Jonah Hill In ‘The Social Network’? Actor Says David Fincher Turned Him Down for Justin Timberlake

“‘The Social Network’ is the one that I was actually like, years later, was like, ‘F*ck, like I’m so bummed,’” Hill recently told Bill Simmons.

Bennett Miller’s 2011 baseball drama “Moneyball” was a defining moment in Jonah Hill’s acting career. After become one of the most popular comedy actors in Hollywood thanks to his roles in “Superbad” and other Judd Apatow-produced films, Hill successfully transitioned to adult-oriented drama with his role as Peter Brand in “Moneyball,” which earned him his first Oscar nomination. However, Hill originally intended to make the genre jump a year earlier with “The Social Network,” a film he says he would have landed had David Fincher been a fan of his.

“Low-key, David Fincher, or high-key, David Fincher didn’t want me in ‘Social Network,’” Hill recently revealed on “The Bill Simmons Podcast.” “It was between me and Justin Timberlake for that part. … Obviously [Fincher’s] the man, but he was not having me. The studio wanted me, I think, and then Justin Timberlake was amazing in it.”

Timberlake ultimately landed the role of Sean Parker, Napster co-founder and the first president of Facebook. The music star was widely praised for his performance, but it did not land him an Oscar nomination like Hill’s “Moneyball” role would a year later. Hill would earn a second Oscar nomination for best supporting actor after starring opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in Martin Scorsese’s “The Wold of Wall Street.”

“‘The Social Network’ is the one that I was actually like, years later, was like, ‘Fuck, like I’m so bummed,’” Hill told Simmons.

Hill is currently in theaters as the writer and director of “Mid90s,” which marks his directorial feature debut. The A24-backed indie centers around a young teenager who comes of age after befriending a group of Los Angeles skateboarders. Hill’s debut has earned strong reviews and is expanding nationwide this Friday, November 2.

Listen to Hill’s entire appearance on Simmons’ podcast in the episode below.

‘World War Z’ Sequel Update: Producers Confirm David Fincher and Brad Pitt Will Kick Off Filming in Summer 2019

Production will begin six years after Paramount released the original “World War Z” in theaters nationwide.

World War Z” is finally gearing up to start production on the long-awaited sequel, or at least that’s the latest update provided by the film’s producers Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner. The producing duo confirmed to Variety on the “Beautiful Boy” red carpet that not only is David Fincher still attached to direct Brad Pitt in the film, but also cameras will start rolling in June 2019. The summer production most likely means the sequel is heading for a 2020 release.

Marc Forster directed the original “World War Z,” which Paramount Pictures released in theaters during summer 2013. The movie was based on Max Brooks’ 2006 novel of the same name and starred Brad Pitt as a former UN employee who travels the globe to find a cure to stop a massive zombie pandemic. Pitt is confirmed to reprise his role, but the jury is still out on whether or not other cast members like Mireille Enos will return for the sequel.

News broke about Fincher joining the sequel as director back in April 2017, but updates on the movie have been scarce. Fincher stepped in to replace J. A. Bayona on the sequel after he left to direct “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.”

As Collider notes, kicking off production on the new “World War Z” in June 2019 aligns with Fincher’s schedule, as he’s filming the second season of Netflix’s “Mindhunter” through the end of 2018 and will spend much of the first quarter of 2019 working on post-production. Pitt, meanwhile, is currently filming Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” but has no new acting projects confirmed for 2019.

The “World War Z” sequel will reunite Fincher and Pitt after films such as “Fight Club” and “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.” Listen to producers Gardner and Kleiner tease the movie in the video below.

‘Atlanta Monster’ Season 2 Will Be ‘Monster: The Zodiac Killer’

The mindhunters of “Atlanta Monster,” the most popular podcast of 2018, will return early next year with a new city and a new serial killer in “Monster: The Zodiac Killer.”

“Atlanta Monster” host Payne Lindsey and executive producer Donald Albright told the “Shoot This Now” podcast earlier this year that they planned to expand to search for other monsters in other cities — and Season 2 will follow through on that plan.

You can listen on Apple or right here:

Also Read: ‘Atlanta Monster’ Host: Wayne Williams ‘Lied to Me About Some Very Crucial Things’ (Podcast)

The aim of the “Monster” stories is to examine serial killers to learn more about the social conditions in the communities that produced them. Season 1 of “Atlanta Monster” focused on Lindsey’s home state of Atlanta. Season 2 moves to the Bay Area, where Albright grew up.

“Atlanta Monster” came from podcast company HowStuffWorks and Lindsey and Albright’s production company, Tenderfoot TV. For Season 2, they will partner with iHeartMedia, and the iHeartRadio Podcast Network will premiere the first episode.

“Atlanta Monster” examined the deaths of at least 28 African-American children and young men in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The series, which had more than 30 million downloads, focused on whether Wayne Williams, who was convicted in two of the murders, was guilty of the killings.

The Zodiac Killer is a source of endless fascination for true-crime fans because his identity still remains a mystery. He was connected to a string of murders in California in the 1960s and 1970s, and taunted police as they tried to catch him. The 2007 David Fincher film “Zodiac” focuses on the desperate, failed attempts to bring him to justice.

Also Read: ‘Atlanta Monster’ Creators Talk TV Show Potential, Expanding to Other Cities’ Serial Killers (Exclusive)

Lindsey will serve as an executive producer on “Monster: The Zodiac Killer,” and contribute his creative input to future seasons of the podcast. Albright and Jason Hoch, head of new initiatives at HowStuffWorks, will also serve as executive producers.

“With ‘Atlanta Monster,’ we really tried to explore and understand all the layers of what was an integral and transformative time in not just the city’s history, but the nation’s history,” Lindsey said in a statement. “I think the success of the podcast proved that listeners want more of these true crime stories where we are dissecting not only harrowing, oftentimes tragic, events, but the complex people involved in them. The new season examines the narrative around one of the most infamous serial killers in American history, and we believe that our partnership with iHeartMedia will allow us to bring this fascinating story to a massive audience that only iHeart can provide.”

The first episode of “Monster: Zodiac Killer” is set to premiere Jan. 3, 2019.

UTA brokered the deal on behalf of HowStuffWorks and TenderfootTV.

Lindsey and Albright are presently in the second season of their other podcast, “Up and Vanished.” You can listen to our “Shoot This Now” episode with Lindsey about “Up and Vanished” on Apple or right here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Up and Vanished’ Is Like ‘Twin Peaks’ – But Scarier (Podcast)

‘Up and Vanished’ Host Payne Lindsey on Kristal Anne Reisinger: Don’t Bother Googling (Podcast)

No, Really: There’s a ‘Wild Wild Country’ and ‘Up and Vanished’ Connection (Podcast)

The mindhunters of “Atlanta Monster,” the most popular podcast of 2018, will return early next year with a new city and a new serial killer in “Monster: The Zodiac Killer.”

“Atlanta Monster” host Payne Lindsey and executive producer Donald Albright told the “Shoot This Now” podcast earlier this year that they planned to expand to search for other monsters in other cities — and Season 2 will follow through on that plan.

You can listen on Apple or right here:

The aim of the “Monster” stories is to examine serial killers to learn more about the social conditions in the communities that produced them. Season 1 of “Atlanta Monster” focused on Lindsey’s home state of Atlanta. Season 2 moves to the Bay Area, where Albright grew up.

“Atlanta Monster” came from podcast company HowStuffWorks and Lindsey and Albright’s production company, Tenderfoot TV. For Season 2, they will partner with iHeartMedia, and the iHeartRadio Podcast Network will premiere the first episode.

“Atlanta Monster” examined the deaths of at least 28 African-American children and young men in the late 1970s and early 1980s. The series, which had more than 30 million downloads, focused on whether Wayne Williams, who was convicted in two of the murders, was guilty of the killings.

The Zodiac Killer is a source of endless fascination for true-crime fans because his identity still remains a mystery. He was connected to a string of murders in California in the 1960s and 1970s, and taunted police as they tried to catch him. The 2007 David Fincher film “Zodiac” focuses on the desperate, failed attempts to bring him to justice.

Lindsey will serve as an executive producer on “Monster: The Zodiac Killer,” and contribute his creative input to future seasons of the podcast. Albright and Jason Hoch, head of new initiatives at HowStuffWorks, will also serve as executive producers.

“With ‘Atlanta Monster,’ we really tried to explore and understand all the layers of what was an integral and transformative time in not just the city’s history, but the nation’s history,” Lindsey said in a statement. “I think the success of the podcast proved that listeners want more of these true crime stories where we are dissecting not only harrowing, oftentimes tragic, events, but the complex people involved in them. The new season examines the narrative around one of the most infamous serial killers in American history, and we believe that our partnership with iHeartMedia will allow us to bring this fascinating story to a massive audience that only iHeart can provide.”

The first episode of “Monster: Zodiac Killer” is set to premiere Jan. 3, 2019.

UTA brokered the deal on behalf of HowStuffWorks and TenderfootTV.

Lindsey and Albright are presently in the second season of their other podcast, “Up and Vanished.” You can listen to our “Shoot This Now” episode with Lindsey about “Up and Vanished” on Apple or right here.


Related stories from TheWrap:

'Up and Vanished' Is Like 'Twin Peaks' – But Scarier (Podcast)

'Up and Vanished' Host Payne Lindsey on Kristal Anne Reisinger: Don't Bother Googling (Podcast)

No, Really: There's a 'Wild Wild Country' and 'Up and Vanished' Connection (Podcast)

‘Mindhunter’ Season 2: David Fincher Using Same Actor to Play Charles Manson as Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Hollywood’ — Report

Australian actor Damon Herriman is about to be forever associated with the notorious serial killer on the big screen.

Australian actor Damon Herriman is about to get a major boost in the U.S. by becoming synonymous with one of history’s most infamous serial killers. Following the news Herriman has been cast as Charles Manson in Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Collider has exclusively shared the actor is also playing Manson for David Fincher during the upcoming second season of Netflix’s “Mindhunter.”

While Herriman has yet to film his scenes as Manson for Tarantino, Collider reports the actor already shot his work on “Mindhunter” Season 2 in July. Manson’s presence in “Mundhunter” Season 2 is expected to be relatively small, as the new episodes are set in the 1980s when the serial killer was in prison. Also expected to appear in Season 2 are Son of Sam and the BTK Killer, who was seen during the first season but never named.

Fincher previously revealed “Mindhunter” Season 2 will deal with the Atlanta child murders, which took place between 1979 and 1981. The murder spree resulted in the deaths of 28 children, teenagers, and adults, all of whom were African-American. The series centers on FBI agents, played by Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany, who interview imprisoned serial killers to understand their psychological and hopefully prevent other murders from happening. Bringing Manson into the series suggests he will consulted behind bars to help with the FBI’s investigation into the Atlanta killing spree.

Damon Herriman attends the 2018 G'Day USA Los Angeles Gala at the InterContinental Hotel Los Angeles, in Los Angeles2018 G'Day Gala, Los Angeles, USA - 27 Jan 2018

Damon Herriman

Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP/REX/Shutterstock

“Mindhunter” Season 2 will reportedly be eight episodes and feature direction from Fincher, Andrew Dominik, and Carl Franklin. The series’ summer production means Netflix probably won’t debut new episodes until 2019. The first season premiered to acclaim in October 2017.

In Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” Herriman will be playing Manson in 1969. The film’s central characters, played by Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio, live next door to Sharon Tate and Roman Polanski. Tate and four others were murdered in the home by members of the Manson Family cult on August 9, 1969.

Herriman is best known in the U.S. for playing Dewey Crowe on five seasons of the FX series “Justified.” IndieWire has reached out to Netflix for further comment.

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William Gibson’s ‘Alien 3’ Script Brought to Life Through Comics

Despite never making it to the silver screen, cyberpunk fiction pioneer William Gibson’s unproduced “Alien 3” is finally seeing the light, with a comic book adaption. Published by Dark Horse Comics, Gibson’s original late 1980s …

Despite never making it to the silver screen, cyberpunk fiction pioneer William Gibson’s unproduced “Alien 3” is finally seeing the light, with a comic book adaption. Published by Dark Horse Comics, Gibson’s original late 1980s vision of the franchise’s xenomorph nightmare has been resurrected thanks to the panels from “Angel Catbird”  artist Johnnie Christmas and […]

Claire Foy: David Fincher’s ‘Dragon Tattoo’ Is ‘Amazing,’ but Don’t Underestimate ‘Spider’s Web’ Director Fede Alvarez

“I think that Fede is incredible, I think he is genius,” raves Foy about her “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” director.

David Fincher and Rooney Mara never got to make a sequel to their Oscar-nominated “The Girl in the Dragon Tattoo,” which means it’s been nearly seven years since Lisbeth Salander last graced the big screen. Claire Foy is stepping into the famous role for this fall’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web,” based on the fourth novel in the bestselling “Millennium” book series, while rising director Fede Alvarez is behind the camera. Replacing David Fincher is a daunting task for any director, but Foy promises Alvarez is a genius.

“I think the Swedish versions were incredible, I think the David Fincher version was amazing, and I think Rooney and Noomi are amazing,” Foy told Collider about stepping into the role. “It’s just I’m doing it this time, which is weird for me, but so many things about it haven’t felt weird, which I find encouraging. I think that Fede is incredible, I think he is genius. I think Pedro [Luque], the DP, is a genius, and I think it’s exciting for that reason, it’s a really exciting combo.”

Alvarez is a relative newcomer, but he’s made a name for himself in the horror community as the director of “Evil Dead” and “Don’t Breathe.” The latter was one of the biggest genre hits of 2016, grossing $157 million worldwide opposite a $9.9 million budget (via Box Office Mojo). “Spider’s Web” is Alvarez’s biggest directorial effort to date, and Foy has nothing but praise for him.

“He sort of is like a concert trained pianist. He’s incredible,” Foy said of Alvarez. “He just has an understanding of film and story and audience that I think very few people do. It is studied in a way, but it’s not studied. He loves film…and sees the rhythm of it. He creates a beautiful image with Pedro, they’re just an incredible team, they just have such beautiful eye. And it’s always slightly different to what you would think it would be.”

“I haven’t done a single shot in this which has been like, ‘Well now we have to cross you and we have to get you all close,'” she continued. “That hasn’t been the case at all. It’s never felt like a formulaic way of making anything. I think he’s full of heart as a person, and really cares about this movie, which is very, very rare. It’s not a vehicle for him, he’s in it, and that’s lovely.”

Similar to Alvarez, Foy is also getting her biggest film project to date in “Spider’s Web.” The actress is best known for her Emmy-nominated role on Netflix’s “The Crown” and appeared on the big screen earlier this year in the lead role of Steven Soderbergh’s “Unsane.” “Spider’s Web” is one of two fall releases for Foy, the other being a supporting turn in Damien Chazelle’s “First Man.”

“The Girl in the Spider’s Web” opens in theaters nationwide November 9. Head to Collider to Foy’s “Spider’s Web” interview in its entirety.

‘Mindhunter’: The David Fincher Look is All About Power and Control

Fincher was very particular about conveying control and dominance through lighting and production design in his Netflix FBI crime drama.

David Fincher brilliantly pushes his cinematic formalism in “Mindhunter,” Netflix’s 10-episode crime drama that explores the FBI’s fledgling Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia, in the late ’70s. But, for the dialogue-heavy creepy interrogations with imprisoned serial killers by agents Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany), executive producer/co-director Fincher manages to visually convey constant power shifts.

“It’s about control and dominance and also about misogyny,” Fincher said. “People forget that this goes all the way back to Jack the Ripper.”

Read More: David Fincher and Editor Kirk Baxter’s Dance of Death

And Fincher’s collaboration with production designer Steve Arnold (“House of Cards”) and gaffer-turned cinematographer Erik Messerschmidt (“Mad Men”) was crucial to the authentic ’70s look and dynamic blocking of the interrogation scenes, particularly those involving Ed Kemper (Cameron Britton), who captivates and mentors Holden.

Visualizing a Walk and Talk

“There aren’t that many shows that have eight pages of dialogue on a regular basis,” said Messerschmidt, who first worked with Fincher as a gaffer on “Gone Girl,” and then replaced DP Chris Probst who left after shooting the first two Fincher-directed episodes because of creative differences. “For me, there were very visual opportunities without dialogue because ‘Mindhunter’ is about blocking.”

Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany, "Mindhunter"

Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany, “Mindhunter”

Merrick Morton/Netflix

Messerschmidt had the benefit of shooting with Fincher’s customized Red Dragon (called the Xenomorph from “Alien”), which is ergonomically friendly and has a small camera footprint. “”We shoot a lot of coverage because it’s all about pace,” he said. “My favorite part of the job is thinking about sequencing on a set. We’re so classical and so formalist about how we tell story. There’s a power dynamic there too between Holden and Bill. There’s a lot of dialogue and off-dialogue looks and little shifts, the moment between moments.”

Delving so deeply into the dark, grisly world of serial killers causes a clash of egos between the two FBI agents, and also cultivates hubris in Ford. But it serves him well in his rapport with Kemper, who relishes the attention and the chance to tell his life story. Yet Kemper always maintains control, willingly handing over information at his own slow, deliberate pace.

Interrogating Kemper

The production design and lighting of the Kemper interrogation scenes were open and bright with a monochromatic background. It was set at a prison in California, but shot in Pittsburgh, where the production was based, and where Arnold went to graduate school at Carnegie Mellon University.

“We went to a couple of prisons that were no longer functioning,” Arnold said. “The interview with Kemper was at one in Greensburg. We altered the space that was the interview room. It was a couple of different rooms that we expanded. We made it as though it was the library reading room in prison. David wanted it to be a different kind of space, less threatening, in a way. The thing that’s threatening about Kemper is himself.”

MINDHUNTER

“Mindhunter”

Merrick Morton/Netflix

In the season finale, also directed by Fincher, during an unnerving showdown between Ford and Kemper in a hospital, Kemper acts like a scorned lover, convalescing from self-inflicted wounds to get Ford’s attention.

“We shot the hospital at a closed-down VA mental hospital,” said Arnold. “It’s an interesting complex with a triple room, and it had a little nurse’s station/viewing room, which works for the story line, where Kemper points out that he’s left alone during emergencies. And that scares Holden. We put bars in the hallway, so it seemed more like a prison medical facility.”

Messerschmidt initially wanted to go dark and spooky, but Fincher disagreed and demanded that it had to look authentic. “What that scene does need thematically is the condition of the environment,” the cinematographer said. “Holden has to suddenly realize that he may be in a compromised situation. You see the guards leave and the reality of that situation shifts for him. You have to see a little bit of fear in his eyes.

MINDHUNTER

“Mindhunter”

Patrick Harbron/Netflix

“So the solution we had was: It’s not bright but it’s still top lit. And he’s the only patient in the room, so we don’t need to light the rest of the room. I saw an opportunity to be as dramatic as the set would allow but still remain a real environment.”

Then the power shifts back to Kemper, who hugs Ford like an anaconda. The FBI agent then pulls away and bolts out of the room. Messerschmidt said it took two days to shoot the scene, and, according to Britton, who played Kemper, they reshot the scene because it was too on the nose. “Kemper put a guilt trip on Holden when they’re talking and then when he hugs him. They realized it was unnecessary.”

Added Messerschmidt: “It’s curious to think about how we tell this story with the camera, and make sure the audience understands what’s going on without showing them every beat editorially.”

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Natalie Portman Remembers Teaching David Fincher About Harvard Life for ‘The Social Network’

The Oscar-winning actress attended Harvard between 1999 and 2003.

David Fincher is one of the most meticulous filmmakers in Hollywood, which means he needed to know everything there was to know about Harvard before gearing up for production on “The Social Network.” The drama, written by Aaron Sorkin, centers on Mark Zuckerberg and the creation of Facebook and is set largely on the Harvard campus.

As Fincher revealed shortly before the film opened in theaters (via Entertainment Weekly), Natalie Portman ended up being an unexpected secret weapon on the film. Portman called Fincher personally when she heard the director was attached to “The Social Network” and invited him to dinner so she could teach him about Harvard life. Portman studied at Harvard from 1999-2003.

On the new episode of the YouTube interview series “Hot Wings,” Portman reveals some of the details of her sit-down with Fincher. Surprisingly, the discussion is the closest Portman has gotten to working with Fincher. The actress dated a member of one of Harvard’s famous final clubs, the Porcellian Club, and taught Fincher about how the clubs work.

Harvard’s final clubs are exclusive, all-male groups officially unrecognized by Harvard. Portman explained to Fincher how prestigious the clubs were for male underclassmen and how the clubs worked on an invite only basis. Portman’s prep found its way into “The Social Network,” as the film begins with Zuckerberg obsessively talking about joining a final club.

Portman most recently starred in the acclaimed science-fiction thriller “Annihilation,” which is now on DVD and Blu-ray. The actress serves as producer on the upcoming food documentary “Eating Animals,” in thaters June 15.

You can watch Portman discuss meeting Fincher (around the nine minute mark), as well as a handful of other topics, in the video below.

Sign Up: Stay on top of the latest breaking film and TV news! Sign up for our Email Newsletters here.

‘Mindhunter’ Breakout Cameron Britton Taps Into Psychology & Cold Intelligence Of Real-Life Serial Killer Edmund Kemper

Breaking through with his first guest star role on David Fincher’s Netflix crime drama Mindhunter, where he would play terrifying serial killer Edmund Kemper, Cameron Britton found both an incredible artistic opportunity and a challenge that would daun…

Breaking through with his first guest star role on David Fincher's Netflix crime drama Mindhunter, where he would play terrifying serial killer Edmund Kemper, Cameron Britton found both an incredible artistic opportunity and a challenge that would daunt any actor, coming face to face with one of the industry's most formidable auteurs. In his first experience playing a real-life figure, Britton couldn't have found a more deliciously complicated character than Kemper, who…

Jonathan Groff on the Time He Disagreed With Producers on David Fincher’s ‘Mindhunter’

While talking with Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Deuce”) for Variety’s “Actors on Actors,” presented by Shutterstock, Jonathan Groff (“Mindhunter”) revealed that during the shooting of the 10-episode span of David Fi…

While talking with Maggie Gyllenhaal (“The Deuce”) for Variety’s “Actors on Actors,” presented by Shutterstock, Jonathan Groff (“Mindhunter”) revealed that during the shooting of the 10-episode span of David Fincher’s “Mindhunter,” he fought to include a certain version of a scene. As he described, as the writers built out his character, they “kept figuring out how they […]

How David Fincher Nailed ‘Mindhunter,’ from Charlize Theron to Jonathan Groff

Take some people obsessed with serial killers, and a detail freak like David Fincher, and the alchemy is undeniably compelling.

There are manifold reasons why Netflix’s chilling series “Mindhunter” breaks the mold, from David Fincher to the bromantic chemistry between boyish FBI agent Holden Ford (“Hamilton” star Jonathan Groff) and gruff, chain-smoking G-man Bill Tench (Fincher veteran Holt McCallany). Here are a few factors that pushed this series to the top of the competitive drama Emmy contenders.

1. Charlize Theron

The series may never have existed if executive producer Charlize Theron hadn’t recognized a fellow serial killer buff in Fincher. When the actress was researching her Oscar-winning role as sociopath Aileen Wuornos in Petty Jenkins’ “Monster,” she read John Douglas’s “Mindhunter,” about the groundbreaking ’70s FBI unit that pioneered research into serial killers.

“This guy had an incredible life,” she said. “What he does is so rare and mind-blowing. I’m fascinated by books on neurology and brain development and why people are sociopaths: They cut off all emotion in order to do horrible things. I bought the rights to his book. I thought about Fincher, who loved ‘Zodiac’ and ‘Seven’ [and thought] ‘He must be obsessed with this stuff too; he must know who John Douglas is.’ People said, ‘You have never produced television.’ I asked David to lunch and he knew about Douglas and was on board: ‘Let’s make it into a series.’ Dream big, motherfuckers!”

No Merchandising. Editorial Use Only. No Book Cover Usage.Mandatory Credit: Photo by Moviestore/REX/Shutterstock (1590737a)Monster, Charlize TheronFilm and Television

Charlize Theron in “Monster”

Moviestore/REX/Shutterstock

2. David Fincher

The director applied his characteristic focus to the entire production, from having all of Joe Penhall’s scripts finalized before shooting for a year in Pittsburgh, to careful casting and rehearsals before shooting four out of the 10 episodes. He stayed on set throughout the shoot, even when he wasn’t directing. The series storytelling is deceptively simple and unshowy. It’s all about framing and nailing the precise power dynamics within the mise-en-scene, from banal windowless basement offices at Quantico to a range of hideous prisons and local jails.

For one 11-12 page interrogation scene, the production designer Steve Arnold recreated a cage he found in an actual prison. “Bars outside, stone walls inside and a cyclone fence cage; three or four visible layers of incarceration,” said Fincher at a Netflix panel. “We start with that conversation, shooting the shit, as the prisoner tries to avoid answering any questions, and they’re chasing him around the space getting him to talk.”

“Mindhunter”

To capture a maximum-security prison, Fincher locked his cameras for 85 feet on a close-up tracking shot of Groff walking, letting the horrific cacophony of sounds bring the environment to life. “Everyone who has ever been in prison will tell you, it’s the sound that is unnerving,” said Fincher. “Male aggression bouncing off the tiles, upstairs and downstairs, screams. We turned it into a big sequence to get him walk straight down the hallway. We could do more unsettling things with the sounds than with all the gruesome inmates with tusks or whatever. It sounds like  a slaughterhouse, basically, cries and moans.”

Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany, "Mindhunter"

Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany, “Mindhunter”

Merrick Morton/Netflix

3. Jonathan Groff and Holt McCallany

Over the course of the series, Groff’s uptight man in black becomes an increasingly more confident and aggressive investigator, and lover to his more sophisticated academic girlfriend (Hannah Gross). “He was having his sexual awakening with his girlfriend while he was interviewing psychosexual murderers,” Groff told me after the panel. “It’s about his psychology and sensibility and ability to be empathetic. J. Edgar Hoover had been dead for four or five years once we hit the late ’70s transition from straight-laced G-men into the late-’60s vibe creeping into the FBI … They were just coming up with the term ‘serial killer’ we’re so familiar with now; they’re putting it together. There’s an innocence that is noble and worthwhile — and complicated and depressing.”

On the four episodes Fincher directed, the regular cast knew what to expect in the way of meticulously precise line readings and subtle shadings that can be refined for as many as 75 takes for one 11-page scene shot with three cameras. “The interrogation scenes are like theater,” said Groff. “We rehearsed every morning. David was specific with us about every single word and every turn of the scene. Sometimes on the day of shooting, we’d go into the room and sit down and talk about how one move forward can change the whole dynamic of the conversation.”

mindhunter david fincher netfix

“Mindhunter”

Screenshot/Netflix

After each take, Fincher would give each actor notes to follow for the next continuous shot. “I didn’t mind,” said McCallany. “I find that when you do something over and over again, you discover things. From take 15 to take 20, something becomes apparent to you didn’t realize. Even subtle adjustments David will give, you will make a huge difference in how the scene plays out.”

Each interview with a serial killer was different as the FBI men get them to talk. “Can you have empathy for someone who is so disgusting and horrible and such a terrible person,” asked Groff, “and give them the space to talk? What can you glean from that? The depressing thing about the show is there’s a bottomless pit in the end. One of the overarching themes of the show is that the idea of human evil is unknowable in a way.”

Groff was fascinated by how “each interview was different in the gaining of knowledge and the language used to get them to open up. Working with David, he makes sure every word has attention, every comma and period. Everything is so intentional. He’s the creator of the show, so we would get into the meat of a scene and his imagination would get turned on, he could change and shift and move things that the other directors didn’t have permission to do.”

Bill Tench is based on an uncle of Fincher’s: “He’s got issues, he’s running away from his family a little, he’s trying really hard, within certain boundaries, to do what’s right.” As far as Fincher is concerned, everyone in this series has a right to a strong point of view. “I don’t like characters in drama who are obviously, patently wrong, saying something stupid because we need an adversary or a conflict,” he said. “I prefer arguments among five people who are all right, who all passionately believe what they are doing is the right thing.”

Holt McCallany, Anna Torv, Erik Messershmidt, Laray Mayfield, Cameron Britton, Jonathan Groff, Jennifer Starzyk, Steven Arnold, David FincherNetflix Original Series "Mindhunter" ATAS Official Screening and Panel at The Crosby Street, New York, USA - 19 May 2018

Holt McCallany, Anna Torv, Erik Messershmidt, Laray Mayfield, Cameron Britton, Jonathan Groff, Jennifer Starzyk, Steven Arnold, David Fincher

Patrick Lewis/Starpix for Netflix/REX/Shutterstock

4. Cinematographer Erik Messerschmidt

Fincher tried to stay away from fancy camerawork. “People think cinematography is about people putting their stamp on it, a filigree to make it attractive,” he said. “With a story like this, it was important to embrace that which is mundane: People are hunting other people hiding in plain sight. Even Ed Kemper at 6-foot-9 is hiding in plain sight. This is not a macabre phantom-of-the-opera character.”

Even the Episode 10 finale hospital scene, in which a shackled Kemper rises out of bed to physically threaten Ford, is terrifying in its plain unfolding. “It’s nice to let it be simple, what it is,” said Fincher. “What is the room, the space, the light, the environment? What about this is real? What’s essential, what has to play out? What’s the dance? What’s the power dynamic between these people in the conversation? Ed Kemper is totally forthcoming; he’ll tell you anything in his head, he’s searching for a chainsaw. How do you glean something important from people who are overly solicitous and possibly unreliable and the people who are withholding everything? It’s a game of chess.”

David Fincher, Director/Executive Producer, Cameron BrittonNetflix FYSEE MINDHUNTER Panel, Los Angeles, CA, USA - 1 June 2018

‘Mindhunter’s’s David Fincher and Cameron Britton

Eric Charbonneau/REX/Shutterstock

5. Cameron Britton

Fincher finally met Cameron Britton, the six-foot-nine actor accustomed to playing bodyguards and bouncers, after five auditions. They met during the sixth, a screen test for the role of Ed Kemper. Fincher told him “to play this guy laid back, mellow, it means nothing to him,” said Britton.

“The tape was undeniable,” said Fincher, who instantly decided that Britton should not be allowed to bond with his castmates: “Make sure Cameron doesn’t talk to anyone. He can’t fraternize. I don’t want this to be a social thing. He has to literally come from Pluto and be in the show. He can’t be indoctrinated into what anyone else is up to, it has to be that this guy shows up, he’s got all the time in the world, 13 life sentences, and he’s going to tell you what you want to know. During the read-through, it was telling that if we can get that on film, we’re going to be fine.”

Britton couldn’t make Kemper too narcissistic. “There was always more to find,” he said. “He’s almost become a Zen master within himself, he leans into his own sociopathy: ‘I can make this work for me, I can take apathy, and as humans we are drawn in apathy, the way we are drawn to the cool kid in high school who didn’t care about anything. ‘I don’t need to care about anyone, that’s only going to benefit me.’ If you talk about his favorite subject — himself — you’re playing with house money.”

‘Mindhunter’: David Fincher Shot a 9-Minute Take 75 Times and Didn’t Let Cameron Britton Talk to Anyone on Set

The notoriously fastidious director discussed his process for the Netflix original series during a panel discussion Friday night.

One of the consistent differences between producing television and films is that TV moves fast; when crews are responsible for six to 22 hours of new content every year, directors don’t often have time to shoot take after take until everyone is satisfied with the result.

Well, no one told David Fincher that.

Speaking at an FYC event for his Netflix original series “Mindhunter” on Friday night, Fincher explained how much time he spent capturing one nine-and-a-half-minute scene for Season 1. Shot with three cameras all running at once, Fincher put his three-person cast and many more crew members through 75 takes before he was ready to call it quits.

Jonathan Groff, who joined Fincher on the panel along with co-star Holt McCallany, Anna Torv, Cameron Britton, and casting director Laray Mayfield, asked his director, “What was the longest scene we had? Seven minutes?”

“No, no,” Fincher said. “The scene with Happy [Anderson] was 11 pages. We had three cameras outside the cage, and we’d do a nine-and-a-half-minute take. Then I’d walk in with a yellow pad [filled] with single-spaced notes: [to Groff] ‘OK, that’s a joke, you can’t toss that off. And this? This is a statement. Make sure that’s a statement.’ And Jonathan would be there going, ‘OK, OK.’ [nodding] Then we’d do another nine-minute take and he’d do all that stuff [I asked], and I’d go to Holt and go over four pages of notes with him. And Happy was like, ‘What? We’re really going to do this [every time]?’”

Fincher said the series regulars like Groff and McCallany got used to it, but guest stars were consistently taken aback by his persistence.

David Fincher, Director/Executive Producer,Netflix FYSEE MINDHUNTER Panel, Los Angeles, CA, USA - 1 June 2018

David Fincher experiences the “Mindhunter” exhibit at the Netflix FYSee space.

Eric Charbonneau/REX/Shutterstock

Looking at Groff for confirmation, Fincher then tried to estimate how many times they ran through that scene in one day. After a few stops and starts, he said, “We didn’t have a break, well we broke for lunch — I would say we did it 75 times in the day.”

Stories of Fincher’s meticulous nature are well-known. Reports surfaced during the “Gone Girl” shoot that he was averaging 50 takes per scene, and the same number was cited by “Zodiac” star John Carrol Lynch as well. Other actors, including Jake Gyllenhaal and Neil Patrick Harris, have commented on the practice with various levels of enthusiasm, but Holt McCallany likes it.

“I didn’t mind,” he said. “I find when you do something over and over again, you discover things. When you guys would say ‘take 14’ or ‘take 20,’ suddenly something becomes apparent to you that you didn’t really realize. It’s not that we were making huge changes, but the subtle adjustments we made or small adjustments David will give you can make a big difference in the way a scene plays out. So I’m a fan of doing a lot of takes.”

Groff was also supportive of Fincher’s laborious style.

“David was really specific with us about every single word, and every single turn of the scene; he was critically specific about the purpose,” Groff said. “On the days of shooting, we would go in the room, sit down, and talk about how leaning forward could change the dynamic of a conversation.”

David Fincher, Director/Executive Producer, Cameron BrittonNetflix FYSEE MINDHUNTER Panel, Los Angeles, CA, USA - 1 June 2018

But long days weren’t the only stipulation coming from Fincher. He also wanted to create a specific atmosphere around one of his stars: the man playing Ed Kemper, Cameron Britton.

After noting how much of the character Britton had put together himself, Fincher explained a decision he made right away to help preserve that special element within his actor’s creation.

“One of the things that was critical [came to me] when we did a read-through of the first three episodes,” Fincher said. “It became really obvious coming out of the first read-through that: ‘Make sure Cameron doesn’t talk to anyone. He can’t fraternize [with anyone]. I don’t want this to be a social thing. He has to literally come from Pluto and be in the show.’ He can’t be indoctrinated into what anyone else is up to. It has to be that this guy shows up, he’s got all the time in the world — 13 life sentences — and he’s going to tell you what you want to know. During the read-through, it was [clear] that if we can get that on film, we’re going to be fine.”

Britton said that he wouldn’t have even been considered for the part if it wasn’t for his height.

“If I’m 6’4”, I’m not here,” Britton said. “The minimum height was 6’5”.”

After five auditions and a screen test with Fincher, he got the part. The rest is history — history that’s probably been documented 75 times over.

“Mindhunter” Season 1 is streaming now on Netflix.

‘Mindhunter’: David Fincher and Editor Kirk Baxter’s Dance of Death

The FBI crime drama about early behavioral profiling is a Fincher Master Class in blocking and montage, with an assist from Steven Soderbergh.

With Netflix’s “Mindhunter,” executive producer David Fincher delivers a gripping crime series about the early days of FBI behavioral profiling in 1977 without any grisly murders. (Fincher directed the initial two episodes as well as the concluding two.) And for Oscar-winning editor Kirk Baxter (“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” “Social Network”), this dialogue-heavy walk and talk between agents Holden Ford (Jonathan Groff) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany) was a gift.

“The skill that David has with blocking scenes is what’s most enjoyable,” Baxter said. “With 25 different angles of different set ups, it’s very dense and takes a lot of man hours in perfecting, but a walk and talk with an A and B camera, all I have to do is pick the best take.”

Read More: David Fincher Reveals ‘Mindhunter’ Season 2 Storyline

The Dance of Death

While the first episode was about “laying pipe” in setting up the fledgling Behavioral Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia, “Mindhunter” kicks in when Ford interviews imprisoned serial killer Ed Kemper (Cameron Britton) in Episode 2 to better understand how he thinks. It’s the beginning of the agent’s dangerous journey down a rabbit hole of death.

“It was an intriguing scene to put together,” Baxter said, “because Holden is the one who wants to get information, to push the conversation forward, and Kemper sits back and willingly hands over the information. But he does so at his own pace.”

MINDHUNTER

“Mindhunter”

Merrick Morton/Netflix

At the same time, the erudite killer becomes fascinated by Ford’s curiosity and sense of empathy. However, the editor made an important discovery in cutting the cat and mouse between them throughout the episode: Kemper’s response time had to be slow. Otherwise, it was less compelling. “He’s in prison and has all the time in the world, and has a steady pace,” added Baxter. “If Kemper speaks too quick, the spell is broken. If his response is slowed down, then Kemper keeps control of the room.”

This sense of control commences with Kemper’s insistence that Ford order an egg salad sandwich. “And we use the close-ups in those moments to dominate him,” said Baxter. But it became obvious to Baxter in viewing subsequent scenes with Kemper that he didn’t edit that the spell was broken. “And it was purely pacing. So I passed a simple note to the editor saying Kemper is never in a rush, and the next time I looked at the scene, it was perfect.”

Inserting the Traveling Montage

After shooting the series, Fincher decided to add a traveling montage in Episode 2 between Ford and Tench after a complaint from true crime co-author John Douglas (“Mindhunter: Inside the FBI’s Elite Serial Crime Unit”) that it lacked a sense of authentic road weariness.

But first Baxter compiled a sizzle reel of Fincher highlights (mostly culled from “Fight Club”) to get the proper vibe for the traveling montage cut to Steve Miller’s “Fly Like an Eagle.” “This was to give David an idea of pace and how many shots he wanted. Once we had that together, I came back and cut it in isolation,” Baxter said.

“Mindhunter”

“To me those montages are so much fun. We presented shots and mostly it told David that he needed brevity and humor. Where it really dances is when you get repetition of action: Four or five plates going down in a row or walking into four or five motel rooms, That musical rhythm of how many am I gonna use? To get the point across with three and then punctuate it with a plop of sugar going into the coffee cup.”

Closure with Kemper

Ford’s final final encounter with Kemper in the hospital (cut to Led Zeppelin’s eerie “In the Light”) brings their relationship full circle and scares the hell out of the FBI agent. At first, he thinks he’s in control until Kemper asserts his dominance and Ford fears for his life. It’s yet another brilliant example of Fincher’s blocking.

MINDHUNTER

“Mindhunter”

Patrick Harbron/Netflix

“We start wide and move closer and Holden sits down,” said Baxter.”Then we go wide again when Kemper is standing. Now they’re slowly going to get closer together until he’s finally going to be wrapped like an anaconda by this guy. And then he makes a break for it and you’re wide again. That’s the stuff editorially that you’re looking for…slowly tightening the noose in the frame so that it’s in lockstep with the danger.”

Soderbergh and the BTK Killer

Finally, Baxter acknowledged that the cold openers with the mysterious and mustachioed ADT serviceman (Sonny Valicenti) are a setup for future exploration of Dennis Rader, the BTK (“Bind, Torture, Kill,”) Killer, who murdered 10 people in Kansas between 1974 and 1991.

“That again came after the fact,” Baxter said. “We shot everything and then went out and did these and found places for them in the story. At first, I found the spots within the episodes where there were concluding points in story lines, where it wasn’t confusing. But then we moved them to the very front and had that awesome one at the end [with the burning of the disturbing drawings].”

Mindhunter - Sonny Valicenti Ending ADT Serviceman

“Mindhunter”

Netflix

Turns out that the placement of the last one was Steven Soderbergh’s idea. The director, known also for his great editorial skills, has been providing notes to Fincher on a few of his most recent projects. “And both David and I loved it because it just gave the promise of Season 2. And it allowed that we tracked the file [of the drawings] all over it, which I adored.”

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David Fincher will make another season of Mindhunter before World War Z 2 

David Fincher’s World War Z was a fairly big hit, but Fincher, Paramount, and original star Brad Pitt have had a surprisingly difficult time getting a sequel off the ground.For one thing, the original came out in 2013—which is like 12 Marvel movies ago…

David Fincher’s World War Z was a fairly big hit, but Fincher, Paramount, and original star Brad Pitt have had a surprisingly difficult time getting a sequel off the ground.For one thing, the original came out in 2013—which is like 12 Marvel movies ago, if that’s how you keep track of time—and the sequel burned…

Read more...

‘Mindhunter’ Season 2: David Fincher Returning to Direct, Joined by Andrew Dominik and More — Report

Fincher previously revealed Season 2 of the Netflix serial killer drama will involve the Atlanta child murders.

Details surrounding “Mindhunter” Season 2 have been quiet over the last several months, but a new report from The Playlist brings some exciting news about the next batch of episodes. David Fincher, who executive produces the show and directed two episodes in the first season, will reportedly be back behind the camera for the Season 2 premiere and finale. Directors Andrew Dominik and Carl Franklin will join Fincher for Season 2.

Dominik is an indie favorite after directing “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.” His other credits include the Nick Cave documentary “One More Time with Feeling” and the drama “Killing Them Softly,” which starred Fincher favorite Brad Pitt. Franklin, meanwhile, is a television veteran with directing credits on “13 Reasons Why,” “The Leftovers,” and Fincher’s own “House of Cards.” Dominik is reportedly filming two episodes, while Franklin will direct the remaining Season 2 episodes.

The Playlist notes Season 2 will only have eight episodes, down two installments from the 10-episode first season. Fincher is expected to kick off production on Season 2 at the end of this month or in early May. Similar to his work on Season 1, Fincher is scheduling in any potential reshoots the episodes will need and is planning to direct those himself. The show is eyeing an early 2019 debut on Netflix. IndieWire has reached out to Netflix for further comment.

“Mindhunter” premiered last October from creator Joe Penhall. Charlize Theron serves as an executive producer alongside Fincher. Cast members Jonathan Groff, Holt McCallany, and Anna Torv are returning for the new season, which Fincher previously revealed will deal with the Atlanta child murders.

“Next year we’re looking at the Atlanta child murders, so we’ll have a lot more African-American music which will be nice,” Fincher told Billboard last year. “The music will evolve. It’s intended to support what’s happening with the show and for the show to evolve radically between seasons.”

The Atlanta child murders were a series of killings that took place over two years in which at least 28 children, teenagers, and adults were murdered. All of the victims were African-American. Atlanta native Wayne Williams was convicted for two of the adult murders and sentenced to two life terms in prison. Many of the murders became remain unsolved.

“Mindhunter” Season 1 is now streaming on Netflix.

The 7 Best Movies New to Netflix in April 2018

From super sharks in “Deep Blue Sea” to Kevin Spacey in “Se7en,” this month’s best new Netflix movies offer a variety of different monsters.

Spring is here, love is in the air, and everyone is finally ready to go back outside, but Netflix’s April offerings are giving us at least seven more compelling reasons to stay on the couch for at least another few weeks. This month brings an eclectic mix of new movies to the streaming platform, from the sweet Americana of “The Iron Giant” to the decidedly less sweet Americana of “Scarface” — from the mad brilliance of Philip Seymour Hoffman in “Along Came Polly” to the brilliant madness of the Wachowskis’ “Speed Racer.” We’ve also got “Deep Blue Sea” and David Fincher’s “Se7en,” two very different movies about two very different monsters (super sharks and Kevin Spacey, respectively).

Here are the seven best movies that are new to Netflix this April.

7. “Psychokinesis” (2018)

Now that Netflix increasingly positions itself as a pipeline for first-run foreign movies, every month seems to bring a major new title that English-language audiences (and critics) have never had a chance to see. This April, the streaming giant is importing the latest from “Train to Busan” director Yeon Sang-ho. Fresh off its January release in South Korea, “Psychokinesis” is a supernatural comedy about a blue-collar security officer (Ryu Seung-ryong) who discovers that he can move things with his mind. While that might seem like an obvious premise for a superhero movie, Yeon isn’t interested in the obvious — his protagonist uses his powers to help stop the evil corporate developers trying to turn his estranged daughter’s neighborhood into a shopping mall. Think globally, act locally. We’re still waiting to get a look at the film ourselves, but if it channels any of the socially conscious anarchy on display in Yeon’s previous stuff, we’ll be grateful to Netflix for giving us the chance.

Available to stream on April 25.

6. “Along Came Polly” (2004)

On its surface, “Along Came Polly” is a pretty standard-issue romantic comedy, albeit one that’s a little grosser and more sadistic than your average love story (Ben Stiller’s idea of courtship has always resembled an extended humiliation ritual). However, lurking beneath this basic story about a neurotic insurance agent who falls in love with a bohemian Jennifer Aniston, is one of the greatest supporting performances of this or any other century.

The late, great Philip Seymour Hoffman is understandably remembered for the immensity of his dramatic turns in films like “Synecdoche, New York” and “The Master,” but one of his finest roles was as Sandford Lyle, a former childhood idol who is now funding his own “E! True Hollywood Story” as he stars in an amateur production of “Jesus Christ Superstar.” The comic relief of a comedy that needs some, Hoffman plays Sandy as a disheveled burnout with a major sharting problem, a legend in New York’s street basketball scene (“white chocolate!”), and — most of all — a good friend who’s willing to help out his best pal in a pinch. If there were any justice in this world, Hoffman would’ve won an Oscar for the scene where he steps into a meeting for Stiller’s character and tries to stall for time. Maybe a Nobel Peace Prize, too.

Available to stream on April 1.

5. “Deep Blue Sea” (1999)

Sharks can’t swim backwards. Sharks can’t swim backwards!!!

One of the dopiest and most sublime blockbusters of the late ’90s (a true golden age for dopey and sublime blockbusters), Renny Harlin’s “Deep Blue Sea” is an enduring reminder that all you need to make a movie is a girl and a genetically enhanced trio of super-sharks who dream of freedom. Of course, it certainly doesn’t hurt to add an incredible roster of character actors to the mix, including LL Cool J as a chef who loves his parrot, Stellan Skarsgård as a scientist who gets treated to one of the most absurd deaths of all time, and (of course) Samuel L. Jackson as a billionaire adventurer who really needs to shorten his inspirational speeches. Set on a sinking laboratory that Harlin establishes with great care, filled with terrifically silly encounters (the best of which stages a shark attack in a kitchen), and created with special effects that are just cartoonish enough to have aged well, “Deep Blue Sea” is chum in the water for anyone who wants to stream some great white shlock.

Available to stream on April 1.

4. “Speed Racer” (2008)

It’s rare to see a movie that was adapted from an ancient franchise and yet still feels ahead of its time, but something like “Speed Racer” doesn’t come around the track every day. Or every decade, for that matter. Inarguably one of the boldest and most dazzling blockbusters of the 21st century, the Wachowskis’ “Speed Racer” is such a brilliant example of a live-action anime that it almost (almost) has us convinced that an “Akira” remake might not be a bad idea (just to reiterate for any studio executives who might happen to read this: An “Akira” remake is a very bad idea).

Paid for with the power its directors had coming off the “Matrix” sequels and stylized with the same reckless abandon that would later sink “Jupiter Ascending,” “Speed Racer” takes the 1960s Japanese cartoon of the same name and swirls it into an impossibly colorful pop spectacle that never bows to American sensibilities. The movie crashed and burned with critics upon release, but it only gets better as blockbuster cinema gets worse; the only thing about it that hasn’t aged well is the casting of Matthew Fox. There may never be anything else like it again, but — in fairness — there was never anything else like it before, either.

Available to stream on April 1.

3. “Scarface” (1983)

One of the best things about “Scarface” — which narrowly edges out “Mission to Mars” as the rap community’s favorite Brian De Palma film — is that it answered a question that cinephiles and scholars had been sitting with since Howard Hawks riffed on the same story in 1932: What would a classic Hollywood gangster picture look like if you filtered it through a metric ton of cocaine? Based on every basic film bro’s favorite movie poster and boasting an Al Pacino performance so big you can see it from outer space, “Scarface” is a rags-to-riches epic about one man trying to embrace the American Dream (but accidentally snorting it instead). Pacino tears up the screen as Cuban refugee Antonio “Tony” Montana, shooting his way to the top of the Miami drug game and marrying Michelle Pfeiffer in the process. Everyone lives happily ever after.

If you’re in the New York area this month and Netflix isn’t doing it for ya, don’t miss the chance to see De Palma’s pastel masterpiece on the big screen as part of the Tribeca Film Festival.

Available to stream on April 1.

2. “The Iron Giant” (1999)

Just in time for the release of “The Incredibles 2” comes the most exquisitely painful reminder of what we lost when Brad Bird forsook hand-drawn animation for digital. A box office flop that justifiably grew into one of the most beloved kids movies ever made, “The Iron Giant” is a heartrending Cold War throwback about a little kid named Hogarth Hughes (Eli Marienthal) and the metal colossus from outer space (Vin Diesel) who becomes his best friend. Steady and soulful where most films of its ilk are manic and disingenuous, “The Iron Giant” isn’t just a gorgeously animated look back at a faded chapter of Norman Rockwell Americana, it’s also a moving examination of what it means to be human.

Available to stream on April 1.

1. “Seven” (1995)

The serial killer in “Se7en” may not have much in common with Donald Trump (one is patient, brilliant, and articulate, and the other is Donald Trump), and yet both monsters teach us the same lesson by preying upon and inspiring the worst of what we are: The world isn’t fair, but some people will always need to be better than others for it to keep spinning.

No, we’re not trying to argue that “Se7en” is a “serial killer story for the Age of Trump.” And yet, for a grunge nightmare that opens with Tipper Gore’s least favorite Nine Inch Nails song, the film seems more responsive to the present moment than you might expect. An epochal neo-noir that launched a handful of careers, galvanized others, and instantly asserted itself as one of the ’90s’ major cinematic flash points, David Fincher’s second feature will always have value when things seem hopeless.

The first two acts of this grippingly oppressive film may be the stuff of a traditional detective procedural, but they’re still suspenseful in an era when every town in America has its own “NCIS” spinoff (thanks in large part to the laconic chemistry that burbles between Morgan Freeman and Brad Pitt). However, “Seven” is obviously remembered for the nihilism of its third act, which giddily reanimates the apocalyptic spirit that once atomized inside the likes of “Kiss Me Deadly.” However, this time around we find out exactly what’s in the box, Fincher ambushing Hollywood (and its audiences) with an unforgettable movie about living in a world so dark that we can’t see it clearly.

Available to stream on April 1.

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‘Zodiac’: David Fincher’s Historical Accuracy Is More Specific Than You Can Imagine — Watch

Cinema is full of movies based on true stories, but none are as specific in detail as “Zodiac.”

The true crime story is one of the most enduring genres in film, but few entries are as specific in their attention to detail as David Fincher’s “Zodiac.” The movie just turned 11 years old last month, and Film Radar video essayist Daniel Netzel has marked the occasion with a fascinating new video investigation into “Zodiac’s” historical accuracy.

So what makes Fincher’s masterpiece the most accurate true crime film? As the video explains, Fincher went to great lengths to ensure the film was historically accurate, from recreating a period-accurate San Francisco to building sets that matched their real-word counterparts and even dressing the murder victims in the clothes they were wearing when they died. But the film is even more accurate than you might notice.

In the video below, Netzel layers Fincher’s footage over real interviews from eyewitnesses who were involved with the Zodiac killer in the 1960s. The result is proof Fincher went above and beyond in his attention to detail.

Zodiac was so realistic it creeped out the killer’s real-life survivors

Anyone going to see a movie that’s supposedly “based on true events” knows that what they’re actually getting is the Hollywood version of events. That means certain elements or characters have been cut, the timeline has been reordered, and things have generally been made more dramatic to serve the narrative. But for…

Read more…

Anyone going to see a movie that’s supposedly “based on true events” knows that what they’re actually getting is the Hollywood version of events. That means certain elements or characters have been cut, the timeline has been reordered, and things have generally been made more dramatic to serve the narrative. But for…

Read more...

Social Network director extremely uninterested in social networks

All of you clamoring to @RealDavidFincher and let him know that, actually, Alien 3 is better than it had any right to be will now have to face up to reality. The director and producer has issued news that he will not, in fact, be joining any social net…

All of you clamoring to @RealDavidFincher and let him know that, actually, Alien 3 is better than it had any right to be will now have to face up to reality. The director and producer has issued news that he will not, in fact, be joining any social network in the near future.

Read more...

David Fincher Won’t Ever Join Social Media to Interact With Fans, Despite Mark Romanek’s Best Efforts

Bad news for anyone hoping for a David Fincher Instagram page.

What would David Fincher’s Instagram page look like? Unfortunately, we’ll never know. Fincher’s good friend and fellow director Mark Romanek published an email exchange between the two men on his Instagram page, and it hilariously features a very blunt Fincher turning down a fan asking for Fincher-run social media pages.

Instagram user philip.mcnroe asked Romanek: “Can you talk David Fincher into using social media and interacting with his fans, please?” Romanek forwarded the question to Fincher via email, to which the “Gone Girl” director only had this to say: “Dear Philip, NO.”

Fincher is notoriously private and usually only talks to select publications when he has a new project out (his “Mindhunter” press tour, for instance, was extremely limited), so it’s not entirely surprising to hear he’s avoiding interacting with fans on social media. The director is at work on the second season of his Netflix serial killer drama “Mindhunter” and currently has no film plans on his docket.

The director was last on the big screen with “Gone Girl” in fall 2014. “Mindhunter” isn’t expected to return to Netflix until late 2018 or 2019.

I tried. #davidfincher

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Cate Blanchett Named Cannes Film Festival Jury President

Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett has been named the President of the Jury for the 71st Annual Cannes Film Festival.

The “Carol” and “Thor: Ragnarok” star will be the first female jury president since Jane Campion served in 2014.

Other women to take on the role this century include Oscar nominee Isabelle Huppert and Liv Ullmann. It is the 12th time in festival history a woman has headed the jury. Director, screenwriter and actress Jeanne Moreau served twice, with all others putting in one year each.

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival to Start One Day Earlier in 2018

“I have been to Cannes in many guises over the years; as an actress, producer, in the marketplace, the Gala-sphere and in Competition,” Blanchett said. “But never solely for the sheer pleasure of watching the cornucopia of films this great festival harbors.”

Festival leaders Pierre Lescure and Thierry Frémaux, General Delegate called Blanchett a “unique artist whose talent and convictions enrich both screen and stage. Our conversations from this autumn tell us she will be a committed President, a passionate woman and a big-hearted spectator.”

Blanchett succeeds 2017 jury president Pedro Almodovar in an already packed year. She’ll release the female heist reboot “Ocean’s 8” in June, then an already-buzzy leading role in Richard Linklater’s “Where’d You Go Bernadette” followed by Eli Roth’s “The House with a Clock in its Walls.”

Read the full announcement:

Australian actor Cate Blanchett is to be President of the Jury of the Festival de Cannes, the 71st edition of which will be taking place in May 2018.

“I have been to Cannes in many guises over the years; as an actress, producer, in the marketplace, the Gala-sphere and in Competition,” she declared, “but never solely for the sheer pleasure of watching the cornucopia of films this great festival harbours.”

Cate Blanchett follows Pedro Almodóvar, Jury President of the 70th edition, whose jury awarded the Palme d’or to The Square by Swedish director Ruben ?-stlund.

“I am humbled by the privilege and responsibility of presiding over this year’s jury,” she continued. “This festival plays a pivotal role in bringing the world together to celebrate story; that strange and vital endeavour that all peoples share, understand and crave.”

Pierre Lescure, Festival de Cannes President and Thierry Frémaux, General Delegate, said: “We are delighted to welcome such a rare and unique artist whose talent and convictions enrich both screen and stage. Our conversations from this autumn tell us she will be a committed President, a passionate woman and a big-hearted spectator.”

Cate Blanchett is one of those actors for whom performing is a permanent delight, whatever the role she takes to stage or screen. In film, always under the eye of great directors, she switches between independent ventures and lavish productions, and appears in the credits of all notable contemporary English-language cinema: The Lord of the Rings trilogy, by Peter Jackson, Benjamin Button by David Fincher, Babel by Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Life Aquatic by Wes Anderson, The Good German by Steven Soderbergh, Coffee and Cigarettes by Jim Jarmusch. To this non-exhaustive list, we must add Steven Spielberg, Terrence Malick, Sally Potter, Ridley Scott, Woody Allen and Todd Haynes.

When she is not on screen, Blanchett’s commitment to the theatre all over the world is palpable. Alongside her producing partner Andrew Upton, she was CEO and co-Artistic Director of the Sydney Theatre Company from 2008 to 2013 and Blanchett has won awards for her work on stage in New York, Washington, London, Paris (she performed in Jean Genêt’s The Maids alongside Isabelle Huppert, Jury President in 2009) and also in Sydney, of course, where she soared in Liv Ullman’s production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

In 2012, Blanchett was awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister for Culture and also the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society, both for her significant contribution to the arts. In 2015, she was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts before she was made a Companion in the Order of Australia in 2017.

Back on the screen, Blanchett won the 2014 Oscar for best actress for her performance in Blue Jasmine by Woody Allen. This award came in addition to the Oscar she was awarded in 2004 for best supporting actress in The Aviator by Martin Scorsese in which she played an unforgettable Katharine Hepburn – it is the first time that an actress has won an Oscar for playing another actress… who also won an Oscar.

Cate Blanchett was also nominated for her performance in Carol by Todd Haynes, a film that she co-produced and which was presented in competition at Cannes in 2015. And not forgetting that in 2008 she also received two Oscar nominations, best actress for Elizabeth the Golden Age by Shekhar Kapur (with whom she collaborated 10 years earlier in Elizabeth) and best supporting actress for I’m Not There by Todd Haynes (for which she won the best actress prize at the Mostra in Venice), making her one of only five actors in the history of the Academy to have been nominated for both categories in the same year.

Recently, Cate Blanchett was seen in the Marvel super-production Thor: Ragnarok and will be appearing in Ocean’s 8, the first chapter in an entirely female saga, produced by Warner and due to be released after Cannes, late spring 2018. In the same year, she will appear in the highly-anticipated film adaptation of Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go Bernadette, directed by Richard Linklater. She can then be seen in The House with a Clock in its Walls, directed by Eli Roth.

Cate Blanchett is also a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, where she focuses on issues of statelessness for refugees around the world.

The Festival de Cannes 2018 will take place from May 8th – 19th and, exceptionally, will open on a Tuesday and end on a Saturday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Review: Cate Blanchett’s Campy Villainess Steals the Thunder

Cate Blanchett’s Lucille Ball Biopic Lands at Amazon Studios

‘Manifesto’ Review: Cate Blanchett Is Every Woman in Trippy Art Piece

Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett has been named the President of the Jury for the 71st Annual Cannes Film Festival.

The “Carol” and “Thor: Ragnarok” star will be the first female jury president since Jane Campion served in 2014.

Other women to take on the role this century include Oscar nominee Isabelle Huppert and Liv Ullmann. It is the 12th time in festival history a woman has headed the jury. Director, screenwriter and actress Jeanne Moreau served twice, with all others putting in one year each.

“I have been to Cannes in many guises over the years; as an actress, producer, in the marketplace, the Gala-sphere and in Competition,” Blanchett said. “But never solely for the sheer pleasure of watching the cornucopia of films this great festival harbors.”

Festival leaders Pierre Lescure and Thierry Frémaux, General Delegate called Blanchett a “unique artist whose talent and convictions enrich both screen and stage. Our conversations from this autumn tell us she will be a committed President, a passionate woman and a big-hearted spectator.”

Blanchett succeeds 2017 jury president Pedro Almodovar in an already packed year. She’ll release the female heist reboot “Ocean’s 8” in June, then an already-buzzy leading role in Richard Linklater’s “Where’d You Go Bernadette” followed by Eli Roth’s “The House with a Clock in its Walls.”

Read the full announcement:

Australian actor Cate Blanchett is to be President of the Jury of the Festival de Cannes, the 71st edition of which will be taking place in May 2018.

“I have been to Cannes in many guises over the years; as an actress, producer, in the marketplace, the Gala-sphere and in Competition,” she declared, “but never solely for the sheer pleasure of watching the cornucopia of films this great festival harbours.”

Cate Blanchett follows Pedro Almodóvar, Jury President of the 70th edition, whose jury awarded the Palme d’or to The Square by Swedish director Ruben ?-stlund.

“I am humbled by the privilege and responsibility of presiding over this year’s jury,” she continued. “This festival plays a pivotal role in bringing the world together to celebrate story; that strange and vital endeavour that all peoples share, understand and crave.”

Pierre Lescure, Festival de Cannes President and Thierry Frémaux, General Delegate, said: “We are delighted to welcome such a rare and unique artist whose talent and convictions enrich both screen and stage. Our conversations from this autumn tell us she will be a committed President, a passionate woman and a big-hearted spectator.”

Cate Blanchett is one of those actors for whom performing is a permanent delight, whatever the role she takes to stage or screen. In film, always under the eye of great directors, she switches between independent ventures and lavish productions, and appears in the credits of all notable contemporary English-language cinema: The Lord of the Rings trilogy, by Peter Jackson, Benjamin Button by David Fincher, Babel by Alejandro González Iñárritu, The Life Aquatic by Wes Anderson, The Good German by Steven Soderbergh, Coffee and Cigarettes by Jim Jarmusch. To this non-exhaustive list, we must add Steven Spielberg, Terrence Malick, Sally Potter, Ridley Scott, Woody Allen and Todd Haynes.

When she is not on screen, Blanchett’s commitment to the theatre all over the world is palpable. Alongside her producing partner Andrew Upton, she was CEO and co-Artistic Director of the Sydney Theatre Company from 2008 to 2013 and Blanchett has won awards for her work on stage in New York, Washington, London, Paris (she performed in Jean Genêt’s The Maids alongside Isabelle Huppert, Jury President in 2009) and also in Sydney, of course, where she soared in Liv Ullman’s production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

In 2012, Blanchett was awarded the Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Minister for Culture and also the Centenary Medal for Service to Australian Society, both for her significant contribution to the arts. In 2015, she was honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts before she was made a Companion in the Order of Australia in 2017.

Back on the screen, Blanchett won the 2014 Oscar for best actress for her performance in Blue Jasmine by Woody Allen. This award came in addition to the Oscar she was awarded in 2004 for best supporting actress in The Aviator by Martin Scorsese in which she played an unforgettable Katharine Hepburn – it is the first time that an actress has won an Oscar for playing another actress… who also won an Oscar.

Cate Blanchett was also nominated for her performance in Carol by Todd Haynes, a film that she co-produced and which was presented in competition at Cannes in 2015. And not forgetting that in 2008 she also received two Oscar nominations, best actress for Elizabeth the Golden Age by Shekhar Kapur (with whom she collaborated 10 years earlier in Elizabeth) and best supporting actress for I’m Not There by Todd Haynes (for which she won the best actress prize at the Mostra in Venice), making her one of only five actors in the history of the Academy to have been nominated for both categories in the same year.

Recently, Cate Blanchett was seen in the Marvel super-production Thor: Ragnarok and will be appearing in Ocean’s 8, the first chapter in an entirely female saga, produced by Warner and due to be released after Cannes, late spring 2018. In the same year, she will appear in the highly-anticipated film adaptation of Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go Bernadette, directed by Richard Linklater. She can then be seen in The House with a Clock in its Walls, directed by Eli Roth.

Cate Blanchett is also a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, where she focuses on issues of statelessness for refugees around the world.

The Festival de Cannes 2018 will take place from May 8th – 19th and, exceptionally, will open on a Tuesday and end on a Saturday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Thor: Ragnarok' Review: Cate Blanchett's Campy Villainess Steals the Thunder

Cate Blanchett's Lucille Ball Biopic Lands at Amazon Studios

'Manifesto' Review: Cate Blanchett Is Every Woman in Trippy Art Piece