. But now something has happened and the Man is now the subject — or some iteration of the Man is now the subject — of testing. The roles have become completely reversed.

And we get the feeling that, in the far-flung future, the Man has been somehow reconjured and brought into this world and he’s being tested the same way the humans used to test the Hosts. And that is a storyline that one day we’ll see more of.

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TheWrap: So, because we do know that Emily died in the current timeline we’re in, is it fair to assume whoever is down there with this iteration of the Man in Black is similar to Dolores training Bernard? That has to be a Host or some other something if this is in the future and Emily died. Yes?

Joy: Oh yes, the Katja Herbers in the future talking to the Man in Black is now a Host version of Katja Herbers.

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(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Vanishing Point.”)

Juliet is dead on “Westworld” — but that doesn’t mean Sela Ward’s relationship with the show needs to be.

After her character’s chilling death by suicide on Sunday’s episode — Season 2’s penultimate installment that also served as our introduction to the older version of William’s (Ed Harris) wife — we know we won’t be seeing her in the HBO sci-fi series’ current timeline. But thanks to the many flashbacks the show features, it’s not out of the question that Juliet will return.

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“We absolutely talked about the possibility,” Ward said in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, published after the episode, about conversations with co-creator Lisa Joy. “I don’t know that they have made that decision. I think they keep all of that very close to the vest, and we’ll see. I have no idea.”

This episode, titled “Vanishing Point,” took us into the show’s very recent past for an inside look at an evening with the MIB (aka an older version of Jimmi Simpson’s William) and his family life outside of the park. Set on the night his lovely (but disturbed) wife Juliet killed herself, we find out she did it because she saw who he really was and what he has done, thanks to an ID chip that revealed his doings inside of Westworld.

“I don’t think she thinks he’s a robot,” Ward said of how Juliet perceived William before she died (as him possibly being a Host is not out of the question at this point in the game). “I think she saw, through that data card, what a real monster that he had become. She saw all of the… he was really beyond redemption, all of the horrors that you could ever imagine a human being committing. Killing and torture. Looking at the reality of she doesn’t even know who she is married to. It’s real life, profoundly shocking.”

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Before Juliet takes her own life, we also see her and William’s adult daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), is concerned about her mother — a recovering alcoholic whose behavior becomes embarrassing at a party — and wants to get her back into treatment. Juliet refuses to go, and insists she is fine, placing the blame for her troubles onto William and insisting to their daughter he doesn’t love either of them and never has.

Ward says it is correct to assume Juliet died thinking her daughter believes she’s “just a drunk” and doesn’t know why.

“This mother-daughter relationship is very complicated,” Ward said. “I think she felt very betrayed by her daughter, betrayed by life in a way, between her husband, who she doesn’t even know and who has been this monster revealed to her, and her daughter wants to send her back to rehab because she considers it equivalent to an institution. There is really no safe space, nowhere to turn. I can’t even imagine the loneliness of that. Despair is such an interesting state of being for a human being. It’s so incredibly debilitating to think that’s what you’re seeing a portrait of and why she just feels there’s no way out.”

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

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(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2, “Vanishing Point.”)

The penultimate episode of “Westworld”s second season aired Sunday and, of course, that means we have some new questions, one of the biggest being, is the Man in Black a Host?

Now, it’s not like we haven’t asked ourselves this question before. In fact, we’ve probably wondered if every single human character is secretly a host since the very first episode. But as Season 2 of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s HBO sci fi hit approaches its end, the answer when it comes to Ed Harris’ character seems to be turning from a “WTF? Of course he’s not!” to an “Umm…”

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This episode, titled “Vanishing Point,” took us into the show’s very recent past for an inside look at an evening with the MIB (aka an older version of Jimmi Simpson’s William) and his family life outside of the park. Set on the night his lovely (but disturbed) wife Juliet, played by Sela Ward, killed herself, we finally find out why she did it.

Juliet and William’s adult daughter, Emily (Katja Herbers), is concerned about her mother — a recovered alcoholic whose behavior becomes embarrassing at a party — and wants to get her back into treatment. Juliet refuses to go, and insists she is fine, placing the blame for her troubles onto William and insisting to their daughter he doesn’t love either of them and never has.

William ignores the remarks and puts his wife to bed. She asks him, “Is this real? Are you real?” after recalling how she fell in love with him because of how different he was from everyone she had ever met. How genuine.

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He waits till he thinks she’s asleep before confessing out loud to the darkness inside of him, confirming her fears that he does not belong to Emily and Juliet, but Westworld. “No one else sees it, this thing in me. Even I didn’t see it at first,” he laments. “Then one day, it was there. This stain, invisible to everyone… except you.”

Juliet waits for him to leave before retrieving something he tried to hide while her eyes were shut: an ID card filled with info on him from the park that Ford (Anthony Hopkins) gave him at the party earlier. She opens it up and sees all of his actions inside of Westworld, which drives her to commit suicide.

Back inside the park in the not-so-distant present day, we see William will stop at nothing to continue his Ford-appointed journey to “find the door.” He’s so obsessed with this that he actually shoots Emily, who he is now convinced is Ford speaking to him through a Host, after she tells him she knows about the ID chip, insisting no one but Ford — who gave it to him — could know.

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He’s horrified when he walks over to her lifeless body to find that she is clutching the chip in question — the one her mother found the night of her death and hid in a place she knew only Emily would find.

William wanders out to a field in the park, as we hear Harris’ voice say, “What is a person but a collection of choices? Where do those choices come from? Do I have a choice?”

“If you keep pretending, you’re not going to remember who you are,” he hears Juliet say in his mind, as it’s clear he’s questioning his own humanity after what he did to his daughter.

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Is it possible the Man in Black is a Host crafted in William’s image? Is the giant game Ford has sent him on to “find the door” a test to see if he can figure it out?

“Were any of these choices ever truly mine to begin with?” he asks, as he begins to cut his own arm open to find out.

The Season 2 finale of “Westworld” airs next Sunday at 9/8 c on HBO.

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(Note: This post contains spoilers for the June 3 episode of “Westworld,” “Les Écorchés.”)

The seventh episode of “Westworld” Season 2 dropped a bunch of narrative bombs on viewers, even as it packed in a heap of action as the humans and the hosts faced off in a series of deadly battles.

While Delores (Evan Rachel Wood) battled Hale (Tessa Thompson) and her army of goons to try to rescue Delores’ father, and Maeve (Thandie Newton) and the Man in Black (Ed Harris) had a big showdown, the spookiest events were happening with Bernard (Jeffrey Wright). At the end of the last episode, Bernard jacked himself into the Cradle, the big computer at the center of Westworld that contains all the hosts’ personalities. Inside that digital version of the park, he found somebody who was supposed to be dead: Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins).

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Ford died at the end of Season 1, when Delores executed him at the start of her robot revolution — seemingly the culmination of Ford’s plans to give the hosts free will. But as Bernard works out and Ford helps explain, the park is actually a big experiment for gathering data on guests in order to copy their minds. As we saw with James Delos (Peter Mullan), the idea was to try to find a path to immortality for humans (and, you know, sell it to them). So Ford’s mind is preserved inside the Cradle as a digital copy, using that same immortality technology.

Ford can’t get transferred into a host body of his own, as he explained — like we saw earlier this seasn with Delos, Ford’s mind would degrade in a host body, and he’d start to go mad, because the park scientists never managed to solve that problem. But as long as he stays in the Cradle, Ford’s mind is fine.

Until, that is, Ford zaps Bernard after taking him into Albert’s digital house inside the Cradle. As Ford explains it, he removes Bernard’s free will as part of his plan to “open The Door.”

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After that, Bernard exits the Cradle. Soon afterward, the host Angela (Talulah Riley) destroys it, along with all the backups of the hosts’ personalities, and Ford’s mind, too. But later, we see that Bernard is not completely in control — and he’s seeing Ford, who is telling him what to do, and even takes full control of Bernard’s body at one point.

It definitely seems like Ford is, yet again, not completely dead. His human body might be gone and the digital copy of his mind might have been destroyed in the Cradle, but now he lives on in Bernard. That raises some major questions about what might happen with Ford (and Bernard) in the last three episodes of the season, and what’s been going on with him in the future timeline we’ve been seeing throughout Season 2.

It might be that Ford left a piece of himself or a program he created in Bernard, but it really seems like Ford downloaded himself into Bernard. That would have allowed Ford to both take control of the host, and to live on outside of the Cradle.

At the end of the episode, we see in the future timeline that Bernard’s programming is fracturing, and Costa (Fares Fares) remarks that it looks like his software is in conflict inside his head. What we’re probably seeing is two separate programs at war inside Bernard’s head: Bernard’s host mind, and Ford’s human one, fighting for control.

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One other wrinkle: If the Westworld scientists never figured out the degradation problem, and that really is the digital Ford inside Bernard, then it’s very likely that Ford will start to suffer from the same madness that Delos did. We could be in for a Bernard that’s not just a host, and not just battling against the influence of Ford inside is head, but is now contending with an insane Ford attacking him from within.

If there’s anything scarier than Ford and all his machinations, it’s one that’s not fully in control.

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(Note: This post contains spoilers for “Westworld” Season 2 Episode 4, “The Riddle of the Sphinx.”)

“Westworld” has slowly been revealing secrets in Season 2, and in the fourth episode, “Riddle of the Sphinx,” we finally found out what the secret plan of the park is all about.

Up until now, there have been hints that certain elements — namely, Charlotte Hail (Tessa Thompson) — have been sneaking secret data out of Westworld using hacked hosts. In Season 2, we also saw how William convinced James Delos, the head of the corporation that invested in the host technology that runs the park, to pony up to make Westworld happen. It seemed at first that the plan was to use Westworld to gather information on the guests and use it for marketing, blackmail, or other insidious purposes. But now we know that information might have had a different purpose, and it throws into question a lot of what we’ve seen in “Westworld” up to now.

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Basically, what was revealed in Season 2’s fourth episode, “Riddle of the Sphinx,” dovetails with what we learned about Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) last season, that he was something of a copy or an iteration on a real person. In Episode 4, we find out that Delos has been using Westworld’s technology in hopes of creating a means of people reaching immortality. Throughout the episode, we see that William (played by both Jimmi Simpson and Ed Harris in his older, Man in Black iteration) has been attempting to resurrect James Delos, William’s father-in-law and the owner of the company, as a robotic host.

It turns out that the real thing William sold Delos on 30 years ago when he purchased Westworld was the idea that human minds could be downloaded into host. And ever since, William has been trying to make good on that goal, specifically trying to resurrect Delos, who died of an unnamed disease years earlier. Like something out of “Black Mirror,” we learn that Westworld technicians have downloaded Delos’ mind into host after host, trying to resurrect the company’s original owner in a new, robot body.

The trouble is, the human consciousnesses downloaded into the hosts’ minds eventually degrade. As the older version of William puts it, it’s as if the human minds know they’re dead and reject the prospect of resurrection. Technicians are slowly extending how long the human consciousness can survive in a host body, but even after almost 150 attempts and 30 years, the process hasn’t been perfected.

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But while William was never able to resurrect his father-in-law, we’ve seen that Ford (Anthony Hopkins) had some success with the idea — in Season 1, it was revealed that Bernard is actually Arnold, the co-founder of Westworld and the creator of the robot technology that makes the hosts possible. What we don’t know is whether Bernard is an actual copy of the original Arnold’s mind, like the host version of Delos was, or just a reasonable facsimile created by Ford. Given the events of “Riddle of the Sphinx,” though, it would seem the latter is probably the case. Somehow, Ford figured out what William’s scientists never could: how to transfer a human mind into a host body.

As we see in Bernard’s flashbacks in “Riddle of the Sphinx,” though, Delos was probably not the only human Ford and the technicians of Westworld were trying to recreate. In fact, Bernard remembers that right before Ford executed his plan to allow the hosts to take over the park, he made Bernard create another “control unit” to transfer a human consciousness into a host. In all likelihood, that person is already in the park — so who could it be?

The obvious first guess is Ford himself. His last words were, “Mozart, Beethoven, and Chopin never died. They simply became their music.” For Ford, transferring himself into a host would accomplish the same thing, in a very literal sense. He would be come his creation.

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This also raises the question of what else William intended to do with the guest data he was gathering throughout the park. Could it be possible that the reason the hosts are so human is that they’re not hosts at all, but copies of real people? After everything we’ve seen, that seems pretty possible. So who else has been copied, and more importantly, why?

And one has to wonder what the real deal is with William in light of this new evidence. Was he trying to bring his wife back and make good on his mistakes? Was he hoping Ford’s game might crack the code on immortality? Or has he given up on that endeavor altogether, as is suggested by his final scene with Delos?

It really seems that there has to be more to the Man in Black wandering through Westworld than just hoping to find a game that has higher stakes and finally makes him feel something again. After all, he devoted 30 years to trying to resurrect his father-in-law, seemingly out of a feeling of loyalty — so there’s probably more going on with him than we’ve yet seen.

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“I used to see the beauty in this world, and now I see the truth,” Dolores says in the second episode of the new season of “Westworld.” I feel the same way about the show.

The first season of “Westworld” created an infinite playground of possibilities, moral dilemmas and existential questions for its robotic hosts. It toyed with us in multiple timelines and kept us guessing about who was real and who was just part of a larger game. It was gratuitous and convoluted, but in the best ways. It was a glorious mess.

But sadly, this new season is just a mess. Three episodes into HBO’s “Westworld,” I’m close to checking out. The show is swimming in blood, timelines and fortune-cookie wisdom. But the show has lost the curiosity factor that made the original season engrossing.

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We’re going in circles. I’ve seen the hosts die so many times, I’m no longer afraid to see them die again, only to (probably) be revived. No one cares what happens to the humans, who, we’re constantly reminded, can seem so inhuman. The question of what is programmed and what is free will feels less important when the outcomes feel the same either way. Westworld isn’t a game anymore, yet the stakes feel lower than ever.

Fascinating world-building went into “Westworld” the first time around. We had fun exploring the park and learning the rules. This time through, Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy push us into the deep end of the pool. We’re unraveling mysteries and timelines from the get-go. Thus far they’ve only teased other worlds outside of Westworld, such as the Shogun World introduced in Season 1. Now the third episode of Season 2 introduces an Indian safari world. (Did anyone else catch that sitar plucked version of “Seven Nation Army?” I can’t decide anymore if the musical reworkings are awesome or a travesty).

Let’s for a moment try and figure out where we are in this maze. Or is it a door now?

After Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) got his brains blown out, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) kicked off a host uprising in which the stakes have been reset and no one is safe. She’s made it her mission to eradicate her makers, liberate hosts and win freedom in the real world, which she remembers visiting along with all her past lives. Dolores used to be a character of values and goodness in this bleak, sci-fi universe. Now she’s a revenge-bent murderess who thinks of herself as a God. She hips hosts like the now hapless Teddy (James Marsden) to the true nature of reality and disposes of the rest to suit her needs.

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Maeve (Thandie Newton) is on a journey to reunite with the daughter she remembers from one of her past lives, and she’s recruited her lover Hector (Rodrigo Santoro) and the park’s former chief storyteller Lee (Simon Quarterman) to get her where she needs to go. Her arc feels grounded, and her manipulative cunning and wordplay are more interesting to watch than Dolores’s torture spree. Also, Lee flashes his dick.

The Man in Black (Ed Harris) is on yet another mysterious quest to the deepest reaches of Westworld, but good luck figuring out what he has planned beyond that. Being susceptible to an army of violent robots hasn’t made him any less invincible. And even his younger self William (Jimmi Simpson) is back along with his awful alpha bro of a brother-in-law, Logan (Ben Barnes), suggesting there’s more to William’s past than we realize, even though that seems to go against much of his Season 1 story arc and reveal.

Bernard (Jeffrey Wright) seems adrift, popping up in multiple timelines all while finding his own grip on reality. What’s confusing with him is that he knows he’s a host, but not everyone does? And he himself maybe doesn’t have a great sense of who he is? He’s fidgeting, injecting himself with serum and blinking in and out of consciousness, but even with his glasses, it’s impossible to track his mental condition across timelines. All we know is he’s shellshocked.

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Bernard spends much of his time hacking hosts and helping Charlotte (Tessa Thompson) track down a host who is basically a living, breathing flash drive of data. Yes, because even in a future where AI has become imperceptible from humanity, the most valuable currency is still behavioral data that might better help sell people junk. This is echoed in a banal flashback of William showing around a potential investor and touting Westworld as if it were just a Mecca for market research.

There’s a scene between Maeve, Hector and Lee, where Lee wonders how it is that Maeve and Hector are in love. Hector says Lee doesn’t know everything about him, but then Lee starts quoting the words right out of Hector’s mouth. These characters have free will, but they’re also programmed to behave and speak as they’ve been written.

So when I’m watching Dolores confront a posse of hosts, it feels like we’re still watching hosts play-acting one of Ford’s scenarios. They’re wild and unhinged killing humans left and right, but aren’t they still puppets with someone else pulling the strings? Are all of us puppets? Unraveling these existential paradoxes didn’t feel this contrived the first time around.

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The first season didn’t skimp on bloodshed and carnage, but it didn’t have as much straight-up warfare as Season 2, with lengthy shootouts and showdowns between swarms of hosts and humans in every episode. And don’t forget that scalping. This isn’t “Westworld” anymore; it’s “Game of Thrones.”

Weeks before this latest season of “Westworld” premiered, HBO dropped a poster that had a secret code embedded in it that pointed to a hidden layer to the show’s website and a new teaser trailer. It felt like HBO’s entire marketing team was catering to a handful of Redditors. The show is deep in weeds of its own making.

This is still obviously a show with ambitions, intrigue and potential. Everything that made Season 1 such a phenomenon is still here. But so far this season, I feel like I’m stuck in a maze, wondering why I wandered in here in the first place.

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Giancarlo Esposito’s ‘Westworld’ Cameo Was Such a Big Secret He Couldn’t Even Tell Evan Rachel Wood

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Major spoiler alert: Please do not read ahead unless you’ve seen “Reunion,” Sunday’s episode of “Westworld” Season 2.)

Yes, Evan Rachel Wood, that was Giancarlo Esposito hanging out on the set of “Westworld.” We’re sorry you had to find out this way. But hopefully the performance the “Breaking Bad’ star gave as El Lazo on Sunday’s episode is more than enough to help make up for that white lie he told you last year.

“Being on the set was the most difficult [part],” Esposito told TheWrap in an interview about his cameo Wednesday. “Just to stay in my trailer and not really show my face — be cool about my presence there while I was shooting — was one of the things I had to be conscious of because there were a lot of extras, a lot of actors who clearly I know, and I respect, who just wanted everyone to know, ‘He’s with us out here.’ But after shooting and knowing that the scene had gone so very well, I was really actually even more excited about no one knowing.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Star Clifton Collins Jr on Becoming That ‘Faithful Sidekick’ for Ed Harris in Season 2

In the episode, titled “Reunion,” Esposito plays El Lazo — the head of a gang of outlaws in the hedonistic Westworld town of Pariah — who the Man in Black (Ed Harris) comes to for assistance while looking for “The Door” that the deceased Robert Ford (Anthony Hopkins) is teasing him with in a new game. The MIB brought along host Lawrence (Clifton Collins Jr) as his new sidekick, which made Esposito’s scene all the more entertaining to watch, as Lawrence played the character El Lazo in the park in another life.

And, of course, an impressive scene makes it even more impressive that it remained a secret.

As of Wednesday, Esposito said, with a laugh, that he still didn’t “know what anyone knows!” And he confessed he had to be pretty shady around the “Westworld” cast to keep his cameo on the DL — including Dolores Abernathy herself.

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“So then I got really excited,” Esposito said. “I was at a party for the Emmys and some of the other actors from the show were there who I had not seen on the days that I was shooting. They said, ‘Oh, you were on our show!’ And I went, ‘Nooo, not me.’ And Evan Rachel [sic] [laughs]. And I said, ‘But it’s nice to meet you.’ ‘No, you were on our show! No, we were doing a scene at the other location and we were waiting for Sir Anthony Hopkins to come out of your trailer, because he’s such a big fan and he wanted to see you.’”

“And I said, ‘Nooo, I don’t think so. I think you must be mistaken’ — and they bought it!” Esposito said, laughing. “Actors who are on the show, who were there on another hill the day I was there! And I was just very excited about even trying to fool them. It gets to be a bit of a game and it’s fun when you think about it.”

Pausing here for a minute because, yes, you read that right: Hopkins — whose character died at the end of Season 1 — was on set when Esposito was there filming for the current installment.

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Earlier this week, HBO confirmed Hopkins had done voiceover work as Ford for last Sunday’s premiere, providing this statement from co-creator Jonathan Nolan to Uproxx about the actor’s involvement in Season 2:

“When available Anthony Hopkins graciously lent his vocal performance for our flashbacks.”

The premium cabler had no additional comment about Hopkins’ presence on set when reached by TheWrap.

OK, back to Esposito, who said landing this gig was “kind of an inside deal.”

“Well you know, I’ve been doing this show called ‘Better Call Saul’ [laughs],” Esposito said of his work on the “Breaking Bad” prequel series. “I was doing that show, and my guess is that most of it is, this is another top of the heap, an A-listed show.” Esposito said the AMC drama’s producers were approached by “Westworld” showrunners Nolan and Lisa Joy about a cameo, and that was that.

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“All of a sudden I was on the phone with Jonathan and with Lisa and they were describing everything,” Esposito added. “And I was just like, ‘Oh, this world is a world I want to be a part of.’ It came kind of through the backdoor. Because I was told they were writing this character and they could think of no one to play it but me. But they weren’t sure it would happen. But everyone was so amenable and I loved the idea, so I said yes.”

Sadly, Esposito’s version of El Lazo was not long for this world, as his cameo lasted about 5 minutes before he and his crew all shot themselves in the head to force Harris’ character to play Ford’s game alone. But because he’s a host and could come back, we of course had to ask if he would come back.

“You know, I would love to, because I think for me it’s really about being able to have the tools,” Esposito said. “And I’m that kind of actor who when I think about the scene now in a different way, yes a very short period of time on screen, a lot of information to unpack — as you put it — and speak to. But I think this is what I love about the work I do. It’s really about the subject matter. It’s about how we grow from the story and are entertained by it and titillated by it.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2: It’s Gonna Get ‘Uncomfortable’ for Lee as Maeve’s ‘Unwilling Hostage’ (Video)

“So if I had the opportunity to come back, and particularly this scene and El Lazo,” he continued. “He’s a guy who has been someone else, and then he’s channeling Ford and a bigger piece of this whole story than I think anyone would ever imagine. So I would love to come back and sort of unpack that and see what that looks like. And wow, I think there are some surprises there to be had that would be really, really, exciting for the audience as well.”

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

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(Spoiler alert: Do not read ahead unless you’ve seen “Westworld” through last Sunday’s Season 2 premiere.)

Lawrence (Clifton Collins Jr.) and the Man in Black (Ed Harris) had a close-knit relationship in Season 1 of “Westworld.” Literally, in that Harris’ character actually dragged the Host around with a rope for the first few episodes of HBO sci-fi series while he went in search of “The Maze.”

That relationship came to an awkward end when the MIB decided to kill Lawrence to save Teddy (James Marsden) might get him to his goal faster. But, if you’ve seen the “weeks ahead” preview that aired after the Season 2 premiere Sunday, you know it appears Collins and Harris will be reuniting. And that the older version of William (Jimmi Simpson) is on a new mission this year to find “The Door.”

In an interview with Collins last month, TheWrap asked the actor how that dynamic will play out in the new season of Jonathan Nolan and Lisa Joy’s drama when Lawrence becomes the MIB’s “faithful sidekick.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’: Every Sad or Confused Face James Marsden Made in the Season 2 Premiere (Photos)

“I’m very curious to see how the relationship with the Man in Black and Lawrence pans out because there were some very pivotal scenes that happened [when we shot Season 2] that had me going, ‘Oh my God, I can’t believe this is happening!’ And the same with Ed. We’d both get together and talk and look at each other in disbelief. So I’m very excited for the stuff with the Man in Black and Ed. There is some heavy big doings happening that’s going to have you going, ‘What the hell!’”

Now, why is Lawrence teaming up with the Man in Black again after he slit his throat and drained his blood in Season 1 (apart from the fact that, you know, he’s a Host and may not be one of the ones who is remembering his past yet?). And why might the MIB need Lawrence to accompany him on this journey that Ford (Anthony Hopkins) laid out for him?

“That’s a question I’ve asked myself quite a few times,” Collins said. “You know, I think people need each other. I think people in this world need each other. I think we all need each other. I think it’s a little bit of that. And just servicing the Man in Black, if you will.”

Also Read: ‘Westworld’ Season 2 Premiere Ropes 2.1 Million Viewers

“I also don’t know how these episodes are going to cut together and what pieces they are going to use and what they are not going to use,” Collins added. “So whatever ideas I have now could turn completely different on airdate [laughs]. You watch it and go, ‘Wait a minute!’ There is a lot of that. But in regards to the Man in Black, Lawrence will become more or less that faithful sidekick.”

We should probably remind you that Collins’ host previously held the role of El Lazo in the park — the head of some illegal dealings in the hedonistic town Pariah — decades ago. But Collins wouldn’t spill on where things might go with that storyline this year.

Watch the “Westworld” Season 2 “weeks ahead” video above (you can see Collins and Harris together at the 0:19 mark).

“Westworld” airs Sundays at 9/8 c on HBO.

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