Denis Villeneuve and Roger Deakins Part Ways for ‘Dune,’ but Greig Fraser Steps In

Greig Fraser, who earned an Oscar nomination for filming “Lion,” will be the DP on Villeneuve’s “Dune.”

One of the most highly anticipated upcoming tentpoles officially has a cinematographer attached: Greig Fraser is set to work with Denis Villeneuve on his ambitious “Dune” remake. The “Arrival” director is planning a two-part movie. Variety’s awards editor Kris Tapley broke the news, and IndieWire has confirmed the hiring with Fraser’s representatives.

The “Dune” news is especially notable since it means Villeneuve is parting ways with longtime collaborator Roger Deakins. Deakins has been a staple of Villeneuve’s American film career, having shot “Prisoners,” “Sicario,” and “Blade Runner 2049.” The cinematographer was Oscar nominated for all his DP efforts on Villeneuve-directed films, and he won the Oscar for Best Cinematography for his work on “2049.”

Stepping in for Deakins to shoot “Dune” is Greig Fraser, himself an Oscar nominee for his work on Garth Davis’ directorial debut “Lion.” Fraser’s additional credits include “Mary Magdalene,” “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,” “Foxcatcher,” and “Zero Dark Thirty,” for which he won the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Cinematography. Fraser’s next release is Adam McKay’s “Vice,” in theaters this Christmas.

Fortunately, Villeneuve has proved in the past he can still thrive without Deakins’ vision behind the camera. The director’s science-ficion drama “Arrival,” starring Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner, was shot by rising DP Bradford Young, whose work extends to Ava DuVernay’s “Selma” and Ron Howard’s “Solo: A Star Wars Story.” Deakins most recently shot the upcoming film adaptation of “The Goldfinch,” directed by “Brooklyn” helmer John Crowley.

Villeneuve’s “Dune” will be the first major film adaptation of Frank Herbert’s iconic 1965 novel since David Lynch tried and failed with his maligned 1984 feature. Villeneuve has cast Timothée Chalamet in the lead role, with production set to start in the beginning of 2019.

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Production Diary Reveals Alternative Title and 9 More Things You Didn’t Know About the Sequel

Producer Cynthia Yorkin kept a running diary during the production of “Blade Runner 2049,” and it’s packed with nuggets of amazing info.

Blade Runner 2049” didn’t set the box office on fire when it was released in October 2017, but the film has earned a devoted following over the last year. Denis Villeneuve’s epic sequel takes place three decades after the events of Ridley Scott’s original and centers around Ryan Gosling’s K, an LAPD blade runner who discovers that a replicant may have given birth to a child.

Read More:  Denis Villeneuve’s Editor Looks Back at That Four-Hour ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cut, Teases How He’s Approaching ‘Dune’

When Villeneuve kicked off production on “2049” in July 2016, producer Cynthia Yorkin began her own side project by deciding to keep a running diary of milestones, setbacks, and overall observations from the set. Collider has exclusively published Yorkin’s production diary, which offers a fascinating in-depth look at the making of “2049” on a month-by-month basis. IndieWire has rounded up some exciting tidbits from Yorkin’s production diary below. Head to Collider to read the diary in its entirety.

An Alternative Title

The film’s official title wasn’t finalized until months into production. Yorkin came up with one title she loved, “Blade Runner: Time to Live,” a play on words that is a call back to Roy Batty’s “time to die” line from the original film. “‘Time to Live’ foreshadows what our film is about,” Yorkin wrote July 28. “The replicants in the first film were never given the chance to live. It’s an homage with many layers, and it’s poetic.” Sony apparently loved the title but ultimately shifted to “Blade Runner 2051” or “Blade Runner 2049.” The film used the latter when it was decided the sequel would be set 30 years after the original.

“Blade Runner”

Warner Bros.

K’s Rooftop Easter Egg

Production designer Dennis Gassner came up with the idea to put a giant “Moebius” sign on K’s apartment rooftop as an homage to graphic artist Jean Moebius Gerraud, whose work greatly inspired Ridley Scott on the original “Blade Runner.” The rooftop setting is used during a romantic encounter between K and Joi, a hologram played by Ana de Armas. “It’s a beautiful scene that perfectly captures a yearning to be more human,” Yorkin wrote August 30. “And the rain makes Joi look more human – it gives her form until she shorts out.”

How the Production Saved $1 Million

Yorkin explained the production was able to shave $1 million off its budget by deciding to build a giant water tank in Budapest and not in Malta. Most of the production was already taking place in Budapest, so building the set there meant not having to pay to transport the 230 crew members to Malta to work on this section of the film. The water tank was built for the climactic fight scene between K and the assassin Luv, played by Sylvia Hoeks. “It’s also really cool to think that such a huge piece of the set will get to stay on in Budapest and be a part of many more films for years to come,” Yorkin noted in July.

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Bros.

Ridley Scott Didn’t Like One of the Film’s Technology

VFX Supervisor John Nelson gave Ridley Scott a special effects demonstration in September 2016. According to Yorkin, “Ridley wanted to know more about the plates, models, and prices, and told us about the challenges he and Douglas Trumbull faced with the smoke level consistency in the first film.” The producer revealed that Scott did not like the ceiling mechanism in K’s apartment that projected Joi and allowed her to walk around the space freely. Scott felt the piece of technology should be more of a remote that uses the internet, something that is used later in the film to make Joi more mobile.

Harrison Ford Spoke Up When He Didn’t Love the Script

The middle of September 2016 was spent filming a scene where Harrison Ford’s Rick Deckard is being transported by Luv. Yorkin revealed that Ford spoke to producers Andrew A. Kosove and Broderick Johnson about some of the writing he felt could be tweaked in the scene. As a result, the team “made the transport conversation simpler so Deckard now says, ‘Where are you taking me?’ and Luv says, ‘Home.'”

The Meaning Behind Deckard’s Frank Sinatra Hologram

“One of my favorite things in Harrison’s penthouse apartment is the Sinatra hologram which sets such a mood for Deckard,” Yorkin wrote September 28. The production was able to license Sinatra’s music from his estate. Yorkin said producer Andrew A. Kosove wanted to get Sinatra into “2049” as an homage to Yorkin’s late husband, Bud Yorkin, who directed Sinatra in his first film, “Come Blow Your Horn.”

“Bud used to tell a story of how Sinatra told him they would work well together as long as Bud understood that they would need to stop filming every day at 5pm for cocktails,” Yorkin wrote. “Bud agreed and the two remained friends for a very long time.”

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Bros.

Production Couldn’t Clash With ‘La La Land’ Press

Yorkin explains throughout her production diary the importance of breaking for Thanksgiving, a priority that was constantly up in the air since shooting kept falling behind schedule. Gosling had to be off set by Thanksgiving because of a commitment in New York City to complete press for “La La Land.” Yorkin said she had hoped Gosling could leave even earlier so he could spend time in Los Angeles with his family before his New York press tour. The production ultimately got Gosling off set by November 22, which allowed him to see his family.

What Scenes Were Shot First

Yorkin wrote on July 25 that production was beginning its third week of filming and that she had seen dailies for some of the scenes already shot. Within the first month, Villeneuve had shot Luv crashing the LAPD office to retrieve the replicant bones and kill office worker Coco (David Dastmalchian), K taking a shower after the opening scenes in which he fights and kills Sapper (Dave Bautista), and K and Joi talking in his apartment following his shower. Two days before principal photography started on July 12, Villeneuve was filming inserts with Robin Wright and Sylvia Hoeks, who the director told Yorkin is one of “the finest actresses he’s ever worked with.”

Wood Harris Was Added to Existing Scenes

Actor Wood Harris appears in a brief role as LAPD officer Nandez. The character appears in a scene at the LAPD office with K, Coco, and Robin Wright’s Joshi, but Yorkin revealed the actor shot his scenes in the film separate from his co-stars. Wood arrived in November 2016 and met with Villeneuve, who explained Wood would be “inserted into existing scenes and will not actually be working with Robin.” Wood “acted and reacted from studying the scene playback on the monitor.” Wood appeared with Gosling on camera on two scenes.

Ford’s Last Day Was Deckard’s Last Shot

Movies don’t always shoot chronologically, but Ford’s last day on set happened to be for the scene that is Deckard’s final appearance in “2049.” Ford wrapped production on Tuesday, November 8 after filming a scene in which Deckard and K walk through the snow toward Dr. Ana Stelline’s lab. “This will be the last scene of movie,” Yorkin wrote. “Just finished Harrison’s last shot as Deckard. It was very emotional, and everyone was crying and clapping for him. I said goodbye to Harrison. He’s so happy with Denis, Ryan, Roger and the entire experience.”

Timothée Chalamet Raves About ‘Dune’ and Denis Villeneuve: ‘If You Do a Big Movie, Make Sure It’s With a Great Director’

Chalamet says his “love is through the roof” for David Lynch’s “Dune” and promises big things to come for Villeneuve’s version.

Timothée Chalamet is an indie film darling thanks to his Oscar-nominated turn in “Call Me by Your Name” and his upcoming role in “Beautiful Boy,” but the 22-year-old actor will be making the leap to big-budget studio fare with Denis Villeneuve’s “Dune” remake. News broke in July that the “Sicario” and “Blade Runner 2049″ director was bringing Chalamet on board to play the lead, Paul Atreides, and now Chalamet is speaking about the project for the first time.

“Denis is one of my favorite filmmakers,” Chalamet told The Playlist. “What’s especially inspiring about Denis films are the size of them. They reach a big audience. These are films meant to play in front of big crowds. And, conversely, he’s also made movies like ‘Incendies’ that are like intimate affairs. So, that would be a dream come true and is going to be a dream come true. And, I’m chomping at the bits for that experience. I can’t wait.”

Chalamet revealed to the Philippine Daily Inquirer that he found out Villeneuve would be tackling “Dune” while he was searching the internet on Google one day. The actor compared Villeneuve tackling “Dune” to Christopher Nolan tackling “The Dark Knight,” which made landing a part in “Dune” a top priority.

“It has always been my dream to do a big movie,” Chalamet told the Inquirer. “And looking at the careers of Leonardo DiCaprio or Joaquin Phoenix, those guys exclusively work with great directors. So I always told myself, if you do a big movie, make sure it’s with a really great director. I met Denis at the Hollywood Film Awards last year. I didn’t want to scare him away with my enthusiasm for the project, so I didn’t even bring it up. I just said, ‘Hi.'”

Chalamet eventually landed a meeting with Villeneuve at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year. The director had a chance to see Chalamet’s performances in “Call Me by Your Name” and “Beautiful Boy” (somebody snuck him a link, Chalamet said) and thought he was great. Chalamet didn’t have to think twice when Villeneuve offered him the role.

“I have read the script and the book and I am so grateful that it’s a big movie and yet, there’s a real arc to this character,” Chalamet said. “My enthusiasm for the David Lynch version is through the roof. And I got an impression that Denis shares my opinion, too. So working on ‘Dune’ is like a dream come true…I don’t think the film version will suffer from green screen-isms or something, like it’s silly or something. It feels like the work is intelligent.”

Anyone who saw “Blade Runner 2049” knows the kind of intelligence Villeneuve can bring to a beloved science-fiction property. Production on “Dune” is set to begin in the first half of 2019. Chalamet recently filmed the Netflix movie “The King” and has “Beautiful Boy” opening in select theaters October 12 via Amazon Studios.

The 4-hour cut of Blade Runner 2049 had much longer “baseline test” scenes

Just about a year ago, Blade Runner 2049 editor Joe Walker revealed that director Denis Villeneuve’s original cut of the film was four hours long and split into two parts, with the first half focusing on Ryan Gosling’s K learning about who he is (or wh…

Just about a year ago, Blade Runner 2049 editor Joe Walker revealed that director Denis Villeneuve’s original cut of the film was four hours long and split into two parts, with the first half focusing on Ryan Gosling’s K learning about who he is (or who he thinks he is) and the second half starting after the high-tech…

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Denis Villeneuve’s Editor Looks Back at That Four-Hour ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cut, Teases How He’s Approaching ‘Dune’

Joe Walker is at the center of two of the best director-editor teams in Hollywood thanks to his work with Denis Villeneuve and Steve McQueen.

Denis Villeneuve piqued the interest of “Blade Runner 2049” fans when he revealed in December that the first cut of his science-fiction sequel was four hours long. The director admitted his four-hour version was “pretty strong,” but he said the 163-minute theatrical version was an overall better movie and less self-indulgant. For editor Joe Walker, a regular collaborator of Villeneuve’s after “Sicario” and “Arrival,” cutting down that four-hour cut proved challenging. Walker recently spoke to Collider about what he left in and took out, and the reasons why for each.

One thing Walker knew he couldn’t touch in the editing room were some of Roger Deakins’ most stunning shots. Walker explained that in conventional films an editor would leave a shot of a character walking into a room on screen for an average of three to four seconds, but taking that approach on “Blade Runner 2049” was impossible given the beauty of Deakins’ work. One shot Walker couldn’t trim was that of Jared Leto’s introduction.

“On ‘Blade Runner,’ I’ve got a world class shot of this amazing caustic light effect following Sylvia Hoeks, who’s amazing to look at, climbing up the steps,” Walker said. “The first person you see in the office is a man in the shadows, a blind man, with artificial sunlight crawling into a huge water set. So, I mean, to make that three to five seconds long is killing a major world class shot.”

Walker wouldn’t dare touch Deakins’ imagery, which is part of the reason the film got released with a still hefty 163 minute runtime (something original “Blade Runner” director Ridley Scott criticized). So what exactly was left on the cutting room floor? Walker said that “experimental things” like scene length were reduced in post-production. Several scenes depicting K (Ryan Gosling) undergoing a baseline test went on for much longer in the four-cut than in the theatrical release.

“In my first assembly I put a lot of [the baseline tests] in because it was really good,” Walker said. “We all knew we would pepper it with a tiny like fraction of it since you probably could have gone out and brewed a cup of tea while that was playing. It was a long first assembly.”

“Blade Runner”

Walker is not sure whether or not Warner Bros. was interested in releasing a two-part film, but he confirmed the first assembly cut was so long that they naturally split it into two halves just to make editing the movie more manageable. Villeneuve and Walker decided to split the film just after K has sex with Mariette (Mackenzie Davis).

“The beginning of part two was her waking up in bed,” Walker said. “It struck us that it drew attention to the fact that [this is a film] unusually in two halves. It starts with an eye opening and the second half starts with an eye opening; it’s a very different K in the first half where he’s coming to terms with his past and him being a real boy in the second half. That was just the way we viewed it.”

Next for Villeneuve in his two-part “Dune” adaptation, which Walker won’t confirm or deny he’s working on. Considering Walker has been Villeneuve’s go-to editor since “Sicario,” all signs point to him editing “Dune,” set to star Timothee Chalamet and Rebecca Ferguson. For now, Walker is taking the anti-approach to the source material.

“I’ve kept away from Dune discussions. I want to be fresh. It’s good for me to come in from the outside a little bit and read the script when they’re ready for it and when it comes my way, and that’s not a certainty. I don’t want to overload it to much with the older film and reading the book. I Just want to see see what his vision is.”

Walker’s next release is “Widows,” his fourth collaboration with Steve McQueen. The movie opens November 16 from 20th Century Fox.

Cate Blanchett Named BAFTA’s Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award Winner for Excellence in Film

Cate Blanchett will receive the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles (BAFTA Los Angeles) this year, the organization announced Thursday.

She joins previously announced honoree Steve McQueen, who will receive the John Schlesinger Britannia Award for Excellence in Directing. This year’s ceremony will take place on Oct. 26 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.

“With an impressive and extensive repertoire of work on screen and stage, Cate’s award-winning talent is unprecedented, earning her international acclaim and numerous accolades,” said BAFTA Los Angeles chairman Kieran Breen. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to celebrate her brilliant work by honoring her with this year’s Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film.”

Also Read: Cate Blanchett Calls for ‘Parity and Transparency’ in Red Carpet Protest of Gender Inequity in Cannes

The Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film is awarded to an individual who is credited with “authorship and ingenuity.” Previous recipients include Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Meryl Streep, Robert Downey Jr. and George Clooney.

Blanchett has had a busy year: This summer she starred in “Ocean’s 8” and will be next seen in “The House with a Clock in Its Walls.” She also served as the Jury President of the 71st Cannes Film Festival, a jury that also included director Ava DuVernay, actress Kristen Stewart and director Denis Villeneuve. She will next star in “Where’d You Go Bernadette” and Netflix’s “Mowgli.”

Also Read: Cate Blanchett Named Cannes Film Festival Jury President

Blanchett’s previous credits include “Blue Jasmine” — for which she won an Oscar — “Thor: Ragnarok,” “The Aviator” — for which she also won an Oscar — “Elizabeth” and “Lord of the Rings.” Her role in “Carol” earned the Best Actress award at the Screen Actors Guild and the Golden Globes.

Blanchett has always previously been awarded the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society through Acting in 2007 and was named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. She has also received a Hollywood Walk of Fame star.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 1: ‘Everybody Knows’ Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Review: Cate Blanchett’s Campy Villainess Steals the Thunder

Cate Blanchett will receive the Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Los Angeles (BAFTA Los Angeles) this year, the organization announced Thursday.

She joins previously announced honoree Steve McQueen, who will receive the John Schlesinger Britannia Award for Excellence in Directing. This year’s ceremony will take place on Oct. 26 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.

“With an impressive and extensive repertoire of work on screen and stage, Cate’s award-winning talent is unprecedented, earning her international acclaim and numerous accolades,” said BAFTA Los Angeles chairman Kieran Breen. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to celebrate her brilliant work by honoring her with this year’s Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film.”

The Stanley Kubrick Britannia Award for Excellence in Film is awarded to an individual who is credited with “authorship and ingenuity.” Previous recipients include Matt Damon, Jodie Foster, Meryl Streep, Robert Downey Jr. and George Clooney.

Blanchett has had a busy year: This summer she starred in “Ocean’s 8” and will be next seen in “The House with a Clock in Its Walls.” She also served as the Jury President of the 71st Cannes Film Festival, a jury that also included director Ava DuVernay, actress Kristen Stewart and director Denis Villeneuve. She will next star in “Where’d You Go Bernadette” and Netflix’s “Mowgli.”

Blanchett’s previous credits include “Blue Jasmine” — for which she won an Oscar — “Thor: Ragnarok,” “The Aviator” — for which she also won an Oscar — “Elizabeth” and “Lord of the Rings.” Her role in “Carol” earned the Best Actress award at the Screen Actors Guild and the Golden Globes.

Blanchett has always previously been awarded the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society through Acting in 2007 and was named one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People. She has also received a Hollywood Walk of Fame star.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Report, Day 1: 'Everybody Knows' Premieres, Cate Blanchett Shines on the Croisette

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

'Thor: Ragnarok' Review: Cate Blanchett's Campy Villainess Steals the Thunder

Rebecca Ferguson In Talks To Join Denis Villeneuve’s ‘Dune’

Rebecca Ferguson is in negotiations to join the Denis Villeneuve-directed adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune, Deadline has confirmed.
The Mission: Impossible – Fallout star will join, as Deadline exclusively reported, Academy Award-nominate…

Rebecca Ferguson is in negotiations to join the Denis Villeneuve-directed adaptation of Frank Herbert’s Dune, Deadline has confirmed. The Mission: Impossible – Fallout star will join, as Deadline exclusively reported, Academy Award-nominated Timothee Chalamet, who will play Paul Atreides the hero (or anti-hero, depending on how you view him) of the epic novels by Herbert. Ferguson will play Atreides' mother, Lady Jessica. Legendary acquired film and TV rights to the…

Denis Villeneuve’s Dune will only cover half of the first book

Traditionally, there are three ways to translate a book series to the big screen. You can make one movie per book (Harry Potter), you can cram a bunch of books into one movie (The Dark Tower), or you can squeeze multiple movies out of one book (The Hob…

Traditionally, there are three ways to translate a book series to the big screen. You can make one movie per book (Harry Potter), you can cram a bunch of books into one movie (The Dark Tower), or you can squeeze multiple movies out of one book (The Hobbit). The Harry Potter method is usually the most popular, but…

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Timothée Chalamet might spice up Denis Villeneuve’s Dune reboot

According to Deadline, Timothée Chalamet is in “final talks” to star in Denis Villeneuve’s new Dune movie. He’ll reportedly be playing Paul Atreides, the character Kyle MachLachlan played in David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation and the main hero of the story….

According to Deadline, Timothée Chalamet is in “final talks” to star in Denis Villeneuve’s new Dune movie. He’ll reportedly be playing Paul Atreides, the character Kyle MachLachlan played in David Lynch’s 1984 adaptation and the main hero of the story. Like Lynch’s version, Villeneuve’s Dune will be based on the 1965…

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‘Dune’: Timothée Chalamet Eyeing the Lead Role in Denis Villeneuve’s Two-Part Film Adaptation

Chalamet is in talks to take on the same role Kyle MacLachlan played in David Lynch’s infamous 1984 version of Frank Herbert’s novel.

Timothée Chalamet is entering final negotiations to star in the lead role of Denis Villeneuve’s two-part “Dune,” adapted from the iconic novel by Frank Herbert (via Deadline). Villeneuve is directing the project for Legendary and the science-fiction epic will be his next project after “Blade Runner 2049,” which was released last fall to critical acclaim.

Chalamet is set to star as nobleman Paul Atreides, played by Kyle MacLachlan in David Lynch’s infamous 1984 adaptation. The story centers around rival families battling for control of the eponymous desert planet. Chalamet is coming off an Oscar nomination for “Call Me By Your Name,” which made him the youngest best actor nominee in the history of the Academy Awards. The 22-year-old is starring in Amazon’s “Beautiful Boy” this fall and is also eyeing a role in Greta Gerwig’s “Little Women” adaptation.

Villeneuve has cited “Dune” as his passion project on numerous occasions. The filmmaker teased last November that his “Dune” adaptation will follow the books more closely than Lynch’s version did.

“David Lynch did an adaptation in the ’80s that has some very strong qualities,” Villeneuve said. “I mean, David Lynch is one of the best filmmakers alive, I have massive respect for him. But when I saw his adaptation, I was impressed, but it was not what I had dreamed of, so I’m trying to make the adaptation of my dreams. It will not have any link with the David Lynch movie. I’m going back to the book, and going to the images that came out when I read it.”

Chalamet’s “Beautiful Boy” debuts in theaters October 12.

Denis Villeneuve Gives ‘Sicario 2’ a Rave Review: ‘It’s An Impressive’ and ‘Masterful’ Sequel (Exclusive)

The original “Sicario” director tips his hat to sequel helmer Stefano Sollima in his enthusiastic response to the follow-up.

Denis Villeneuve’s lack of involvement in “Sicario: Day of the Soldado” has made fans of the original a bit nervous about what to expect from the follow-up, but the filmmaker is here to assure moviegoers the sequel is a worthy follow-up to his original. The “Sicario” sequel is directed by Stefano Sollima, the Italian director best known for “Suburra” and helming numerous episodes of the series “Gamorrah.”

Villeneuve first reacted to “Sicario: Day of the Soldado” by telling producers, “[The sequel is] a knockout. Sollima did a masterful follow up to ‘Sicario.’ I was blown away!” When asked for further comment by IndieWire, the “Blade Runner 2049″ director had more praise to share about the film.

“Having seen his film, I’m proud to say that Stefano did an impressive, powerful, masterful follow-up,” Villeneuve told IndieWire. “It’s a hell of a good movie!”

“Sicario: Day of the Soldado” centers around Benicio del Toro and Josh Brolin’s Alejandro Gillick and Matt Graver, respectively. The operatives are tasked with kidnapping the daughter of a drug kingpin in an attempt to start a war between rival cartels. Alejenadro is ordered to kill the daughter (Isabela Moner) when the mission goes awry, but the mysterious assassin refuses and goes rogue in order to protect her.

Villeneuve’s original, released in September 2015, earned three Oscar nominations and also starred Emily Blunt. Screenwriter Taylor Sheridan wrote the new film as an anthology follow-up and not a direct sequel, which is why Blunt’s character is not the focus this time around. Villeneuve decided against directing the sequel due to his busy schedule, which included making “Blade Runner 2049” at the time.

“Sicario: Day of the Soldado” opens in theaters June 29.

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart Join Cate Blanchett on 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart, Denis Villeneuve, Chang Chen, Robert Guédiguian, Khadja Nin, Léa Seydoux and Andrey Zvyagintsev have been named members of the 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury.

They will join Cate Blanchett, who was previously named president of the jury at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.

During the era of #MeToo and #TimesUp, the jury is made up of five women and four men, only the third time that women have made up a majority of the jury. All three times have come in the last 10 years.

The jurors are of seven nationalities and from five continents.

Also Read: Cannes Lineup Reaches From Spike Lee to Jean-Luc Godard

Blanchett marks the first female jury president since Jane Campion served in 2014. Other women to take on the role this century include Oscar nominee Isabelle Huppert and Liv Ullmann. It is the 12th time in festival history a woman has headed the jury. Director, screenwriter and actress Jeanne Moreau served twice, with all others putting in one year each.

The Cannes Film Festival will take over the south of France from May 8-19.

See the full bios for the jury members courtesy of the festival organizers below.

Also Read: Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Chang Chen – Chinese actor
Chang Chen made his film debut in the late Edward Yang’s A Brighter Summer Day. He rose to fame in the Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” in 2000. His film credits include “Wong Kar Wai’s Happy Together” (1997), 2046 (2004), “The Grandmaster” (2013), Hou Hsiao-hsien’s “Three Times” (2005) and “The Assassin” (2015), Tian Zhuangzhuang’s “The Go Master” (2006) John Woo’s “Red Cliff” (2008-2009) “The Last Supper” directed by Lu Chuan (2012). In 2017, he returned for Yang Lu’s film Brotherhood of “Blades II” and recently played in “Forever Young” by Fangfang Li.

Ava DuVernay – American writer, director, producer
Nominated for the Academy Award and Golden Globe and winner of the BAFTA and EMMY, Ava DuVernay is a writer, director, producer and film distributor known for the historical drama “Selma” (2014), the criminal justice documentary “13th” (2016) and the recent Disney cinematic adaptation of the classic children’s novel A wrinkle in Time. Winner of the 2012 Sundance Film Festival’s Best Director Prize for her film “Middle of Nowhere,” DuVernay amplifies the work of people of color and women directors through her film collective ARRAY.

Robert Guédiguian – French director, writer, producer
The work of Robert Guédiguian, an activist filmmaker, celebrates the city of Marseille where he grew up. Acclaimed by critics when he first started directing in the 80s, he met public success with Marius and Jeannette, which won the Prix Louis-Delluc in 1997.

His film credits include “Marie-Jo et ses deux amours” (2002) “Le Promeneur du Champ de Mars” (2004) “Le Voyage en Arménie” (2007) “Lady Jane” (2008) “L’armée du crime” (2009) “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (2011). His latest film in date, “The House by the Sea” (2017), received enthusiastic response from critics and audience.

Khadja Nin – Burundian songwriter, composer, singer
Youngest of a family of eight Khadja Nin studied music at an early age, before leaving Africa to go to Europe. Her albums are a mix of occidental popmusic, African and afro-cuban rhythms. She gained wide recognition and success with “Sambolera Mayi Son.” “Ya…” (“From me to you”) is a wonderful tribute to Mandela and the video of her song “Mama” was directed by Jeanne Moreau. International Artist, she became a Unicef and ACP Observatory on Migration Good Will Ambassador. She was awarded the Prize “Prix de l’Action Feminine” by the African Women’s League in 2016. She has been committed to support ordinary heroes.

Léa Seydoux – French actress
Rising to fame with Christophe Honoré’s “The Beautiful Person” in 2008, Léa Seydoux is an award-winning actress, notably the Palme d’Or for Abdelatif Kechiche’s “Blue is the Warmest Colour” in 2013. She successfully alternates between author and mainstream films. Her film credits include Rebecca Zlotowski’s “Dear Prudence” and “Grand Central,” Benoît Jacquot’s “Farewell, My Queen” and “Diary of a Chambermaid,” Bertrand Bonello’s “Saint Laurent,” Sam Mendes’ “Spectre,” Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster” and Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World.”

Kristen Stewart – American actress
Kristen Stewart has been playing roles since an early age and received widespread recognition in 2008 for “The Twilight Saga” film series (2008-12). Her film credit includes “Snow White and the Huntsman” (2012), “Equals” by Drake Doremus (2015) “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ang Lee (2016), and several Festival de Cannes Selections such as “On the Road” by Walter Salles (2012) “Clouds of Sils Maria” (2014) and “Personal Shopper” (2016) both by Olivier Assayas (2014) as well as “Café Society” by Woody Allen. She directed her first short film “Come Swim” in 2017.

Denis Villeneuve – Canadian director, writer
Internationally renowned and recently two-time Academy Award winner for “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve made his debut at the National Film Board of Canada in the early 90’s. His first feature, “Un 32 août sur Terre” (1998) was invited to Cannes. He returned there with “Next Floor” (2008), “Polytechnique” (2009) and the Oscar nominated “Sicario” (2015). In 2010 “Incendies” was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. In 2017, Arrival was nominated for 8 Oscars and 9 BAFTAs, including best movie and best director.

Andreï Zvyagintsev – Russian director, writer
Multi-award winning filmmaker Andreï Zvyagintsev has already become one of the most respected directors in Russian and international cinema. He directed his first feature film in 2003 The Return which won him a “Golden Lion” at the Venice Film Festival. He has continued to write and direct award-winning feature films “The Banishment” (2007), “Elena” (2011) and “Leviathan” (2014). His most recent film “Loveless” won the Jury Prize at the 2017 Festival de Cannes, and was among the nominees at the Golden Globe and 90th Academy Awards.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics’ Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart, Denis Villeneuve, Chang Chen, Robert Guédiguian, Khadja Nin, Léa Seydoux and Andrey Zvyagintsev have been named members of the 2018 Cannes Film Festival Jury.

They will join Cate Blanchett, who was previously named president of the jury at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.

During the era of #MeToo and #TimesUp, the jury is made up of five women and four men, only the third time that women have made up a majority of the jury. All three times have come in the last 10 years.

The jurors are of seven nationalities and from five continents.

Blanchett marks the first female jury president since Jane Campion served in 2014. Other women to take on the role this century include Oscar nominee Isabelle Huppert and Liv Ullmann. It is the 12th time in festival history a woman has headed the jury. Director, screenwriter and actress Jeanne Moreau served twice, with all others putting in one year each.

The Cannes Film Festival will take over the south of France from May 8-19.

See the full bios for the jury members courtesy of the festival organizers below.

Chang Chen – Chinese actor
Chang Chen made his film debut in the late Edward Yang’s A Brighter Summer Day. He rose to fame in the Ang Lee’s “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” in 2000. His film credits include “Wong Kar Wai’s Happy Together” (1997), 2046 (2004), “The Grandmaster” (2013), Hou Hsiao-hsien’s “Three Times” (2005) and “The Assassin” (2015), Tian Zhuangzhuang’s “The Go Master” (2006) John Woo’s “Red Cliff” (2008-2009) “The Last Supper” directed by Lu Chuan (2012). In 2017, he returned for Yang Lu’s film Brotherhood of “Blades II” and recently played in “Forever Young” by Fangfang Li.

Ava DuVernay – American writer, director, producer
Nominated for the Academy Award and Golden Globe and winner of the BAFTA and EMMY, Ava DuVernay is a writer, director, producer and film distributor known for the historical drama “Selma” (2014), the criminal justice documentary “13th” (2016) and the recent Disney cinematic adaptation of the classic children’s novel A wrinkle in Time. Winner of the 2012 Sundance Film Festival’s Best Director Prize for her film “Middle of Nowhere,” DuVernay amplifies the work of people of color and women directors through her film collective ARRAY.

Robert Guédiguian – French director, writer, producer
The work of Robert Guédiguian, an activist filmmaker, celebrates the city of Marseille where he grew up. Acclaimed by critics when he first started directing in the 80s, he met public success with Marius and Jeannette, which won the Prix Louis-Delluc in 1997.

His film credits include “Marie-Jo et ses deux amours” (2002) “Le Promeneur du Champ de Mars” (2004) “Le Voyage en Arménie” (2007) “Lady Jane” (2008) “L’armée du crime” (2009) “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (2011). His latest film in date, “The House by the Sea” (2017), received enthusiastic response from critics and audience.

Khadja Nin – Burundian songwriter, composer, singer
Youngest of a family of eight Khadja Nin studied music at an early age, before leaving Africa to go to Europe. Her albums are a mix of occidental popmusic, African and afro-cuban rhythms. She gained wide recognition and success with “Sambolera Mayi Son.” “Ya…” (“From me to you”) is a wonderful tribute to Mandela and the video of her song “Mama” was directed by Jeanne Moreau. International Artist, she became a Unicef and ACP Observatory on Migration Good Will Ambassador. She was awarded the Prize “Prix de l’Action Feminine” by the African Women’s League in 2016. She has been committed to support ordinary heroes.

Léa Seydoux – French actress
Rising to fame with Christophe Honoré’s “The Beautiful Person” in 2008, Léa Seydoux is an award-winning actress, notably the Palme d’Or for Abdelatif Kechiche’s “Blue is the Warmest Colour” in 2013. She successfully alternates between author and mainstream films. Her film credits include Rebecca Zlotowski’s “Dear Prudence” and “Grand Central,” Benoît Jacquot’s “Farewell, My Queen” and “Diary of a Chambermaid,” Bertrand Bonello’s “Saint Laurent,” Sam Mendes’ “Spectre,” Yorgos Lanthimos’ “The Lobster” and Xavier Dolan’s “It’s Only the End of the World.”

Kristen Stewart – American actress
Kristen Stewart has been playing roles since an early age and received widespread recognition in 2008 for “The Twilight Saga” film series (2008-12). Her film credit includes “Snow White and the Huntsman” (2012), “Equals” by Drake Doremus (2015) “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ang Lee (2016), and several Festival de Cannes Selections such as “On the Road” by Walter Salles (2012) “Clouds of Sils Maria” (2014) and “Personal Shopper” (2016) both by Olivier Assayas (2014) as well as “Café Society” by Woody Allen. She directed her first short film “Come Swim” in 2017.

Denis Villeneuve – Canadian director, writer
Internationally renowned and recently two-time Academy Award winner for “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve made his debut at the National Film Board of Canada in the early 90’s. His first feature, “Un 32 août sur Terre” (1998) was invited to Cannes. He returned there with “Next Floor” (2008), “Polytechnique” (2009) and the Oscar nominated “Sicario” (2015). In 2010 “Incendies” was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. In 2017, Arrival was nominated for 8 Oscars and 9 BAFTAs, including best movie and best director.

Andreï Zvyagintsev – Russian director, writer
Multi-award winning filmmaker Andreï Zvyagintsev has already become one of the most respected directors in Russian and international cinema. He directed his first feature film in 2003 The Return which won him a “Golden Lion” at the Venice Film Festival. He has continued to write and direct award-winning feature films “The Banishment” (2007), “Elena” (2011) and “Leviathan” (2014). His most recent film “Loveless” won the Jury Prize at the 2017 Festival de Cannes, and was among the nominees at the Golden Globe and 90th Academy Awards.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Cannes Will Welcome Back Lars von Trier, Says Festival Director

Majority of Cannes Critics' Week Competition Films Were Directed by Women

Cannes Sets Ava DuVernay, Kristen Stewart For Competition Jury Under Cate Blanchett

The Cannes Film Festival has set its competition jury under president Oscar-winning actress Cate Blanchett. The festival chose five women and four men, covering seven nationalities and five continents. They will spend plenty of time in dark rooms on the Croisette before revealing the winners Saturday, May 19 during the Closing Ceremony.
The jury for this year’s fest under Blanchett includes Chang Chen (Chinese actor), Ava DuVernay (American writer, director, producer), Rob…

The Cannes Film Festival has set its competition jury under president Oscar-winning actress Cate Blanchett. The festival chose five women and four men, covering seven nationalities and five continents. They will spend plenty of time in dark rooms on the Croisette before revealing the winners Saturday, May 19 during the Closing Ceremony. The jury for this year’s fest under Blanchett includes Chang Chen (Chinese actor), Ava DuVernay (American writer, director, producer), Rob…

Denis Villeneuve says he’s now making two Dune movies, actually

Suggesting the sort of potential bloat that inevitably leads to people floating around a ballroom, ripping out people’s heart plugs and screaming about “he who controls the spice,” director Denis Villeneuve has announced that his upcoming Dune movie is expanding into at least a second film. Speaking in front of a crowd

Read more…

Suggesting the sort of potential bloat that inevitably leads to people floating around a ballroom, ripping out people’s heart plugs and screaming about “he who controls the spice,” director Denis Villeneuve has announced that his upcoming Dune movie is expanding into at least a second film. Speaking in front of a crowd

Read more...

Denis Villeneuve Is Planning At Least Two ‘Dune’ Films, If Not More: ‘It Will Probably Take Two Years to Make’

Villeneuve is moving on from “Blade Runner 2049” and gearing up for what sounds like a massive adaptation of “Dune.”

With “Blade Runner 2049” behind him, Denis Villeneuve is gearing up for “Dune” and he isn’t hiding the fact he has some big plans in store for his adaptation of Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel. The director appeared at the Rendez-Vous du Cinema Quebecois this week (via The Playlist) where he revealed to the audience that “Dune” is going to be more than just a one-off tentpole.

“’Dune’ will probably take two years to make,” Villeneuve said. “The goal is to make two films, maybe more.”

The franchise plans are all Villeneuve is willing to tease right now, but multiple films sounds fitting considering Herbert’s novel is over 400 pages and incredibly dense. David Lynch’s infamous 1984 adaptation struggled to tell the entire story in just over two hours. As The Playlist notes, there’s a significant time jump in the middle of “Dune,” which would more or less be the ideal place to split the film adaptation into two parts. Warner Bros. did something similar with their “It” movie adaptation.

Villeneuve flirted with a similar plan on “Blade Runner 2049” when the assembly cut came in over the four-hour mark. Instead of releasing “2049” in two parts, Villeneuve and Warner Bros. decided to cut down the film into a single theatrical release. The director has referred to “Dune” as the movie he’s been wanting to make since he was a child. He previously warned that his take would greatly differ from Lynch’s version.

“David Lynch did an adaptation in the ’80s that has some very strong qualities. I mean, David Lynch is one of the best filmmakers alive, I have massive respect for him,” Villeneuve said in November 2016. “But when I saw his adaptation, I was impressed, but it was not what I had dreamed of, so I’m trying to make the adaptation of my dreams. It will not have any link with the David Lynch movie. I’m going back to the book, and going to the images that came out when I read it.”

No casting or release info has been set for “Dune.” The film will keep Villeneuve in the science-fiction drama after “Arrival” and “2049.”

Oscars: Roger Deakins Finally Wins, Snapping the Longest-Ever Losing Streak

Roger Deakins might be the greatest living cinematographer, and he’s finally – finally! – getting the credit he deserves. Deakins won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, snapping the longest losing streak in Oscar history.

Deakins’s nomination for “Blade Runner 2049” marked his 14th nomination dating back to 1995, but this is his first win.

“I really love my job. I’ve been doing it a long time as you can see,” Deakins said upon winning his Oscar. “It’s for us, because it was a team, a real team effort.”

Deakins has been nominated for his work with the Coen Brothers, Sam Mendes and his director on “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve. Some of his notable, yet Oscar-losing work, included other Best Picture nominees “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and “No Country for Old Men,” which went on to win Best Picture. This win follows Deakins earning top honors from the American Society of Cinematographers.

Also Read: Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

In speaking with TheWrap for the Down to the Wire Oscars magazine, Deakins didn’t think he was overdue for the award. “Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years,” he said.

“Blade Runner 2049” is the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic, shot by Jordan Cronenweth, who never won an Oscar either. The special effects heavy “Blade Runner 2049” is dazzling, but Deakins told TheWrap you’d be surprised how much was actually captured in-camera without the aid of CGI.

“I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is,” Deakins said.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

‘Sicario’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

Roger Deakins, Janusz Kaminski Nominated by American Society of Cinematographers, Again

Roger Deakins might be the greatest living cinematographer, and he’s finally – finally! – getting the credit he deserves. Deakins won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, snapping the longest losing streak in Oscar history.

Deakins’s nomination for “Blade Runner 2049” marked his 14th nomination dating back to 1995, but this is his first win.

“I really love my job. I’ve been doing it a long time as you can see,” Deakins said upon winning his Oscar. “It’s for us, because it was a team, a real team effort.”

Deakins has been nominated for his work with the Coen Brothers, Sam Mendes and his director on “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve. Some of his notable, yet Oscar-losing work, included other Best Picture nominees “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and “No Country for Old Men,” which went on to win Best Picture. This win follows Deakins earning top honors from the American Society of Cinematographers.

In speaking with TheWrap for the Down to the Wire Oscars magazine, Deakins didn’t think he was overdue for the award. “Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years,” he said.

“Blade Runner 2049” is the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic, shot by Jordan Cronenweth, who never won an Oscar either. The special effects heavy “Blade Runner 2049” is dazzling, but Deakins told TheWrap you’d be surprised how much was actually captured in-camera without the aid of CGI.

“I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is,” Deakins said.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Deakins Doesn't Think He's Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

'Sicario' Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

Roger Deakins, Janusz Kaminski Nominated by American Society of Cinematographers, Again

How ‘Blade Runner 2049’ VFX Supervisor John Nelson Brought Rachael & Pic’s Holograms To Life

A self-described science-fiction fan, visual effects supervisor John Nelson saw a “dream gig” and rare opportunity in Denis Villeneuve‘s Blade Runner 2049. Getting the chance to work on a sequel to a revered sci-fi film—one of the pillars of the genre—Nelson would construct surreal cityscape shots out of real aerial footage shot across the globe, while exploring holograms in all their various visual representations.
Specifically, in 2049, Nelson would create holograms of…

A self-described science-fiction fan, visual effects supervisor John Nelson saw a "dream gig" and rare opportunity in Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049. Getting the chance to work on a sequel to a revered sci-fi film—one of the pillars of the genre—Nelson would construct surreal cityscape shots out of real aerial footage shot across the globe, while exploring holograms in all their various visual representations. Specifically, in 2049, Nelson would create holograms of…

Production Designer Dennis Gassner Gets His “All-In,” ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Moment With ‘Blade Runner 2049’

An Oscar nominee for Blade Runner 2049—a sequel to Ridley Scott’s ’80s sci-fi classic—production designer Dennis Gassner saw challenges everywhere when he first signed on to the project.
“It was going to be particularly demanding in lots of ways. You think about trying to remake a film 35 years later. What is that going to be like?” the designer reflects. “We shot it in Budapest, Hungary, and that was a challenge in itself.”
A steward of design for the last several Bond

An Oscar nominee for Blade Runner 2049—a sequel to Ridley Scott's '80s sci-fi classic—production designer Dennis Gassner saw challenges everywhere when he first signed on to the project. "It was going to be particularly demanding in lots of ways. You think about trying to remake a film 35 years later. What is that going to be like?" the designer reflects. "We shot it in Budapest, Hungary, and that was a challenge in itself." A steward of design for the last several Bond

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Made Light “Feel Alive” With Computer-Controlled Rigs

Teaming with Denis Villeneuve on Blade Runner 2049—a well-received sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic—cinematographer Roger Deakins took on what the director has called “the most expensive art house movie in cinema history,” seamlessly recreating the aesthetic of the original film while building out its world. Back in the running at the Oscars this year with his 14th nomination—and looking for his first win—Deakins was compelled to take on the ambitious project…

Teaming with Denis Villeneuve on Blade Runner 2049—a well-received sequel to Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic—cinematographer Roger Deakins took on what the director has called "the most expensive art house movie in cinema history," seamlessly recreating the aesthetic of the original film while building out its world. Back in the running at the Oscars this year with his 14th nomination—and looking for his first win—Deakins was compelled to take on the ambitious project…

Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

A version of this story on Roger Deakins first ran in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine. 

Roger Deakins now has more cinematography nominations without a win than anyone in Oscar history. “Blade Runner 2049” marks his 14th nod. And it’s not as though the movies he’s lost for, including “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and the Best Picture-winning “No Country for Old Men,” have been completely snubbed by the Academy. It would seem he’s long overdue.

“You say that, but I don’t really agree,” said Deakins. “I don’t subscribe to that ‘overdue.’ Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years.”

For one, Jordan Cronenweth never got an Oscar (he was nominated once), and he shot the original “Blade Runner.” Deakins admires that film’s memorable noir look, but he and director Denis Villeneuve aimed to have 2049 stand on its own.

Also Read: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

“I think the only way I paid respect to Jordan’s work is I didn’t try to mimic it in any way,” Deakins said. “I did not light like Jordan lit. I’m not Jordan Cronenweth. I talked to Denis about it, but he said it was a film to stand by itself.”

The new film is a visual marvel. Deakins staged a fight scene to the neon-lit backdrop of a holographic Elvis Presley stage show that recalls his work on “Skyfall.” He turned the Vegas strip into a burnt orange hellscape. And he bounced rippling waves of light from a reflecting pond onto the walls of the villain’s lair to make a dreamily ominous fortress.

Asked how many of the effects were captured in-camera without the aid of CGI, Deakins said, “You’d be surprised both ways, really. I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is.”

Also Read: ‘Mudbound’ Gives American Society of Cinematographers Its First-Ever Female Film Nominee

And though he worked on a far smaller budget and with more technical limitations back on one of his earliest films, an adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” Deakins said the challenge of finding ways to visualize these moments in-camera is the same.

“It’s just a matter of scale,” Deakins said. “I was just talking with someone else about the night time storm sequence on the sea wall at the end. I certainly hadn’t shot anything quite like that, such an extended scene with actors in the water and crashing waves at night. But you just figure it out.”

Deakins used this blend of in-camera visuals with the artificial to poignant effect during a “threesome” scene among two real characters and a holographic one. Deakins explained you would’ve never been able to replicate the exact lighting on an actresses face if one of them was filmed in front of a green screen. So his team filmed two actresses in the same light without a green screen, then rotoscoped one actress out and laid her image on top of the other to a beautifully imperfect effect.

“It’s the simplicity of doing it that way that makes it successful and believable,” Deakins said. “You have a picture of what you want, and it’s work, work, work to try and create it.”

Go here for more from the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap Oscar Magazine.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Sicario’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

‘Blade Runner’ and ‘Planet of the Apes’ Lead Visual Effects Nominations

A version of this story on Roger Deakins first ran in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine. 

Roger Deakins now has more cinematography nominations without a win than anyone in Oscar history. “Blade Runner 2049” marks his 14th nod. And it’s not as though the movies he’s lost for, including “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and the Best Picture-winning “No Country for Old Men,” have been completely snubbed by the Academy. It would seem he’s long overdue.

“You say that, but I don’t really agree,” said Deakins. “I don’t subscribe to that ‘overdue.’ Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years.”

For one, Jordan Cronenweth never got an Oscar (he was nominated once), and he shot the original “Blade Runner.” Deakins admires that film’s memorable noir look, but he and director Denis Villeneuve aimed to have 2049 stand on its own.

“I think the only way I paid respect to Jordan’s work is I didn’t try to mimic it in any way,” Deakins said. “I did not light like Jordan lit. I’m not Jordan Cronenweth. I talked to Denis about it, but he said it was a film to stand by itself.”

The new film is a visual marvel. Deakins staged a fight scene to the neon-lit backdrop of a holographic Elvis Presley stage show that recalls his work on “Skyfall.” He turned the Vegas strip into a burnt orange hellscape. And he bounced rippling waves of light from a reflecting pond onto the walls of the villain’s lair to make a dreamily ominous fortress.

Asked how many of the effects were captured in-camera without the aid of CGI, Deakins said, “You’d be surprised both ways, really. I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is.”

And though he worked on a far smaller budget and with more technical limitations back on one of his earliest films, an adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” Deakins said the challenge of finding ways to visualize these moments in-camera is the same.

“It’s just a matter of scale,” Deakins said. “I was just talking with someone else about the night time storm sequence on the sea wall at the end. I certainly hadn’t shot anything quite like that, such an extended scene with actors in the water and crashing waves at night. But you just figure it out.”

Deakins used this blend of in-camera visuals with the artificial to poignant effect during a “threesome” scene among two real characters and a holographic one. Deakins explained you would’ve never been able to replicate the exact lighting on an actresses face if one of them was filmed in front of a green screen. So his team filmed two actresses in the same light without a green screen, then rotoscoped one actress out and laid her image on top of the other to a beautifully imperfect effect.

“It’s the simplicity of doing it that way that makes it successful and believable,” Deakins said. “You have a picture of what you want, and it’s work, work, work to try and create it.”

Go here for more from the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap Oscar Magazine.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sicario' Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

'Blade Runner 2049' Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

'Blade Runner' and 'Planet of the Apes' Lead Visual Effects Nominations

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Used Sound to Build a Sci-Fi Dystopia from Scratch — Watch

Denis Villeneuve and his sound design team break down the hellish soundscape of BiBi’s Bar.

When filmmakers talk about building the world of a movie, it is often in terms of its visual components – production design, special effects and cinematography – but necessarily not sound. But for a science fiction film set in the future, sound editors can’t rely on sound libraries or modern day sound effects; instead, they have to imagine and construct sounds based on how the world has changed, and in the case of “Blade Runner 2049,” how the dystopia Ridley Scott created in 1982 has evolved.

Most movies don’t really start dealing with sound design until post-production, but because of the demands and scope of the “Blade Runner 2049” soundscape, director Denis Villeneuve was able to put into practice an idea he had considered for a long time — bringing on sound designer Theo Green at the beginning of production, and supervising sound editor Mark Mangini just weeks later. Both men are currently nominated for Oscars for Best Sound Editing; it’s Mangini’s fifth nomination, and Green’s first.

“Usually, you start the sound design almost when the editing is finished,” said Villeneuve in an interview with IndieWire. “So to start on the sound for a year full time, designing sounds for each aspect of the movie and sculpting those beautiful ambiences – that are like music sometimes – it became part of the DNA of the film that my editor Joe Walker and I can edit to.”

"Blade Runner 2049"

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Bros.

One of the guiding principles Villeneuve gave Green early on was that the dystopia of Los Angeles in 2049 had multiple levels. The world became quieter as viewers moved above the ground of the city and into the air, until the soundscape reached an almost zen-like calm. “It’s a socio-economic leveling, on the bottom people are struggling and the top levels this is where the remaining elite live,” said Green. The audience is first introduced to this sharp contrast when K (Ryan Gosling) travels to BiBi’s Bar. “It’s hellishly busy and it’s oppressive,” Green said. “You are being bombarded with advertisements in many different languages and people and from every angle – even above you there are things projecting.”

To introduce the world of BiBi’s bar, following the quiet of the previous scene unfolding far above the city, Mangini created sounds to emphasize the contrast. “I wanted to smash cut into the scene, as if to say, ‘Here we go, you are going to really experience the dystopia and mad crush that is Los Angeles 2049,'” said Mangini. “I remember being really struck by those gorgeous drum booms [composer] Vangelis used in original ‘Blade Runner’ and I wanted to use something like that to jump start the scene and mark the transition. It’s really the only piece of sound – although we created our own version of it – that harkens back to the original.”

The boom is followed by a cacophony of sounds that form the cityscape: PA speakers blasting advertisements in different languages, very distant but crushed sounds of thousands of voices, a disturbing, almost motorcycle-like sound composer Benjamin Wallfisch created and the endless array of vending machines. Collectively, they create a mounting sense of unease.

“We were really tasked with getting in the head of Ryan Gosling in this movie, almost psycho-acoustically describing his emotion through the environment around him and yes,” said Green. “At Bibi’s, we are inundating you with layers and layers of sound, and it could be a mess [all these sounds at once], but we reveal layers piece by piece through a single, subjective perspective, which is K’s.”

“Blade Runner 2049”

The sounds also plays a key storytelling role of the world itself, yielding a complete vision of 2049 that grounds the futuristic world in realism and allows the audience to suspend its disbelief. To accomplish this, each sound plays a role in defining how Los Angeles has evolved since the first film.

Mangini took an innovative approach for the BiBi’s scene. “You are surrounded by thousands of people speaking different languages – Hindu, Korean, German, Japanese,” he said. He custom-recorded conversational sounds known in industry parlable as walla – nondescript crowd sounds – “to create this polyglot sense of the city,” he said. “Our instruction to our native speakers was to make up discussions about the concerns someone who is living in 2049 at the lowest level of society would have – finding water, finding food, finding employment and finding happiness. It’s almost an actors’ exercise.” The approach was designed to have a subconscious effect on the viewer. “Many linguists will argue that while you don’t understand the words in German or Hindu, we are intuitive enough as humans to get the sense of the conversation and the mood, the feel of that walla will convey the information anyway,” he said. “We are helping to build the world in these very economical and albeit sub-conscience ways.”

Villeneuve and Walker — who was composer before he was an editor — tend to treat sound design as if it were part of the score on all their projects. However, it was only by starting the collaboration with Green at the start of production that they managed to blur the line between score and sound design.

“One of the early requests from Denis to Theo and I was to ‘compose with sound,’” said Mangini. “He had this goal that sound could work on this other, more emotional, maybe even expository level in the way that score could. Part of his technique with Joe Walker, our film editor, is to create the first edit of the film without any score because, as a smart filmmaker, you need to know when scenes are working on their own merit. Theo and I went off and spent months creating, for lack of better term, sound sculptures and sound architecture, sound that didn’t have any relationship to a sync point in the film, but have their own unique kind of musical ambience to them without having a melody, but they have a mode or feel to them.”

Denis Villeneuve on the set of "Blade Runner 2049"

Denis Villeneuve on the set of “Blade Runner 2049”

Stephen Vaughan

By the time composers Hans Zimmer and Ben Wallfisch came on board, the sound design was in place. This allowed for the composers to create music that played off the soundscape in a complementary and almost improvisatory fashion. “We had such a long time to the sound design and the music was more done in very jazzy way, very spontaneous, very intense working session,” said Villeneuve. “We were very solid with the sound design, which had been so carefully planned and researched, so it became this spontaneous dialogue with music off that.”

Green marveled at how well the score melds with the sound design, to the point where it’s often unclear where one begins and the other ends. He also emphasized that, although Zimmer and Wallfisch are two composers who think about score like sound design, that level of synchronicity is only possible because he and Mangini were able to start their collaboration with Villeneuve and Walker so early.

“It’s the first time Denis had the budget to [start sound design early], but at the same time it’s something we would like to evangelize about, that other films could do this,” said Green. “It’s considered that sound is post-production and shouldn’t be started that early, but I think the proof is in the pudding.”

To see how the sound design of the BiBi’s Bar scene was built layer by layer from scratch, watch the video below.