‘SNL’ Star Darrell Hammond Reveals Past Trauma in Documentary Trailer (EXCLUSIVE)

For 14 seasons, “Saturday Night Live’s” Darrell Hammond delighted crowds with his uncanny impersonations of Sean Connery, Regis Philbin, and (most notably) former President Bill Clinton. Mimicking over 107 celebrities, Hammond found f…

For 14 seasons, “Saturday Night Live’s” Darrell Hammond delighted crowds with his uncanny impersonations of Sean Connery, Regis Philbin, and (most notably) former President Bill Clinton. Mimicking over 107 celebrities, Hammond found fame on the sketch show, appearing on films and even performing at the White House Correspondents’ dinner. But behind-the-scenes, the comedian suffered. Plagued by incapacitating […]

Billy Crystal, Kevin Kline, Annette Bening Stage A Mildly ‘Nice Day’: Off Broadway Review

Nearly 10 years ago, Billy Crystal and writer Quinton Peeples started work on a screenplay they’d eventually call Have A Nice Day. Not terribly long in Hollywood development years, but eons removed from our current political climate.
Performed an…

Nearly 10 years ago, Billy Crystal and writer Quinton Peeples started work on a screenplay they’d eventually call Have A Nice Day. Not terribly long in Hollywood development years, but eons removed from our current political climate. Performed and recorded (by Amazon’s Audible) as a staged Off Broadway reading last night and tonight by a starry ensemble – Crystal, Kevin Kline, Annette Bening and Dick Cavett, among others – Have a Nice Day, with its progressive, honest and…

Reminder: Darrell Hammond ‘Just Started Crying’ When Baldwin Replaced Him as Trump

Donald Trump tweeted early Friday that Alec Baldwin’s impersonation of him on “Saturday Night Live” is an “agony” compared to Darrell Hammond’s. But he’s not the only one who was disappointed when the NBC sketch show changed performers for the role.

In a 2017 Washington Post profile, Hammond detailed his reaction to executive producer Lorne Michaels’s decision that Baldwin should play the then-presidential candidate.

“I just started crying,” said Hammond, who stepped away as a regular “SNL” cast member in 2009. “In front of everyone. I couldn’t believe it. I was in shock, and I stayed in shock for a long time. Everything wiped out. The brand, me, what I do. Corporate appearances canceled. It was a hell of a shock, and all of it was apparent to me in one breath. ‘That ends me.’”

Also Read: Alec Baldwin Rebuffs Trump’s Call for New ‘SNL’ Impersonator: ‘I’d Like to Hang in There for the Impeachment’

At the time, Michaels explained the decision by saying he needed a new person to portray the character Trump had become on the campaign trail. Baldwin’s pouting, blow-hard Trump became a huge success and led to one of “SNL’s” buzziest seasons in years.

But Trump himself has repeatedly voiced displeasure at the unflattering portrayal, including Friday’s early morning tweet.

“Alec Baldwin, whose dying mediocre career was saved by his terrible impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing me was agony,” the president wrote, twenty minutes after deleting a similar tweet riddled with typos. “Alec, it was agony for those who were forced to watch. Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater talent!”

Also Read: Trump Botches Tweet Ripping ‘Alex’ Baldwin’s ‘SNL’ Impression: ‘Bring Back Darrell Hammond’

Alec Baldwin, whose dying mediocre career was saved by his terrible impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing me was agony. Alec, it was agony for those who were forced to watch. Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater talent!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 2, 2018

However, even if “Saturday Night Live” were to make the unlikely capitulation to the president, it seems like Baldwin would certainly take steps to maintain his role.

“I’d like to hang in there for the impeachment hearings, the resignation speech, the farewell helicopter ride to Mara-A-Lago,” Baldwin tweeted on Friday. “You know. The Good Stuff. That we’ve all been waiting for.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Alec Baldwin Rebuffs Trump’s Call for New ‘SNL’ Impersonator: ‘I’d Like to Hang in There for the Impeachment’

Trump Botches Tweet Ripping ‘Alex’ Baldwin’s ‘SNL’ Impression: ‘Bring Back Darrell Hammond’

Every ‘SNL’ Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

Donald Trump tweeted early Friday that Alec Baldwin’s impersonation of him on “Saturday Night Live” is an “agony” compared to Darrell Hammond’s. But he’s not the only one who was disappointed when the NBC sketch show changed performers for the role.

In a 2017 Washington Post profile, Hammond detailed his reaction to executive producer Lorne Michaels’s decision that Baldwin should play the then-presidential candidate.

“I just started crying,” said Hammond, who stepped away as a regular “SNL” cast member in 2009. “In front of everyone. I couldn’t believe it. I was in shock, and I stayed in shock for a long time. Everything wiped out. The brand, me, what I do. Corporate appearances canceled. It was a hell of a shock, and all of it was apparent to me in one breath. ‘That ends me.'”

At the time, Michaels explained the decision by saying he needed a new person to portray the character Trump had become on the campaign trail. Baldwin’s pouting, blow-hard Trump became a huge success and led to one of “SNL’s” buzziest seasons in years.

But Trump himself has repeatedly voiced displeasure at the unflattering portrayal, including Friday’s early morning tweet.

“Alec Baldwin, whose dying mediocre career was saved by his terrible impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing me was agony,” the president wrote, twenty minutes after deleting a similar tweet riddled with typos. “Alec, it was agony for those who were forced to watch. Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater talent!”

However, even if “Saturday Night Live” were to make the unlikely capitulation to the president, it seems like Baldwin would certainly take steps to maintain his role.

“I’d like to hang in there for the impeachment hearings, the resignation speech, the farewell helicopter ride to Mara-A-Lago,” Baldwin tweeted on Friday. “You know. The Good Stuff. That we’ve all been waiting for.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Alec Baldwin Rebuffs Trump's Call for New 'SNL' Impersonator: 'I'd Like to Hang in There for the Impeachment'

Trump Botches Tweet Ripping 'Alex' Baldwin's 'SNL' Impression: 'Bring Back Darrell Hammond'

Every 'SNL' Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

Donald Trump Tells ‘Saturday Night Live’ to Nix ‘Terrible’ Alec Baldwin and ‘Bring Back Darrell Hammond’

“Mr President… please ask your wife to stop calling me for SNL tickets,” Baldwin responded.

In between tweets about a “great” meeting with the NRA and the importance of the steel industry, Donald Trump took a shot at Alec Baldwin’s “Saturday Night Live” impression. In a since deleted tweet posted early Friday morning, the president made two spelling errors: Mistaking Baldwin’s first name as “Alex,” and referring to his “dieing” career. He then fixed the mistakes and re-posted the tweet.

“Alec Baldwin, whose dying mediocre career was saved by his terrible impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing me was agony,” said Trump. “Alec, it was agony for those who were forced to watch. Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater talent!”

Baldwin responded a few hours later, and even Tina Fey couldn’t have written a better response: “Agony though it may be, I’d like to hang in there for the impeachment hearings, the resignation speech, the farewell helicopter ride to Mara-A-Lago. You know. The Good Stuff. That we’ve all been waiting for,” he said.

In a separate tweet, he added: “And Mr President…please ask your wife to stop calling me for SNL tickets. (Hey, Melania…we’ve got Charles Barkley this Saturday!)”

Baldwin has earned much acclaim for his Trump impersonation, appearing on the NBC show since September of 2016 to rave reviews. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he said playing the president was “agony,” which is likely what prompted the president’s tweet. Hammond, who often played Trump during his days as a cast member, briefly returned in the role before Baldwin took over.

Trump Botches Tweet Ripping ‘Alex’ Baldwin’s ‘SNL’ Impression: ‘Bring Back Darrell Hammond’

Donald Trump’s propensity for tweeting at odd hours got the best of him Friday morning as a rant about Alec Baldwin’s impression of him on the past two season of “SNL” contained multiple typos — the most crucial one being that he referred to the actor as “Alex Bladwin” not once, but twice.

In addition to the misspelled name, Trump also botched the spelling of “dying,” spelling it instead as “dieing.”

“Alex Baldwin, whose dieing mediocre career was saved by his impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing DJT was agony for him. Alex, it was also agony for those who were forced to watch. You were terrible. Bring back Darrell Hammond, much funnier and a far greater talent!”

Also Read: Stephen Colbert Breaks Down Trump’s Continuing Feud with ‘Racist Dobby’ Jeff Sessions (Video)

Trump was referring to comments Baldwin made to THR published on Thursday, in which he said: “Every time I do it now, it’s like agony. Agony. I can’t.”

The typo-filled tweet went out at 2:42 a.m. PT, and was deleted not long after and replaced a half-hour later with a new version of the tweet with the three errors corrected.

Alec Baldwin, whose dying mediocre career was saved by his terrible impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing me was agony. Alec, it was agony for those who were forced to watch. Bring back Darrell Hammond, funnier and a far greater talent!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) March 2, 2018

Also Read: Every ‘SNL’ Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

Trump also endorsed the return of Darr: ell Hammond, who was known for doing a pretty great impression of Trump — among many others, including Bill Clinton — during his 15-year stint on the show from 1995 to 2009. POTUS endorsed Hammond as “funnier and a far greater talent!”

Baldwin has been playing Trump on “SNL” since the beginning of season 42 just prior to the 2016 presidential election, and has continued in the role through this season though the frequency of his appearances has been waning.

Baldwin only appeared as Trump in one of the four “SNL” episodes that has aired so far this year. The show returns from a month-long hiatus on Saturday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tucker Carlson Shreds Trump Over Gun Control: If ‘Obama Had Said That,’ We’d Be ‘Talking Impeachment’

Stephen Colbert Breaks Down Trump’s Continuing Feud with ‘Racist Dobby’ Jeff Sessions (Video)

Seth Meyers Laughs At Trump Becoming the Anti-Gun Monster He Claimed Obama Was (Video)

Trevor Noah: Trump Attacking the NRA Is The Most Shocking Twist Since ‘The Usual Suspects’ (Video)

Donald Trump’s propensity for tweeting at odd hours got the best of him Friday morning as a rant about Alec Baldwin’s impression of him on the past two season of “SNL” contained multiple typos — the most crucial one being that he referred to the actor as “Alex Bladwin” not once, but twice.

In addition to the misspelled name, Trump also botched the spelling of “dying,” spelling it instead as “dieing.”

“Alex Baldwin, whose dieing mediocre career was saved by his impersonation of me on SNL, now says playing DJT was agony for him. Alex, it was also agony for those who were forced to watch. You were terrible. Bring back Darrell Hammond, much funnier and a far greater talent!”

Trump was referring to comments Baldwin made to THR published on Thursday, in which he said: “Every time I do it now, it’s like agony. Agony. I can’t.”

The typo-filled tweet went out at 2:42 a.m. PT, and was deleted not long after and replaced a half-hour later with a new version of the tweet with the three errors corrected.

Trump also endorsed the return of Darr: ell Hammond, who was known for doing a pretty great impression of Trump — among many others, including Bill Clinton — during his 15-year stint on the show from 1995 to 2009. POTUS endorsed Hammond as “funnier and a far greater talent!”

Baldwin has been playing Trump on “SNL” since the beginning of season 42 just prior to the 2016 presidential election, and has continued in the role through this season though the frequency of his appearances has been waning.

Baldwin only appeared as Trump in one of the four “SNL” episodes that has aired so far this year. The show returns from a month-long hiatus on Saturday.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tucker Carlson Shreds Trump Over Gun Control: If 'Obama Had Said That,' We'd Be 'Talking Impeachment'

Stephen Colbert Breaks Down Trump's Continuing Feud with 'Racist Dobby' Jeff Sessions (Video)

Seth Meyers Laughs At Trump Becoming the Anti-Gun Monster He Claimed Obama Was (Video)

Trevor Noah: Trump Attacking the NRA Is The Most Shocking Twist Since 'The Usual Suspects' (Video)

Darrell Hammond Reflects on Losing His Donald Trump Gig on ‘SNL’: ‘I Just Started Crying’

The show’s best-known impressionist was devastated.

Before Alec Baldwin, there was Darrell Hammond. The longtime “Saturday Night Live” cast member has been one of the show’s best-known impressionists for more than two decades, sending up the likes of Bill Clinton, Sean Connery, and, yes, Donald Trump. Last September, however, he received word that he would no longer be impersonating the then–presidential candidate — and it broke him.

Hammond recalls the experience in a lengthy Washington Post profile, recalling how devastated he was with great candor. “I just started crying,” he says. “In front of everyone. I couldn’t believe it. I was in shock, and I stayed in shock for a long time. Everything wiped out. The brand, me, what I do. Corporate appearances canceled. It was a hell of a shock, and all of it was apparent to me in one breath. That ends me.”

Making it worse was the fact that Lorne Michaels didn’t deliver the news personally; he delegated that task to producer Steve Higgins, an old friend of Hammond’s. On election night, he didn’t even watch the results — it was too painful a reminder of the opportunity he’d lost, so he put on “Game of Thrones” instead.

“I needed another force, on an acting level, to have the power that Trump was embodying then,” Michaels tells WaPo. “The Darrell Trump…it wasn’t the Trump that had gotten darker. It was the Trump from ‘The Apprentice.’” Read the full piece here.

Darrell Hammond Cried When He Found Out Alec Baldwin Would Take Over as Trump on ‘SNL’

“Saturday Night Live” is coming off one of its buzziest seasons in recent years, thanks in part to Alec Baldwin stepping in to portray Donald Trump. But the transition wasn’t easy for Darrell Hammond, the NBC sketch show’s announcer who previously played Trump on the show.

Hammond told the Washington Post that he broke down in tears when “SNL” producer Steve Higgins told him during the summer of 2016 that Baldwin would be supplanting him. This followed Hammond having closely studied the now-president on the campaign trail with the expectation of donning the signature hairpiece and red tie in Season 42.

“I just started crying,” said Hammond, who stepped away as a regular “SNL” cast member in 2009. “In front of everyone. I couldn’t believe it. I was in shock, and I stayed in shock for a long time. Everything wiped out. The brand, me, what I do. Corporate appearances canceled. It was a hell of a shock, and all of it was apparent to me in one breath. ‘That ends me.’”

Also Read: ‘Saturday Night Live’ Adds 3 New Cast Members for Season 43

Hammond pointed out that doctors wrote several prescriptions to help him avoid drinking, as the performer had previously struggled with substance issues. He said that he wanted to avoid dwelling on losing the gig, but that it seemed impossible to escape.

“I couldn’t get on an elevator, couldn’t walk through a lobby, couldn’t turn on a television, couldn’t walk down Broadway, couldn’t go to my favorite diner, couldn’t go anywhere,” Hammond said. “People would literally pull up in their cars on the way to Lincoln Tunnel to say: ‘What the hell happened? What in the world? Are you OK?’ Like, ‘Why would you give that job up?’”

Hammond, who ended up moving to L.A. from New York for a fresh perspective (he records the show’s announcements remotely), explained that he was hurt that “SNL” creator Lorne Michaels had asked Higgins to deliver the news instead of doing so himself.

Also Read: ‘Saturday Night Live’ Will Continue to Air Live Coast-to-Coast This Season

“I don’t want to sound like a large, squawking bird,” Hammond said, concerned about appearing overly sensitive.

For his part, Michaels told the Post that he wanted the show’s post-election Trump to have a different tone than Hammond’s, given that viewers impressions of the real estate mogul have changed.

“I needed another force, on an acting level, to have the power that Trump was embodying then,” Michaels said. “The Darrell Trump … it wasn’t the Trump that had gotten darker. It was the Trump from ‘The Apprentice.’”

“Saturday Night Live” Season 43 debuts Sept. 30 at 11:30/10:30c on NBC. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys Backstage: Alec Baldwin Sympathizes With Sean Spicer – ‘I’ve Done Some Jobs You Shouldn’t Admire Either’

Alec Baldwin-Hosted ‘Match Game’ Renewed for Season 3

Alec Baldwin Joins NBC’s Live ‘A Few Good Men’

Every ‘SNL’ Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

“Saturday Night Live” is coming off one of its buzziest seasons in recent years, thanks in part to Alec Baldwin stepping in to portray Donald Trump. But the transition wasn’t easy for Darrell Hammond, the NBC sketch show’s announcer who previously played Trump on the show.

Hammond told the Washington Post that he broke down in tears when “SNL” producer Steve Higgins told him during the summer of 2016 that Baldwin would be supplanting him. This followed Hammond having closely studied the now-president on the campaign trail with the expectation of donning the signature hairpiece and red tie in Season 42.

“I just started crying,” said Hammond, who stepped away as a regular “SNL” cast member in 2009. “In front of everyone. I couldn’t believe it. I was in shock, and I stayed in shock for a long time. Everything wiped out. The brand, me, what I do. Corporate appearances canceled. It was a hell of a shock, and all of it was apparent to me in one breath. ‘That ends me.'”

Hammond pointed out that doctors wrote several prescriptions to help him avoid drinking, as the performer had previously struggled with substance issues. He said that he wanted to avoid dwelling on losing the gig, but that it seemed impossible to escape.

“I couldn’t get on an elevator, couldn’t walk through a lobby, couldn’t turn on a television, couldn’t walk down Broadway, couldn’t go to my favorite diner, couldn’t go anywhere,” Hammond said. “People would literally pull up in their cars on the way to Lincoln Tunnel to say: ‘What the hell happened? What in the world? Are you OK?’ Like, ‘Why would you give that job up?'”

Hammond, who ended up moving to L.A. from New York for a fresh perspective (he records the show’s announcements remotely), explained that he was hurt that “SNL” creator Lorne Michaels had asked Higgins to deliver the news instead of doing so himself.

“I don’t want to sound like a large, squawking bird,” Hammond said, concerned about appearing overly sensitive.

For his part, Michaels told the Post that he wanted the show’s post-election Trump to have a different tone than Hammond’s, given that viewers impressions of the real estate mogul have changed.

“I needed another force, on an acting level, to have the power that Trump was embodying then,” Michaels said. “The Darrell Trump … it wasn’t the Trump that had gotten darker. It was the Trump from ‘The Apprentice.'”

“Saturday Night Live” Season 43 debuts Sept. 30 at 11:30/10:30c on NBC. 

Related stories from TheWrap:

Emmys Backstage: Alec Baldwin Sympathizes With Sean Spicer – 'I've Done Some Jobs You Shouldn't Admire Either'

Alec Baldwin-Hosted 'Match Game' Renewed for Season 3

Alec Baldwin Joins NBC's Live 'A Few Good Men'

Every 'SNL' Alec Baldwin Donald Trump Sketch Ranked, From Least to Most Retweetable (Photos)

‘Saturday Night Live’: Who Will Play President Donald Trump On NBC Show?

Donald Trump pulled a major upset with his stunning victory last night. His win will have major implications for the deeply divided nation and its policies. While nowhere near as fateful for the country, a Trump presidency also is creating intrigue at Saturday Night Live, which will have to come up with a long-term plan for President-elect Trump’s portrayal for the next four years.
Maybe heeding polls predicting a Hillary Clinton victory, SNL recruited Alec Baldwin to…

Donald Trump pulled a major upset with his stunning victory last night. His win will have major implications for the deeply divided nation and its policies. While nowhere near as fateful for the country, a Trump presidency also is creating intrigue at Saturday Night Live, which will have to come up with a long-term plan for President-elect Trump’s portrayal for the next four years. Maybe heeding polls predicting a Hillary Clinton victory, SNL recruited Alec Baldwin to…

11 Hilarious ‘SNL’ Election Sketches, From Scheming Reagan To ‘Yuge’ Bernie Sanders (Videos)

If there’s one good thing about this chaotic election, it’s that it has given the comedians of America an endless well of material. “Saturday Night Live” has certainly dug into that well, with plenty of skits poking fun at Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump (the latter of which, ironically, hosted last year). Here are some of the best “SNL” sketches from this election, along with classics from elections past, starting with Alec Baldwin‘s parody of Donald Trump in the first presidential debate.

If you asked someone to name an “SNL” election sketch, they will likely come up with Tina Fey‘s famous 2008 parody of Sarah Palin. Fey’s quip about how Palin could see Russia from her house immediately entered the zeitgeist and became one of the most famous “SNL” jokes ever.

The laughs over “Fey-lin” reached their peak when the real Sarah Palin showed up to take over for Fey, showing that the resemblance between the comedienne and the governor of Alaska.

Imagine an alternate universe where Al Gore won the 2000 election. Well, Al Gore himself is here to show you what kind of speech he would have made as our 43rd president. Don’t worry about George W. Bush. He landed a nice cushy job as the commissioner of Major League Baseball.

When Amy Poehler left “SNL,” Kate McKinnon was tasked with taking up her job as the show’s Hillary Clinton impersonator. Last year, the two reunited for a very special Clinton Christmas sketch that highlighted toe duo’s different approaches to impersonating the Democratic candidate. .

For “SNL,” the breakout performance of this election has been Larry David and his impersonation of Bernie Sanders. The finest example of his work is “Bern Your Enthusiasm,” where David gets to combine the two roles that have made him one of the biggest stars of 2016.

One of the longest running impersonations in “SNL” history is Darrell Hammond‘s parody of Bill Clinton, which has been going for almost a quarter-century now. Here’s a quick clip of Hammond after Bill Clinton was cleared of perjury in the Monica Lewinsky case.

Several actors have impersonated George W. Bush on “SNL,” but the most famous by far is Will Ferrell‘s version. Here’s a recent skit in which Ferrell shows Dubya announcing his endorsement for president.

Back in 2012, Taran Killam starred in this riff on undecided voters whom politicians desperately try to court for votes…even if they’ve been living under a rock.

In 1984, “SNL” political impersonators included the likes of Phil Hartman and Joe Piscopo, the latter of whom can be seen here scheming with Sammy Davis, Jr. (Billy Crystal) on how to come out on top in the re-election campaign.

Finally, here’s McKinnon again in a Hillary Clinton ad that tries to reach out to millennials disappointed that Bernie Sanders didn’t win.

If there’s one good thing about this chaotic election, it’s that it has given the comedians of America an endless well of material. “Saturday Night Live” has certainly dug into that well, with plenty of skits poking fun at Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Donald Trump (the latter of which, ironically, hosted last year). Here are some of the best “SNL” sketches from this election, along with classics from elections past, starting with Alec Baldwin‘s parody of Donald Trump in the first presidential debate.

If you asked someone to name an “SNL” election sketch, they will likely come up with Tina Fey‘s famous 2008 parody of Sarah Palin. Fey’s quip about how Palin could see Russia from her house immediately entered the zeitgeist and became one of the most famous “SNL” jokes ever.

The laughs over “Fey-lin” reached their peak when the real Sarah Palin showed up to take over for Fey, showing that the resemblance between the comedienne and the governor of Alaska.

Imagine an alternate universe where Al Gore won the 2000 election. Well, Al Gore himself is here to show you what kind of speech he would have made as our 43rd president. Don’t worry about George W. Bush. He landed a nice cushy job as the commissioner of Major League Baseball.

When Amy Poehler left “SNL,” Kate McKinnon was tasked with taking up her job as the show’s Hillary Clinton impersonator. Last year, the two reunited for a very special Clinton Christmas sketch that highlighted toe duo’s different approaches to impersonating the Democratic candidate. .

For “SNL,” the breakout performance of this election has been Larry David and his impersonation of Bernie Sanders. The finest example of his work is “Bern Your Enthusiasm,” where David gets to combine the two roles that have made him one of the biggest stars of 2016.

One of the longest running impersonations in “SNL” history is Darrell Hammond‘s parody of Bill Clinton, which has been going for almost a quarter-century now. Here’s a quick clip of Hammond after Bill Clinton was cleared of perjury in the Monica Lewinsky case.

Several actors have impersonated George W. Bush on “SNL,” but the most famous by far is Will Ferrell‘s version. Here’s a recent skit in which Ferrell shows Dubya announcing his endorsement for president.

Back in 2012, Taran Killam starred in this riff on undecided voters whom politicians desperately try to court for votes…even if they’ve been living under a rock.

In 1984, “SNL” political impersonators included the likes of Phil Hartman and Joe Piscopo, the latter of whom can be seen here scheming with Sammy Davis, Jr. (Billy Crystal) on how to come out on top in the re-election campaign.

Finally, here’s McKinnon again in a Hillary Clinton ad that tries to reach out to millennials disappointed that Bernie Sanders didn’t win.