Hollywood Women Practice Trauma Training Before #MeToo Anniversary, Kavanaugh Confirmation

On the eve of #MeToo’s first anniversary, as Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court looked more certain, a group of Hollywood women came together to cope, vent — and to learn to treat trauma.

Many survivors of sexual abuse were already on edge because of the anniversary of The New York Times story about sexual misconduct by Harvey Weinstein. The looming confirmation didn’t help.

“It’s been a ride and it’s a new ride all over again,” Katherine Kendall, who was one of the first women to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct, told TheWrap. “I have been through the ringer this week and I finally had to stop the pain and just keep telling my truth and stay on track.”

Also Read: Hollywood Slams Susan Collins’ Yes on Kavanaugh: ‘I Can’t Watch This Anymore’

The event Thursday, was held at SAG-AFTRA’s headquarters by Women In Film, which advocates for women working in entertainment industry, and Echo, a nonprofit that trains parents and professionals in trauma and resilience. It is led by Louise Godbold, who offered what she called “mini-training on trauma and resilience.”

“Several people called me saying that they were so triggered by the Kavanaugh story that they weren’t sure they could make it,” said Godbold.

Last October, Goldbold came forward with her own story of sexual misconduct by Weinstein, who has denied any nonconsensual sex with anyone.

She said that as the #MeToo movement expanded, she quickly realized the need for trauma training for survivors.

“Once the danger is over, the trauma remains in our body,” Godbold explained. “It continues to wreak havoc on our immune system and can lead to long-term heath issue and mental health issues.”

Also Read: How Hollywood’s Sexual Misconduct Policies Have Changed in the Year Since #MeToo

The two hour-event started with a panel of #MeToo activists, including Kendall. It included tools for regulating the nervous system, which Godbold called “nervous system hacks.” One technique included singing “Old McDonald Had a Farm” while rubbing one’s forehead, shoulders and palms together to create “soothing energy.”

“It doesn’t matter what you’re singing,” Godbold said. “It’s just a way to get you out of the hamster wheel of the mind.”

Godbold said the aim is to look at the impact of trauma on the body and the brain to better understand our behaviors.

“We look at what lies beneath certain behaviors that we’re apt to judge or dismiss, not realizing that trauma is the root cause,” Godbold said. “For example, we use the label ‘control freak,’ but if someone got hurt and they had no control of the situation, it makes sense that they would want to control their environment so they don’t get hurt again.”

Also Read: Lady Gaga Calls Kavanaugh Debate ‘One of the Most Upsetting Things I Have Ever Witnessed’ (Videos)

Melissa Schuman, one of the panelists, said the last few days have been particularly hard. She said she was raped by former Backstreet Boys member Nick Carter, who denies any wrongdoing.

“I think we’re all just feeling a lot,” Schuman told TheWrap. “The whole thing is incredibly triggering and I find myself disassociating a lot.”

Schuman planned to spend Friday avoiding TV and listening to “worship music.”

“I go to God,” she said. “That’s where I go to recharge.”

Also Read: Activists Blame ‘White Women’ After Susan Collins Says She’ll Vote for Kavanaugh

Caitlin Dulany, who accused Weinstein of sexually assaulting her in Cannes, France, in 1996, told TheWrap that the weeks leading up to the anniversary have been “intense.” Weinstein, like Kavanaugh, has denied any wrongdoing.

“My heart has been heavy,” she said. “I have felt a lot of anger towards Kavanaugh and those that support him.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Activists Blame ‘White Women’ After Susan Collins Says She’ll Vote for Kavanaugh

Lady Gaga Calls Kavanaugh Debate ‘One of the Most Upsetting Things I Have Ever Witnessed’ (Videos)

Fox News Host Greg Gutfeld Compares Brett Kavanaugh Treatment to Jesus’ Crucifixion (Video)

On the eve of #MeToo’s first anniversary, as Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court looked more certain, a group of Hollywood women came together to cope, vent — and to learn to treat trauma.

Many survivors of sexual abuse were already on edge because of the anniversary of The New York Times story about sexual misconduct by Harvey Weinstein. The looming confirmation didn’t help.

“It’s been a ride and it’s a new ride all over again,” Katherine Kendall, who was one of the first women to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual misconduct, told TheWrap. “I have been through the ringer this week and I finally had to stop the pain and just keep telling my truth and stay on track.”

The event Thursday, was held at SAG-AFTRA’s headquarters by Women In Film, which advocates for women working in entertainment industry, and Echo, a nonprofit that trains parents and professionals in trauma and resilience. It is led by Louise Godbold, who offered what she called “mini-training on trauma and resilience.”

“Several people called me saying that they were so triggered by the Kavanaugh story that they weren’t sure they could make it,” said Godbold.

Last October, Goldbold came forward with her own story of sexual misconduct by Weinstein, who has denied any nonconsensual sex with anyone.

She said that as the #MeToo movement expanded, she quickly realized the need for trauma training for survivors.

“Once the danger is over, the trauma remains in our body,” Godbold explained. “It continues to wreak havoc on our immune system and can lead to long-term heath issue and mental health issues.”

The two hour-event started with a panel of #MeToo activists, including Kendall. It included tools for regulating the nervous system, which Godbold called “nervous system hacks.” One technique included singing “Old McDonald Had a Farm” while rubbing one’s forehead, shoulders and palms together to create “soothing energy.”

“It doesn’t matter what you’re singing,” Godbold said. “It’s just a way to get you out of the hamster wheel of the mind.”

Godbold said the aim is to look at the impact of trauma on the body and the brain to better understand our behaviors.

“We look at what lies beneath certain behaviors that we’re apt to judge or dismiss, not realizing that trauma is the root cause,” Godbold said. “For example, we use the label ‘control freak,’ but if someone got hurt and they had no control of the situation, it makes sense that they would want to control their environment so they don’t get hurt again.”

Melissa Schuman, one of the panelists, said the last few days have been particularly hard. She said she was raped by former Backstreet Boys member Nick Carter, who denies any wrongdoing.

“I think we’re all just feeling a lot,” Schuman told TheWrap. “The whole thing is incredibly triggering and I find myself disassociating a lot.”

Schuman planned to spend Friday avoiding TV and listening to “worship music.”

“I go to God,” she said. “That’s where I go to recharge.”

Caitlin Dulany, who accused Weinstein of sexually assaulting her in Cannes, France, in 1996, told TheWrap that the weeks leading up to the anniversary have been “intense.” Weinstein, like Kavanaugh, has denied any wrongdoing.

“My heart has been heavy,” she said. “I have felt a lot of anger towards Kavanaugh and those that support him.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

Activists Blame 'White Women' After Susan Collins Says She'll Vote for Kavanaugh

Lady Gaga Calls Kavanaugh Debate 'One of the Most Upsetting Things I Have Ever Witnessed' (Videos)

Fox News Host Greg Gutfeld Compares Brett Kavanaugh Treatment to Jesus' Crucifixion (Video)

#MeToo Silence Breakers Sign Statement of Support for Asia Argento After Anthony Bourdain’s Death

Dozens of people who spoke out during the #MeToo movement have signed a statement of solidarity in support of Asia Argento, calling out “internet trolls” who have targeted her since the suicide of her boyfriend, Anthony Bourdain.

“Asia has now found herself on the receiving end of vicious cyberbullying and repulsive slander at the hands of internet trolls who hold her responsible for Anthony’s death,” the statement reads. “She has been accused of everything from causing her boyfriend’s suicide to trying to use her “survivor status” and the #MeToo movement to advance her career.”

After Argento told The New Yorker‘s Ronan Farrow that Weinstein had “forcibly performed oral sex on her” in 1997, Bourdain became an fierce advocate for victims of sexual misconduct and the #MeToo movement.

The statement, obtained by TheWrap, was signed by 45 of #MeToo’s most visible names, including Rosanna Arquette, Zoë Brock, Terry Crews, Paz De La Huerta, Lucia Evans, Rose McGowan, Olivia Munn, Anthony Rapp, Johnathon Schaech, Mira Sorvino, Jessica Barth and Lauren Sivan.

Also Read: Don’t Blame Asia Argento for Anthony Bourdain’s Suicide, Rose McGowan Says: ‘His Depression Won’

Argento, one of the first women to come forward with her accusations of sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein, was dating Bourdain when the famed chef was found unresponsive in a hotel room in France last month.

“We are here to ask those who are angry and grieving the loss of Anthony to find a healthy outlet for their pain. Asia is a survivor, just as we are, and her fame and outward show of strength does not make her any less vulnerable. Asia is not a headline — she is a human being, and she is in horrific pain,” the statement went on to say. “There has long been a traditional narrative of blaming, vilifying and martyring courageous women. We reject that narrative.”

Also Read: Asia Argento ‘Beyond Devastated’ by Anthony Bourdain’s Death: ‘My Love, My Rock, My Protector’

The letter concludes by saying that, “standing up for [Argento] is standing up to any and all bullies. We implore you to be kind to each other, to believe survivors, to stand up for survivors, to encourage, support and sympathize with them.”

Read the full statement below.

On June 8, we lost a rare, great man. Anthony Bourdain was a lightning rod of cultural connectivity. He brought disparate, marginalized people together and made the unknown accessible — some of the many gifts that made Anthony such a valuable presence in our collective lives, whether we knew him or not. An unwavering supporter of women and the #MeToo movement, Bourdain’s loss was a tragedy on so many levels, to so many people who saw him as a beacon of a new way of being. We share that grief and deepest sadness for his family and those closest to him whose pain must be unimaginable.

One of the most vocal and unwavering figures in the #MeToo movement has been Asia Argento. At the center of our community, Asia has stood, her fist in the air, fighting daily not just for justice for those of us she has come to know, but for abused people the world over.

Asia has now found herself on the receiving end of vicious cyberbullying and repulsive slander at the hands of internet trolls who hold her responsible for Anthony’s death. She has been accused of everything from causing her boyfriend’s suicide to trying to use her “survivor status” and the #MeToo movement to advance her career.

There has long been a traditional narrative of blaming, vilifying and martyring courageous women. We reject that narrative. If there is one thing we know with unwavering confidence, “sexual violence victim” is not a title anyone wants attached to themselves. Being known as a sexual assault victim isn’t a badge of honor or career booster; it’s a highly difficult, sometimes traumatizing and humiliating experience. All of us who have taken the risk of coming forward — and it is truly a risk to us, our reputations, relationships and mental health — have faced harsh criticism and often outright anger and hatred online, in our respective communities and, for some, within our own families. Yet we come forward in the hope that we can change things for others and end the sexual violence and abuse that has flourished with impunity for millennia.

We are here to ask those who are angry and grieving the loss of Anthony to find a healthy outlet for their pain. Asia is a survivor, just as we are, and her fame and outward show of strength does not make her any less vulnerable. Asia is not a headline — she is a human being, and she is in horrific pain.

We are proud to stand together as silence-breakers. We are so grateful for the foresight and compassion of #MeToo founder Tarana Burke and every member of the community of survivors whose pain deserves equal attention. We are indebted to and linked with every person who has come forward to report their own experiences with sexual harassment, abuse and rape. We are proud of the courage of each and every person who has decided to speak their truth, just as we support those who do not wish to speak. We are proud of the work that is being done, but we are not finished; we have only just begun.

We understand sexual harassment and assault are global epidemics. Our request for Asia is a request for any and all survivors. Our standing up for her is standing up to any and all bullies. We implore you to be kind to each other, to believe survivors, to stand up for survivors, to encourage, support and sympathize with them.

We ask you to stand with us, as we stand with Asia.

Sincerely,

Jessicka Addams
Lysette Anthony
Rosanna Arquette
Jessica Barth
Chantal Cousineau
Terry Crews
Emma de Caunes
Paz de la Huerta
Juliana De Paula
Drew Dixon
Caitlin Dulany
Dawn Dunning
Molly Maeve Eagan
Lucia Evans
Alice Evans
Louisette Geiss
Louise Godbold
Larissa Gomes
Natasha Henstridge
Dominique Huett
Anna Graham Hunter
Melissa Kester
Katherine Kendall
Mia Kirshner
Nannette Klatt
Jasmine Lobe
Sarah Ann Masse
Brittny McCarthy
Rose McGowan
Mary Monahan
Olivia Munn
Samantha Panagrosso
Anthony Rapp
Starr Rinaldi
Tomi-Ann Roberts
Erika Rosenbaum
Kathryn Rossetter
Melissa Sagemiller
Johnathon Schaech
Morgan Shanahan
Lauren Sivan
Mira Sorvino
Cori Thomas
Melissa Thompson
Sarah Tither-Kaplan

Related stories from TheWrap:

Harvey Weinstein Accuser Lauren Sivan Says Fox 11 Demoted Her After She Spoke Out (Exclusive)

Anthony Bourdain Performed Bhutan Death Ritual for Final ‘Parts Unknown’ Episode

Anthony Bourdain Did Not Have Drugs in System at Time of Death, French Official Says

Dozens of people who spoke out during the #MeToo movement have signed a statement of solidarity in support of Asia Argento, calling out “internet trolls” who have targeted her since the suicide of her boyfriend, Anthony Bourdain.

“Asia has now found herself on the receiving end of vicious cyberbullying and repulsive slander at the hands of internet trolls who hold her responsible for Anthony’s death,” the statement reads. “She has been accused of everything from causing her boyfriend’s suicide to trying to use her “survivor status” and the #MeToo movement to advance her career.”

After Argento told The New Yorker‘s Ronan Farrow that Weinstein had “forcibly performed oral sex on her” in 1997, Bourdain became an fierce advocate for victims of sexual misconduct and the #MeToo movement.

The statement, obtained by TheWrap, was signed by 45 of #MeToo’s most visible names, including Rosanna Arquette, Zoë Brock, Terry Crews, Paz De La Huerta, Lucia Evans, Rose McGowan, Olivia Munn, Anthony Rapp, Johnathon Schaech, Mira Sorvino, Jessica Barth and Lauren Sivan.

Argento, one of the first women to come forward with her accusations of sexual assault by Harvey Weinstein, was dating Bourdain when the famed chef was found unresponsive in a hotel room in France last month.

“We are here to ask those who are angry and grieving the loss of Anthony to find a healthy outlet for their pain. Asia is a survivor, just as we are, and her fame and outward show of strength does not make her any less vulnerable. Asia is not a headline — she is a human being, and she is in horrific pain,” the statement went on to say. “There has long been a traditional narrative of blaming, vilifying and martyring courageous women. We reject that narrative.”

The letter concludes by saying that, “standing up for [Argento] is standing up to any and all bullies. We implore you to be kind to each other, to believe survivors, to stand up for survivors, to encourage, support and sympathize with them.”

Read the full statement below.

On June 8, we lost a rare, great man. Anthony Bourdain was a lightning rod of cultural connectivity. He brought disparate, marginalized people together and made the unknown accessible — some of the many gifts that made Anthony such a valuable presence in our collective lives, whether we knew him or not. An unwavering supporter of women and the #MeToo movement, Bourdain’s loss was a tragedy on so many levels, to so many people who saw him as a beacon of a new way of being. We share that grief and deepest sadness for his family and those closest to him whose pain must be unimaginable.

One of the most vocal and unwavering figures in the #MeToo movement has been Asia Argento. At the center of our community, Asia has stood, her fist in the air, fighting daily not just for justice for those of us she has come to know, but for abused people the world over.

Asia has now found herself on the receiving end of vicious cyberbullying and repulsive slander at the hands of internet trolls who hold her responsible for Anthony’s death. She has been accused of everything from causing her boyfriend’s suicide to trying to use her “survivor status” and the #MeToo movement to advance her career.

There has long been a traditional narrative of blaming, vilifying and martyring courageous women. We reject that narrative. If there is one thing we know with unwavering confidence, “sexual violence victim” is not a title anyone wants attached to themselves. Being known as a sexual assault victim isn’t a badge of honor or career booster; it’s a highly difficult, sometimes traumatizing and humiliating experience. All of us who have taken the risk of coming forward — and it is truly a risk to us, our reputations, relationships and mental health — have faced harsh criticism and often outright anger and hatred online, in our respective communities and, for some, within our own families. Yet we come forward in the hope that we can change things for others and end the sexual violence and abuse that has flourished with impunity for millennia.

We are here to ask those who are angry and grieving the loss of Anthony to find a healthy outlet for their pain. Asia is a survivor, just as we are, and her fame and outward show of strength does not make her any less vulnerable. Asia is not a headline — she is a human being, and she is in horrific pain.

We are proud to stand together as silence-breakers. We are so grateful for the foresight and compassion of #MeToo founder Tarana Burke and every member of the community of survivors whose pain deserves equal attention. We are indebted to and linked with every person who has come forward to report their own experiences with sexual harassment, abuse and rape. We are proud of the courage of each and every person who has decided to speak their truth, just as we support those who do not wish to speak. We are proud of the work that is being done, but we are not finished; we have only just begun.

We understand sexual harassment and assault are global epidemics. Our request for Asia is a request for any and all survivors. Our standing up for her is standing up to any and all bullies. We implore you to be kind to each other, to believe survivors, to stand up for survivors, to encourage, support and sympathize with them.

We ask you to stand with us, as we stand with Asia.

Sincerely,

Jessicka Addams
Lysette Anthony
Rosanna Arquette
Jessica Barth
Chantal Cousineau
Terry Crews
Emma de Caunes
Paz de la Huerta
Juliana De Paula
Drew Dixon
Caitlin Dulany
Dawn Dunning
Molly Maeve Eagan
Lucia Evans
Alice Evans
Louisette Geiss
Louise Godbold
Larissa Gomes
Natasha Henstridge
Dominique Huett
Anna Graham Hunter
Melissa Kester
Katherine Kendall
Mia Kirshner
Nannette Klatt
Jasmine Lobe
Sarah Ann Masse
Brittny McCarthy
Rose McGowan
Mary Monahan
Olivia Munn
Samantha Panagrosso
Anthony Rapp
Starr Rinaldi
Tomi-Ann Roberts
Erika Rosenbaum
Kathryn Rossetter
Melissa Sagemiller
Johnathon Schaech
Morgan Shanahan
Lauren Sivan
Mira Sorvino
Cori Thomas
Melissa Thompson
Sarah Tither-Kaplan

Related stories from TheWrap:

Harvey Weinstein Accuser Lauren Sivan Says Fox 11 Demoted Her After She Spoke Out (Exclusive)

Anthony Bourdain Performed Bhutan Death Ritual for Final 'Parts Unknown' Episode

Anthony Bourdain Did Not Have Drugs in System at Time of Death, French Official Says

Why I Waited So Long to Share My Harvey Weinstein Saga (Guest Blog)

I met Harvey Weinstein one winter evening in 1996 outside of the Miramax offices in TriBeCa. I was in my late 20s, a working actress, though not famous. A journeyman, so to speak. I was there to do a reading of a friend’s screenplay, and he introduced himself. He was charming, intelligent and knowledgeable in the industry that I loved. We started a friendship. It was not intimate. It was casual and social. He invited me to a screening of a Miramax film and introduced me to his colleagues, asked my opinion of the film. I remember being invited to a party at a restaurant as well.

Harvey was a powerful and respected film producer. He made me feel as though he was really listening to me, and that my ideas were interesting to him. It’s flattering to have someone of that stature seemingly value you. In retrospect, I would say it throws you off. At that point, I trusted him.

That same winter, Harvey set up a meeting in his offices with a talent manager. He decided that she should represent me. I wasn’t particularly comfortable with the idea for many reasons. One, it seemed a little far-fetched. She represented a fair number of famous people. What would she want with me? My agent at the time did not like the idea either. She didn’t think that I needed a manager and she wasn’t too fond of Harvey and his friendships with young actresses.

It was a bit of a disaster. I remember the manager, whose name I can’t recall, expressed to me that she was summoned by Harvey and was not there of her own accord. I looked at her and said, “Well, I don’t want to be here either.”  I’ve heard that she told that story over the years as an amusement. I tended to agree.

Also Read: Harvey Weinstein Accused of Sex Trafficking in New Lawsuit

One evening, that same winter, he invited me out to dinner. He came to pick me up at my apartment. I went to use the bathroom before we left and when I came out, he was standing there, fully naked, his clothes in a pile on the floor. I was shocked and, frankly, pissed off.

My apartment was a large loft space and I walked over to the other end of it, as far away from him as I could get and said, “Put your clothes back on, Harvey.” I remember being very stern in my delivery. He stood there for a short while, no more than a minute or two, and said something quietly, almost to himself. I couldn’t hear what it was. Then he put his clothes back on and left. It felt out of the blue and unnerving and I could feel that flight or fight adrenaline rush kick in, but that was it.

The next time I saw Harvey was when I ran into him at the bar of the Hotel du Caps in Cannes, France, in May of that same year. I was at the Cannes Film Festival promoting a film that I was in. He was very friendly and welcoming. He invited me to the Cinema Against AIDS benefit. This was a big event, hosted that year by Elizabeth Taylor and tied into the premiere of a Miramax film. I accepted the invitation and went to the event.

Also Read: Harvey Weinstein Out at Directors Guild of America

Did I feel, in accepting the invitation, that I was colluding with him, keeping his secrets? Maybe just smoothing things over. Hollywood is a town where business and socializing are inextricably linked. I guess I was making nice.

So why have I never told my story until now? The story of my social acquaintance with Harvey Weinstein, how he came to pick me up at my apartment for dinner some 20 years ago and undressed while I was in the bathroom. The story of how I was shocked, angered and unnerved. How I asked him to put his clothes back on, which he did (thank God) and then left.

To be honest, I have never consciously kept this encounter a secret. I’ve told the story to a number of friends and colleagues over the years. However, there have been many times when I have thought of my experience with Harvey, and other experiences, and held my tongue. Why?

Until recently, navigating the waters of men in positions of power in Hollywood was a tricky business. You would do your best to avoid situations in which you had to defend your integrity at the risk of affecting your career or future. And if you found yourself in such a “situation,” you certainly didn’t want to make waves after the fact — again risking potential damage to your career or future.

Also Read: Uma Thurman Posts #MeToo Message, Calls Out Harvey Weinstein: ‘You Don’t Deserve a Bullet’

I heard stories about Harvey Weinstein, Brett Ratner, Louis C.K., Jeremy Piven, James Toback and others over the years. That was the part of the culture of Hollywood. There were no repercussions for the behavior of these men that I knew of. You just had to fend for yourself.

And telling my story was complicated in other ways too. Why did I consider Harvey a friend? Why was he in my apartment? Didn’t I know he was interested in me sexually? What will people think of me, personally and professionally? As Rachel Weisz put it, “People find out I’m an actress and I see that ‘whore’ look flicker across their face.”

Again, and still, you are really just trying to hold onto your personal integrity.

And all the while, these men are committing criminal acts and silencing their victims through coercion, legal settlements and the threat of ruining their lives and reputations.

Which I didn’t know.

This is how it worked, how it has always worked in Hollywood.

Also Read: Bob Weinstein Paid £250,000 to Settle 2 Harvey Harassment Claims, New Yorker Says

More recently, I had to decide if I wanted to tell my story and forever have my name associated with Harvey Weinstein. Whatever that meant, it was forever. I decided it was way more important to speak out and join the chorus in support of the promise that all women have a voice and are protected.

What I couldn’t have envisioned in telling my story is not that my name will now forever be associated with Harvey’s. Instead, I’m linked to the most amazing and powerful army of women, the women who are finally able to speak out.

They are the story now, aren’t they? They are the change that is happening. They are making history. I want to know what they are thinking and doing. I want to follow them on social media and in the news. They emboldened me with their bravery and I am honored to be among them.

I am certain that we will be reading about their strength, their courage, and their many accomplishments for years to come.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Harvey Weinstein Out at Directors Guild of America

Harvey Weinstein Accused of Sex Trafficking in New Lawsuit

Harvey Weinstein Slapped With First Civil Lawsuit in UK

That Time James Cameron Almost Hit Harvey Weinstein With His Oscar for ‘Titanic’

I met Harvey Weinstein one winter evening in 1996 outside of the Miramax offices in TriBeCa. I was in my late 20s, a working actress, though not famous. A journeyman, so to speak. I was there to do a reading of a friend’s screenplay, and he introduced himself. He was charming, intelligent and knowledgeable in the industry that I loved. We started a friendship. It was not intimate. It was casual and social. He invited me to a screening of a Miramax film and introduced me to his colleagues, asked my opinion of the film. I remember being invited to a party at a restaurant as well.

Harvey was a powerful and respected film producer. He made me feel as though he was really listening to me, and that my ideas were interesting to him. It’s flattering to have someone of that stature seemingly value you. In retrospect, I would say it throws you off. At that point, I trusted him.

That same winter, Harvey set up a meeting in his offices with a talent manager. He decided that she should represent me. I wasn’t particularly comfortable with the idea for many reasons. One, it seemed a little far-fetched. She represented a fair number of famous people. What would she want with me? My agent at the time did not like the idea either. She didn’t think that I needed a manager and she wasn’t too fond of Harvey and his friendships with young actresses.

It was a bit of a disaster. I remember the manager, whose name I can’t recall, expressed to me that she was summoned by Harvey and was not there of her own accord. I looked at her and said, “Well, I don’t want to be here either.”  I’ve heard that she told that story over the years as an amusement. I tended to agree.

One evening, that same winter, he invited me out to dinner. He came to pick me up at my apartment. I went to use the bathroom before we left and when I came out, he was standing there, fully naked, his clothes in a pile on the floor. I was shocked and, frankly, pissed off.

My apartment was a large loft space and I walked over to the other end of it, as far away from him as I could get and said, “Put your clothes back on, Harvey.” I remember being very stern in my delivery. He stood there for a short while, no more than a minute or two, and said something quietly, almost to himself. I couldn’t hear what it was. Then he put his clothes back on and left. It felt out of the blue and unnerving and I could feel that flight or fight adrenaline rush kick in, but that was it.

The next time I saw Harvey was when I ran into him at the bar of the Hotel du Caps in Cannes, France, in May of that same year. I was at the Cannes Film Festival promoting a film that I was in. He was very friendly and welcoming. He invited me to the Cinema Against AIDS benefit. This was a big event, hosted that year by Elizabeth Taylor and tied into the premiere of a Miramax film. I accepted the invitation and went to the event.

Did I feel, in accepting the invitation, that I was colluding with him, keeping his secrets? Maybe just smoothing things over. Hollywood is a town where business and socializing are inextricably linked. I guess I was making nice.

So why have I never told my story until now? The story of my social acquaintance with Harvey Weinstein, how he came to pick me up at my apartment for dinner some 20 years ago and undressed while I was in the bathroom. The story of how I was shocked, angered and unnerved. How I asked him to put his clothes back on, which he did (thank God) and then left.

To be honest, I have never consciously kept this encounter a secret. I’ve told the story to a number of friends and colleagues over the years. However, there have been many times when I have thought of my experience with Harvey, and other experiences, and held my tongue. Why?

Until recently, navigating the waters of men in positions of power in Hollywood was a tricky business. You would do your best to avoid situations in which you had to defend your integrity at the risk of affecting your career or future. And if you found yourself in such a “situation,” you certainly didn’t want to make waves after the fact — again risking potential damage to your career or future.

I heard stories about Harvey Weinstein, Brett Ratner, Louis C.K., Jeremy Piven, James Toback and others over the years. That was the part of the culture of Hollywood. There were no repercussions for the behavior of these men that I knew of. You just had to fend for yourself.

And telling my story was complicated in other ways too. Why did I consider Harvey a friend? Why was he in my apartment? Didn’t I know he was interested in me sexually? What will people think of me, personally and professionally? As Rachel Weisz put it, “People find out I’m an actress and I see that ‘whore’ look flicker across their face.”

Again, and still, you are really just trying to hold onto your personal integrity.

And all the while, these men are committing criminal acts and silencing their victims through coercion, legal settlements and the threat of ruining their lives and reputations.

Which I didn’t know.

This is how it worked, how it has always worked in Hollywood.

More recently, I had to decide if I wanted to tell my story and forever have my name associated with Harvey Weinstein. Whatever that meant, it was forever. I decided it was way more important to speak out and join the chorus in support of the promise that all women have a voice and are protected.

What I couldn’t have envisioned in telling my story is not that my name will now forever be associated with Harvey’s. Instead, I’m linked to the most amazing and powerful army of women, the women who are finally able to speak out.

They are the story now, aren’t they? They are the change that is happening. They are making history. I want to know what they are thinking and doing. I want to follow them on social media and in the news. They emboldened me with their bravery and I am honored to be among them.

I am certain that we will be reading about their strength, their courage, and their many accomplishments for years to come.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Harvey Weinstein Out at Directors Guild of America

Harvey Weinstein Accused of Sex Trafficking in New Lawsuit

Harvey Weinstein Slapped With First Civil Lawsuit in UK

That Time James Cameron Almost Hit Harvey Weinstein With His Oscar for 'Titanic'