Brian Tyree Henry Reunites With ‘Widows’ Canine Co-Star Olivia the Dog (Video)

Brian Tyree Henry is blowing up, but maybe not as much as his co-star Olivia in his latest film “Widows.” That’s because Olivia happens to be a dog.

Tyree Henry reunited with his furry co-star on the set of “Busy Tonight,” hosted by Busy Philipps on Sunday where she scampered out onto the talk show set and leapt to join them on the couch. Tyree Henry was surprised as the rest of us at how quickly this white Westie has gained fame over the past few months.

“She’s got like, articles about her online,” Tyree Henry told Philipps. He’s right, like this one.

Also Read: Brian Tyree Henry on What ‘Atlanta’ Cast Learned From Sudden Fame: ‘You Can’t Make It Alone’ (Video)

Tyree Henry said that Olivia was one of the best co-stars he’s ever worked with, having fed her baloney and petting her in between takes, and even soothing her about the intense scene that they were about to film. Which is good, because as Tyree Henry notes, and without spoiling anything specific, he is not kind to the dog in the movie.

“I’m so awful to this dog in this movie,” he said. “She’s clearly acting her face off in this movie.”

Olivia also appeared in this year’s “Game Night” and in Netflix’s “Insatiable.” She’s a three-year-old, 15-pound Westie. Watch Olivia and Tyree Henry’s cute reunion on “Busy Tonight” above.

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‘Atlanta’ Star Brian Tyree Henry Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘Atlanta’: ‘Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again’ for Alfred After ‘Woods,’ Brian Tyree Henry Says

Brian Tyree Henry is blowing up, but maybe not as much as his co-star Olivia in his latest film “Widows.” That’s because Olivia happens to be a dog.

Tyree Henry reunited with his furry co-star on the set of “Busy Tonight,” hosted by Busy Philipps on Sunday where she scampered out onto the talk show set and leapt to join them on the couch. Tyree Henry was surprised as the rest of us at how quickly this white Westie has gained fame over the past few months.

“She’s got like, articles about her online,” Tyree Henry told Philipps. He’s right, like this one.

Tyree Henry said that Olivia was one of the best co-stars he’s ever worked with, having fed her baloney and petting her in between takes, and even soothing her about the intense scene that they were about to film. Which is good, because as Tyree Henry notes, and without spoiling anything specific, he is not kind to the dog in the movie.

“I’m so awful to this dog in this movie,” he said. “She’s clearly acting her face off in this movie.”

Olivia also appeared in this year’s “Game Night” and in Netflix’s “Insatiable.” She’s a three-year-old, 15-pound Westie. Watch Olivia and Tyree Henry’s cute reunion on “Busy Tonight” above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Godzilla vs Kong': Brian Tyree Henry Joins Cast of Monster Movie

'Atlanta' Star Brian Tyree Henry Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

'Atlanta': 'Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again' for Alfred After 'Woods,' Brian Tyree Henry Says

‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Team Talks Diversity: ‘Modern Heroes for a Modern World’

Brian Tyree Henry wasn’t so sure about being cast as a father in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” At just 36, the “Atlanta” actor said he didn’t think he was old enough, but when he found out he would be rearing …

Brian Tyree Henry wasn’t so sure about being cast as a father in “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” At just 36, the “Atlanta” actor said he didn’t think he was old enough, but when he found out he would be rearing Miles Morales, Marvel’s only black, Latino Spider-Man, he decided to forgo any insecurities he had […]

‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Film Review: Animated Arachnids Cross Paths in Clever Superhero Saga

If you’re of the opinion that Spider-Man has been rebooted too many times in the last two decades, hold onto your hats: the animated adventure “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” introduces no less than seven new versions of the character within a single film.

Miraculously, instead of feeling like too much of a good thing, “Into the Spider-Verse” is simply a very good thing. The film, directed by Bob Perischetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman, captures the sprawling interconnectivity of comic-book universes in a way that no other feature film has. Anything can happen, and it usually does. It’s incredibly thrilling to watch, impressively emotional throughout, and easily the best Spider-Man movie since “Spider-Man 2.”

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” stars Shameik Moore (“Dope”) as Miles Morales, a half-black, half-Latino teenager torn between his overbearing yet good-natured police officer father Jefferson (Brian Tyree Henry) and his more relaxed, sketchier uncle Aaron (Mahershala Ali). While Miles practices his graffiti art with his uncle, he’s bitten by a radioactive spider, and we all know what that means.

Watch Video: ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Trailer: Meet All the Spider-People, and One Spider-Pig

The problem isn’t just that Miles starts sticking to his fellow classmates, or that his inner monologue gets louder (one of the film’s most satisfying jokes). The problem is that he stumbles across Spider-Man (Jake Johnson) fighting Kingpin (Liev Schreiber), in the middle of a giant interdimensional rift device. Miles watches helplessly as Spider-Man dies, and he promises to finish what the hero started, namely to prevent the Kingpin from using the machine again, lest it destroy the world.

While he’s wallowing in guilt and self-doubt, Miles stumbles across yet another Peter Parker/Spider-Man (Johnson, again)… and a Spider-Gwen (Hailee Steinfeld) … and a Spider-Noir (Nicolas Cage)… and a Spider-Ham (John Mulaney)… and a SP//dr (Kimiko Glenn, “Orange is the New Black”). Spider-Persons from throughout the multiverse have been sucked into Miles’s reality because of Kingpin’s machine, and they need to stop him and return to their own time periods before they blink out of existence.

Also Read: ‘Spider-Woman’ and Other ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ Follow-Ups in the Works at Sony

The plot seems like it should be too much for one film to handle, but “Into the Spider-Verse” wisely stays focused on Miles and his story, and uses all the other characters for support.

Miles Morales is an incredibly captivating new hero, in a story that challenges him in every conceivable way. His powers force upon him an awkward physicality that robs him of his previous confidence. His oath to save the world is such a heavy weight around his shoulders that he always looks ready to collapse. And his loyalties to his family are strained past the breaking point, in a subplot that has the sort of dramatic heft we haven’t seen in a superhero film in a very, very long time.

That heft is shared by several other Spider-heroes, and it’s impressive how organic the presence of such wildly different interpretations of the characters comes across. Miles, Peter and Gwen take up most of the screen time, leaving Spider-Ham, Spider-Noir and SP//dr to add levity and unusual action beats to the film’s second half. It’s also satisfying to see a superhero film offer this much representation across the board (even though the recurring fat jokes are bound to leave some audience members feeling like they’re still not allowed in the club).

Watch Video: ‘Marvel’s Spider-Man’ PS4 Has the Most Heartwarming Stan Lee Cameo Ever

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” understands all too well that the appeal of Spider-Man, in any form, isn’t just the hero’s powers, and it isn’t just the hero’s tragic backstory. It’s the unmistakable sense that the universe has it out for this person, and he or she is going to persevere anyway, through good humor and good intentions. Miles and Peter seem permanently trapped in violent Harold Lloyd routines, getting hit by cars, falling off buildings, dragged by trains, and hiding their identities behind flimsy excuses.

But as hilarious as “Into the Spider-Verse” is (and it’s easily the funniest Spider-Man movie ever), the film also evokes a greater sense of tragedy than any film in the series since Sam Raimi’s original. The heroes are elastic, but life is fragile, and death is very real. If you include flashbacks, the film has a rather impressive body count. What’s more, each of these deaths still motivates the characters left alive, so mortality is always at the forefront of our thoughts, even when the heroes are effortlessly throwing cars around inside a swirling knick-knack vortex of death.

What’s more, the film’s sprawling cast legitimizes every single version of every single superhero, to audiences who may still wonder why we need yet another “Spider-Man.” Or yet another “Fantastic Four.” Or yet another anything. The realization of each hero that they aren’t alone, and that someone understands their pain, can be shared by every audience member recognizing someone just like them on the big screen. They share similar origins, but they connect with different fans, who each have different ideas about the character and what they represent. And each of those versions of Spider-Man, or any other hero, deserves at least a modicum of appreciation, even if they’re not “our” version of the character.

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” represents some of the best superhero storytelling on the market. The frenetic animation and freewheeling story offer audiences a sense of boundless dynamism. It’s not the first time a director has attempted to incorporate comic book iconography into a feature-film adaptation — see also: Ang Lee’s “Hulk” and Edgar Wright’s “Scott Pilgrim vs. The World” — but it’s the most appealing. Watching “Into the Spider-Verse” evokes feelings of sitting cross-legged on the floor of your bedroom, eating cookies and immersing yourself in outrageous, mostly inviting new worlds.



Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Marvel’s Spider-Man’ PS4 Includes a Great Reference to ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’

Marie Severin, Spider-Woman Co-Creator and Marvel Comics Pioneer, Dies at 89

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‘Avengers: Infinity War’ — Here’s Why Spider-Man Took Longer to Disappear Than Everyone Else

If you’re of the opinion that Spider-Man has been rebooted too many times in the last two decades, hold onto your hats: the animated adventure “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” introduces no less than seven new versions of the character within a single film.

Miraculously, instead of feeling like too much of a good thing, “Into the Spider-Verse” is simply a very good thing. The film, directed by Bob Perischetti, Peter Ramsey and Rodney Rothman, captures the sprawling interconnectivity of comic-book universes in a way that no other feature film has. Anything can happen, and it usually does. It’s incredibly thrilling to watch, impressively emotional throughout, and easily the best Spider-Man movie since “Spider-Man 2.”

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” stars Shameik Moore (“Dope”) as Miles Morales, a half-black, half-Latino teenager torn between his overbearing yet good-natured police officer father Jefferson (Brian Tyree Henry) and his more relaxed, sketchier uncle Aaron (Mahershala Ali). While Miles practices his graffiti art with his uncle, he’s bitten by a radioactive spider, and we all know what that means.

The problem isn’t just that Miles starts sticking to his fellow classmates, or that his inner monologue gets louder (one of the film’s most satisfying jokes). The problem is that he stumbles across Spider-Man (Jake Johnson) fighting Kingpin (Liev Schreiber), in the middle of a giant interdimensional rift device. Miles watches helplessly as Spider-Man dies, and he promises to finish what the hero started, namely to prevent the Kingpin from using the machine again, lest it destroy the world.

While he’s wallowing in guilt and self-doubt, Miles stumbles across yet another Peter Parker/Spider-Man (Johnson, again)… and a Spider-Gwen (Hailee Steinfeld) … and a Spider-Noir (Nicolas Cage)… and a Spider-Ham (John Mulaney)… and a SP//dr (Kimiko Glenn, “Orange is the New Black”). Spider-Persons from throughout the multiverse have been sucked into Miles’s reality because of Kingpin’s machine, and they need to stop him and return to their own time periods before they blink out of existence.

The plot seems like it should be too much for one film to handle, but “Into the Spider-Verse” wisely stays focused on Miles and his story, and uses all the other characters for support.

Miles Morales is an incredibly captivating new hero, in a story that challenges him in every conceivable way. His powers force upon him an awkward physicality that robs him of his previous confidence. His oath to save the world is such a heavy weight around his shoulders that he always looks ready to collapse. And his loyalties to his family are strained past the breaking point, in a subplot that has the sort of dramatic heft we haven’t seen in a superhero film in a very, very long time.

That heft is shared by several other Spider-heroes, and it’s impressive how organic the presence of such wildly different interpretations of the characters comes across. Miles, Peter and Gwen take up most of the screen time, leaving Spider-Ham, Spider-Noir and SP//dr to add levity and unusual action beats to the film’s second half. It’s also satisfying to see a superhero film offer this much representation across the board (even though the recurring fat jokes are bound to leave some audience members feeling like they’re still not allowed in the club).

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” understands all too well that the appeal of Spider-Man, in any form, isn’t just the hero’s powers, and it isn’t just the hero’s tragic backstory. It’s the unmistakable sense that the universe has it out for this person, and he or she is going to persevere anyway, through good humor and good intentions. Miles and Peter seem permanently trapped in violent Harold Lloyd routines, getting hit by cars, falling off buildings, dragged by trains, and hiding their identities behind flimsy excuses.

But as hilarious as “Into the Spider-Verse” is (and it’s easily the funniest Spider-Man movie ever), the film also evokes a greater sense of tragedy than any film in the series since Sam Raimi’s original. The heroes are elastic, but life is fragile, and death is very real. If you include flashbacks, the film has a rather impressive body count. What’s more, each of these deaths still motivates the characters left alive, so mortality is always at the forefront of our thoughts, even when the heroes are effortlessly throwing cars around inside a swirling knick-knack vortex of death.

What’s more, the film’s sprawling cast legitimizes every single version of every single superhero, to audiences who may still wonder why we need yet another “Spider-Man.” Or yet another “Fantastic Four.” Or yet another anything. The realization of each hero that they aren’t alone, and that someone understands their pain, can be shared by every audience member recognizing someone just like them on the big screen. They share similar origins, but they connect with different fans, who each have different ideas about the character and what they represent. And each of those versions of Spider-Man, or any other hero, deserves at least a modicum of appreciation, even if they’re not “our” version of the character.

“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” represents some of the best superhero storytelling on the market. The frenetic animation and freewheeling story offer audiences a sense of boundless dynamism. It’s not the first time a director has attempted to incorporate comic book iconography into a feature-film adaptation — see also: Ang Lee’s “Hulk” and Edgar Wright’s “Scott Pilgrim vs. The World” — but it’s the most appealing. Watching “Into the Spider-Verse” evokes feelings of sitting cross-legged on the floor of your bedroom, eating cookies and immersing yourself in outrageous, mostly inviting new worlds.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Marvel's Spider-Man' PS4 Includes a Great Reference to 'Spider-Man: Homecoming'

Marie Severin, Spider-Woman Co-Creator and Marvel Comics Pioneer, Dies at 89

'Crazy Rich Asian' Star Remy Hii Joins 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' Cast (Exclusive)

'Avengers: Infinity War' — Here's Why Spider-Man Took Longer to Disappear Than Everyone Else

Aubrey Plaza to Host 2019 Film Independent Spirit Awards

Aubrey Plaza will host the 2019 Film Independent Spirit Awards, Film Independent announced on Tuesday.

On Nov. 16, “Crazy Rich Asians” star Gemma Chan and “Private Life” star Molly Shannon announced this year’s nominees at a press conference. Best Feature nominees include “Eighth Grade,” “First Reformed,” “If Beale Street Could Talk” and “Leave No Trace.”

The 2019 Film Independent Spirit Awards will take place on Feb. 23, 2019, and will be broadcast exclusively on IFC at 2 p.m. PT.

See Video: Aubrey Plaza Tells Us Why ‘An Evening With Beverly Luff Lin’ Is a ‘Wild Ride’

“I am truly honored and delighted to host the Spirits Awards this year,” said Plaza. “It is a dream come true to host a show that celebrates my greatest loves… independent film, the people that make them possible and live television!”

“The search for a great Spirit Awards host is never easy,” added Film Independent president Josh Welsh. “This year we said, let’s find someone funny, smart, a cinephile, being a great actor wouldn’t hurt, and it would be an added bonus if they’ve previously won a Spirit Award. Then we realized, oh wait, that’s Aubrey Plaza! So thank you Aubrey, for hosting the Spirits!”

Also Read: Aubrey Plaza’s ‘An Evening With Beverly Luff Linn’ Acquired by UPHE Content Group

Most recently, Plaza starred opposite Elizabeth Olsen in “Ingrid Goes West,” which Plaza also produced,” as well as Jeff Baena’s “The Little Hours” and Jim Hosking’s “An Evening with Beverly Luff Lin.” She currently stars in FX’s “Legion” and will next be seen in Lars Klevberg’s remake of “Child’s Play” opposite Brian Tyree Henry.

This year marks the 34th edition of the awards show, which celebrates the very best of independent film. Past Spirit Awards hosts include Nick Kroll and John Mulaney, Kate McKinnon and Kumail Nanjiani, Andy Samberg, Sarah Silverman, Samuel L. Jackson and Queen Latifah. Joel Gallen of Tenth Planet Production will executive produce and direct for the fifth consecutive year. Shawn Davis returns as producer for his 17th year, while Rick Austin will produce for his fourth year in a row. Danielle Federico and Andrew Schaff return as co-producers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘If Beale Street Could Talk,’ ‘Leave No Trace’ Nominated for Top Independent Spirit Awards

Inside the 2018 Spirit Awards: 9 Things You Didn’t See on TV

Spirit Awards Send Jordan Peele and ‘Get Out’ to the Oscars on a Mission

Aubrey Plaza will host the 2019 Film Independent Spirit Awards, Film Independent announced on Tuesday.

On Nov. 16, “Crazy Rich Asians” star Gemma Chan and “Private Life” star Molly Shannon announced this year’s nominees at a press conference. Best Feature nominees include “Eighth Grade,” “First Reformed,” “If Beale Street Could Talk” and “Leave No Trace.”

The 2019 Film Independent Spirit Awards will take place on Feb. 23, 2019, and will be broadcast exclusively on IFC at 2 p.m. PT.

“I am truly honored and delighted to host the Spirits Awards this year,” said Plaza. “It is a dream come true to host a show that celebrates my greatest loves… independent film, the people that make them possible and live television!”

“The search for a great Spirit Awards host is never easy,” added Film Independent president Josh Welsh. “This year we said, let’s find someone funny, smart, a cinephile, being a great actor wouldn’t hurt, and it would be an added bonus if they’ve previously won a Spirit Award. Then we realized, oh wait, that’s Aubrey Plaza! So thank you Aubrey, for hosting the Spirits!”

Most recently, Plaza starred opposite Elizabeth Olsen in “Ingrid Goes West,” which Plaza also produced,” as well as Jeff Baena’s “The Little Hours” and Jim Hosking’s “An Evening with Beverly Luff Lin.” She currently stars in FX’s “Legion” and will next be seen in Lars Klevberg’s remake of “Child’s Play” opposite Brian Tyree Henry.

This year marks the 34th edition of the awards show, which celebrates the very best of independent film. Past Spirit Awards hosts include Nick Kroll and John Mulaney, Kate McKinnon and Kumail Nanjiani, Andy Samberg, Sarah Silverman, Samuel L. Jackson and Queen Latifah. Joel Gallen of Tenth Planet Production will executive produce and direct for the fifth consecutive year. Shawn Davis returns as producer for his 17th year, while Rick Austin will produce for his fourth year in a row. Danielle Federico and Andrew Schaff return as co-producers.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'If Beale Street Could Talk,' 'Leave No Trace' Nominated for Top Independent Spirit Awards

Inside the 2018 Spirit Awards: 9 Things You Didn't See on TV

Spirit Awards Send Jordan Peele and 'Get Out' to the Oscars on a Mission

Brian Tyree Henry Still Doesn’t Know Who Played Teddy Perkins at the Emmys

The “Atlanta” co-star says he’s perfectly fine letting the mystery be.

It’s been over seven months since the “Atlanta” Season 2 episode “Teddy Perkins” unleashed one of the biggest TV discussions of the year. Pored over and unpacked, both thematically and logistically, both title character and the episode itself have been shrouded in a layer of secrecy and uncertainty ever since it aired in early April.

That confusion only grew exponentially at this year’s Emmys, when Teddy showed up in the audience. Though eagle-eyed viewers spotted him in the crowd, photos later surfaced of this Teddy with the regular “Atlanta” cast, including Donald Glover, who played the character in the original episode.

Apparently, Glover’s co-star Brian Tyree Henry still doesn’t know who it was that popped up on awards night. In an interview on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” to promote the upcoming release of “Widows,” Henry told Meyers that he still has no idea who it was under the makeup at the Emmys.

“I don’t want any part of it,” Henry said. “I was sitting next to Zazie [Beetz] and I looked at her and I was like ‘Is that Teddy Perkins? So where’s Donald? Oh, there’s Donald right there.’ She’s like, ‘It’s gotta be Keith.’ I was like, ‘Keith is behind you!’ So we all started this group thread and said, ‘Who is Teddy Perkins?'”

It’s been a busy year for Henry, who in addition to his supporting turn on “Atlanta,” was also nominated for a Tony for his work in the revival of the Kenneth Lonergan play “Lobby Hero” and will have a busy fall on the film side as part of “Widows,” Barry Jenkins’ “If Beale Street Could Talk” and the upcoming animated feature “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.”

Watch his “Late Night” interview (which also gets into some extensive Rihanna appreciation) below:

Aubrey Plaza’s ‘Child’s Play’ Reboot to Hit Theaters in June 2019

Orion Pictures will release the reboot of “Child’s Play,” starring Aubrey Plaza, Brian Tyree Henry, and Gabriel Bateman, on June 21, 2019. Plaza will portray the mother who gives her son a toy doll for his birthday, unaware of its more sini…

Orion Pictures will release the reboot of “Child’s Play,” starring Aubrey Plaza, Brian Tyree Henry, and Gabriel Bateman, on June 21, 2019. Plaza will portray the mother who gives her son a toy doll for his birthday, unaware of its more sinister nature. Henry will play the role of a police detective and Bateman will […]

‘Godzilla vs Kong’: Demián Bichir in Talks to Star in Monster Movie

Legendary is in negotiations for Academy Award nominee Demián Bichir to join the upcoming “Godzilla vs Kong” film alongside previously announced cast Julian Dennison and Brian Tyree Henry.

“Godzilla vs. Kong” is the fourth installment of the Legendary and Warner Bros. cinematic universe and is set to be released on May 22, 2020. “Godzilla” brought in $529 million globally after it was released in 2014. “Kong: Skull Island” was released March 10, 2017, and grossed more than $565 million worldwide. A sequel to Godzilla, titled “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” with Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and Millie Bobby Brown, will also be released next year.

Also Read: ‘Godzilla vs Kong’: Brian Tyree Henry Joins Cast of Monster Movie

Screenwriter Terry Rossio, best known for writing “Pirates of the Caribbean” films, is writing the “Godzilla vs. Kong” screenplay. In March, Legendary set a writers room to work on the script for “Godzilla vs. Kong,” with Rossio as its head. Other writers include Patrick McKay and J.D. Payne (“Star Trek Beyond”), Lindsey Beer, Cat Vasko, “Maze Runner” movies writer T.S. Nowlin, Jack Paglen (“Transcendence”) and “Babylon 5” creator J. Michael Straczynski.

Bichir was nominated for Best Performance by a Leading Actor for his role in “A Better Life.” His other credits include “The Hateful Eight” and most recently horror-thriller “The Nun,” the highest-grossing title in “The Conjuring” universe. Upcoming credits include “Grudge,” “Chaos Walking,” and ABC’s “Grand Hotel,” in which he stars and produces.

Bichir is represented by CAA.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

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Legendary is in negotiations for Academy Award nominee Demián Bichir to join the upcoming “Godzilla vs Kong” film alongside previously announced cast Julian Dennison and Brian Tyree Henry.

“Godzilla vs. Kong” is the fourth installment of the Legendary and Warner Bros. cinematic universe and is set to be released on May 22, 2020. “Godzilla” brought in $529 million globally after it was released in 2014. “Kong: Skull Island” was released March 10, 2017, and grossed more than $565 million worldwide. A sequel to Godzilla, titled “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” with Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and Millie Bobby Brown, will also be released next year.

Screenwriter Terry Rossio, best known for writing “Pirates of the Caribbean” films, is writing the “Godzilla vs. Kong” screenplay. In March, Legendary set a writers room to work on the script for “Godzilla vs. Kong,” with Rossio as its head. Other writers include Patrick McKay and J.D. Payne (“Star Trek Beyond”), Lindsey Beer, Cat Vasko, “Maze Runner” movies writer T.S. Nowlin, Jack Paglen (“Transcendence”) and “Babylon 5” creator J. Michael Straczynski.

Bichir was nominated for Best Performance by a Leading Actor for his role in “A Better Life.” His other credits include “The Hateful Eight” and most recently horror-thriller “The Nun,” the highest-grossing title in “The Conjuring” universe. Upcoming credits include “Grudge,” “Chaos Walking,” and ABC’s “Grand Hotel,” in which he stars and produces.

Bichir is represented by CAA.

The Hollywood Reporter first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Demián Bichir Lands 'Grand Hotel' Pilot at ABC

Demian Bichir Joins Cast of 'Conjuring' Spinoff 'The Nun'

'The Bridge' Star Demian Bichir on His Character's 'Darker' Season 2

‘Atlanta’s Brian Tyree Henry Joins ‘Godzilla Vs. Kong’

Brian Tyree Henry, nominated for Emmys this year for FX’s Atlanta and NBC’s This Is Us as well as a Tony for Lobby Hero, has closed a deal to join Legendary and Warner Bros’ Godzilla vs Kong. He joins Millie Bobby Brown, Danai Gurira …

Brian Tyree Henry, nominated for Emmys this year for FX’s Atlanta and NBC’s This Is Us as well as a Tony for Lobby Hero, has closed a deal to join Legendary and Warner Bros’ Godzilla vs Kong. He joins Millie Bobby Brown, Danai Gurira and Julian Dennison to help lead the ensemble cast. Adam Wingard directs the fourth installment of the monster universe franchise, which has a May 22, 2020 release date. Henry most recently was on the big screen in White Boy Rick, and before…

‘Godzilla vs Kong’: Brian Tyree Henry Joins Cast of Monster Movie

Legendary Entertainment has closed a deal for Emmy award and Tony award nominee Brian Tyree Henry to join the cast of the upcoming “Godzilla vs. Kong” film, directed by Adam Wingard.

“Godzilla vs. Kong” is the fourth installment of the Legendary and Warner Bros. cinematic universe and is set to be released on May 22, 2020. “Godzilla” brought in $529 million globally after it was released in 2014. “Kong: Skull Island” was released March 10, 2017, and grossed more than $565 million worldwide. A sequel to Godzilla, titled “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” with Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and Millie Bobby Brown, will also be released next year.

Henry is currently in production on several film projects, including “Super Intelligence,” “The Woman in the Window” and “Child’s Play.” He is set to film the feature film “The Outside Story” this fall, ahead of the third season of “Atlanta.”

Also Read: Brian Tyree Henry on What ‘Atlanta’ Cast Learned From Sudden Fame: ‘You Can’t Make It Alone’ (Video)

Henry can currently be seen in the feature film “White Boy Rick.” Next month, he co-stars in “Widows” and “If Beale Street Could Talk.” In December, he lends his voice to the animated film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.”

Henry was nominated for Primetime Emmys in 2018 for his role as Alfred ‘Paper Boi’ Miles in “Atlanta” and 2017 for a guest-starring role in “This Is Us,” and was nominated for a Tony Award in 2018 for his performance in “Lobby Hero.”

Henry is represented by CAA, JWS Entertainment, Jill Fritzo PR and Jackoway Austen Tyerman Wertheimer Mandelbaum Morris Bernstein Trattner & Klein.

Variety first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sterling K Brown Loses Control of His Butt in Dance Battle With Brian Tyree Henry, Jimmy Fallon (Video)

‘Atlanta’: ‘Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again’ for Alfred After ‘Woods,’ Brian Tyree Henry Says

‘Atlanta’: Why Being Brian Tyree Henry Is ‘a Lot of Daunting’ Right Now

Legendary Entertainment has closed a deal for Emmy award and Tony award nominee Brian Tyree Henry to join the cast of the upcoming “Godzilla vs. Kong” film, directed by Adam Wingard.

“Godzilla vs. Kong” is the fourth installment of the Legendary and Warner Bros. cinematic universe and is set to be released on May 22, 2020. “Godzilla” brought in $529 million globally after it was released in 2014. “Kong: Skull Island” was released March 10, 2017, and grossed more than $565 million worldwide. A sequel to Godzilla, titled “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” with Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and Millie Bobby Brown, will also be released next year.

Henry is currently in production on several film projects, including “Super Intelligence,” “The Woman in the Window” and “Child’s Play.” He is set to film the feature film “The Outside Story” this fall, ahead of the third season of “Atlanta.”

Henry can currently be seen in the feature film “White Boy Rick.” Next month, he co-stars in “Widows” and “If Beale Street Could Talk.” In December, he lends his voice to the animated film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.”

Henry was nominated for Primetime Emmys in 2018 for his role as Alfred ‘Paper Boi’ Miles in “Atlanta” and 2017 for a guest-starring role in “This Is Us,” and was nominated for a Tony Award in 2018 for his performance in “Lobby Hero.”

Henry is represented by CAA, JWS Entertainment, Jill Fritzo PR and Jackoway Austen Tyerman Wertheimer Mandelbaum Morris Bernstein Trattner & Klein.

Variety first reported the news.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Sterling K Brown Loses Control of His Butt in Dance Battle With Brian Tyree Henry, Jimmy Fallon (Video)

'Atlanta': 'Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again' for Alfred After 'Woods,' Brian Tyree Henry Says

'Atlanta': Why Being Brian Tyree Henry Is 'a Lot of Daunting' Right Now

Brian Tyree Henry to Co-Star With Millie Bobby Brown in ‘Godzilla vs. Kong’ (EXCLUSIVE)

Brian Tyree Henry, who is coming off his Emmy-nominated performance in “Atlanta” Season 2, will star opposite Millie Bobby Brown in Legendary’s “Godzilla vs. Kong.” Adam Wingard is directing with Henry also joining “…

Brian Tyree Henry, who is coming off his Emmy-nominated performance in “Atlanta” Season 2, will star opposite Millie Bobby Brown in Legendary’s “Godzilla vs. Kong.” Adam Wingard is directing with Henry also joining “Deadpool 2” star Julian Dennison. Plot details are vague, but the film will feature the two titular classic monsters squaring off in […]

Gabriel Bateman To Star As Andy In MGM’s ‘Child’s Play’ Remake, Joining Aubrey Plaza & Brian Tyree Henry

Young actor Gabriel Bateman (Lights Out, American Gothic), Parks and Rec alum Aubrey Plaza, and Atlanta star Brian Tyree Henry are set to star in MGM’s Child’s Play remake for Orion Pictures. Bateman will take on the role as Andy, Plaza wil…

Young actor Gabriel Bateman (Lights Out, American Gothic), Parks and Rec alum Aubrey Plaza, and Atlanta star Brian Tyree Henry are set to star in MGM’s Child’s Play remake for Orion Pictures. Bateman will take on the role as Andy, Plaza will play Andy’s mom Karen, and  Henry is Mike. Those characters originated in the 1988 version which went on to gross $44 million worldwide, spawned six sequels,  and created one of the most well-known characters in the horror genre. Polar…

53 Stunning Portraits From TheWrap’s Toronto Studio (Exclusive Photos)

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

Toronto Film Festival 2018: Maggie Gyllenhaal, Elle Fanning, Robert Pattinson and more stop by our studio

‘Widows’ Film Review: Viola Davis, Steve McQueen Team Up for a Curious Heist Movie

If you’re looking for a curious combination of filmmaker and subject matter at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, look no further than Steve McQueen’s “Widows,” which had its world premiere at the festival on Saturday.

McQueen, best known for the 2013 Oscar Best Picture winner “12 Years a Slave,” is an exacting British artist and film director drawn to obsession and control. He’s made films about slavery, the Irish hunger strike in a British prison (“Hunger”) and sex addiction (“Shame”).

But “Widows” is a heist movie, based on a British miniseries about four women who plot and pull off a robbery after their husbands are killed attempting another job.

Also Read: Viola Davis Loads up in New Trailer for Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows’ (Video)

Heist movies, one would think, need to have a little fun in them, and McQueen is not a man who puts much fun into his movies. From the evidence of his filmography, he is enthralled by the extremes of human behavior and uncompromising in the way he documents those extremes.

And while “Widows” can be powerful and dramatic, the director doesn’t seem all that interested in the complicated heist that is theoretically driving the plot. This isn’t Steven Soderbergh delighting in the intricacies of the vault break-in in “Ocean’s Eleven”; McQueen is far more interested in how desperate these people are and in the level of corruption and despair that has led them here.

That’s a reasonable thing for McQueen to be interested in, of course, especially when he’s exploring it with the help of a powerhouse cast headed by Viola Davis and also including Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Liam Neeson and Robert Duvall. But it also feels like a missed opportunity, given that the plot hinges on heist-flick standbys like sudden snafus, double crosses and chase scenes.

Also Read: Viola Davis Is Out for Blood in Explosive ‘Widows’ Trailer (Video)

Davis plays Veronica, a cultured upper-class woman whose life is thrown into turmoil when her husband (Neeson) is killed along with three colleagues pulling off an armed robbery. The money was presumably blown up along with the gang, leaving Veronica in debt to some very angry and very vicious gangsters, one of whom also happens to be running for office in the famously corrupt city of Chicago.

Facing the loss of everything she has, Veronica locates the notebook in which her hubby has helpfully written out every detail of his next heist, and then convinces three other widows that they should take a crash course in robbery. And then complications ensue — but you knew they would, didn’t you?

The action includes the usual assortment of implausibilities, but the details are less important — to McQueen for sure, and because of that to the audience — than the glimpses of lives in perpetual panic, or of corruption so deep and pervasive that no one can ever escape it.

Also Read: ‘Sunset’ Film Review: ‘Son of Saul’ Director Keeps His Characters, and Audience, Off Balance

The heist is the film’s centerpiece, which means “Widows” plays like McQueen doing genre, not McQueen making a statement. The problem is that the genre he’s doing requires a lighter touch than he supplies — and if those car chases and double crosses aren’t at least a little fun, the action turns into a slog. A polished, dramatic slog, maybe, but a slog nonetheless.

Davis is typically fine, though “Widows” is unlikely to occupy as much real estate on her career-achievement clip packages than “Fences” or “Doubt” or “The Help.” Rodriguez, Debicki and Cynthia Erivo make for a team you can root for, even if you never really believe they can do what they’re doing.

On the male side, Neeson has enough gravitas that his very presence constitutes a kind of spoiler. And Farrell and Duvall serve as one side of the brutally corrupt coin, with Daniel Kaluuya and Brian Tyree Henry as the other.

“Widows” works as an example of Steve McQueen bending the genre to his particular obsessions. But it may also leave you hoping that he forgets about ill-fitting genres and goes back to a film where he can care about the whole story, not just part of it.

“Widows” will be released in November by 20th Century Fox.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Will Oscar Season’s Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

‘White Boy Rick’ Film Review: Gritty, Poignant Drama Is Portrait of a Teenager, Corrupted

If you’re looking for a curious combination of filmmaker and subject matter at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival, look no further than Steve McQueen’s “Widows,” which had its world premiere at the festival on Saturday.

McQueen, best known for the 2013 Oscar Best Picture winner “12 Years a Slave,” is an exacting British artist and film director drawn to obsession and control. He’s made films about slavery, the Irish hunger strike in a British prison (“Hunger”) and sex addiction (“Shame”).

But “Widows” is a heist movie, based on a British miniseries about four women who plot and pull off a robbery after their husbands are killed attempting another job.

Heist movies, one would think, need to have a little fun in them, and McQueen is not a man who puts much fun into his movies. From the evidence of his filmography, he is enthralled by the extremes of human behavior and uncompromising in the way he documents those extremes.

And while “Widows” can be powerful and dramatic, the director doesn’t seem all that interested in the complicated heist that is theoretically driving the plot. This isn’t Steven Soderbergh delighting in the intricacies of the vault break-in in “Ocean’s Eleven”; McQueen is far more interested in how desperate these people are and in the level of corruption and despair that has led them here.

That’s a reasonable thing for McQueen to be interested in, of course, especially when he’s exploring it with the help of a powerhouse cast headed by Viola Davis and also including Michelle Rodriguez, Elizabeth Debicki, Liam Neeson and Robert Duvall. But it also feels like a missed opportunity, given that the plot hinges on heist-flick standbys like sudden snafus, double crosses and chase scenes.

Davis plays Veronica, a cultured upper-class woman whose life is thrown into turmoil when her husband (Neeson) is killed along with three colleagues pulling off an armed robbery. The money was presumably blown up along with the gang, leaving Veronica in debt to some very angry and very vicious gangsters, one of whom also happens to be running for office in the famously corrupt city of Chicago.

Facing the loss of everything she has, Veronica locates the notebook in which her hubby has helpfully written out every detail of his next heist, and then convinces three other widows that they should take a crash course in robbery. And then complications ensue — but you knew they would, didn’t you?

The action includes the usual assortment of implausibilities, but the details are less important — to McQueen for sure, and because of that to the audience — than the glimpses of lives in perpetual panic, or of corruption so deep and pervasive that no one can ever escape it.

The heist is the film’s centerpiece, which means “Widows” plays like McQueen doing genre, not McQueen making a statement. The problem is that the genre he’s doing requires a lighter touch than he supplies — and if those car chases and double crosses aren’t at least a little fun, the action turns into a slog. A polished, dramatic slog, maybe, but a slog nonetheless.

Davis is typically fine, though “Widows” is unlikely to occupy as much real estate on her career-achievement clip packages than “Fences” or “Doubt” or “The Help.” Rodriguez, Debicki and Cynthia Erivo make for a team you can root for, even if you never really believe they can do what they’re doing.

On the male side, Neeson has enough gravitas that his very presence constitutes a kind of spoiler. And Farrell and Duvall serve as one side of the brutally corrupt coin, with Daniel Kaluuya and Brian Tyree Henry as the other.

“Widows” works as an example of Steve McQueen bending the genre to his particular obsessions. But it may also leave you hoping that he forgets about ill-fitting genres and goes back to a film where he can care about the whole story, not just part of it.

“Widows” will be released in November by 20th Century Fox.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Will Oscar Season's Early Contenders Survive the Toronto Film Festival Onslaught?

Toronto Film Festival Market: Will Streaming Giants Spend Big Again and 5 Other Things to Watch

'White Boy Rick' Film Review: Gritty, Poignant Drama Is Portrait of a Teenager, Corrupted

Brian Tyree Henry To Topline Indie Film ‘The Outside Story’

EXCLUSIVE: Emmy nominated Atlanta star Brian Tyree Henry has been tapped to star in The Outside Story, a Brooklyn-based indie feature from first-time writer/director Casimir Nozkowski. The pic, which will begin filming on location in mid-November, is b…

EXCLUSIVE: Emmy nominated Atlanta star Brian Tyree Henry has been tapped to star in The Outside Story, a Brooklyn-based indie feature from first-time writer/director Casimir Nozkowski. The pic, which will begin filming on location in mid-November, is being produced by Sub Genre and Greenmachine Film. Henry stars as Charles Young, an introverted editor living a vertical life in his 2nd-floor apartment, always on deadline and in a rut. When Charles locks himself out of his…

‘Atlanta’ Star Brian Tyree Henry Talks Standing Out With Fashion Choices

Despite his growing fame as a rapper, “Atlanta” character Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles — portrayed by second-time Emmy nominee Brian Tyree Henry — maintains a modest wardrobe. “In essence he’s a trap boy — he’s a drug dealer — so he’s not really concerned …

Despite his growing fame as a rapper, “Atlanta” character Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles — portrayed by second-time Emmy nominee Brian Tyree Henry — maintains a modest wardrobe. “In essence he’s a trap boy — he’s a drug dealer — so he’s not really concerned about labels,” Henry says. “Because anything too gaudy, too flashy, draws […]

‘Atlanta’: Brian Tyree Henry Worked Through Tears, Fears, and His Mother’s Death by Trusting His Crew

The actor has received an Emmy nomination for his performance in the dark, personal episode about his mother’s death.

“Get off me!” At an Emmys event for “Atlanta” in June, Brian Tyree Henry jokingly brushed off the conciliatory hand of one of his co-stars after he was reduced to tears on stage. The usually stoic actor was addressing the recent death of his mother Willow Deane Kearse, in relation to the episode “Woods,” and broke down several times during the Q & A session.

“The first thing I have to do is say thank you to all of you for letting me do that… because you all were with me through the whole thing. I’ve been talking about this episode for a month and this [crying] has never happened,” he said while wiping his tears. “I’ll just say this. It was very personal. It was very cathartic. It was very therapeutic.”

In a way, it makes sense that the tears didn’t come until this point. Even though he’s discussed the importance of “Woods” — which was written by Stefani Robinson — in all the interviews, he’d always maintained his equanimity. Henry seemed as if he had mourned but made his peace with the loss of his mother, who had died suddenly in an automobile accident shortly after finishing shooting the first season of the Emmy-winning FX series.

“We were having a wrap party. I remember us having the time of our lives with each other,” he said. “Literally the next morning I got the call that my mother’s gone and [I’m] just sitting there. Your brain just goes through that: How could you possibly go through having the best moment of your life doing this thing and…? The first person I called was [executive producer Dianne McGunigle]. I felt so bad because I was just like, ‘I can’t call Donald [Glover] and I can’t call ‘Keith [Stanfield]. I don’t want to take this away from them.’” One by one, department by department, each person learned of the news from McGunigle and then checked in on Henry.

“It was this care of everybody,” he reflected. “So then we go away and we’re gone for a year and then we come back and Stefani is like, ‘So, you know there’s this episode called “Woods.”’ I still didn’t really think anything about it. The way it works is, you don’t really get the scripts ahead of time. That is what I kind of love.”

It was only later that the episode’s subject would register when director Hiro Murai confirmed it to the actor. “The only thing I asked was, whoever is playing my mother, I can’t see her,” said Henry. “I just don’t want to meet this woman. I just had to do [the episode].”

Brian Tyree Henry and Zazie Beetz'Atlanta' TV show FYC event, Panel, Los Angeles, USA - 08 Jun 2018

Zazie Beetz comforts Brian Tyree Henry after he gets emotional speaking about the episode “Woods,” which paid tribute to the death of his own mother.

Michael Buckner/Variety/REX/Shutterstock

It’s a reasonable request, but also one that shows how much he was willing to trust in the show’s creative vision, even if it involves his personal tragedy. “Woods” opens with Alfred “Paper Boi” Miles (Henry) asleep on his couch, and the phantom presence of his mother enters his apartment, starts cleaning and gives him grief for being lazy. The rest of the episode takes place over the course of the day, the anniversary of his mother’s death, and other characters keep calling attention to the fact that he’s not truly living. He claims he wants fame, but he’s still caught in the inertia of grief.

Alfred’s odyssey to making a change in his life begins with physical pain. Three guys recognize Paper Boi and take advantage of him being by himself and mug him. The beatdown is swift and brutal, leaving Alfred bloody.

“It was very very hard. That situation was not something that is very beautiful to watch,” Henry told IndieWire on the red carpet for the FYC event. “But it was fun to go there. It was fun to actually get Alfred to his knees and to a place of him having to realize that he is not the same person that he used to be, that he can’t really walk the streets the way he used to.

“The whole episode took about four or five days, but yeah it took a little while because we wanted to get the essence of what it was for him to really have to be brought to his knees, to really bring him down to a place where he needs refuge, and it wasn’t something that we took lightly,” he said. “It stuck with me, and it’s really hard to watch, but I’m glad that I committed to it. I’m glad that Hiro guided that and moved that the way he did, and it came out in a way that I still can’t believe. But it wasn’t that easy to do.”

After the attack, Alfred flees into the nearby woods, where he gets lost. This portion of the episode is also disorienting for the viewers because as the sun goes down, so does the light in the episode.

“That was the woods. It was dark. What you saw is what you saw, seriously, with a few lights here and there,” said Henry. “But the whole environment, the whole terrain was real. Nothing about that was staged at all. We were out in the middle of nowhere and we had the elements going. All those animals you heard were there. It’s the south. You know what it’s like. And the woods out there, it’s very real and very rough. So everything you saw was real.”

Working in the darkness and relying on others was emblematic of what Alfred had been doing throughout the season. At the FYC event, Henry noted that Alfred was rarely the driver this year, but that he ended up being the passenger for his barber Bibby (Robert S. Powell III) in “Barbershop” and his ambitious stripper friend Ciara (Angela Wildflower).

ATLANTA Robbin' Season -- "Woods" -- Season Two, Episode 8 (Airs Thursday, April 19, 10:00 p.m. e/p) Pictured: Brian Tyree Henry as Alfred Miles. CR: Curtis Baker/FX

“Every time I was the passenger with somebody, some shit goes wrong. If I let somebody drive me somewhere, shit goes left,” he said. “I kept telling Stefani [who received an Emmy nomination for writing ‘Barbershop’], what’s with the restraint? I’m so restrained this season. Before I could just pop in and beat someone’s ass and say what I wanted to say and throw this and do that, but this time it’s like I had to go with another consciousness.”

This loss of control continued through the mugging and then comes to a head later in the woods when Alfred has a strange encounter with a bum named Wally (Reggie Green), who makes Alfred examine his life. At one point, Wally holds a boxcutter to Alfred’s throat and says, “Make the decision. Keep standing still, you’re gone, boy. You’re wasting time, and the only people who’ve got time are dead.”

“He just came out of nowhere to tell me something that I didn’t want to hear but had to hear, right?” said Henry.

Poised on the threshold of getting hurt again, perhaps even fatally injured, Alfred makes a decision. He stands up and walks away as Wally stays frozen, holding the boxcutter and talking to the empty space where Alfred once was. That move wasn’t written into the script, but was a suggestion by Murai while shooting the scene. Although Henry was skeptical, he tried it. “It was so unbelievable,” he said. “I think I ran and hugged [him] after that.

“I was terrified. And Stefani, man, she just wrote it, and I just had to do it,” said Henry. “Here I am in these woods, and Hiro just let me go places that I didn’t think I would ever want to go. I also didn’t think I would have to address this part of my life, [but] mental health is real. I think everybody saw what I was going through and everyone saw what I was dealing with. And Alfred was dealing with that too. He literally lost his mother. You feel that way.”

In the end, Alfred wandered out of the woods, beaten but determined to do what he needed for success. In the next episode, he’s taken the wheel, literally, as he drives to an event at a nearby college.

As for Henry, relying on his writer, his director, and his co-stars allowed him to open himself up and work through his grief onscreen. This July, the actor earned his first Emmy nomination for his meaningful performance.

Brian Tyree Henry on What ‘Atlanta’ Cast Learned From Sudden Fame: ‘You Can’t Make It Alone’ (Video)

This story about Brian Tyree Henry first appeared in the Comedy/Drama/Actors issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

It’s an eat-or-be-eaten world out there, but that doesn’t mean you have to navigate it alone. That’s the lesson that Brian Tyree Henry’s character Alfred, a.k.a. the rising rapper Paper Boi, learned in the sophomore season of “Atlanta.”

“We all want to believe that we can make it alone, but we really can’t sometimes,” Henry said. “And so I think that Alfred was discovering that in a huge way this season.”

Over the 11 episodes, Henry delivered a nuanced performance as Alfred dealt with his rising fame and floundering manager, his cousin Earn (Donald Glover). “Ideally, you want to see your family excel, you want to be there with them, you want to push them forward, you want to walk beside them,” Henry said.

Also Read: Sterling K Brown Loses Control of His Butt in Dance Battle With Brian Tyree Henry, Jimmy Fallon (Video)

“And sometimes when things get in the way — new people, new circumstances, new environments — that kind of communication fizzles a little bit, when you should have been listening to the one thing that you know to be certain all along. And that’s the connection you have with your family members.”

In the season’s final episode, Alfred, Earn and Darius (Lakeith Stanfield) head to Europe for Paper Boi’s first tour. “You’re family,” Alfred tells Earn.

“I think that you realize along this route of celebrity, or, you know, notoriety, that sometimes you need to look to your left, look to your right, and make sure those people [are there]. And I think that’s definitely something that Alfred and Earn were discovering at the same time,” Henry said.

Also Read: ‘Atlanta’ Director and ‘Girlfriend Experience’ Co-Creator Amy Seimetz Signs Overall Deal at FX

It’s a discovery that Henry found at the same time, too. When he looks to his left and right, it’s his “Atlanta” cast — which has become its own family — that holds him up. “I love that all of us in our own way are going through the same experience,” said Henry, who recently earned a Tony nomination for the Broadway revival of “Lobby Hero.”

“I mean, Lakeith is doing his movie [“Sorry to Bother You”], Zazie’s doing her thing [“Deadpool 2”], and Donald, you know [“Solo: A Star Wars Story”]. So it’s nice that we’re traversing this land in our own lanes, but at the end of the day we’re going to come back together to really share that.”

Watch video of the interview above.

Read more of the Comedy/Drama/Actors Emmy issue here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stefani Robinson on Being the Only Female Writer on ‘Atlanta’: ‘It’s Really Bittersweet’

‘Atlanta’: ‘Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again’ for Alfred After ‘Woods,’ Brian Tyree Henry Says

‘Atlanta’ Shock: Donald Glover Plays Michael Jackson-Like Character in Whiteface

This story about Brian Tyree Henry first appeared in the Comedy/Drama/Actors issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

It’s an eat-or-be-eaten world out there, but that doesn’t mean you have to navigate it alone. That’s the lesson that Brian Tyree Henry’s character Alfred, a.k.a. the rising rapper Paper Boi, learned in the sophomore season of “Atlanta.”

“We all want to believe that we can make it alone, but we really can’t sometimes,” Henry said. “And so I think that Alfred was discovering that in a huge way this season.”

Over the 11 episodes, Henry delivered a nuanced performance as Alfred dealt with his rising fame and floundering manager, his cousin Earn (Donald Glover). “Ideally, you want to see your family excel, you want to be there with them, you want to push them forward, you want to walk beside them,” Henry said.

“And sometimes when things get in the way — new people, new circumstances, new environments — that kind of communication fizzles a little bit, when you should have been listening to the one thing that you know to be certain all along. And that’s the connection you have with your family members.”

In the season’s final episode, Alfred, Earn and Darius (Lakeith Stanfield) head to Europe for Paper Boi’s first tour. “You’re family,” Alfred tells Earn.

“I think that you realize along this route of celebrity, or, you know, notoriety, that sometimes you need to look to your left, look to your right, and make sure those people [are there]. And I think that’s definitely something that Alfred and Earn were discovering at the same time,” Henry said.

It’s a discovery that Henry found at the same time, too. When he looks to his left and right, it’s his “Atlanta” cast — which has become its own family — that holds him up. “I love that all of us in our own way are going through the same experience,” said Henry, who recently earned a Tony nomination for the Broadway revival of “Lobby Hero.”

“I mean, Lakeith is doing his movie [“Sorry to Bother You”], Zazie’s doing her thing [“Deadpool 2”], and Donald, you know [“Solo: A Star Wars Story”]. So it’s nice that we’re traversing this land in our own lanes, but at the end of the day we’re going to come back together to really share that.”

Watch video of the interview above.

Read more of the Comedy/Drama/Actors Emmy issue here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stefani Robinson on Being the Only Female Writer on 'Atlanta': 'It's Really Bittersweet'

'Atlanta': 'Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again' for Alfred After 'Woods,' Brian Tyree Henry Says

'Atlanta' Shock: Donald Glover Plays Michael Jackson-Like Character in Whiteface

Tony Awards 2018: The Complete Winners List (Updating)

“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” the hit two-part drama that follows up on J.K. Rowling’s beloved wizard franchise, dominated the 72nd annual Tony Awards on Sunday.

The two-part hit show, which broke the record in its London run by winning nine Olivier Awards, won early awards for director John Tiffany as well as for scenic, costume, lighting and sound design.

Among new musicals, The Tony Shalhoub-led “The Band’s Visit” emerged as an early favorite, picking up awards for director David Cromer, featured actor Ari’el Stachel, book writer Itamar Moses as well as for the show’s orchestrations, sound and lighting design.

Also Read: All 12 EGOT Winners, From Audrey Hepburn to Whoopi Goldberg (Photos)

Another revival, of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical “Carousel,” picked up early awards for featured actress Lindsay Mendez and choreographer Justin Peck.

Andrew Garfield and Nathan Lane kicked off  with wins for best actor and best featured actor in a play for the hit revival of Tony Kushner’s epic “Angels in America.”

Eighty-two-year-old Glenda Jackson and former “Roseanne” star Laurie Metcalf won the best and featured actresses prizes for “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” — Metcalf’s came one year after winning best actress in a play for “A Doll’s House, Part 2.”

Bruce Springsteen and John Leguizamo received special Tony Awards for their one-man shows this past season — Leguizamo’s “Latin History for Morons” also competed in the Best Play category.

The awards, presented by the Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, previously announced that actress Chita Rivera and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber will received lifetime achievement awards.

Music stars and past Tony nominees Sara Bareilles (“Waitress”) and Josh Groban (“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”) co-host this year’s ceremony, which was broadcast on CBS from Radio City Music Hall.

Also Read: Tony Awards 2018: See All the Red Carpet Looks (Photos)

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Best Play

“The Children” — Author: Lucy Kirkwood
“Farinelli and The King” — Author: Claire van Kampen;
“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” — Author: Jack Thorne
“Junk” — Author: Ayad Akhtar
“Latin History for Morons” — Author: John Leguizamo

Best Musical

“The Band’s Visit”
“Frozen”
“Mean Girls”
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

Best Revival of a Play

“Angels in America”
“Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
“Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
“Lobby Hero”
“Travesties”

Best Revival of a Musical

“My Fair Lady”
“Once On This Island”
“Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Also Read: 20 Stars Who Need Only a Tony to EGOT, From Julie Andrews to Kate Winslet (Photos)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Andrew Garfield, “Angels in America” – *WINNER*
Tom Hollander, “Travesties’
Jamie Parker, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Mark Rylance, “Farinelli and The King”
Denzel Washington, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Glenda Jackson, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” – *WINNER*
Condola Rashad, “Saint Joan”
Lauren Ridloff, “Children of a Lesser God”
Amy Schumer, “Meteor Shower”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Harry Hadden-Paton, “My Fair Lady”
Joshua Henry, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Band’s Visit”
Ethan Slater, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Lauren Ambrose, “My Fair Lady”
Hailey Kilgore, “Once on This Island”
LaChanze, “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical”
Katrina Lenk, “The Band’s Visit”
Taylor Louderman, “Mean Girls”
Jessie Mueller, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Anthony Boyle, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Michael Cera, “Lobby Hero”
Brian Tyree Henry, “Lobby Hero”
Nathan Lane, “Angels in America” – *WINNER*
David Morse, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Susan Brown, “Angels in America”
Noma Dumezweni, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Deborah Findlay, “The Children”
Denise Gough, “Angels in America”
Laurie Metcalf, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” – *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Norbert Leo Butz, “My Fair Lady”
Alexander Gemignani, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Grey Henson, “Mean Girls”
Gavin Lee, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Ari’el Stachel, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Ariana DeBose, “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical”
Renée Fleming, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Lindsay Mendez, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel” – *WINNER*
Ashley Park, “Mean Girls”
Diana Rigg, “My Fair Lady”

Also Read: 17 All-Time Great Tony Awards Performances, From ‘Dreamgirls’ to ‘Hamilton’ (Videos)

Best Direction of a Play

Marianne Elliott, “Angels in America”
Joe Mantello, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Patrick Marber, “Travesties’
John Tiffany, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
George C. Wolfe, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Direction of a Musical

Michael Arden, “Once on This Island”
David Cromer, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Tina Landau, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Casey Nicholaw, “Mean Girls”
Bartlett Sher, “My Fair Lady”

Best Book of a Musical

“The Band’s Visit,” Itamar Moses – *WINNER*
“Frozen,” Jennifer Lee
“Mean Girls,” Tina Fey
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical,” Kyle Jarrow

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre

“Angels in America,” Music: Adrian Sutton
“The Band’s Visit”, Music & Lyrics: David Yazbek
“Frozen,” Music & Lyrics: Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
“Mean Girls,” Music: Jeff Richmond and Lyrics: Nell Benjamin
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical” — Music & Lyrics: Yolanda Adams, Steven Tyler & Joe Perry of Aerosmith, Sara Bareilles, Jonathan Coulton, Alex Ebert of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, The Flaming Lips, Lady Antebellum, Cyndi Lauper & Rob Hyman, John Legend, Panic! at the Disco, Plain White T’s, They Might Be Giants, T.I., Domani & Lil’C

Best Choreography

Christopher Gattelli, “My Fair Lady”
Christopher Gattelli, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Steven Hoggett, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Casey Nicholaw, “Mean Girls”
Justin Peck, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel” – *WINNER*

Best Orchestrations

John Clancy, “Mean Girls”
Tom Kitt, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Annmarie Milazzo & Michael Starobin, “Once On This Island”
Jamshied Sharifi, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Jonathan Tunick, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Also Read: 17 Top-Grossing Broadway Musicals of All Time From ‘Hamilton’ to ‘The Lion King’ (Photos)

Best Scenic Design of a Play

Miriam Buether, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Jonathan Fensom, “Farinelli and The King”
Christine Jones, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Santo Loquasto, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
Ian MacNeil and Edward Pierce, “Angels in America”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Dane Laffrey, “Once on This Island”
Scott Pask, “The Band’s Visit”
Scott Pask, Finn Ross & Adam Young, “Mean Girls”
Michael Yeargan, “My Fair Lady”
David Zinn, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical” – *WINNER*

Best Costume Design of a Play

Jonathan Fensom, “Farinelli and The King”
Nicky Gillibrand, “Angels in America”
Katrina Lindsay, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Ann Roth, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Ann Roth, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Gregg Barnes, “Mean Girls”
Clint Ramos, “Once on This Island”
Ann Roth, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
David Zinn, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Catherine Zuber, “My Fair Lady” – *WINNER*

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Neil Austin, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Paule Constable, “Angels in America”
Jules Fisher + Peggy Eisenhauer, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
Paul Russell, “Farinelli and The King”
Ben Stanton, “Junk”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Kevin Adams, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Jules Fisher + Peggy Eisenhauer, “Once On This Island”
Donald Holder, “My Fair Lady”
Brian MacDevitt, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Tyler Micoleau, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*

Best Sound Design of a Play

Adam Cork, “Travesties”
Ian Dickinson for Autograph, “Angels in America”
Gareth Fry, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Tom Gibbons, “1984”
Dan Moses Schreier, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Sound Design of a Musical

Kai Harada, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Peter Hylenski, “Once On This Island”
Scott Lehrer, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Brian Ronan, “Mean Girls”
Walter Trarbach and Mike Dobson, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

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“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child,” the hit two-part drama that follows up on J.K. Rowling’s beloved wizard franchise, dominated the 72nd annual Tony Awards on Sunday.

The two-part hit show, which broke the record in its London run by winning nine Olivier Awards, won early awards for director John Tiffany as well as for scenic, costume, lighting and sound design.

Among new musicals, The Tony Shalhoub-led “The Band’s Visit” emerged as an early favorite, picking up awards for director David Cromer, featured actor Ari’el Stachel, book writer Itamar Moses as well as for the show’s orchestrations, sound and lighting design.

Another revival, of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical “Carousel,” picked up early awards for featured actress Lindsay Mendez and choreographer Justin Peck.

Andrew Garfield and Nathan Lane kicked off  with wins for best actor and best featured actor in a play for the hit revival of Tony Kushner’s epic “Angels in America.”

Eighty-two-year-old Glenda Jackson and former “Roseanne” star Laurie Metcalf won the best and featured actresses prizes for “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” — Metcalf’s came one year after winning best actress in a play for “A Doll’s House, Part 2.”

Bruce Springsteen and John Leguizamo received special Tony Awards for their one-man shows this past season — Leguizamo’s “Latin History for Morons” also competed in the Best Play category.

The awards, presented by the Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, previously announced that actress Chita Rivera and composer Andrew Lloyd Webber will received lifetime achievement awards.

Music stars and past Tony nominees Sara Bareilles (“Waitress”) and Josh Groban (“Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812”) co-host this year’s ceremony, which was broadcast on CBS from Radio City Music Hall.

Here’s the complete list of winners:

Best Play

“The Children” — Author: Lucy Kirkwood
“Farinelli and The King” — Author: Claire van Kampen;
“Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” — Author: Jack Thorne
“Junk” — Author: Ayad Akhtar
“Latin History for Morons” — Author: John Leguizamo

Best Musical

“The Band’s Visit”
“Frozen”
“Mean Girls”
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

Best Revival of a Play

“Angels in America”
“Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
“Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
“Lobby Hero”
“Travesties”

Best Revival of a Musical

“My Fair Lady”
“Once On This Island”
“Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play

Andrew Garfield, “Angels in America” – *WINNER*
Tom Hollander, “Travesties’
Jamie Parker, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Mark Rylance, “Farinelli and The King”
Denzel Washington, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Play

Glenda Jackson, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” – *WINNER*
Condola Rashad, “Saint Joan”
Lauren Ridloff, “Children of a Lesser God”
Amy Schumer, “Meteor Shower”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Musical

Harry Hadden-Paton, “My Fair Lady”
Joshua Henry, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Tony Shalhoub, “The Band’s Visit”
Ethan Slater, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Musical

Lauren Ambrose, “My Fair Lady”
Hailey Kilgore, “Once on This Island”
LaChanze, “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical”
Katrina Lenk, “The Band’s Visit”
Taylor Louderman, “Mean Girls”
Jessie Mueller, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Play

Anthony Boyle, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Michael Cera, “Lobby Hero”
Brian Tyree Henry, “Lobby Hero”
Nathan Lane, “Angels in America” – *WINNER*
David Morse, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Play

Susan Brown, “Angels in America”
Noma Dumezweni, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Deborah Findlay, “The Children”
Denise Gough, “Angels in America”
Laurie Metcalf, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women” – *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actor in a Featured Role in a Musical

Norbert Leo Butz, “My Fair Lady”
Alexander Gemignani, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Grey Henson, “Mean Girls”
Gavin Lee, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Ari’el Stachel, “The Band’s Visit” - *WINNER*

Best Performance by an Actress in a Featured Role in a Musical

Ariana DeBose, “Summer: The Donna Summer Musical”
Renée Fleming, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Lindsay Mendez, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel” - *WINNER*
Ashley Park, “Mean Girls”
Diana Rigg, “My Fair Lady”

Best Direction of a Play

Marianne Elliott, “Angels in America”
Joe Mantello, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Patrick Marber, “Travesties’
John Tiffany, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” - *WINNER*
George C. Wolfe, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Direction of a Musical

Michael Arden, “Once on This Island”
David Cromer, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Tina Landau, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Casey Nicholaw, “Mean Girls”
Bartlett Sher, “My Fair Lady”

Best Book of a Musical

“The Band’s Visit,” Itamar Moses - *WINNER*
“Frozen,” Jennifer Lee
“Mean Girls,” Tina Fey
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical,” Kyle Jarrow

Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre

“Angels in America,” Music: Adrian Sutton
“The Band’s Visit”, Music & Lyrics: David Yazbek
“Frozen,” Music & Lyrics: Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
“Mean Girls,” Music: Jeff Richmond and Lyrics: Nell Benjamin
“SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical” — Music & Lyrics: Yolanda Adams, Steven Tyler & Joe Perry of Aerosmith, Sara Bareilles, Jonathan Coulton, Alex Ebert of Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros, The Flaming Lips, Lady Antebellum, Cyndi Lauper & Rob Hyman, John Legend, Panic! at the Disco, Plain White T’s, They Might Be Giants, T.I., Domani & Lil’C

Best Choreography

Christopher Gattelli, “My Fair Lady”
Christopher Gattelli, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Steven Hoggett, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two”
Casey Nicholaw, “Mean Girls”
Justin Peck, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel” – *WINNER*

Best Orchestrations

John Clancy, “Mean Girls”
Tom Kitt, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Annmarie Milazzo & Michael Starobin, “Once On This Island”
Jamshied Sharifi, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Jonathan Tunick, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”

Best Scenic Design of a Play

Miriam Buether, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Jonathan Fensom, “Farinelli and The King”
Christine Jones, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Santo Loquasto, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
Ian MacNeil and Edward Pierce, “Angels in America”

Best Scenic Design of a Musical

Dane Laffrey, “Once on This Island”
Scott Pask, “The Band’s Visit”
Scott Pask, Finn Ross & Adam Young, “Mean Girls”
Michael Yeargan, “My Fair Lady”
David Zinn, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical” – *WINNER*

Best Costume Design of a Play

Jonathan Fensom, “Farinelli and The King”
Nicky Gillibrand, “Angels in America”
Katrina Lindsay, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Ann Roth, “Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women”
Ann Roth, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Costume Design of a Musical

Gregg Barnes, “Mean Girls”
Clint Ramos, “Once on This Island”
Ann Roth, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
David Zinn, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Catherine Zuber, “My Fair Lady” - *WINNER*

Best Lighting Design of a Play

Neil Austin, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” – *WINNER*
Paule Constable, “Angels in America”
Jules Fisher + Peggy Eisenhauer, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”
Paul Russell, “Farinelli and The King”
Ben Stanton, “Junk”

Best Lighting Design of a Musical

Kevin Adams, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”
Jules Fisher + Peggy Eisenhauer, “Once On This Island”
Donald Holder, “My Fair Lady”
Brian MacDevitt, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Tyler Micoleau, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*

Best Sound Design of a Play

Adam Cork, “Travesties”
Ian Dickinson for Autograph, “Angels in America”
Gareth Fry, “Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts One and Two” - *WINNER*
Tom Gibbons, “1984”
Dan Moses Schreier, “Eugene O’Neill’s The Iceman Cometh”

Best Sound Design of a Musical

Kai Harada, “The Band’s Visit” – *WINNER*
Peter Hylenski, “Once On This Island”
Scott Lehrer, “Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Carousel”
Brian Ronan, “Mean Girls”
Walter Trarbach and Mike Dobson, “SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical”

Related stories from TheWrap:

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‘Atlanta’ Renewed for Season 3 at FX

FX is taking you down South once more, as the cable network has renewed Donald Glover’s surreal dramedy “Atlanta” for a third season set to premiere in 2019. (No word on if Season 3 will have a modified title a la the sophomore installment’s moniker, “Robbin’ Season.”)

“‘Atlanta’ is phenomenal, achieving and exceeding what few television series have done,” Nick Grad said Thursday, while announcing the renewal with fellow president of original programming for FX Networks and FX Productions, Eric Schrier. “With ‘Atlanta Robbin’ Season,’ Donald and his collaborators elevated the series to even greater heights, building on the enormous success of their award-winning first season. We’re grateful to the producers and our extraordinary cast and crew for achieving this level of excellence, and we share the excitement with our audience about the third season knowing they will continue to take us to unexpected and thrilling places.”

Backed by FX Productions and created by Glover, “Atlanta” also stars Brian Tyree Henry, Lakeith Lee Stanfield and Zazie Beetz.

Also Read: Stefani Robinson on Being the Only Female Writer on ‘Atlanta’: ‘It’s Really Bittersweet’

The gap between Season 1 and Season 2 of “Atlanta” was substantial, with the FX series not returning from its first year wrap in the fall of 2017 until this March.

In the recently concluded second season, two cousins work through the Atlanta music scene in order to better their lives and the lives of their families. Earn Marks (Donald Glover) is a young manager trying to get his cousin’s career off the ground. Alfred Miles (Brian Tyree Henry) is a new hot rapper trying to understand the line between real life and street life. Darius (Lakeith Lee Stanfield) is Alfred’s right-hand man and visionary. Van (Zazie Beetz) is Earn’s best friend and the mother of Earn’s daughter.

The premiere of “Atlanta Robbin’ Season” was the top scripted comedy on basic cable in more than a year. The series’ first season earned two Emmys and two Golden Globes, grabbing a best comedy award at both shows and lead-actor trophies for Donald Glover.

Also Read: ‘Atlanta’ Writer-Producer Stefani Robinson Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

“Atlanta” is executive produced by Donald Glover, his younger brother Stephen Glover, Paul Simms, Dianne McGunigle, and Hiro Murai (who directed the majority of the episodes in the first two seasons).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stefani Robinson on Being the Only Female Writer on ‘Atlanta’: ‘It’s Really Bittersweet’

‘Atlanta’ Writer-Producer Stefani Robinson Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Who Is Hiro Murai? Meet Director Behind Donald Glover’s ‘This Is America’ and a Lot of ‘Atlanta’

‘Atlanta’: ‘Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again’ for Alfred After ‘Woods,’ Brian Tyree Henry Says

FX is taking you down South once more, as the cable network has renewed Donald Glover’s surreal dramedy “Atlanta” for a third season set to premiere in 2019. (No word on if Season 3 will have a modified title a la the sophomore installment’s moniker, “Robbin’ Season.”)

“‘Atlanta’ is phenomenal, achieving and exceeding what few television series have done,” Nick Grad said Thursday, while announcing the renewal with fellow president of original programming for FX Networks and FX Productions, Eric Schrier. “With ‘Atlanta Robbin’ Season,’ Donald and his collaborators elevated the series to even greater heights, building on the enormous success of their award-winning first season. We’re grateful to the producers and our extraordinary cast and crew for achieving this level of excellence, and we share the excitement with our audience about the third season knowing they will continue to take us to unexpected and thrilling places.”

Backed by FX Productions and created by Glover, “Atlanta” also stars Brian Tyree Henry, Lakeith Lee Stanfield and Zazie Beetz.

The gap between Season 1 and Season 2 of “Atlanta” was substantial, with the FX series not returning from its first year wrap in the fall of 2017 until this March.

In the recently concluded second season, two cousins work through the Atlanta music scene in order to better their lives and the lives of their families. Earn Marks (Donald Glover) is a young manager trying to get his cousin’s career off the ground. Alfred Miles (Brian Tyree Henry) is a new hot rapper trying to understand the line between real life and street life. Darius (Lakeith Lee Stanfield) is Alfred’s right-hand man and visionary. Van (Zazie Beetz) is Earn’s best friend and the mother of Earn’s daughter.

The premiere of “Atlanta Robbin’ Season” was the top scripted comedy on basic cable in more than a year. The series’ first season earned two Emmys and two Golden Globes, grabbing a best comedy award at both shows and lead-actor trophies for Donald Glover.

“Atlanta” is executive produced by Donald Glover, his younger brother Stephen Glover, Paul Simms, Dianne McGunigle, and Hiro Murai (who directed the majority of the episodes in the first two seasons).

Related stories from TheWrap:

Stefani Robinson on Being the Only Female Writer on 'Atlanta': 'It's Really Bittersweet'

'Atlanta' Writer-Producer Stefani Robinson Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

Who Is Hiro Murai? Meet Director Behind Donald Glover's 'This Is America' and a Lot of 'Atlanta'

'Atlanta': 'Nothing Can Ever Be The Same Again' for Alfred After 'Woods,' Brian Tyree Henry Says