22 Most Shocking TV Character Deaths of 2018, From ‘The Affair’ to ‘Westworld’ (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

If there was one thing 2018 taught us, it’s that “shocking” is a truly relative term — and we’re not even talking about real-life instances here. Yes, it’s pretty hard to blow anyone’s mind these days, includin…

‘Castle Rock’ Finale Teases the Truth About Ruth Deaver’s Condition

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the finale episode of “Castle Rock.”)

Throughout the first season of Hulu’s “Castle Rock,” Ruth Deaver has struggled to deal with her life as an Alzheimer’s patient — but the show has teased that something more might be going on with her.

The finale episode seems to finally come down on the truth, one way or the other. And it seems that the condition Ruth (Sissy Spacek) has been grappling with all season is more than Alzheimer’s disease.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

The suggestion that more was going on started back in Episode 7, “The Queen,” when we spent a whole episode seeing everything Ruth was experiencing from her perspective. Her life with her condition means she experiences time out of order and out of sync — sometimes she’s in the present with other people, and other times, she’s reliving events from her past.

Ruth places chess pieces around her house in the present, which she explains help her maintain her grip on where and when she is; if she finds a chess piece, she knows it’s “now,” essentially, and finding a chess piece helps bring her back to the present.

In “Romans,” the last episode of the season, though, finds Ruth standing on the edge of a bridge in the middle of Castle Rock, as we’ve seen her do before (and the one time that she actually jumped). She’s discovered by Molly (Melanie Lynskey), and Ruth says that she and Molly have had this conversation many times before. Every time, nothing Molly says is enough to dissuade Ruth from choosing to jump rather than live with the knowledge that she killed Alan Pangborn (Scott Glenn).

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’: Here’s What That Ultra-Creepy Ending Means

This time, though, Molly intuits what’s been happening to Ruth, and asks her a question based on her conversations with the Kid (Bill Skarsgard). She asks her one question: do her memories include her leaving her husband, and she and Henry (Andre Holland) leaving Castle Rock behind with Alan?

Ruth says that Molly has never asked her that question before, and the implication is that she has, in fact, experienced that before. And that’s an element of the alternate universe version of Castle Rock that the Kid (Bill Skarsgard) described last week in Episode 9, “Henry Deaver.”

It seems that what Ruth is actually experiencing is that she’s briefly bouncing between the different realities that converge on Castle Rock, known as “the schisma,” as Odin Branch (Charles Jones) explained in Episode 6, “Filter.” That would track with some of the things we saw in “The Queen,” like Alan coming to investigate the gunshot that seemed to be the one fired when Ruth killed him, and the fact that she seemed to find herself holding the queen chess piece somewhere other than the present.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Reveals What Really Happened to Henry Deaver’s Dad

Ruth’s conversation with Molly on the bridge suggests that Molly has experienced the bridge situation many times before in many other realities, but this is the first time that Molly has had this conversation with Ruth and given her an idea that the other realities she’s seeing are real. And that’s enough to stop Ruth from stepping off the bridge.

Between “The Queen” and that final revelation in “Romans,” it seems clear that Ruth’s condition goes beyond simple confusion about her own memories. She might not have traveled between the two worlds, like the Kid claims he and Henry have done, but it seems the schisma affects more than those few people who can hear it.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Castle Rock’ Reveals What Really Happened to Henry Deaver’s Dad

‘Castle Rock’: Here’s What That Ultra-Creepy Ending Means

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

‘Castle Rock’ Reveals What Really Happened to Henry Deaver’s Dad

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Sept. 11 episode of “Castle Rock.”)

The final episode of “Castle Rock” runs two stories in parallel: the present action that has the Kid trying to convince Henry to help him, and the past, in which we finally see (some of) what happened to Henry when he was 12.

We’ve been getting tidbits of this story all season, partially because Henry doesn’t seem to remember all of it, and partially because he refuses to tell anyone what really happened. The broad strokes that everyone in Castle Rock knows are these: One day, Henry Deaver (André Holland, with his younger counterpart played by Caleel Harris) went into the woods with his adopted father, Reverend Matthew Deaver (Adam Rothenberg).

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

Later, Matthew was found at the base of a cliff, badly hurt from a fall and near death, and Henry had disappeared. Search parties looked for Henry for the next six days. Meanwhile, Matthew hung on and seemed like he might even recover while being nursed at home over the next few days, but then abruptly died in his bed, seemingly succumbing to his injuries.

When Henry was found six days after he disappeared out on the frozen Castle Lake, he hadn’t been hurt, nor had he suffered any ill effects from the cold. It seemed that he had been inside and well-cared for during those six days. Because nothing seemed to be wrong with him, the people of Castle Rock started to speculate that Henry had pushed Matthew and gone to hide out somewhere, faking his disappearance.

Whether Henry, as a boy, actually tried to kill his father has been an open question all season, and something that clearly plagues Henry. The final episode, “Romans,” answers the question definitively by showing us what happened to Henry and Matthew that day. The pair went out into the woods to hear the sound that Matthew called the Voice of God and that others have called “the schisma.” There, Matthew told Henry that he meant to kill Ruth Deaver (Sissy Spacek), his wife and Henry’s adopted mother.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’: Here’s What That Ultra-Creepy Ending Means

Matthew tells Henry that he knows about Ruth’s affair with Sheriff Pangborn (Scott Glenn, with his younger version played by Jeffrey Pierce). That transgression, and her encouraging Henry to lie about hearing the schisma in order to protect himself from the increasingly erratic Matthew, are sins that Matthew uses to justify his plan to get rid of her. The name of the episode is a reference to Matthew’s biblical reasoning for killing Ruth. He quotes Romans 6:23: “The wages of sin is death.”

When Henry hears this, he realizes what he’s dealing with when it comes to his father, and runs away from him in the snowy wilderness. In a great callback to “The Shining,” Stephen King’s story about a father trying to kill his son, Henry runs out to the cliff above Castle Lake, then carefully steps back through his own footprints so he can trick Matthew. He hides in the woods and waits for his father to follow his prints to the cliff. When Matthew does, Henry pushes him over the side.

We know that Matthew survived the fall, though, and we also know that it wasn’t Henry who ultimately killed his dad. Henry’s former friend and neighbor in Castle Rock, Molly Strand (Melanie Lynskey, with Cassady McClincy playing the character as a child), told Henry that she actually killed Matthew in his bed after his fall.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

Molly told Henry that she could sense the fact that Henry wanted Matthew dead, and that’s what made her do it for him. In fact, she said, it was as if Henry completed the act of murder through her.

Also Read: Looks Like Pennywise Beat Up James McAvoy on the Set of ‘IT: Chapter 2’ (Photo)

In the end, Henry’s act was to protect his mother from his frightening, ever-more deranged father. Henry even asked the Kid what would have happened in the other world — and the Kid (Bill Skarsgård) agreed that Matthew would have murdered Ruth, but in the Kid’s version of Castle Rock, Ruth and Pangborn took the Kid and left town.

Whether Henry believes the Kid, or believes that he was justified in what he did to Matthew, is another story. After all, as Matthew said, the devil tells people what they want to hear.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

‘Castle Rock’: Here’s What That Ultra-Creepy Ending Means

Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

‘Castle Rock’: Here’s What That Ultra-Creepy Ending Means

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the finale episode of “Castle Rock.”)

The final moments of the first season of “Castle Rock” wrapped up most of the plotlines of the show, but it also ended with a whole lot of ambiguity.

In last week’s episode, the Kid (Bill Skarsgard) explained his own identity and where he came from to Molly (Melanie Lynskey). The Kid claimed he was the child of Ruth (Sissy Spacek) and Matthew Deaver (Adam Rothenberg) from another, parallel reality — and that he’d been trapped in this world by Shawshank State Penitentiary Warden Lacy (Terry O’Quinn) for more than 15 years.

The Kid wanted Henry (Andre Holland) to take him to the woods, since Henry could see the gateway between the worlds that would allow the Kid to travel back to his home reality.

The episode ends with a time skip that finds that Henry didn’t do what the Kid wanted. Instead, Henry climbs down into the bowels of the now-defunct Shawshank, to the cage where the Kid was found — and we see that he has locked the Kid back up, the same way Lacy did.

The Kid insists that he is trapped in the wrong reality, an alternate version of Castle Rock, and that the same thing happened to Henry when he was young — Henry just doesn’t remember. Eventually, he will, the Kid says, and when that happens, Henry will release him. Henry doesn’t seem to believe him, though. In the last seconds of the episode, Henry leaves the Kid in the darkness with some food, and a flicker of a smile crosses the Kid’s face.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

So what does it all mean? There’s room for interpretation, but the Kid’s final reaction to Henry imprisoning him pushes one major one: that Warden Lacy might have been right about the Kid’s actual identity.

At the start of the show, when Lacy commits suicide, we learned that he imprisoned the Kid because he thought he was the devil, thanks to the horrific things that happened wherever the Kid went. Last week, the Kid appeared to explain why that was the case: He claimed to be from another universe, an alternate Castle Rock, and the fact that he was trapped in a universe that wasn’t his own created the weirdness that made tragedies happen around him.

It seems, though, that Henry didn’t buy it. When the Kid dragged Henry at gunpoint out into the woods in order to make Henry help him find the gateway between the realities, Henry managed to get the gun away from the Kid. Rather than helping him get home, the time skip reveals that Henry put the Kid back in the cage — so obviously he never found the gateway that the Kid claimed was real.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

So what’s happening here, and why is the Kid smiling? One way to look at it is that Lacey was right, and Henry believes his interpretation: The Kid really is the devil. And Henry is staying in Castle Rock in order to make sure the Kid stays in his cage and can’t harm anyone else.

The thing is, the Kid told his story about coming from another universe, and he claimed that Henry also crossed that barrier and was trapped in the other reality for years — but Henry can’t remember those events. The only place that information comes from is the Kid, and it’s unverified. Like Matthew, Henry might be seeing this whole thing as the devil telling him what he wants to hear.

The turning point for Henry was the series of events that took place in the jail. He and the Kid were locked up together when a bus full of Shawshank inmates was brought in to be held in the jail. In the Kid’s presence, the prisoners staged a breakout, murdering all the deputies in the office, as well as Willie (Rory Culkin). As Henry watched the murders, the keys to the cell he and the Kid were held in came straight to the Kid’s feet.

Also Read: Looks Like Pennywise Beat Up James McAvoy on the Set of ‘IT: Chapter 2’ (Photo)

That moment recontextualizes everything that happened with the Kid throughout the series. The Kid previously acted like tragedy followed him almost accidentally, as a result of him being out of place in this universe. But when Henry sees the Kid get exactly what he wants out of the tragedy in the jail, he sees the Kid’s intent — the way he uses horrific things to get what he wants. The same thing was true of the shooting at Shawshank earlier in the season, and the off-screen arson at Juniper Hill, the mental institution where the Kid was housed once he was released from the prison.

So, if the Kid really is the devil, or at least some kind of evil manipulator, there’s still the question of why he smiled in the last moments. The smile suggests the Kid succeeded in whatever his goal was, even if he’s still caught in the cage. That’s a powerful piece of evidence for the Kid being the devil, in fact; he doesn’t mind being incarcerated, because he managed to keep Henry in Castle Rock, and turn him into his jailer.

In a major way, the Kid has corrupted Henry, convincing him to do something that caused Lacey to kill himself. The Kid even mentions how the same thing that Henry is doing didn’t work out so well for Lacey.

Also Read: Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

That last-minute smile seems to suggest that the Kid is not who he says he is — and that might mean that everything he said last week, and throughout the season, is untrue. It throws into question everything we thought we knew about “Castle Rock.” In Henry’s eyes, clearly the Kid is not who he says he is. With the first season of “Castle Rock” concluded, the question for audiences to figure out for themselves is who the Kid actually is.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Everything — Here’s What the Hell Happened

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Sept. 5 episode of “Castle Rock.”)

Throughout the first season of Hulu’s Stephen King-inspired series “Castle Rock,” fans have been wondering what the deal is with the character known only as “The Kid.” In Episode 9, “Henry Deaver,” we finally found out — along with the show pretty much explaining all its mysteries.

That doesn’t mean the explanation was extremely clear, even if it was well-executed. In Episode 9, “Castle Rock” shook up everything, rewrote its timeline, and gave viewers a ton of information about The Kid (Bill Skarsgård). You’d be forgiven for not fully understanding what you were seeing, since it completely re-contextualized everything viewers knew about “Castle Rock.”

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

To follow what “Castle Rock” was showing fans with its reveal of The Kid’s identity, you have to think back two full episodes to one key piece of information. It came up when Henry (André Holland) ventured into the woods in Episode 6, “Filter,” and met Odin (CJ Jones) and Willie (Rory Culkin). During their conversation, Odin explained that the ringing Henry hears  in his ears is “the Schisma” — essentially, what Henry and his father were hearing for all those years was the existence of other, alternate universes.

Episode 9 confirms the theory that there are alternate universes intersecting in the town of Castle Rock. It starts with The Kid, not cracked by his years of being kept in a cage by Warden Lacey (Terry O’Quinn), but living a normal life as a doctor and Alzheimer’s Disease researcher. We also found out his real name: Henry Deaver.

What we’re seeing throughout the course of Episode 9 is one of those alternate universes, one of those “other heres, other nows,” that Odin described in “Filter.” Earlier in the season, we learned from Henry’s mother, Ruth (Sissy Spacek), that she lost a baby before she and her husband, Pastor Matthew Deaver, adopted Henry. Episode 9 is showing us a whole other universe, where Ruth didn’t lose that baby. The Kid is also named Henry Deaver — to some degree, The Kid and Henry are two versions of the same identity.

Also Read: Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

The Kid’s universe includes key changes from the version of Castle Rock we’ve been seeing on the show up to now. First, Henry Deaver in this universe is The Kid, and therefore, Ruth and Matthew never adopted. The Kid grew up with basically the same childhood as the Henry we’ve seen so far, which included his father hearing “the Voice of God” in the woods, which we now know is the Schisma, the presence of alternate universes. Just like Henry, the alternate universe version of Matthew took his son, The Kid, out to try to hear the Schisma as well. Unlike Henry, though, it seems The Kid never could.

Ruth in The Kid’s world didn’t hang around when Matthew started to get scary and abusive. Instead, she took up Alan Pangborn (Scott Glenn) on his offer when The Kid was young, and ran away with him, leaving Matthew. Apparently, The Kid’s relationship with Matthew was basically non-existent. In this universe, Matthew never died during his son’s childhood, instead living another 15 or so years before committing suicide, which is what drew The Kid back to Castle Rock.

What The Kid finds in his father’s home is the big reveal of the episode: A child in a cage. Mirroring the first episode of the season, the discovery shakes up the town, as well as The Kid. Even more confusing, the child in the cage says he’s Henry Deaver. When The Kid listens to Matthew’s recorded tapes of years of hearing the Schisma, we discover what’s really going on.

Also Read: Looks Like Pennywise Beat Up James McAvoy on the Set of ‘IT: Chapter 2’ (Photo)

The child in the cage is Henry Deaver, and what’s more, he’s the same character we’ve been following so far throughout “Castle Rock.” The tapes explain the missing time in Henry’s life when he was about 12 and disappeared for several days in the woods, which has been referenced since the show’s first episode. It seems that young Henry (Caleel Harris) unknowingly traveled through the Schisma and entered an alternate universe — and another Castle Rock.

When he eventually found Matthew in the new universe, Henry told him that he was his son and that he heard the Voice of God. That shook Matthew significantly, because in his universe, Henry was The Kid; he’d never adopted. What’s more, despite Matthew’s hope that his Henry would hear the sound in the woods, The Kid never did. Matthew came to think that young Henry was actually the devil, promising him what he’d always hoped for. That prompted Matthew to lock young Henry in a cage for years.

Somehow, despite being trapped for more than a decade, Henry didn’t age, and remained 12 for the entire time. After The Kid rescues him, Molly (Melanie Lynskey) and The Kid take Henry into the woods, where he tries to find the Schisma again. Molly winds up getting shot accidentally (she previously saw a vision of herself dying in the woods in Episode 8, but didn’t understand it), and The Kid and Henry somehow travel back into the other universe, which is the version of Castle Rock we’ve been watching all season.

Though Henry was locked in Matthew’s cage for something like 15 years, he’s only been missing for six days in his original universe, and is discovered in the middle of a frozen lake by Sheriff Pangborn. Apparently Henry repressed, or otherwise couldn’t remember, his whole ordeal. That’s probably as a result of being so traumatized by the cage, coupled with the fact that, even though a ton of time had passed, he never aged or grew up. Back in his own universe, Henry does grow up, to become the protagonist of the show as we know him.

Also Read: Every Stephen King Easter Egg in ‘The Dark Tower’ (Photos)

Meanwhile, The Kid has now left his universe, where he is Henry Deaver, and is trapped in the alternate universe. He’s eventually discovered by Warden Lacey, who doesn’t believe him when he explains that he is Henry Deaver. After at least some time, Lacey imprisons The Kid in the cage in Shawshank Penitentiary. Like Henry, despite being in the cage for years, The Kid never ages. Lacey kills himself at the beginning of the season, just like Matthew did in The Kid’s universe, and that leads to the Shawshank guards finally finding him in the cage in Episode 1. When the guards ask him his name at the start of the season, The Kid says “Henry Deaver” — it turns out, he really was giving his name, and not just asking for this universe’s version of Henry.

So now we know what happened to Henry when he disappeared for those six days when he was young: he traveled to an alternate universe version of Castle Rock, and was imprisoned there. And we know where The Kid came from: he’s Henry from that other universe, who doesn’t exist in the version of Castle Rock we’ve been watching all this time.

We’ve also learned a few interesting tidbits about what’s going on with The Kid. Throughout Season 1, wherever The Kid goes, tragedy, madness and death seem to follow. That’s why Warden Lacey locked him up to begin with, and said he was the devil. It turns out the same thing was true of Henry when he was in the wrong universe, according to Matthew, which was also part of why Henry was caged. It seems that people who don’t belong in the universe they’re in have adverse effects on things and people — the out-of-place element apparently warps and twists the world around them.

Also Read: 26 Streaming TV Shows You Can Binge in a Weekend (Photos)

The question now is, what will all this mean for the characters as the first season of “Castle Rock” comes to a close? Will The Kid be able to return to his own universe, and the life he left there — and how would he cope after all that’s happened to him? What effects might arise from attempting to return the Kid to where he belongs? How will the Schisma affect Molly, who clearly can sense the other universe?

And maybe most importantly: if The Kid and Henry could travel between the universes, what else could make its way into Castle Rock?

Related stories from TheWrap:

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

Looks Like Pennywise Beat Up James McAvoy on the Set of ‘IT: Chapter 2’ (Photo)

Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

26 Streaming TV Shows You Can Binge in a Weekend (Photos)

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Stephen King has been seeing a resurgence as of late. Many of the iconic horror author’s works are getting new TV adaptations. 2016 saw “11.22.63” on Hulu and 2017 saw “The Mist” on Spike and we’re still due for &#82…

‘Castle Rock’ Just Explained Why So Many Stephen King Stories Happen There

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

(Note: This post contains spoilers from the Aug. 15 episode of “Castle Rock.”)

Hulu’s “Castle Rock” might have just given an explanation to why the fictional Maine town is the focus of so much supernatural spookiness in the universe of Stephen King novels.

The show, which is partially its own King-esque story and partially an adaptation of some of his spooky ideas and recurring themes, started down the path of explaining what the heck is going on — at least partially — in its Aug. 15 episode, “Filter.” The episode finds Henry (André Holland) heading into the woods after uncovering some old videos of trips he and his dad used to take out there, wondering if there might be answers from his past to find.

Also Read: Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

It seems there are, although “Castle Rock” is a little fuzzy on the details. Henry meets two men waiting in the dark woods: Odin Branch (C.J. Jones) and his sign language interpreter, Willie (Rory Culkin). Odin tells Henry that he’d met Henry’s father, and explains what they were doing out there in the woods: the Reverend Deaver (Adam Rothenberg) thought he heard the voice of God in those woods, and he became obsessed with it.

Odin explains that, as a scientist, he’s been studying the phenomenon Reverend Deaver was experiencing — what the ancients called the “Music of the Spheres,” the sound of the universe. Not everyone can hear it, he says, and for some, it’s just a ringing in the ears (explaining that weird tinnitus Henry experiences). Reverend Deaver and Odin worked to try to hear it more clearly. What the Reverend described as the voice of God, Odin has a more scientific name for: the “Schisma.”

There’s another bit of dialogue that gives a clue as to what this Schisma actually is. Odin says it’s “quantum interrelated totalities operating in parallel — other heres, other nows,” he says. “All possible pasts, all possible presents. The Schisma is the sound of the universe trying to reconcile that.”

Basically, according to Odin, various parallel universes are overlapping in Castle Rock, and some people can detect that overlap.

Also Read: 15 Time Travel TV Shows You Should Be Watching Right Now, From ’12 Monkeys’ to ‘Dark’ (Photos)

The detail isn’t explored much during the episode, since Henry soon finds himself stuck in the “Filter,” a room his father conceived and Odin built, to better hear the Schisma. But if Odin is right about the nature of the Schisma and the other universes, it would mean that “Castle Rock” just took a big step toward potentially explaining the nature of the town, and why so many Stephen King stories have been set there.

The fictional town of Castle Rock, Maine, has seen its share of weird, scary and often deadly things happen in it courtesy of King. It’s the setting for “Cujo,” the story of a rabid dog who goes on a murder spree; “Needful Things,” the tale of a spooky shopkeeper who sells people objects that give them their hearts’ desires, then turn evil on them; and “The Dark Half,” in which a writer’s dark and shadowy alter-ego, a pseudonym he writes under, actually comes to life. There are other stories set in Castle Rock, too — it’s a place that’s not just rife with tragedy, but seemingly, supernatural goings-on.

With the Schisma it seems “Castle Rock” is giving an explanation of how these spooky events could all take place in the same location without everyone immediately moving away, the government quarantining the area, and the entire world changing as it comes to realize that ghosts, monsters and haunted houses are all real. If Castle Rock is at the intersection of universes, than the many stories taking place in the town could be happening in those various universes.

Also Read: 26 Streaming TV Shows You Can Binge in a Weekend (Photos)

The existence of the Schisma could also be what’s creating the supernatural spookiness in the first place, as people, events and elements from one universe bleed into another, where they don’t belong.

“Castle Rock” isn’t the first Castle Rock story to suggest there might be portals to other worlds within the town or nearby. In the 1984 short story “Mrs. Todd’s Shortcut,” King tells a story of a woman who discovers that she can drive from Castle Rock to Bangor, Maine, with her car odometer measuring less distance than how far apart the two towns actually are. It seems that the shortcut is actually a portal into another world, full of frightening things like living trees and strange animals — and that passing through it reverses aging.

Hulu has renewed “Castle Rock” for a second season and confirmed that it’s an anthology series, with each season telling a new, self-contained story. Introducing the Schisma makes a lot of sense in that context, because it frees up the show to keep telling scary stories in the town without them necessarily all having to take place in the same physical location, or with the same set of people experiencing them. Not only has “Castle Rock” come up with an explanation for all the King novels set in the town, it has also freed itself up to fully explore the frightening place for as long as people keep watching.

Related stories from TheWrap:

14 Stephen King TV Adaptations Ranked, Including ‘Castle Rock’ (Photos)

Every Stephen King Easter Egg in ‘The Dark Tower’ (Photos)

Here’s Who Should Play the Kids From ‘It’ as Adults in ‘Chapter 2’ (and Who Really Is Playing Them)

15 Time Travel TV Shows You Should Be Watching Right Now, From ’12 Monkeys’ to ‘Dark’ (Photos)

‘Castle Rock’: Stephen King-Inspired Hulu Series Renewed for Second Season

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Get ready to spend some more time in Castle Rock.

Hulu announced Tuesday that it has renewed its Stephen King pseudo-adaptation, “Castle Rock” for a second season.

“Castle Rock,” which has been billed as a limited series, is the re-imagining of the entire Stephen King canon into one universe and touches on some of King’s most iconic stories and characters. The fictional Maine town sits at the center of the King universe, appearing in numerous books including “Cujo,” “The Dead Zone,” and “The Body” (the novella that “Stand By Me” was based on).

Hulu did not divulge any plot details or if any new Stephen King stories that were not used in the first season, would be adapted for the follow up.

Also Read: ‘Castle Rock’ Showrunners Say the Scariest Part of Stephen King’s World Is ‘the Monsters Are Human’

The first season — the sixth episode premieres Wednesday — centers on Henry Deaver (Andre Holland), a death-row attorney who returns to the eponymous town years after a tragic accident killed his father, for which he is blamed. “Castle Rock” also stars King veterans Sissy Spacek, who plays Henry’s dementia-stricken adopted mother, and Bill Skarsgard as a feral inmate who’s found in the bowels of Shawshank State Penitentiary (yes, that Shawshank). Scott Glenn plays Alan Pangborn, the now-retired Castle Rock sheriff, who has been portrayed in films “The Dark Half” and “Needful Things” by Michael Rooker and Ed Harris.

Sam Shaw and Dustin Thomason developed the series for television and serve as showrunners and executive producers, along with J.J. Abrams, Mark Lafferty, Ben Stephenson, Liz Glotzer and Stephen King. “Castle Rock” is from Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television.

“Castle Rock” is the second Stephen King-inspired series for Hulu. The first, a straight adaptation of King’s novel “11.22.63,” ran in 2016.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stephen King’s ‘Castle Rock’ Trailer: There’s ‘Something Wrong’ With Bill Skarsgård (Video)

‘Castle Rock’ Super Bowl Spot Promises Scares: ‘It’s Happening’ (Video)

Watch Bill Skarsgard Sans Pennywise Makeup in New Stephen King Series ‘Castle Rock’ Trailer (Video)

Castle Rock is too busy remembering other stories to tell its own

Read on: The A.V. Club.

“Remember the dog? The strangler? Sure you do.” Early in Castle Rock’s second episode, Dale Lacy’s voice-over sets the tone for “Habeas Corpus.” In the title sequence (introduced in this episode), torn pages from Stephen King’s oeuvre allude to horrors…

‘Castle Rock’ Showrunners Say the Scariest Part of Stephen King’s World Is ‘the Monsters Are Human’

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

It may be Stephen King’s world, but “Castle Rock” showrunners Dustin Thomason and Sam Shaw are more than happy to live in it.

“The things that are the most enduringly disturbing about [King’s books] are that the monsters are human,” Shaw told TheWrap. “The monsters may be the protagonist.”

The setting for Hulu’s drama is Castle Rock, Maine, a place where monsters a-plenty have roamed around in King’s works. The fictional town sits at the center of the King universe, appearing in numerous books including “Cujo,” “The Dead Zone,” and “The Body” (the novella that “Stand By Me” was based on).

Also Read: Stephen King’s ‘Castle Rock’ Trailer: There’s ‘Something Wrong’ With Bill Skarsgård (Video)

“It took a big leap of faith to even approach him with the idea of coming back to Castle Rock,” said Thomason. “We took some pretty big swings in this first season with some of his cherished stories, locations and even characters.” The showrunners said they were “terrified” of King’s opinion on the finished product, but J.J. Abrams, who’s Bad Robot produces the show with Warner Bros., forwarded an email from King giving them his approval. “About as good a vote of confidence as we could have gotten,” said Shaw.

The series centers on Henry Deaver (Andre Holland), a death-row attorney who returns to the eponymous town years after a tragic accident killed his father, for which he is blamed. “Castle Rock” also stars King veterans Sissy Spacek, who plays Henry’s dementia-stricken adopted mother, and Bill Skarsgard as a feral inmate who’s found in the bowels of Shawshank State Penitentiary (yes, that Shawshank). Scott Glenn plays Alan Pangborn, the now-retired Castle Rock sheriff, who has been portrayed in films “The Dark Half” and “Needful Things” by Michael Rooker and Ed Harris.

Though not technically a King character, Jane Levy plays “Jackie Torrence,” a clear nod to Jack Nicholson’s Jack Torrence from “The Shining.” The series premieres Wednesday with the first three episodes.

Also Read: Ted Cruz Rips ‘Limousine Liberal’ Stephen King for ‘Scary’ Endorsement of Opponent: ‘Like Carrie Riding Cujo’

“It can seem like we assembled an Avengers of Stephen King,” said Shaw. Though they had no idea just how big Skarsgard’s turn as Pennywise the Clown would be, which helped “It” storm the box office to a tune of more $700 million worldwide last fall. “When we cast Bill, ‘It’ had not come out yet.”

There have been roughly 90 different TV and film adaptations of King’s works, to varying degrees of success. Self-described “lifelong” King fans, Shaw and Thomason said the trap that many of the lesser adaptations fall into is “this temptation to fixate on all the scares.” Arguing that King invented the character-driven horror genre, they say the scariest part of his works is the terrifying decisions that normal people make, rather than the supernatural monsters.

“‘The Shining’ is terrifying to me because it’s a story of a father who’s taken to this place where he could harm the people he’s supposed to be protecting,” said Shaw. “You’re trying to compact [a novel] into the three-act structure of a 90 minute or two-hour movie, what gets jettisoned is the depth of character.” And some of King’s novels can run over 1,000 pages.

Also Read: Anne Rice’s ‘Vampire Chronicles’ TV Series Heads to Hulu

But with “Castle Rock” they get to empty King’s toy chest and create a story designed for the medium of television. “It’s a new story in the key of Stephen King,” says Thomason.

This included using Shawshank in a very different way than the 1992 film. “The story of Shawshank is so specific to Andy Fufresne and Red, and to that story that happens in that time,” said Thomason. “We were really interested in the idea that Shawshank kind of loomed over the town of Castle Rock.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Here’s Everything Coming to and Leaving Hulu in August

‘UnReal’ 4th and Final Season Gets Surprise Release on Hulu

Hulu Acquires Sundance Award-Winning Doc ‘Crime + Punishment’