TV New Roundup: ‘Walking Dead’ Sets Season 9 Midseason Premiere Date

In Today’s TV News Roundup, AMC announced a new premiere date for the return of “The Walking Dead” season nine and director Patty Jenkins released a new trailer for TNT’s upcoming drama “I Am the Night,” starring Chr…

In Today’s TV News Roundup, AMC announced a new premiere date for the return of “The Walking Dead” season nine and director Patty Jenkins released a new trailer for TNT’s upcoming drama “I Am the Night,” starring Chris Pine.  DATES AMC announced the return of  “The Walking Dead” season nine on Feb. 10 at 9:00 p.m. […]

‘I Am the Night’ Trailer: Chris Pine Has All the Clues (and He’s Getting Scared)

The six-part mystery series, set on the outer edges of the Black Dahlia murder investigation, premieres January on TNT.

Tell the average TV viewer that there’s a new show coming up where Chris Pine shouts the phrase “Can ya dig it??!?” and their first thought would probably not be “Black Dahlia murder connection complete with an animal-mask cult party.”

But those two things are pretty explicitly connected in “I Am the Night,” the upcoming six-part TNT series from director Patty Jenkins and writer Sam Sheridan. Pine plays Jay Singletary, a would-be reporter looking into the mystery of Fauna Hodel (India Eisley), an LA transplant who stumbles onto a dark secret in a strange new city.

While the first trailer centered on Pine’s detective character (in various states of undress), this new look is firmly centered on the Fauna’s experiences. As she finds herself far deeper in over her head than anyone involved in this saga realizes, Singletary is hot on the trail. “I Am the Night” also co-stars Leland Orser and Connie Nielsen, while “Devil in a Blue Dress” director Carl Franklin also serves as an executive producer on the series.

The debut episode of the series premiered at the AFI Film Festival in Los Angeles earlier this month. As IndieWire’s Ben Travers wrote in his review, “[TNT’s] second attempt at a dark and gritty limited series is far more enticing through the pilot. Jenkins adds visual richness that separates her story from others like it. Sheridan’s script teases enough mystery to get your mind racing, and Pine’s bubbly performance keeps the miniseries’ premiere from being overwhelmed by the night.”

Watch the new trailer (complete with an intro from Jenkins and Pine on the set of “Wonder Woman 1984”) below:

“I Am the Night” premieres Monday, January 28 on TNT.

‘I Am the Night’ Review: Chris Pine and Patty Jenkins Reunite to Light Up TNT’s Newest Dark and Gritty Limited Series

The duo who helped “Wonder Woman” stand out from a league of superhero movies brings distinct flavor to this juicy ’60s crime drama.

Just as Patty Jenkins and Chris Pine popped the self-serious bubble suffocating DC movies with “Wonder Woman,” the burgeoning duo elevates what could have been another bleak cable drama to pulpy, twisted fun.

Written by Jenkins’ husband Sam Sheridan (“Warrior”), TNT’s six-episode limited series “I Am the Night” has all the hallmarks of a made-to-order “prestige” period drama. Set in 1965, there’s a wayward girl in trouble, a suffering hero in need of redemption, and dismembered bodies that could somehow connect to a sex cult. Familiar and edgy, it’s a classic noir made for modern TV. (Did I mention the sex cult uses animal masks?)

TNT first resurrected the period crime genre with “The Alienist,” an outdated and needlessly grim adaptation that nonetheless proved successful. However, the network’s second attempt at a dark and gritty limited series is far more enticing through the pilot. Jenkins adds visual richness that separates her story from others like it. Sheridan’s script teases enough mystery to get your mind racing, and Pine’s bubbly performance keeps the miniseries’ premiere from being overwhelmed by the night.

Pat (India Eisley) is a young girl not yet 18 who’s already working to support her family and aching to escape her small California town. Her mother Jimmy (Golden Lee) is a mean drunk, but she’s also hiding secrets that will send her daughter searching for a new family in Los Angeles.

I Am the Night Chris Pine

“I Am the Night”

TNT

Now, meet Jay (Chris Pine), a young man not yet 40 who’s already working to support his coke habit and aching to snort more coke alone in his car. His semi-casual drug habit makes him a bit temperamental, but he’s also mourning his crushed dreams — dreams that will send him searching for the truth about a weird, wealthy L.A. family (who just might be hosting orgies in their open-air mansion).

Our two protagonists are kept apart in the first hour, tied by nothing beyond their mutual dislike for people who think they’re superior. Pat faces them every day in the unchecked bigotry expressed by those who recognizes she’s multiracial (despite her pale complexion), while Jay vents his rage for empty fame by ignoring the pleas of a philandering actress he just photographed, and then beating the hell out of a phone booth when her weeping make him second guess trading those photos for money. (His temper could also be tied to that whole cocaine thing.)

“I Am the Night” isn’t subtle in developing its themes or characters. Race is addressed as bluntly as the accepted racism of the era, and class divides are illustrated by pristine mansions and messy apartments. Both Pat and Jay ask and answer big questions about themselves like, “Why am I here?” (a verbatim quote from Jay) and “I just want to know who I am” (an answer from Pat). They’re clearly meant to complement each other, and future episodes will no doubt highlight their shared interests and overlapping narratives.

But Sheridan’s story doesn’t need nuance to be effective. Complemented by David Lang’s driving score, Jenkins whips viewers through the introduction using searing frames with a pulse all their own and choice sliding shots that pull viewers closer to a faraway image, drawing them deeper into a dangerous world. (The series opens with a lengthy zoom through a seemingly vacant desert landscape into the back door of Pat’s hidden home.) She has a good time playing with light in a sea of shadows, just as Pine relishes every word in lines like, “If you’re feeling froggy [translation: “If you want to fight”], we can do this dance [translation: “we can fight”] — just pick a lily pad.” [translation: unknown]

In viewing just one of the six episodes, it’s impossible to say if the series’ many mysteries will pay off. Still, the team here does a fine job teasing them out. There’s Pat’s secret family, Jay’s spirit-crushing screw-up, and, of course, the pressing question of why people have to strap on super ugly masks to get in the mood. (OK, time to come clean: There’s no actual evidence of a sex cult in “I Am the Night.” There’s definitely a cult, or some kind of mask-wearing secret society, and given all the other weirdness going on — like the evil gynecologist’s creepy phone voice and the fact that the presumed villain is an evil gynecologist — it seems safe to assume some kinky stuff is coming.)

“I Am the Night” may be a little too formulaic to be TV’s next limited series with maximum impact — a la “Sharp Objects,” or what TNT really wants, another “True Detective” — but it’s well positioned to deliver the kind of entertainment that overly serious fare often overlooks.

Grade: B

“I Am the Night” premieres in January 2019 on TNT. The first episode premiered November 9 at the AFI Film Festival.

‘Outlaw King’ Film Review: Chris Pine Scottish War Epic is Meh-dieval

For those of you wondering why “Braveheart” was only three hours, when the wars of Scottish independence lasted decades, there’s now two more hours of it in the form of “Outlaw King.”

Taking place in the space between William Wallace’s insurgency and the “Braveheart” coda, “Hell or High Water” director David Mackenzie’s ruddy, muddy, bloody 14th-century chronicle of the successfully rebellious campaign Robert the Bruce (Chris Pine) waged against English king Edward I (Stephen Dillane) isn’t likely to replace Mel Gibson’s Oscar-winning warrior cry in the pantheon of medieval war epics. Sometimes, getting there first with overlooked, then heightened, battle history has pop culture advantages.

But as Netflix-and-kill offerings go, “Outlaw King” is a respectably engaging slice of freedom-fighting bluster, if ultimately suffering from the same need to bleed that weighs down most warfare sagas these days. Mackenzie shaved 20 minutes or so after its world premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, but there’s still no getting around the fact that what starts as a human drama of occupation, unease, brotherhood, and political fracturing invariably must give way to the mechanics of lengthy, loud, and splatter-enhanced combat.

Watch Video: Chris Pine Goes Full Monty in Netflix’s ‘Outlaw King’ and It’s All People Can Talk About

Kudos to the production’s war department, then, for the clanging, gory realism, but when cinematic representations of up-close skirmishing have barely improved since Orson Welles redefined the chaos of war in “Chimes at Midnight,” it’s disheartening to see a movie like “Outlaw King” think of its climax only in terms of battlefield butchery.

Up until then, McKenzie and co-writers Bash Doran (“Boardwalk Empire”) and James MacInnes fashion a mostly convincing tale of how the flame of independence stays lit inside a compromised people. The film starts in 1306 in the immediate aftermath of battered Scotland’s acquiescence to the reign of England. Forced fealty doesn’t preclude King Edward, however, from trying to solidify ties with his former antagonists, bestowing his goddaughter Elizabeth (Florence Pugh, “Lady Macbeth”) as a new wife for vanquished, widowed noble Robert, whom he begrudgingly respects.

Also Read: ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

Part of a larger tent ceremony whereby defeated Scottish noblemen must kneel before Edward, this scene kicks off a seriously long, character-introducing single-take opening shot that segues into Robert sword-sparring with the hotheaded, buffoonish Prince of Wales (Billy Howle, “The Seagull”) and ends with a display of England’s war prowess in the way of a massive catapult launching a fire rock at a faraway castle just for kicks.

Until Mackenzie flexes his battle-directing muscles much later, that shot is the only virtuosic thing about “Outlaw King,” which afterward is content to methodically track Robert’s shift from brooding acceptance as a conquered subject to newly energized rebel sovereign with unhurried precision. While Robert’s initially platonic, respectful relationship with arranged spouse Elizabeth evolves into support for his truce-breaking cause (Pugh is appealingly strong-willed in the role), his bid to conscript war-weary, infighting Scottish nobles — or self-serving ones like John Comyn (Callan Mulvey, “Power”) — into joining him and fiercely committed comrade Angus (Tony Curran) becomes a shakier endeavor. Rejection and betrayal follow his ragtag band as Edward girds his massive army for violent retribution across Scotland, leading to a decisive showdown at Loudon Hill that pits a smaller force’s tactical ingenuity against sheer might.

Also Read: ‘Starred Up’ Director David Mackenzie Dishes on Jack O’Connell Prison Drama

All the while, Pine, who grasps leading-man technique as well as anyone these days, uses the Steve McQueen playbook of low-boil masculinity flecked with charm and soulfulness (and brief, no-frills nudity) to make his underdog king seem both of his time and ours. It’s very much the anti-Gibson version of medieval heroism — awkwardness becomes Pine — and it’s refreshing in its unadorned, feeling-around-for-something appeal. Plus it allows for the bearded beasts around him to howl and growl to their heart’s content.

Dillane, meanwhile, cribs entertainingly from his “Game of Thrones” approach to contemptuous rulers, making one wish there were an all-Edward movie he could sink his teeth into. There will come a time, if it’s not already here, when Dillane’s appearance in a project will register “scowling British foil” faster than his considerable acting skills can portray it. But until then, enjoy what he can do exhaling a hilariously chilling line like “I am so sick of Scotland” with equal parts meta, alpha, and ho-hum.

Visually, the Scottish landscape’s misty beaches, purple heather, and majestic glens do their part under cinematographer Barry Ackroyd’s no-nonsense approach to period realism, as do the historical castles that give gritty oomph to the location work. Apart from the bloody hostilities, “Outlaw King” isn’t a bad advertisement for touring the country’s natural beauty. Could it stir Scotland to reject UK rule again after voting no on independence only four years ago in a nationwide referendum?



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For those of you wondering why “Braveheart” was only three hours, when the wars of Scottish independence lasted decades, there’s now two more hours of it in the form of “Outlaw King.”

Taking place in the space between William Wallace’s insurgency and the “Braveheart” coda, “Hell or High Water” director David Mackenzie’s ruddy, muddy, bloody 14th-century chronicle of the successfully rebellious campaign Robert the Bruce (Chris Pine) waged against English king Edward I (Stephen Dillane) isn’t likely to replace Mel Gibson’s Oscar-winning warrior cry in the pantheon of medieval war epics. Sometimes, getting there first with overlooked, then heightened, battle history has pop culture advantages.

But as Netflix-and-kill offerings go, “Outlaw King” is a respectably engaging slice of freedom-fighting bluster, if ultimately suffering from the same need to bleed that weighs down most warfare sagas these days. Mackenzie shaved 20 minutes or so after its world premiere at the Toronto Film Festival, but there’s still no getting around the fact that what starts as a human drama of occupation, unease, brotherhood, and political fracturing invariably must give way to the mechanics of lengthy, loud, and splatter-enhanced combat.

Kudos to the production’s war department, then, for the clanging, gory realism, but when cinematic representations of up-close skirmishing have barely improved since Orson Welles redefined the chaos of war in “Chimes at Midnight,” it’s disheartening to see a movie like “Outlaw King” think of its climax only in terms of battlefield butchery.

Up until then, McKenzie and co-writers Bash Doran (“Boardwalk Empire”) and James MacInnes fashion a mostly convincing tale of how the flame of independence stays lit inside a compromised people. The film starts in 1306 in the immediate aftermath of battered Scotland’s acquiescence to the reign of England. Forced fealty doesn’t preclude King Edward, however, from trying to solidify ties with his former antagonists, bestowing his goddaughter Elizabeth (Florence Pugh, “Lady Macbeth”) as a new wife for vanquished, widowed noble Robert, whom he begrudgingly respects.

Part of a larger tent ceremony whereby defeated Scottish noblemen must kneel before Edward, this scene kicks off a seriously long, character-introducing single-take opening shot that segues into Robert sword-sparring with the hotheaded, buffoonish Prince of Wales (Billy Howle, “The Seagull”) and ends with a display of England’s war prowess in the way of a massive catapult launching a fire rock at a faraway castle just for kicks.

Until Mackenzie flexes his battle-directing muscles much later, that shot is the only virtuosic thing about “Outlaw King,” which afterward is content to methodically track Robert’s shift from brooding acceptance as a conquered subject to newly energized rebel sovereign with unhurried precision. While Robert’s initially platonic, respectful relationship with arranged spouse Elizabeth evolves into support for his truce-breaking cause (Pugh is appealingly strong-willed in the role), his bid to conscript war-weary, infighting Scottish nobles — or self-serving ones like John Comyn (Callan Mulvey, “Power”) — into joining him and fiercely committed comrade Angus (Tony Curran) becomes a shakier endeavor. Rejection and betrayal follow his ragtag band as Edward girds his massive army for violent retribution across Scotland, leading to a decisive showdown at Loudon Hill that pits a smaller force’s tactical ingenuity against sheer might.

All the while, Pine, who grasps leading-man technique as well as anyone these days, uses the Steve McQueen playbook of low-boil masculinity flecked with charm and soulfulness (and brief, no-frills nudity) to make his underdog king seem both of his time and ours. It’s very much the anti-Gibson version of medieval heroism — awkwardness becomes Pine — and it’s refreshing in its unadorned, feeling-around-for-something appeal. Plus it allows for the bearded beasts around him to howl and growl to their heart’s content.

Dillane, meanwhile, cribs entertainingly from his “Game of Thrones” approach to contemptuous rulers, making one wish there were an all-Edward movie he could sink his teeth into. There will come a time, if it’s not already here, when Dillane’s appearance in a project will register “scowling British foil” faster than his considerable acting skills can portray it. But until then, enjoy what he can do exhaling a hilariously chilling line like “I am so sick of Scotland” with equal parts meta, alpha, and ho-hum.

Visually, the Scottish landscape’s misty beaches, purple heather, and majestic glens do their part under cinematographer Barry Ackroyd’s no-nonsense approach to period realism, as do the historical castles that give gritty oomph to the location work. Apart from the bloody hostilities, “Outlaw King” isn’t a bad advertisement for touring the country’s natural beauty. Could it stir Scotland to reject UK rule again after voting no on independence only four years ago in a nationwide referendum?

Related stories from TheWrap:

Satanic Temple Sues Netflix, Warner Bros for $50 Million Over 'Sabrina's' Use of Baphomet Statue

Netflix Announces New Anime Projects Based on 'Pacific Rim,' 'Altered Carbon'

Netflix's 'The Christmas Chronicles' Trailer: Kurt Russell Will Make You Believe in Santa Claus (Video)

'Roma,' 'The Ballad of Buster Scruggs' and 'Bird Box' to Open in Theaters Ahead of Netflix Debuts

How David Mackenzie Salvaged ‘Outlaw King’ After the Netflix Oscar Hopeful Crashed and Burned

After a brutal TIFF premiere, “Outlaw King” director David Mackenzie went back into the editing room to save the biggest film of his life.

ConsiderThis

That night was supposed to be a celebration. After more than five years of work on a rough and rowdy medieval epic several times larger than anything he’d ever made before (including his Best Picture-nominated “Hell or High Water”), and a desperate race to cut the thing together in time for its glitzy debut, “Outlaw King” director David Mackenzie had finally made it to the majestic Princess of Wales Theatre, where his latest movie had been invited to screen as the opening selection of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

More than 2,000 critics and industry professionals — including Chris Pine, Florence Pugh, and the rest of Mackenzie’s extraordinary cast — traveled from all over the world to witness the unveiling, eager for the first look at one of the fall’s most hotly anticipated contenders. The lights went down, the Netflix logo “ba-dummed!” across the massive screen, and the audience was dropped into the tumultuous story of Robert the Bruce and the First War for Scottish independence.

It wasn’t long before Mackenzie realized he had a problem. The film wasn’t working. After the spectacular first shot — an enthralling 8-minute long-take that introduces Robert (Pine) as he reluctantly pledges fealty to Edward I (Stephen Dillane), spars with the king’s psychotic son (Billy Howle), and watches an enormous catapult rain hell on a defenseless castle in the distance — the director could feel the air seeping out of the room. The conflict was slow to come into focus. The story was split between too many supporting characters. A chance encounter between Robert and legendary folk hero William Wallace distracted from the growing tensions between the Scottish nobles and the occupying Englishmen who had seized control of their land. The film’s sweep was as undeniable as its savagery, but when it finally came to an end (some 137 minutes after it had began), some audience members felt as if they had just watched a man unite his country in real time.

The response was harsh, if not quite brutal (as of the time of this writing, “Outlaw King” has a respectable score of 60 on Metacritic). This critic called the film a “gritty but unfocused and interminable attempt to wrest the fight for freedom away from Hollywood myth, and return it to something more primal.” IndieWire’s assessment went on to say that “‘Outlaw King’ begins to feel like a full season of television that’s been squeezed in a vice.” But Mackenzie didn’t need to read the reviews to know what he had to do next. Two weeks after “Outlaw King” premiered at TIFF — and a little less than two months before it was due to bow on Netflix — the news broke that the director cut 20 minutes from the film.

“I think it was 23,” Mackenzie said when he met with IndieWire in the lobby of a Manhattan hotel just a few days ahead of unleashing the new and improved version of “Outlaw King” upon the world. “That’s a fairly sizable chunk.” He’s not wrong. The truncated edit of the movie is a significantly different experience, and a better one in every way. Clear where the previous cut was convoluted, and engrossingly character-driven where it used to feel pulled by the sheer inertia of history, the “Outlaw King” that Netflix subscribers will get to see this Friday — the only “Outlaw King” the public will ever know — is a vivid reminder that good movies are often hiding inside bad ones, like Renaissance statues just waiting to be chiseled from their slabs of stone. Often, filmmakers just need to see their work through new eyes in order to know what to cut. Indeed, Mackenzie’s process would’ve been totally unexceptional if half the film world wasn’t there to witness it.

“I wasn’t really ready, to be honest,” Mackenzie said, the 52-year-old Scotsman. “It’s just that being able to premiere the film in front of a large audience at TIFF was something desirable, so we aimed at that target. We hadn’t really put the movie before audiences in that way, so the festival was a rather big and rather public test.” Typically, a $90 million war epic might be processed through several rounds of test screenings, but Netflix’s unique distribution system has a way of leapfrogging tradition. “Outlaw King” wouldn’t have had time for such things anyway; Mackenzie only finished the TIFF cut 48 hours before its gala premiere.

Sitting through that screening must have been an exquisite form of torture for the director, who could only focus on the parts of his movie that he wanted to fix. “Yeah,” Mackenzie said, staring down at the table, “there was an element of that.” He sighed. “I felt what I felt. And then literally the next morning, I went to my producer Gillian Berrie and asked if we could go back into the edit.” Netflix signed off on the decision immediately. “Sarah Bowen, who’s our main executive there, told us to go for it. It was very simple. But I only had two weeks, so we rushed straight back into it and started cutting away.”

Chris Pine and David Mackenzie

Chris Pine and David Mackenzie

Silverhub/REX/Shutterstock

Mackenzie was over the moon, fully aware that he had been granted an opportunity that other, more traditional movie studios would never have allowed. “I can’t tell you how glad I am that I had a chance to go back in there and not be stuck in a position where the film was rushed for a festival and that was that. That would have been terrible. It feels like a privilege to be able to completely control your own destiny on a film of this scale.”

His primary task was to smooth out the pacing. Mackenzie sensed a restlessness from the Princess of Wales crowd, a reaction he attributed to a numbing barrage of action sequences. “The film was almost too relentless, and put Robert in a position of vulnerability too often. That’s the kind of thing that can lead an audience to disengage.”

The first things to go were a battle scene, a big confrontation backdropped by a waterfall, and an eight-minute chase sequence: These are the kinds of things a filmmaker dreams of shooting, a financier loses sleep over seeing on the cutting room floor, and this critic honestly doesn’t even remember. Killing your darlings is never easy, but it’s even harder when they’re all riding horses and carrying broadswords.

But Mackenzie, to paraphrase a line from Edward I, has the courage to stand up for his work, and the wisdom to stand down from it. If it hurt the director to amputate on himself, he’s done a fine job of covering up his scars. “I didn’t know if streamlining those elements was going to work,” he said, “but as soon as I did it, it as like — snap! — this is good, this is the way it should be. I didn’t really change the structure too much, it was more about lifting out whole things and going ‘gosh, the story doesn’t collapse when you do that.’ It was quite educational, really.”

Mackenzie, whose average movie runs less than 100 minutes, has never been too proud to learn a hard lesson. “More often than not, my director’s cuts are shorter than how they started,” he said. “People have encouraged me to put stuff back into the movies, so I’m quite capable of being tough on the material. Sitting through the premiere of ‘Outlaw King’ and having a strong sense that it was playing long and all over the place kind of gave me the carte blanche I needed to be more ruthless in the editorial process” (relax, all 12 frames of Chris Pine’s penis are still in the movie).

“Outlaw King”

In this case, it helped that Mackenzie had wanted to cut certain things for a long time, and just needed an extra bit of convincing. “There were all sorts of itches that I needed to scratch,” he said, “and a lot of the things I took out were things that I had my doubts about from the start — things that felt were necessary in some way, but ultimately weren’t.”

Chief among them was that scene between Robert the Bruce and William Wallace. “To be honest, it always felt contrived. Robert just accidentally encounters this guy in the woods?” And then there’s the Mel Gibson of it all. “We were aware of the shadow of that character,” Mackenzie said, admitting that “Braveheart” inspired him to cut Wallace out of his film, restoring him to a disembodied folk hero whose name is merely whispered in the wind. “To me, that feels stronger than forcing an actor to play someone who people across the world already know.”

Removing Wallace was symptomatic of the director’s larger effort to balance his film between spectacular entertainment and grounded fact. “We made an effort to be as historically accurate as possible,” Mackenzie said, reflecting on the cold and visceral wedding sequence that highlights the first act of his film. “It was important for me to try and at least attempt to serve that reality. I’ve called this an ‘anti-fantasy film,’ because I think it’s easy to mythologize the past, and it’s easy to be maximalist about some of these things, but it was important for us to serve the history and tell a decent story at the same time.”

Asked if “Braveheart” has a good reputation in Scotland, Mackenzie laughed. “Not really. It’s a funny movie, because it’s got much more of a rabble-rousing, ‘rah rah’ kind of tone, and — in this day and age — I just don’t feel it’s appropriate to be making that type of movie, to be honest. The forces of nationalism are expanding across the world, and I think one has to be very careful about that… even though I’m telling a true story about a national hero, I don’t want ‘Outlaw King’ to be taken too literally as a rallying call.”

Removing Wallace from the story, and trimming some of the action in order to imbue every drop of bloodshed with new urgency, has allowed Mackenzie to better honor the history without romanticizing the violence. “Yes, there was an occupation that forced my people to fight for the existence of their country, but I want to be honest about the material without inciting a certain segment of the population.”

Besides, a war pageant like “Braveheart” was never the kind of movie that Mackenzie wanted to make — his inspirations were more ruminative and mudbound. In fact, the First War of Scottish Independence wasn’t of particular interest to him, as he was mostly drawn to the script because he dreamed of directing a medieval religious epic in the vein of “Andrei Rublev.” He loved the visceral intensity of Tarkovsky’s masterpiece, which grabs hold of you mind, body, and soul, and never lets go.

“Outlaw King”

That’s why Mackenzie was predisposed to making “Outlaw King” shorter, instead of expanding it into an episodic Netflix show; if the Coen brothers were granted permission to shrink “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” from an anthology series to a self-contained feature, surely it’s feasible that someone could do the opposite. Someone, perhaps, but not Mackenzie.

“I’m not really interested in a series,” he said, “I’m interested in films. I’m interested in something that engages you in one sitting, as it were, and doesn’t rely on narrative devices to keep audiences coming back. There’s something about TV that I find a little bit garish, because it’s trying to be addictive. So I’m not really tempted to go in that direction.”

Still, Mackenzie appreciates what Netflix made possible for him, and the director insisted that the freedom to make a film of this scale was worth the tradeoff that most people may end up watching his epic at home. “The theatrical/video thing is a false dichotomy,” he said. “It’s not as if the whole romance of the big screen is what it used to be. When it comes to most chain theaters these days, there’s not a lot of love there, and cinema manners aren’t very good.”

If anything, Mackenzie sees the streaming giant as a potential savior for the cinema experience: “I hope that Netflix buys theater chains, so that films like this might have a continuing life. We don’t have to worry about opening weekend, so there’s no reason why you couldn’t have ‘Outlaw King’ play on an ongoing business — have it run now, and then it can come back a year from now or whenever.”

Two months ago, Mackenzie wasn’t ready for anyone to see “Outlaw King.” Now, he beams at the idea that it will be instantly available to viewers all over the world. “This is a much stronger cut,” he said, shaking his head like he was trying to dislodge a painful memory. “It’s to the point where I no longer have any connection whatsoever to the cut that screened at TIFF. You know the old adage that less is more? There’s less in this film now, but you get more out of it. I think it’s a really strong movie, and I’m very proud of it.” He paused. “I slightly wish I didn’t have to deal with a previous cut that wasn’t so well-received.” As of November 9, he won’t have to.

“Outlaw King” will be available to see in theaters and stream on Netflix November 9.

Here’s Chris Pine Doing Shakespeare in a Scottish Accent for Stephen Colbert — Watch

It was a key part of getting into character to play Robert the Bruce in David Mackenzie’s new film “Outlaw King.”

Friday brings a chance to see two hours (well, around there) of Chris Pine speaking as if he grew up thousands of miles away from California. Still, his character in “Outlaw King” did live a few centuries before the time of Shakespeare.

Wednesday night on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert,” Pine talked about how, even with that gap in timelines, reciting some classic verse helped him nail down the tricky brogue for his daily work as Robert the Bruce. When Colbert pressed him on giving the audience a little taste, Pine offered up a few quick lines.

Of course, Colbert prompted him with a little bit from “Macbeth” (don’t read this post out loud if you’re backstage somewhere), sliding right into the “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow” speech from the last act of “Macbeth.” (If those lines sound a little familiar, they played a pivotal part in one of the latter episodes of “Barry.”)

For those unfamiliar with the historical basis for the “Outlaw King” story, Pine also dons his Medieval Studies 101 professor hat for a bit, explaining the differences between the “Braveheart” version of the Robert the Bruce tale and those in the soon-to-be-released David Mackenzie film.

Pine also mentioned that “Henry V” was another favorite accent prep tool in the trailer, so if anyone from Netflix is listening, it’s not too late to put a bonus feature of Chris Pine doing the St. Crispin’s Day speech under the “Trailers and More” section. Scottish, Boston, natural: whatever accent, doesn’t really matter. There’s probably a demand for it.

The Shakespeare bit starts around 3:12, but watch the full clip (including Colbert catching himself 1.2 seconds after an interesting choice of words) below:

“Outlaw King” premieres Friday, November 8, on Netflix.

‘Wonder Woman 84’ Release Date Pushed 7 Months to 2020

“Wonder Woman 1984” has been pushed seven months from Nov. 1, 2019 to June 5, 2020, Warner Bros. Pictures announced Monday.

“Super excited to announce that, thanks to the changing landscape, we are able to put Wonder Woman back to its rightful home. June 5, 2020. Be there or be square!!!” tweeted headliner Gal Gadot.

Super excited to announce that, thanks to the changing landscape, we are able to put Wonder Woman back to its rightful home. June 5, 2020. Be there or be square!!!

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— Gal Gadot (@GalGadot) October 22, 2018

“We had tremendous success releasing the first ‘Wonder Woman’ film during the summer so when we saw an opportunity to take advantage of the changing competitive landscape, we did. This move lands the film exactly where it belongs,” said Jeff Goldstein, Warner Bros. president of domestic distribution.

Also Read: Comic-Con Goers Get a Gloriously ’80s Look at New ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Footage

“Wonder Woman 1984” is set in the 1980s and the film brings back Patty Jenkins as director and co-writer. Gadot is starring, along with Chris Pine as Steve Trevor with Kristen Wiig as Cheetah. Pedro Pascal has also been cast in the film.

“Wonder Woman” became the highest grossing film directed by a woman in 2017, grossing $412.5 million domestically and $821 million worldwide.

Set during the late height of Cold War tensions, the film sees Diana come into conflict with the Soviet Union and encountering a new enemy in Cheetah.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Marvel Female Heroes Series From ‘Wonder Woman’ Writer in the Works at ABC

‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

‘Wonder Woman 1984’: Patty Jenkins Shares First Look at Pedro Pascal (Photo)

“Wonder Woman 1984” has been pushed seven months from Nov. 1, 2019 to June 5, 2020, Warner Bros. Pictures announced Monday.

“Super excited to announce that, thanks to the changing landscape, we are able to put Wonder Woman back to its rightful home. June 5, 2020. Be there or be square!!!” tweeted headliner Gal Gadot.

“We had tremendous success releasing the first ‘Wonder Woman’ film during the summer so when we saw an opportunity to take advantage of the changing competitive landscape, we did. This move lands the film exactly where it belongs,” said Jeff Goldstein, Warner Bros. president of domestic distribution.

“Wonder Woman 1984” is set in the 1980s and the film brings back Patty Jenkins as director and co-writer. Gadot is starring, along with Chris Pine as Steve Trevor with Kristen Wiig as Cheetah. Pedro Pascal has also been cast in the film.

“Wonder Woman” became the highest grossing film directed by a woman in 2017, grossing $412.5 million domestically and $821 million worldwide.

Set during the late height of Cold War tensions, the film sees Diana come into conflict with the Soviet Union and encountering a new enemy in Cheetah.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Marvel Female Heroes Series From 'Wonder Woman' Writer in the Works at ABC

'Wonder Woman 1984' Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create 'Breakfast Club' Poster

'Wonder Woman 1984': Patty Jenkins Shares First Look at Pedro Pascal (Photo)

Chris Pine Goes Full Monty in Netflix’s ‘Outlaw King’ and It’s All People Can Talk About (Video)

Chris Pine’s newest film, “Outlaw King,” is an epic period adventure that takes viewers on a journey of 14th century Scotland… and Chris Pine’s naked body.

The “Star Trek” actor goes for full-frontal nudity in the new Netflix film and, apparently, that’s all some viewers need to know to give it five stars.

While promoting “Outlaw King” on “The Graham Norton Show,” the late-night host asked Pine about all the attention his private parts got when the film premiered during the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

Also Read: ‘Outlaw King’ Review: Chris Pine Soldiers Bravely Through Crowded Epic

“There’s a scene in the film where I bare the full monty and, yeah, that seemed to get a lot of attention,” Pine said, sitting on the couch between “Bohemian Rhapsody” star Rami Malek and Sally Field, who exclaimed, “Well, yeah!”

Norton read a few tweets from when the film screened at TIFF in September, each more risqué than the previous. The first: “Chris Pine. Full frontal. OUTLAW KING. That’s pretty much my review.”

Also Read: ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

Yes, Pine has read all those comments — and more. “Oh yeah. They’re f–in’ brutal,” he said.

The film tells the story of how the 14th century Scottish warrior, Robert the Bruce, used cunning and bravery to defeat and repel the much larger and better equipped occupying English army.

“Outlaw King” also stars Florence Pough, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and James Cosmo, and debuts on Netflix on Nov. 9.
Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

‘I Am the Night’: Chris Pine Investigates a Murder in First Trailer (Video)

‘Hell or High Water’ Stars Chris Pine and Ben Foster Reunite With Director for Netflix’s ‘Outlaw King’

Chris Pine’s newest film, “Outlaw King,” is an epic period adventure that takes viewers on a journey of 14th century Scotland… and Chris Pine’s naked body.

The “Star Trek” actor goes for full-frontal nudity in the new Netflix film and, apparently, that’s all some viewers need to know to give it five stars.

While promoting “Outlaw King” on “The Graham Norton Show,” the late-night host asked Pine about all the attention his private parts got when the film premiered during the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

“There’s a scene in the film where I bare the full monty and, yeah, that seemed to get a lot of attention,” Pine said, sitting on the couch between “Bohemian Rhapsody” star Rami Malek and Sally Field, who exclaimed, “Well, yeah!”

Norton read a few tweets from when the film screened at TIFF in September, each more risqué than the previous. The first: “Chris Pine. Full frontal. OUTLAW KING. That’s pretty much my review.”

Yes, Pine has read all those comments — and more. “Oh yeah. They’re f–in’ brutal,” he said.

The film tells the story of how the 14th century Scottish warrior, Robert the Bruce, used cunning and bravery to defeat and repel the much larger and better equipped occupying English army.

“Outlaw King” also stars Florence Pough, Aaron Taylor-Johnson and James Cosmo, and debuts on Netflix on Nov. 9.
Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Wonder Woman 1984' Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create 'Breakfast Club' Poster

'I Am the Night': Chris Pine Investigates a Murder in First Trailer (Video)

'Hell or High Water' Stars Chris Pine and Ben Foster Reunite With Director for Netflix's 'Outlaw King'

David Mackenzie And Cast On His Grueling Medieval Festival Opener ‘Outlaw King’: “It Was Relentless” – Toronto Studio

Scottish director David Mackenzie ruffled a few feathers this year with the festival’s opening film, a violent period drama that many considered to be a companion piece to Mel Gibson’s 1995 Oscar-winning drama Braveheart.
“The story’s about Robert Bruc…

Scottish director David Mackenzie ruffled a few feathers this year with the festival's opening film, a violent period drama that many considered to be a companion piece to Mel Gibson's 1995 Oscar-winning drama Braveheart. "The story's about Robert Bruce," explained Mackenzie when he brought several members of his huge cast to the Deadline studio. "He's a man who was a founding father of Scotland, 700 years ago. It covers a certain period in his history, where he goes…

Chris Pine on Going Full Frontal in ‘Outlaw King’

The internet has been abuzz since the news broke that Chris Pine would have a full-frontal nude scene in the upcoming Netflix drama “Outlaw King,” in which he stars as Robert the Bruce, King of Scots. Pine was demure when he spoke of the sc…

The internet has been abuzz since the news broke that Chris Pine would have a full-frontal nude scene in the upcoming Netflix drama “Outlaw King,” in which he stars as Robert the Bruce, King of Scots. Pine was demure when he spoke of the scene at our Variety Studio presented by AT&T at the Toronto Film Festival. “It was cold […]

Toronto Film Review: Chris Pine in ‘Outlaw King’

Someone at Netflix must love movies, because they keep on making them: massive, large-canvas sagas that beg to be witnessed on the big screen — like Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” (shot on 65mm) and Martin Scorsese’s upcoming “The Irishman” (whose budget has …

Someone at Netflix must love movies, because they keep on making them: massive, large-canvas sagas that beg to be witnessed on the big screen — like Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” (shot on 65mm) and Martin Scorsese’s upcoming “The Irishman” (whose budget has reportedly swollen past $140 million) — even if virtually everyone who does see them […]

‘Outlaw King’ Review: Chris Pine Soldiers Bravely Through Crowded Epic

Before introducing the director of this year’s opening night film at TIFF, festival artistic director Cameron Bailey said his group is always looking for “filmmaking craft which shows just what big screen filmmaking can do.”

The audience got that and then some with David Mackenzie’s bursting-at-the-seems Scottish war epic “Outlaw King,” which stars Chris Pine and played for the first time ever at Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theater.

Pine stars as Robert the Bruce, the historic warrior-king who helped wrestle the crown of Scotland from British control and establish the country as independent in the 1300s. To Americans, Robert the Bruce is probably most famous for being played by Angus Macfadyen in Mel Gibson’s Oscar-winning William Wallace biopic “Braveheart,” and yes “Outlaw King” repays the favor by also featuring Wallace as a character. This is notable because you’re sure to hear a lot of comparisons of the films from viewers, and perhaps the streamer’s own marketing department.

Also Read: Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

Pine is in his strapping movie star-glory in “Outlaw,” all toothy-grins and horseback hero shots as he interacts with a massive ensemble of dogged soldiers (Golden Globe winner Aaron Taylor Johnson, notably) and a formidable love interest in Florence Pugh (the 2016 breakout star of indie “Lady Macbeth”).

At first called to help stabilize the country’s leadership, after England’s Edward I starts aggressively skimming taxes from the nobility and flexing his control over the neighboring region, Pine’s Bruce galvanizes his countrymen to become their defacto King of the Scots. Thus launches an endless parade of bloody battles to take back the motherland.

Pine and Mackenzie previously collaborated to dazzling effect on the blue collar heist thriller “Hell or High Water,” about family, class and American masculinity. There is no such nuance in “Outlaw,” as the men go 120mph to sell you an earnest love story, rousing patriotic drama, bloody “Game of Thrones” savagery and even satirical humor.

Also Read: ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

Seriously. The film got several big laughs at the premiere screening that so bordered on satire we were half expecting it to devolve into an episode of “Family Guy.”

“Where the f–k have you been? You said three weeks, it’s been four months,” one feisty redheaded Scottish wife says to her solider husband, snapping him with a tea towel when he returns home from a long tour.

Another laughable but somehow poignant moment was the wedding night of Pine and Pugh. His bride is a gift from a prominent military family as a symbol of faith in their renegade King. Though Pugh is hardly a damsel and vibrates with a kind of modern independence, Pine leaves her bedroom without insisting on consummating their marriage. Even she seems confused.

“Have a good night,” he says, walking off to laughs from the Princess of Wales. He wakes the next morning in his own room, cuddling his dog. A fellow general wakes him and says, “you’re in bed with the wrong bitch.”

It’s whiplash tonal change, and feels like it may have been done to open the film up to different kinds of audiences. It felt bitter in the moments after, though, considering that contemporary content depicts these exact medieval marital rituals as nightmares of rape and violence.

Speaking of, “Outlaw King” chooses some odd moments for jarring depictions of gore. Historically accurate as they may be, the battles of Robert the Bruce are shot and scored as triumphant. They feel rewarding, until suddenly a detractor is disemboweled at close range. Another scene, where a Pine follower is confessing to a betrayal, ends in a brutal killing despite the table being set for healing or forgiveness.

Whatever your take, the film boasts gorgeous cinematography from DP Barry Ackroyd, who makes the most of lush green locations and dank battle scenes (probably making the most of that Netflix production budget, too).

No one has more fun here than Pine, empowered to be a lover and a fighter and a war hero. He’s so at home in the character, he even makes the rare male movie star leap to go full frontal while bathing in the trenches. “Outlaw King,” indeed.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Will Oscar Season’s Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

12 Hottest Toronto Movies for Sale, From ‘Wild Rose’ to ‘Vox Lux’ (Photos)

Toronto Film Festival Adds Conversations and Events With Mahershala Ali, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jason Reitman

Before introducing the director of this year’s opening night film at TIFF, festival artistic director Cameron Bailey said his group is always looking for “filmmaking craft which shows just what big screen filmmaking can do.”

The audience got that and then some with David Mackenzie’s bursting-at-the-seems Scottish war epic “Outlaw King,” which stars Chris Pine and played for the first time ever at Toronto’s Princess of Wales Theater.

Pine stars as Robert the Bruce, the historic warrior-king who helped wrestle the crown of Scotland from British control and establish the country as independent in the 1300s. To Americans, Robert the Bruce is probably most famous for being played by Angus Macfadyen in Mel Gibson’s Oscar-winning William Wallace biopic “Braveheart,” and yes “Outlaw King” repays the favor by also featuring Wallace as a character. This is notable because you’re sure to hear a lot of comparisons of the films from viewers, and perhaps the streamer’s own marketing department.

Pine is in his strapping movie star-glory in “Outlaw,” all toothy-grins and horseback hero shots as he interacts with a massive ensemble of dogged soldiers (Golden Globe winner Aaron Taylor Johnson, notably) and a formidable love interest in Florence Pugh (the 2016 breakout star of indie “Lady Macbeth”).

At first called to help stabilize the country’s leadership, after England’s Edward I starts aggressively skimming taxes from the nobility and flexing his control over the neighboring region, Pine’s Bruce galvanizes his countrymen to become their defacto King of the Scots. Thus launches an endless parade of bloody battles to take back the motherland.

Pine and Mackenzie previously collaborated to dazzling effect on the blue collar heist thriller “Hell or High Water,” about family, class and American masculinity. There is no such nuance in “Outlaw,” as the men go 120mph to sell you an earnest love story, rousing patriotic drama, bloody “Game of Thrones” savagery and even satirical humor.

Seriously. The film got several big laughs at the premiere screening that so bordered on satire we were half expecting it to devolve into an episode of “Family Guy.”

“Where the f–k have you been? You said three weeks, it’s been four months,” one feisty redheaded Scottish wife says to her solider husband, snapping him with a tea towel when he returns home from a long tour.

Another laughable but somehow poignant moment was the wedding night of Pine and Pugh. His bride is a gift from a prominent military family as a symbol of faith in their renegade King. Though Pugh is hardly a damsel and vibrates with a kind of modern independence, Pine leaves her bedroom without insisting on consummating their marriage. Even she seems confused.

“Have a good night,” he says, walking off to laughs from the Princess of Wales. He wakes the next morning in his own room, cuddling his dog. A fellow general wakes him and says, “you’re in bed with the wrong bitch.”

It’s whiplash tonal change, and feels like it may have been done to open the film up to different kinds of audiences. It felt bitter in the moments after, though, considering that contemporary content depicts these exact medieval marital rituals as nightmares of rape and violence.

Speaking of, “Outlaw King” chooses some odd moments for jarring depictions of gore. Historically accurate as they may be, the battles of Robert the Bruce are shot and scored as triumphant. They feel rewarding, until suddenly a detractor is disemboweled at close range. Another scene, where a Pine follower is confessing to a betrayal, ends in a brutal killing despite the table being set for healing or forgiveness.

Whatever your take, the film boasts gorgeous cinematography from DP Barry Ackroyd, who makes the most of lush green locations and dank battle scenes (probably making the most of that Netflix production budget, too).

No one has more fun here than Pine, empowered to be a lover and a fighter and a war hero. He’s so at home in the character, he even makes the rare male movie star leap to go full frontal while bathing in the trenches. “Outlaw King,” indeed.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Will Oscar Season's Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

12 Hottest Toronto Movies for Sale, From 'Wild Rose' to 'Vox Lux' (Photos)

Toronto Film Festival Adds Conversations and Events With Mahershala Ali, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jason Reitman

Every Jack Ryan Actor Ranked, From Alec Baldwin to John Krasinski

The first season of Amazon’s “Jack Ryan” show is finally here, with John Krasinski being the fifth actor to take on the role. So it feels like a good time to look back at every Jack Ryan and figure out who did it best.
5. Chris Pine
T…

The first season of Amazon’s “Jack Ryan” show is finally here, with John Krasinski being the fifth actor to take on the role. So it feels like a good time to look back at every Jack Ryan and figure out who did it best.

5. Chris Pine

There’s a reason why nobody remembers this movie even though it only came out like four years ago, because it’s a really slight and unremarkable experience aside from Kenneth Branagh’s delightful Russian baddie. Pine is just kinda there.

4. John Krasinski 

Jack Ryan is kind of a blank slate, generic white guy of a character, and so whether I like an actor in the role often largely depends on how good the thing he’s in is. Unfortunately for Krasinski, Amazon’s “Jack Ryan” is not good, and it drags him down with it. He’s fine, whatever.

3. Harrison Ford 

It’s not hard to imagine Ford’s Jack Ryan as Indiana Jones after retiring and going straight, because that’s kinda the mode Ford is in in “Patriot Games” and “Clear and Present Danger.” Which is a pleasure to watch even though it’s not overly interesting.

2. Ben Affleck 

The Ben Affleck of “The Sum of All Fears” was before he solidified himself as a Serious Actor, and his turn as the “boy scout” Jack Ryan is pretty unique in his filmography. It’s fun to watch him as an un-cynical good dude.

1. Alec Baldwin 

Baldwin is an actor who definitely has a type of role he usually does, and so it’s easy to forget that he didn’t always play characters who are jerks. The standard Baldwin character would be like Jack Ryan’s boss trying to keep him from taking the initiative to do the right thing, so having him as Jack Ryan himself is really fascinating. And also Baldwin just kills it.

Moguls on a Boat, All-Female Edition! How Oprah, Donna Langley, Gwyneth Spent Their Summer

It ain’t easy being a power woman in entertainment, media and tech  — which is why our annual executive vacation report “Moguls on a Boat” is devoted this year to high-profile women who deserve to play as hard as they work.

This list isn’t as long as in years past, which should probably tell you something about gender parity in the executive ranks of these industries, but our bosses are fierce.

They are spiritual and thought leaders, CEOs, philanthropists, underwriters of art and culture and definitively in charge. They also rake in substantial incomes — the list includes the richest woman in the world, Forbes’ reigning most powerful woman in media and three brand titans who leveraged multimillion-dollar companies based on their celebrity.

Indulge in their summer retreats from the boardroom in places like Capri, Portofino, the lush and hippie hills of Ojai, the seersucker-clad island of Martha’s Vineyard and, of course, plenty of open water to house those chartered and owned floating palaces.

Also Read: Oprah Winfrey Fires Back at ‘Frivolous’ Lawsuit Over ‘Greenleaf’ TV Series

WHO: Oprah, aboard David Geffen’s yacht Rising Sun in Portofino, with Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson and Julianna Margulies

STATUS: Every year is a good year to be Oprah, but she’s been particularly busy since last summer. In January, the mogul delivered a Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award acceptance speech at the Golden Globes that was so inspiring, it inserted her into the 2020 presidential election race.

While she demurred over a White House run, Oprah did return to acting. In February, she starred alongside Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time.” At the top of her summer, she signed a multi-year content partnership with Apple that will “embrace her incomparable ability to connect with audiences around the world,” the tech giant said.

Those checks will add to her 2017 updated net worth of $2.8 billion, according to Forbes.

Also Read: Oprah Winfrey Signs Multi-Year Content Partnership Deal With Apple

WHO: Gwyneth Paltrow — with fiancé Brad Falchuk, designer Valentino Garavani and his partner Giancarlo Giammetti — on Valentino’s yacht T.M. Blue One in Capri.

STATUS: Forget her little movie this year — the $2 billion worldwide box office phenomenon “Avengers: Infinity War” — since acting is officially Gwyneth’s hobby now. This year, Paltrow’s rapidly growing lifestyle company Goop received a $250 million valuation for its editorial and diverse e-commerce business that encompasses fashion, beauty, wellness and live events.

Largely hailed as a prototype for leveraging celebrity into big business (like another mogul on this list, Kylie Jenner), Paltrow continues to be a cultural lightning rod while monetizing the eyeballs of her haters — exquisitely detailed in a recent New York Times magazine profile on her business.

Paltrow is also set to wed “Pose” producer Falchuk this year, following the 2016 finalization of her divorce from Coldplay rocker Chris Martin. Her betrothed has also recruited her back onto the small screen, as she’ll cameo in his new Ben Platt-Barbra Streisand musical comedy “The Politician” at Netflix.

Also Read: Gwyneth Paltrow: Brad Pitt Told Harvey Weinstein ‘I’ll Kill You’ After ‘Weird’ Hotel Encounter

WHO: Stacey Snider, at her home on Martha’s Vineyard

STATUS: If anyone deserves a bike ride around the Gay Head Lighthouse or a few glasses of vino at the Obama-beloved restaurant The Cardboard Box on the Vineyard, its 20th Century Fox Film CEO Snider, who has long had a vacation home on the high-end Massachusetts island.

In 2016, Snider joined an extremely small club of female studio heads when she succeeded Jim Gianopulos as CEO and chairman at the company. Roughly 18 months later, Disney announced its plan to acquire all of Fox’s film and TV content assets, plunging the media establishment into chaos and raising still-prominent question about the fate of thousands of Fox employees as Disney absorbs them.

Snider has been bold in her candor about the uncertain future. Speaking at the movie theater owner convention CinemaCon in April, she could barely contain her emotion as she played a sizzle of the greatest films made in the studio’s 103 years. The Disney transition is expected to be complete by 2019.

Also Read: Fox Film CEO Teases Uncertain Future With Looming Disney Acquisition: ‘We Face a New Transition’

WHO: Donna Langley, at her home in Ojai, Calif.

STATUS: Another member of the rarefied female-studio head club, Universal Pictures Chairman Langley is frankly crushing it this year. In July, the studio crossed $1 billion at the domestic box office, the eighth year in a row the NBCUniversal property has hit that milestone. This month, Universal crossed $2 billion at the worldwide box office for the fourth time in its history. This is largely due to the success of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” which also helped put the studio in second place behind monolith Disney in terms of market share.

In January, Langley was honored with the Producers Guild of America Milestone Award, honoring those who have made “historic contributions to the entertainment industry.”

Also Read: ‘Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again’ Proves Power of Women at Box Office

WHO: Beyoncé, on the Amalfi coast aboard the $200 million charter yacht Kismet, with husband Jay-Z and their children in between stops on the “On The Run II” tour.

STATUS: In a career of dizzying highs and milestones for an African American and female artist, Beyonce achieved another transcendent moment as the first black woman to headline the Coachella Valley music festival in April.

More than that, the show was a celebration of deep Southern culture and a nearly two-hour nonstop dance party that one review billed as “two years and a career in the making.” The concert was immediately followed by the announcement of a joint world tour with husband Jay-Z, “On the Run II” — and another surprise album drop, “Everything Is Love.”

Even in the dog days of summer, Beyoncé is still making history. She clocked a second September cover of Vogue magazine this year, and tapped Tyler Mitchell to shoot the photos — the first ever African American photographer to shoot the most important annual issue of the fashion bible.

Also Read: Why Beyonce and Jay-Z Were Allowed to Film ‘Apes-‘ Music Video at the Louvre

WHO: Kylie Jenner, in a multi-bedroom villa at the Turks and Caicos resort Amanyara, with boyfriend Travis Scott and newborn daughter, Stormi.

STAUTS: We are living in a post-reality-stardom age for the polarizing and pouty Kardashian clan. The family has become synonymous with raking in millions on branding and lifestyle businesses where they once were known for a sex tape, vulgar language and staged photo ops.

No family member represents this new Kardashian prototype quite like Kylie, daughter of Kris and Caitlyn Jenner, who stunned this year on the cover of Forbes magazine lauding America’s self-made billionaires. Jenner’s runaway success with Kylie Cosmetics, a makeup range curated and released in flash sales propped up largely by her 113 million (you read that correctly) Instagram followers.

WHO: Alice Walton, heiress to the Walmart Stores fortune, bidding farewell to her horse ranches in Millsap, Texas.

STATUS: Walton is the richest woman in the world, at a reported $44.9 billion, but her vacation spot is not nearly as lavish as her counterparts on our list.

This year Walton, a voracious horse trainer and breeder, sold the last of two Texas ranches that long sat in her real estate portfolio. Nestled in the town of Millsap, Walton offloaded both but doubtlessly enjoyed a last hurrah before shipping off to her new home in Fort Worth, Texas.

Walton is a dedicated philanthropist and art lover. She founded the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and serves as chairman of the board, in Walmart’s hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas.

WHO: Anna Wintour, hosting the wedding of daughter Bee Shaffer and director Francesco Carrozzini, at her Forge River estate in Mastic, N.Y., on Long Island.

STATUS: Conde Nast’s creative director and long-reigning editor of Vogue is looking warily toward retirement, numerous outlets have reported over the last year (she denies any plans to leave her job). Not that a possible abdication is slowing her down.

Wintour was named the most powerful woman in media by Forbes last year, a nod to the iron clutch she has on the famed magazine publisher despite continued setbacks. Her relevance never takes a hit despite the challenges of print media. Vogue’s authoritarian hold on fashion and beauty has transferred seamlessly to social media (ask Beyoncé, a few notches above here) with series like the YouTube makeup tutorial show “Beauty Secrets” earning hundred of millions of views thanks to stars like, well, Jenner, Paltrow, Hailey Baldwin and Priyanka Chopra.

Wintour is also never far from Hollywood’s mind. Her efforts in making the annual Met Gala the American social event of the year was a key plot point in Warner Bros.’s 2018 caper “Ocean’s 8,” which features a brief cameo from Wintour herself alongside Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Anne Hathaway, Cate Blanchett and Helena Bonham Carter.

Fall Forecast: We know where top women executives, talent, thought leaders and game changers will be at summer’s end — the inaugural Power Women Summit in Los Angeles, taking November 1 and 2.

Produced by Wrap Women, the event will be the largest ever gathering of the most influential women in entertainment, media and technology. The summit represents a significant media platform to celebrate positive examples of individuals and companies that are paving the road to greater inclusivity. It is also a launchpad and catalyst for concrete measures to help the media and entertainment industry move toward gender equity across the board.

And you can join them — start here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Moguls on a Boat 2017: Where Jeff Bezos, Lachlan Murdoch, Obamas, Zuck Vacay-tioned

Moguls on a Boat 2015: Where Beyonce, Bob Iger, Oprah, Michael Lynton Kicked Back This Summer

Moguls on a Boat 2014: Where Rupert Murdoch, Ryan Kavanaugh, Clive Davis, Puff Daddy Had Fun in the Sun (Photos)

Moguls on a Boat at Cannes: TheWrap’s Guide to Captains of the Cote d’Azur

It ain’t easy being a power woman in entertainment, media and tech  — which is why our annual executive vacation report “Moguls on a Boat” is devoted this year to high-profile women who deserve to play as hard as they work.

This list isn’t as long as in years past, which should probably tell you something about gender parity in the executive ranks of these industries, but our bosses are fierce.

They are spiritual and thought leaders, CEOs, philanthropists, underwriters of art and culture and definitively in charge. They also rake in substantial incomes — the list includes the richest woman in the world, Forbes’ reigning most powerful woman in media and three brand titans who leveraged multimillion-dollar companies based on their celebrity.

Indulge in their summer retreats from the boardroom in places like Capri, Portofino, the lush and hippie hills of Ojai, the seersucker-clad island of Martha’s Vineyard and, of course, plenty of open water to house those chartered and owned floating palaces.

WHO: Oprah, aboard David Geffen’s yacht Rising Sun in Portofino, with Tom Hanks, Rita Wilson and Julianna Margulies

STATUS: Every year is a good year to be Oprah, but she’s been particularly busy since last summer. In January, the mogul delivered a Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award acceptance speech at the Golden Globes that was so inspiring, it inserted her into the 2020 presidential election race.

While she demurred over a White House run, Oprah did return to acting. In February, she starred alongside Reese Witherspoon and Chris Pine in Ava DuVernay’s “A Wrinkle in Time.” At the top of her summer, she signed a multi-year content partnership with Apple that will “embrace her incomparable ability to connect with audiences around the world,” the tech giant said.

Those checks will add to her 2017 updated net worth of $2.8 billion, according to Forbes.

WHO: Gwyneth Paltrow — with fiancé Brad Falchuk, designer Valentino Garavani and his partner Giancarlo Giammetti — on Valentino’s yacht T.M. Blue One in Capri.

STATUS: Forget her little movie this year — the $2 billion worldwide box office phenomenon “Avengers: Infinity War” — since acting is officially Gwyneth’s hobby now. This year, Paltrow’s rapidly growing lifestyle company Goop received a $250 million valuation for its editorial and diverse e-commerce business that encompasses fashion, beauty, wellness and live events.

Largely hailed as a prototype for leveraging celebrity into big business (like another mogul on this list, Kylie Jenner), Paltrow continues to be a cultural lightning rod while monetizing the eyeballs of her haters — exquisitely detailed in a recent New York Times magazine profile on her business.

Paltrow is also set to wed “Pose” producer Falchuk this year, following the 2016 finalization of her divorce from Coldplay rocker Chris Martin. Her betrothed has also recruited her back onto the small screen, as she’ll cameo in his new Ben Platt-Barbra Streisand musical comedy “The Politician” at Netflix.

WHO: Stacey Snider, at her home on Martha’s Vineyard

STATUS: If anyone deserves a bike ride around the Gay Head Lighthouse or a few glasses of vino at the Obama-beloved restaurant The Cardboard Box on the Vineyard, its 20th Century Fox Film CEO Snider, who has long had a vacation home on the high-end Massachusetts island.

In 2016, Snider joined an extremely small club of female studio heads when she succeeded Jim Gianopulos as CEO and chairman at the company. Roughly 18 months later, Disney announced its plan to acquire all of Fox’s film and TV content assets, plunging the media establishment into chaos and raising still-prominent question about the fate of thousands of Fox employees as Disney absorbs them.

Snider has been bold in her candor about the uncertain future. Speaking at the movie theater owner convention CinemaCon in April, she could barely contain her emotion as she played a sizzle of the greatest films made in the studio’s 103 years. The Disney transition is expected to be complete by 2019.

WHO: Donna Langley, at her home in Ojai, Calif.

STATUS: Another member of the rarefied female-studio head club, Universal Pictures Chairman Langley is frankly crushing it this year. In July, the studio crossed $1 billion at the domestic box office, the eighth year in a row the NBCUniversal property has hit that milestone. This month, Universal crossed $2 billion at the worldwide box office for the fourth time in its history. This is largely due to the success of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” which also helped put the studio in second place behind monolith Disney in terms of market share.

In January, Langley was honored with the Producers Guild of America Milestone Award, honoring those who have made “historic contributions to the entertainment industry.”

WHO: Beyoncé, on the Amalfi coast aboard the $200 million charter yacht Kismet, with husband Jay-Z and their children in between stops on the “On The Run II” tour.

STATUS: In a career of dizzying highs and milestones for an African American and female artist, Beyonce achieved another transcendent moment as the first black woman to headline the Coachella Valley music festival in April.

More than that, the show was a celebration of deep Southern culture and a nearly two-hour nonstop dance party that one review billed as “two years and a career in the making.” The concert was immediately followed by the announcement of a joint world tour with husband Jay-Z, “On the Run II” — and another surprise album drop, “Everything Is Love.”

Even in the dog days of summer, Beyoncé is still making history. She clocked a second September cover of Vogue magazine this year, and tapped Tyler Mitchell to shoot the photos — the first ever African American photographer to shoot the most important annual issue of the fashion bible.

WHO: Kylie Jenner, in a multi-bedroom villa at the Turks and Caicos resort Amanyara, with boyfriend Travis Scott and newborn daughter, Stormi.

STAUTS: We are living in a post-reality-stardom age for the polarizing and pouty Kardashian clan. The family has become synonymous with raking in millions on branding and lifestyle businesses where they once were known for a sex tape, vulgar language and staged photo ops.

No family member represents this new Kardashian prototype quite like Kylie, daughter of Kris and Caitlyn Jenner, who stunned this year on the cover of Forbes magazine lauding America’s self-made billionaires. Jenner’s runaway success with Kylie Cosmetics, a makeup range curated and released in flash sales propped up largely by her 113 million (you read that correctly) Instagram followers.

WHO: Alice Walton, heiress to the Walmart Stores fortune, bidding farewell to her horse ranches in Millsap, Texas.

STATUS: Walton is the richest woman in the world, at a reported $44.9 billion, but her vacation spot is not nearly as lavish as her counterparts on our list.

This year Walton, a voracious horse trainer and breeder, sold the last of two Texas ranches that long sat in her real estate portfolio. Nestled in the town of Millsap, Walton offloaded both but doubtlessly enjoyed a last hurrah before shipping off to her new home in Fort Worth, Texas.

Walton is a dedicated philanthropist and art lover. She founded the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, and serves as chairman of the board, in Walmart’s hometown of Bentonville, Arkansas.

WHO: Anna Wintour, hosting the wedding of daughter Bee Shaffer and director Francesco Carrozzini, at her Forge River estate in Mastic, N.Y., on Long Island.

STATUS: Conde Nast’s creative director and long-reigning editor of Vogue is looking warily toward retirement, numerous outlets have reported over the last year (she denies any plans to leave her job). Not that a possible abdication is slowing her down.

Wintour was named the most powerful woman in media by Forbes last year, a nod to the iron clutch she has on the famed magazine publisher despite continued setbacks. Her relevance never takes a hit despite the challenges of print media. Vogue’s authoritarian hold on fashion and beauty has transferred seamlessly to social media (ask Beyoncé, a few notches above here) with series like the YouTube makeup tutorial show “Beauty Secrets” earning hundred of millions of views thanks to stars like, well, Jenner, Paltrow, Hailey Baldwin and Priyanka Chopra.

Wintour is also never far from Hollywood’s mind. Her efforts in making the annual Met Gala the American social event of the year was a key plot point in Warner Bros.’s 2018 caper “Ocean’s 8,” which features a brief cameo from Wintour herself alongside Sandra Bullock, Rihanna, Anne Hathaway, Cate Blanchett and Helena Bonham Carter.

Fall Forecast: We know where top women executives, talent, thought leaders and game changers will be at summer’s end — the inaugural Power Women Summit in Los Angeles, taking November 1 and 2.

Produced by Wrap Women, the event will be the largest ever gathering of the most influential women in entertainment, media and technology. The summit represents a significant media platform to celebrate positive examples of individuals and companies that are paving the road to greater inclusivity. It is also a launchpad and catalyst for concrete measures to help the media and entertainment industry move toward gender equity across the board.

And you can join them — start here.

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‘Outlaw King’ Trailer: Chris Pine and David Mackenzie Team Up for Epic Netflix Period Piece

The Robert the Bruce biopic will open TIFF 2018.

David Mackenzie’s follow-up to his Best Picture nominee “Hell or High Water” is headed to Netflix, but it looks to spare no expense on the streaming service. “Outlaw King,” slated to debut in select theatres and on the streaming platform on November 9, reunites the director with his “Water” star Chris Pine for a much different story. Pine stars as Robert the Bruce, the King of Scots who hopes to get back control of his country after the King of England declares that he is an outlaw after stirring the country to civil war. Mackenzie also co-wrote and co-produced the film, which co-stars Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Florence Pugh, Billy Howle, Tony Curran, and Stephen Dillane. The film is slated to open TIFF 2018.

Mackenzie recently spoke about the importance of the film opening at TIFF.

“Thank you, TIFF, for welcoming our film into the world. The Festival is the perfect launch pad for our realistic epic, and we are delighted to be the first Scottish film ever to open Toronto,” the director said in a statement. “I cannot imagine a better place to have our World Premiere. Scotland and Canada’s histories are bound together, forged in the crucible of the struggles of history, bringing this day an affinity and sensibility that I hope will translate to a profound, visceral, and riotously entertaining experience. We have an amazing cast and crew working at the top of their game, and we are really looking forward to spreading some Scottish goodwill on the great city of Toronto.”

Watch the trailer below:

‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine Re-Create ‘Breakfast Club’ Poster

“Wonder Woman 1984” stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Kristen Wiig, Pedro Pascal and director Patty Jenkins re-created the famous “The Breakfast Club” poster — and nailed it.

Gadot took on Molly Ringwald’s pose, while Pine posed as Anthony Michael Hall’s geeky Brian. Jenkins is Judd Nelson’s delinquent character, while Wiig takes on Ally Sheedy’s outcast Allison and Pascal is Emilio Estevez’s champion wrestler, Andrew.

Of course, Diana Prince’s gold headband is front and center in the picture.

See Photo: ‘Wonder Woman 1984’: Patty Jenkins Shares First Look at Pedro Pascal

“Wonder Woman 1984” is set in the 1980s and will feature Wiig as Dr. Barbara Minerva, also known as Cheetah. Pine is reprising his role as Steve Trevor.

The sequel will hit theaters on November 1, 2019.

Also Read: Gal Gadot Joins Voice Cast of Disney’s ‘Ralph Breaks the Internet’

“The Breakfast Club” was released in 1985 and was written and directed by John Hughes. It followed five kids from different high school cliques who are forced to hang out in detention. It has since become a cult classic and one of the most famous movies about a high school. The five actors who starred became known as members of a group referred to as “The Brat Pack.”

See the photos below.

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— FE FI FO FILM! (@FionaUnderhill) August 17, 2018

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Gal Gadot Drops First Shot of Wonder Woman in Costume in ‘Wonder Woman 1984’

“Wonder Woman 1984” stars Gal Gadot, Chris Pine, Kristen Wiig, Pedro Pascal and director Patty Jenkins re-created the famous “The Breakfast Club” poster — and nailed it.

Gadot took on Molly Ringwald’s pose, while Pine posed as Anthony Michael Hall’s geeky Brian. Jenkins is Judd Nelson’s delinquent character, while Wiig takes on Ally Sheedy’s outcast Allison and Pascal is Emilio Estevez’s champion wrestler, Andrew.

Of course, Diana Prince’s gold headband is front and center in the picture.

“Wonder Woman 1984” is set in the 1980s and will feature Wiig as Dr. Barbara Minerva, also known as Cheetah. Pine is reprising his role as Steve Trevor.

The sequel will hit theaters on November 1, 2019.

“The Breakfast Club” was released in 1985 and was written and directed by John Hughes. It followed five kids from different high school cliques who are forced to hang out in detention. It has since become a cult classic and one of the most famous movies about a high school. The five actors who starred became known as members of a group referred to as “The Brat Pack.”

See the photos below.

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Chris Pine and Laura Dern Films to Open and Close Toronto Film Festival

“Outlaw King,” a historical drama starring Chris Pine and directed by “Hell or High Water” director David Mackenzie, will serve as the opening-night film of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, TIFF organizers announced on Tuesday.

Pine stars as Robert the Bruce, the 14th century Scottish hero who led a group of outlaws to reclaim the Scottish throne from English rule. Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Florence Pugh and Billy Howle also appear in the film, which will premiere at the Roy Thompson Hall on Thursday, Sept. 6.

Netflix will release the “Outlaw King” in November.

Also Read: ‘Hell or High Water’ Stars Chris Pine and Ben Foster Reunite With Director for Netflix’s ‘Outlaw King’

TIFF also announced that “Jeremiah Terminator LeRoy,” a film from director Justin Kelly about the JT LeRoy literary hoax, will be the festival’s closing-night attraction. The film stars Laura Dern as real-life author Laura Albert, who created the fictionalized alter ego of a young queer man named JT LeRoy. As LeRoy, she wrote a bestselling book, and then enlisted her boyfriend’s sister, Savannah Knoop (Kristen Stewart) to play LeRoy in public.

The 43rd Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6-16. Additional programming will be announced over the next week, with the schedule announced on Aug. 21.

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“Outlaw King,” a historical drama starring Chris Pine and directed by “Hell or High Water” director David Mackenzie, will serve as the opening-night film of the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival, TIFF organizers announced on Tuesday.

Pine stars as Robert the Bruce, the 14th century Scottish hero who led a group of outlaws to reclaim the Scottish throne from English rule. Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Florence Pugh and Billy Howle also appear in the film, which will premiere at the Roy Thompson Hall on Thursday, Sept. 6.

Netflix will release the “Outlaw King” in November.

TIFF also announced that “Jeremiah Terminator LeRoy,” a film from director Justin Kelly about the JT LeRoy literary hoax, will be the festival’s closing-night attraction. The film stars Laura Dern as real-life author Laura Albert, who created the fictionalized alter ego of a young queer man named JT LeRoy. As LeRoy, she wrote a bestselling book, and then enlisted her boyfriend’s sister, Savannah Knoop (Kristen Stewart) to play LeRoy in public.

The 43rd Toronto International Film Festival will run from Sept. 6-16. Additional programming will be announced over the next week, with the schedule announced on Aug. 21.

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‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Team Talks ’80s Setting, Chris Pine’s Resurrection

The team behind the upcoming “Wonder Woman 1984” took to Hall H at San Diego Comic-Con Saturday to discuss the upcoming sequel film and debut some footage for the assembled fans. Chris Pine, director Patty Jenkins, and Gal Gadot were all pr…

The team behind the upcoming “Wonder Woman 1984” took to Hall H at San Diego Comic-Con Saturday to discuss the upcoming sequel film and debut some footage for the assembled fans. Chris Pine, director Patty Jenkins, and Gal Gadot were all present at the panel. Pine kicked it off by quashing any hopes that he’d […]

Comic-Con Goers Get a Gloriously ’80s Look at New ‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Footage

A glorious dose of 1980s cheese and kick-ass action greeted fans in Hall H on Saturday morning during Warner Bros.’ big Comic-Con panel, as director Patty Jenkins and star Gal Gadot unveiled the first footage from “Wonder Woman 1984.”…

A glorious dose of 1980s cheese and kick-ass action greeted fans in Hall H on Saturday morning during Warner Bros.’ big Comic-Con panel, as director Patty Jenkins and star Gal Gadot unveiled the first footage from “Wonder Woman 1984.”

The video featured Wonder Woman (Gadot) in her 1980s get-up in a mall food court, where armed gunmen stage a hold-up. Before she moves in to stop the bad guys, Wonder Woman is spotted by a glasses-wearing little girl who’s shocked at the superhero’s appearance.

Wonder Woman gets the girl away from the danger by picking her up and gently sliding her across the mall with her super strength, so that the girl comes to a comfortable stop against a giant teddy bear. She’s not so gentle with the robbers.

Next, Wonder Woman leaps over the robbers, grabs the guns from their hands, and crushes them. Next, she uses her glowing golden Lasso of Truth to lasso both baddies, then leaps up to the second floor of the food court and drags them behind her.

The footage then cut to a shot of Wonder Woman running down a city street as the logo for the film appeared on the screen. It was notable that, unlike “Wonder Woman,” the sequel has taken on a very bright and colorful aesthetic to go with its 1980s setting.

Set during the late height of Cold War tensions, the film sees Diana come into conflict with the Soviet Union and encountering a new enemy, the villain Cheetah.

“Wonder Woman 1984,” is in production with a planned release on Nov. 1, 2019. The film brings back Patty Jenkins as director and co-writer. Gadot is starring, along with Chris Pine as Steve Trevor (returning from the dead in a great Member’s Only jacket), with Kristen Wiig as Cheetah. Pedro Pascal has also been cast in the film.

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‘Wonder Woman 1984’ Team Talks The Return Of Chris Pine, Why Sequel Is Set In The ’80s – Comic-Con

Even though they are only three and a half weeks into production on Wonder Woman 1984, director Patty Jenkins, Chris Pine and Gal Gadot took the stage with enthusiasm and even a little early footage Saturday during Warner Bros’ Hall H presentatio…

Even though they are only three and a half weeks into production on Wonder Woman 1984, director Patty Jenkins, Chris Pine and Gal Gadot took the stage with enthusiasm and even a little early footage Saturday during Warner Bros’ Hall H presentation at Comic-Con. Pine opened the proceedings by revealing he couldn't divulge why he's back, following his demise in the first film. But he so brightened the original film that nobody seemed to be holding the lapse against…

TV News Roundup: Chris Pine Investigates Hollywood in First ‘I Am the Night’ Trailer

In today’s roundup, TNT released the trailer for the Chris Pine-starrer “I Am the Night,” directed by Patty Jenkins, and HBO set the premiere date for “Random Acts of Flyness.” DATES HBO has set the premiere date for the n…

In today’s roundup, TNT released the trailer for the Chris Pine-starrer “I Am the Night,” directed by Patty Jenkins, and HBO set the premiere date for “Random Acts of Flyness.” DATES HBO has set the premiere date for the new late-night series “Random Acts of Flyness,” which will debut Aug. 3. at 12 a.m. ET/PT. The […]