Anita Hill: Joe Biden ‘Hasn’t Apologized to Me’ for Handling of Thomas Hearings

Professor Anita Hill says time is long past for a personal apology from former Vice President Joe Biden, over how things went when she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991 that she had been sexually harassed by then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Biden, considered a potential candidate for president in 2020, chaired the committee during the hearings to confirm Thomas’ nomination to the high court, and has since been frequently criticized for the way Hill was treated during her testimony. A year ago during Glamour’s Women of the Year summit, Biden said that he was “so sorry that she had to go through what she went through” during the hearings, and later told Teen Vogue that “I owe her an apology” for not doing more to rein in attacks on her character by Republican members of the committee.

“He said he apologized, but he hasn’t apologized to me,” Hill said amid frequent applause and two standing ovations during USC Dornsife’s “From Social Movement to Social Impact: Putting an End to Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” event Thursday afternoon.

Also Read: Anita Hill Vows to Do What the Government Won’t: ‘The Down and Dirty Work of Changing Culture’ (Video)

“The statute of limitations has run on an apology. I don’t need an apology,” Hill continued. And yet. “But sometimes when the doorbell rings, and I am not expecting anyone, I think, could that be Joe Biden?” she joked, provoking roars of laughter from the audience of students and professors.

Biden, Hill says, keeps saying he “could have done more” to support her testimony in 1991, such as calling her supporting witnesses. Her retort now: “Yes, you could have!”

Representatives for Biden did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TheWrap.

Hill also criticized the decision by Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, despite Prof. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers. “It was a political decision,” Hill said of Collins’s vote. “I would have respected her more if she said, ‘this is a political decision.’”

Also Read: Anita Hill Calls on Hollywood to Make ‘Tangible Commitments’ to Address Harassment and Equality Goals

Hill was troubled by Collins’s proclamation that Ford did not know who attacked her, and Collins’s statement that she is “100% sure” it was not Kavanaugh. “I resented that Sen. Susan Collins would tell Dr. Christine Blasey Ford that [the senator] would know who [Ford’s] assailant was better than [Ford] did,” Hill said.

Hill also criticized Collins for suggesting that the standard of “innocent until proven guilty” was the correct standard for Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings. That high standard is an important protection for criminal defendants, Hill said, but Collins “debased” that protection by saying the rule applied to a political process.

What kind of questions would Hill have asked Kavanaugh had she been on the Judiciary Committee when he testified? “How do you view your power? Do you view it is something that can be used as a weapon? Or do you use it as something that should be shared?” she said.

Also Read: Anita Hill Calls on Men to ‘Step Up’ in #MeToo Era: ‘There Are No Innocent Bystanders’ (Video)

Hill added that she thinks much has improved in terms of the courts and society recognizing that sexual harassment is harmful and against the law, but says there is still much work to be done, such as exploring how sexual assault impacts the lives of transgender women of color and others who are not the stereotypical image of a rape victim – a young, attractive, white woman.

Sexual assault, she said, “should be treated as a public health issue, a public safety issue, a business issue, and a civil rights issue.”

Hill is a professor of social policy, law, and women’s studies at Brandeis University.

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Professor Anita Hill says time is long past for a personal apology from former Vice President Joe Biden, over how things went when she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 1991 that she had been sexually harassed by then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Biden, considered a potential candidate for president in 2020, chaired the committee during the hearings to confirm Thomas’ nomination to the high court, and has since been frequently criticized for the way Hill was treated during her testimony. A year ago during Glamour’s Women of the Year summit, Biden said that he was “so sorry that she had to go through what she went through” during the hearings, and later told Teen Vogue that “I owe her an apology” for not doing more to rein in attacks on her character by Republican members of the committee.

“He said he apologized, but he hasn’t apologized to me,” Hill said amid frequent applause and two standing ovations during USC Dornsife’s “From Social Movement to Social Impact: Putting an End to Sexual Harassment in the Workplace” event Thursday afternoon.

“The statute of limitations has run on an apology. I don’t need an apology,” Hill continued. And yet. “But sometimes when the doorbell rings, and I am not expecting anyone, I think, could that be Joe Biden?” she joked, provoking roars of laughter from the audience of students and professors.

Biden, Hill says, keeps saying he “could have done more” to support her testimony in 1991, such as calling her supporting witnesses. Her retort now: “Yes, you could have!”

Representatives for Biden did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TheWrap.

Hill also criticized the decision by Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine to confirm Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, despite Prof. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers. “It was a political decision,” Hill said of Collins’s vote. “I would have respected her more if she said, ‘this is a political decision.'”

Hill was troubled by Collins’s proclamation that Ford did not know who attacked her, and Collins’s statement that she is “100% sure” it was not Kavanaugh. “I resented that Sen. Susan Collins would tell Dr. Christine Blasey Ford that [the senator] would know who [Ford’s] assailant was better than [Ford] did,” Hill said.

Hill also criticized Collins for suggesting that the standard of “innocent until proven guilty” was the correct standard for Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings. That high standard is an important protection for criminal defendants, Hill said, but Collins “debased” that protection by saying the rule applied to a political process.

What kind of questions would Hill have asked Kavanaugh had she been on the Judiciary Committee when he testified? “How do you view your power? Do you view it is something that can be used as a weapon? Or do you use it as something that should be shared?” she said.

Hill added that she thinks much has improved in terms of the courts and society recognizing that sexual harassment is harmful and against the law, but says there is still much work to be done, such as exploring how sexual assault impacts the lives of transgender women of color and others who are not the stereotypical image of a rape victim – a young, attractive, white woman.

Sexual assault, she said, “should be treated as a public health issue, a public safety issue, a business issue, and a civil rights issue.”

Hill is a professor of social policy, law, and women’s studies at Brandeis University.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Google Workers Walk Out Globally Over Handling of Sexual Harassment

Vice Media President Andrew Creighton Steps Down After Sexual Harassment Accusation

Former 'Home & Family' Chef Says She Was Fired for Reporting Sexual Harassment

Google Fired 48 Workers for Sexual Harassment in Last 2 Years

Nicole Kidman Says Marriage to Tom Cruise Protected Her From Sexual Harassment

Anita Hill Vows to Do What the Government Won’t: ‘The Down and Dirty Work of Changing Culture’

Anita Hill vowed Friday to do what she says the government won’t: to embrace the “down an dirty work of changing culture” by fighting for gender equality and the end of sexual harassment.

Hill’s lack of faith in lawmakers is understandable: The Senate approved Clarence Thomas’ nomination to the Supreme Court in 1991 despite her testimony that he sexually harassed her. She was disgusted to see another nominee accused of sexual misconduct, Brett Kavanaugh, confirmed to the court in September.

“We at the commission, which is what I’m chairing this year, are about changing the cultures and environments that the entertainment industry works in,” Hill said at TheWrap’s Power Women Summit in Los Angeles on Friday. She leads the  Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, which is funded by some of the most powerful women in Hollywood.

“We are about putting into place policies that will actually bring about changes immediately, that will allow opportunities for people to hear, set up systems where we can report complaints and know they were thoroughly vetted and investigated, not only in an impartial way but also in a way that’s informed about knowledge of trauma… What we are trying to do is to create the kind of cultures where everybody takes responsibility for what’s going on and ending sexual misconduct,” she said.

Hill added: “It can’t all be placed upon the lapse of the people who are the most vulnerable and who are the targets of the misconduct. We must understand that everyone has a responsibility to end the awful and heinous behavior that so many people describe and we know exist.”

The summit gathered together 1,500 women in the entertainment and media industries. Hill said the commission includes studios, agencies, guilds, unions and academies, and that the commission’s goal is to make sure employers understand the burden us on them to improve.

“They need to understand that the problem isn’t that we complain about sexual harassment, the problem is that sexual harassment and abuse exists. We have started with information gathering,” she said. “We are not talking about that is going to make a lot of headlines. This is the down and dirty work of changing culture and putting in place rules and policies and practices that will last for generations — we hope.”

Also Read: Anita Hill, Barbara Boxer, HAIM, Sherry Lansing, Zoe Saldana, Jill Soloway Lead TheWrap’s Power Women Summit

Hill became a national figure in 1991 when she accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, who was her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, of sexual harassment.

Hill said 27 years ago that Thomas sexually harassed her repeatedly when he was her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She felt a kinship with Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of trying to rape her when they were in high school.

“She spoke so eloquently and movingly not only for herself but for so many of us and especially for the 1 of 6 women — those statistics don’t cover all of us — who have already been sexually assaulted or the 1 in 3 women age 18 to 24 who will become victims of assault,” Hill said. “Unfortunately, she was met with the same kind of resistance and indifference that all of us feel when we step forward and tell the truth of our experience. It is discouraging and depressing, but rest assured I have been on this path for 27 years and I will not retreat now.”

Hill also spoke about equality in the workplace and in education, and said it is important that women can “live free of sexual violence.”

“We must make unequivocally clear, even if the government isn’t prepared to protect women from sexual violence, we are,” she told the crowd. “We will do it ourselves. We deserve to work in harassment-free workplaces, and we deserve to have an equal chance to display our very talents throughout these industries, and throughout workplaces all over. These are not privileges that should be limited to men — these are rights we all have.”

She added: “Gender equality can’t be parsed out, and people can’t be partially equal. It’s all or nothing. It has to be whole, it has to be complete, it had to be radical.”

Also Read: Alyssa Milano: Voting Is ‘How We Protect Each Other’

Before Hill took the stage, civil rights activist and founder of the #MeToo movement Tarana Burke took part in a tribute to sexual harassment and assault survivors alongside actress Mira Sorvino, who has accused Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and derailing her career.

“The world needs to understand the life cycle of a survivor,” Burke said. “I still cry uncomfortably at things, I’m still triggered, and that’s just the reality. When the Dr. Ford testimony happened, people don’t talk enough about what survival looks like. I have to get up every day to decide to survive. There are some days where I say, I can’t do it today.”

She added, “It’s not about being bold and brave — it’s about resilience. This is what we’re doing — we’re bouncing back, every day.”

Sorvino, who said she wants to work with programs that focus on the youth so that young men growing up will not “engage in this misconduct,” explained that “harassment is the gateway drug to sexual violence.”

Sorvino and Burke then welcomed women to the stage who have come forward about their abuse and harassment experiences. Jessica Barth, Melissa Schuman and Rosanna Arquette were among the women to step onto the stage.

Just a few days before the historic midterm election, the focus of the summit is to achieve gender equity in Hollywood, with the theme, “The Road to 50/50 By 2020.”

The summit is the largest gathering ever assembled of the most influential women in entertainment and media, attended and supported by studios, news organizations and non-profits across the entertainment industry landscape. It is presented by the WrapWomen Foundation, a division of TheWrap News.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why We Created the Power Women Summit – The Road to 50/50 by 2020

David Oyelowo Joins TheWrap’s Power Women Summit to Talk Men’s Role in Gender Equity

Anita Hill, Barbara Boxer, HAIM, Sherry Lansing, Zoe Saldana, Jill Soloway Lead TheWrap’s Power Women Summit

Anita Hill vowed Friday to do what she says the government won’t: to embrace the “down an dirty work of changing culture” by fighting for gender equality and the end of sexual harassment.

Hill’s lack of faith in lawmakers is understandable: The Senate approved Clarence Thomas’ nomination to the Supreme Court in 1991 despite her testimony that he sexually harassed her. She was disgusted to see another nominee accused of sexual misconduct, Brett Kavanaugh, confirmed to the court in September.

“We at the commission, which is what I’m chairing this year, are about changing the cultures and environments that the entertainment industry works in,” Hill said at TheWrap’s Power Women Summit in Los Angeles on Friday. She leads the  Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, which is funded by some of the most powerful women in Hollywood.

“We are about putting into place policies that will actually bring about changes immediately, that will allow opportunities for people to hear, set up systems where we can report complaints and know they were thoroughly vetted and investigated, not only in an impartial way but also in a way that’s informed about knowledge of trauma… What we are trying to do is to create the kind of cultures where everybody takes responsibility for what’s going on and ending sexual misconduct,” she said.

Hill added: “It can’t all be placed upon the lapse of the people who are the most vulnerable and who are the targets of the misconduct. We must understand that everyone has a responsibility to end the awful and heinous behavior that so many people describe and we know exist.”

The summit gathered together 1,500 women in the entertainment and media industries. Hill said the commission includes studios, agencies, guilds, unions and academies, and that the commission’s goal is to make sure employers understand the burden us on them to improve.

“They need to understand that the problem isn’t that we complain about sexual harassment, the problem is that sexual harassment and abuse exists. We have started with information gathering,” she said. “We are not talking about that is going to make a lot of headlines. This is the down and dirty work of changing culture and putting in place rules and policies and practices that will last for generations — we hope.”

Hill became a national figure in 1991 when she accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, who was her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, of sexual harassment.

Hill said 27 years ago that Thomas sexually harassed her repeatedly when he was her supervisor at the U.S. Department of Education and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She felt a kinship with Christine Blasey Ford, who accused Kavanaugh of trying to rape her when they were in high school.

“She spoke so eloquently and movingly not only for herself but for so many of us and especially for the 1 of 6 women — those statistics don’t cover all of us — who have already been sexually assaulted or the 1 in 3 women age 18 to 24 who will become victims of assault,” Hill said. “Unfortunately, she was met with the same kind of resistance and indifference that all of us feel when we step forward and tell the truth of our experience. It is discouraging and depressing, but rest assured I have been on this path for 27 years and I will not retreat now.”

Hill also spoke about equality in the workplace and in education, and said it is important that women can “live free of sexual violence.”

“We must make unequivocally clear, even if the government isn’t prepared to protect women from sexual violence, we are,” she told the crowd. “We will do it ourselves. We deserve to work in harassment-free workplaces, and we deserve to have an equal chance to display our very talents throughout these industries, and throughout workplaces all over. These are not privileges that should be limited to men — these are rights we all have.”

She added: “Gender equality can’t be parsed out, and people can’t be partially equal. It’s all or nothing. It has to be whole, it has to be complete, it had to be radical.”

Before Hill took the stage, civil rights activist and founder of the #MeToo movement Tarana Burke took part in a tribute to sexual harassment and assault survivors alongside actress Mira Sorvino, who has accused Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and derailing her career.

“The world needs to understand the life cycle of a survivor,” Burke said. “I still cry uncomfortably at things, I’m still triggered, and that’s just the reality. When the Dr. Ford testimony happened, people don’t talk enough about what survival looks like. I have to get up every day to decide to survive. There are some days where I say, I can’t do it today.”

She added, “It’s not about being bold and brave — it’s about resilience. This is what we’re doing — we’re bouncing back, every day.”

Sorvino, who said she wants to work with programs that focus on the youth so that young men growing up will not “engage in this misconduct,” explained that “harassment is the gateway drug to sexual violence.”

Sorvino and Burke then welcomed women to the stage who have come forward about their abuse and harassment experiences. Jessica Barth, Melissa Schuman and Rosanna Arquette were among the women to step onto the stage.

Just a few days before the historic midterm election, the focus of the summit is to achieve gender equity in Hollywood, with the theme, “The Road to 50/50 By 2020.”

The summit is the largest gathering ever assembled of the most influential women in entertainment and media, attended and supported by studios, news organizations and non-profits across the entertainment industry landscape. It is presented by the WrapWomen Foundation, a division of TheWrap News.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Why We Created the Power Women Summit – The Road to 50/50 by 2020

David Oyelowo Joins TheWrap's Power Women Summit to Talk Men's Role in Gender Equity

Anita Hill, Barbara Boxer, HAIM, Sherry Lansing, Zoe Saldana, Jill Soloway Lead TheWrap's Power Women Summit

Shedding Light On ‘Dark Money’: Kimberly Reed’s Doc Exposes Secret Corporate Cash Flooding Election Campaigns

Suspense is building as the midterm elections near, with control of the House and Senate—and possibly the fate of American democracy—hanging in the balance. The outcome remains unclear but one race is hardly in doubt: In the contest to infl…

Suspense is building as the midterm elections near, with control of the House and Senate—and possibly the fate of American democracy—hanging in the balance. The outcome remains unclear but one race is hardly in doubt: In the contest to influence election results, "dark money" is winning. Kimberly Reed's film Dark Money, nominated as best documentary for the IDA Awards and the Critics' Choice Documentary Awards, explores the way untraceable cash from anonymous…

Emily Ratajkowski Talks Getting Arrested With Amy Schumer (Video)

Early last month, Emily Ratajkowski and Amy Schumer were detained by Washington, D.C. police while protesting the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. On Wednesday, a Halloweened-up Ratajkowski recalled the experience for Jimmy Kimmel.

“I had just landed from Europe and … I got this text message [that] was like, ‘Hey, want to get arrested with me this week?’” Ratajkowski recalled. “I knew, obviously, what she was referring to because [she] had been updating us on the Kavanaugh hearings.”

Ratajskowski was in.

Also Read: Here’s the Penalty Amy Schumer and Emily Ratajkowski Will Face for Arrest at Anti-Kavanaugh Protest

Though the duo planned to get arrested, they didn’t prepare for it — and it was HOT in D.C. that day.

“Amy is pregnant, which is amazing, but no one knew at that point,” Ratajkowski said. “We were detained for four hours, sitting outside on the ground. And she keeps going to the bathroom and everyone’s kind of looking at her — the guys, the police, the Capital Police — were like, ‘Why does this lady need to keep going to the bathroom?’”

Watch the video above.

Also Read: Ben Stiller, Amy Schumer and Other Hollywood Stars React to ‘Great Tragedy’ of Pittsburgh Shooting

Ratajkowski’s and Schumer’s misdemeanor crime, unlawfully demonstrating in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building, carried just a $50 fine. A Capitol Police spokeswoman told TheWrap that 293 individuals were arrested for the offense.

Another nine were arrested for “unlawful demonstration activities” on the fourth floor of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. All were charged with “Crowding, Obstructing, or Incommoding.”

Ratajkowski’s new movie “Welcome Home” is available now on DirecTV and opens in theaters Nov. 16.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer, Emily Ratajkowski Detained During Kavanaugh Protest in Washington DC

Emily Ratajkowski Gets Naked, People Get Angry: A Puzzling Timeline (Photos)

Emily Ratajkowski Is a ‘Global Bimbo,’ Piers Morgan Says

Emily Ratajkowski Lingerie Pasta Photos Spark Sick Reaction From Piers Morgan

Early last month, Emily Ratajkowski and Amy Schumer were detained by Washington, D.C. police while protesting the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh. On Wednesday, a Halloweened-up Ratajkowski recalled the experience for Jimmy Kimmel.

“I had just landed from Europe and … I got this text message [that] was like, ‘Hey, want to get arrested with me this week?'” Ratajkowski recalled. “I knew, obviously, what she was referring to because [she] had been updating us on the Kavanaugh hearings.”

Ratajskowski was in.

Though the duo planned to get arrested, they didn’t prepare for it — and it was HOT in D.C. that day.

“Amy is pregnant, which is amazing, but no one knew at that point,” Ratajkowski said. “We were detained for four hours, sitting outside on the ground. And she keeps going to the bathroom and everyone’s kind of looking at her — the guys, the police, the Capital Police — were like, ‘Why does this lady need to keep going to the bathroom?'”

Watch the video above.

Ratajkowski’s and Schumer’s misdemeanor crime, unlawfully demonstrating in the atrium of the Hart Senate Office Building, carried just a $50 fine. A Capitol Police spokeswoman told TheWrap that 293 individuals were arrested for the offense.

Another nine were arrested for “unlawful demonstration activities” on the fourth floor of the Dirksen Senate Office Building. All were charged with “Crowding, Obstructing, or Incommoding.”

Ratajkowski’s new movie “Welcome Home” is available now on DirecTV and opens in theaters Nov. 16.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Amy Schumer, Emily Ratajkowski Detained During Kavanaugh Protest in Washington DC

Emily Ratajkowski Gets Naked, People Get Angry: A Puzzling Timeline (Photos)

Emily Ratajkowski Is a 'Global Bimbo,' Piers Morgan Says

Emily Ratajkowski Lingerie Pasta Photos Spark Sick Reaction From Piers Morgan

Donald Trump Campaigns in Houston For “Beautiful Ted” Cruz

“In just 15 days the people of Texas are going to re-elect a man who has become a really good friend of mine,” President Donald Trump said as he campaigned in Houston for Sen. Ted Cruz – a man he once labeled a liar and the son of a possible presidential assassin.
“You know we had our little difficulties. But, actually, if you remember, at the beginning, it was a love fest,” Trump said, glossing over their “Lyin’ Ted” phase and their “Donald, leave Heidi the hell alone!”…

"In just 15 days the people of Texas are going to re-elect a man who has become a really good friend of mine," President Donald Trump said as he campaigned in Houston for Sen. Ted Cruz – a man he once labeled a liar and the son of a possible presidential assassin. "You know we had our little difficulties. But, actually, if you remember, at the beginning, it was a love fest," Trump said, glossing over their “Lyin’ Ted” phase and their “Donald, leave Heidi the hell alone!”…

Colbert: If Trump Wants Women to Vote Republican He Should Maybe Stop Insulting Them (Video)

Stephen Colbert began his monologue on “The Late Show” Friday night by reminding viewers that the show will be doing a rare live broadcast on the night of the midterm elections on Nov. 6, before sliding into a look at what exactly might be the downfall of Republicans in the House of Representatives.

“Everybody is excited the midterms are 18 days away. Eighteen days away right now. I am giddy with deep concern, because this is America’s first real chance to wash the taste of Trump’s victory out of our mouths,” Colbert joked, grimly. “It’s dark. It’s a dark, earthy taste. It’s mushroom-y, even. It’s really not a great taste. Rinse twice.”

Colbert then noted why things look optimistic for the Democrats.

Also Read: Seth Meyers Returns to ‘SNL’ Weekend Update, Colin Jost Blames Him for Trump Presidency (Video)

“If the Republicans do lose the House of Representatives, it could be because of their continued, passionate support for men credibly accused of sexual assault,” Colbert said. “Surprise: that’s driving away women voters. Polls show, women prefer Democrats 63 percent to 33 percent. 63 to 33, 30 points.

“And, remember, women make up over half of the country. A little tip to Republicans: if you’re going to pick on a minority, make sure they’re not the majority.”

That current major disadvantage, of course, did not stop Trump from being as condescending as possible about which way women will go in upcoming elections.

Also Read: ‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Trump Returns to Have Lunch With Kanye – ‘He’s Black Me!’ (Video)

“Trump’s trying to win back suburban, college-educated women,” Colbert said, “tweeting, ‘College- educated women want safety, security, and healthcare protections — very much along with financial and economic health for themselves and our Country. I supply all of this far better than any Democrat (for decades, actually). That’s why they will be voting for me!’

“Did Trump just try to mansplain the midterms to women? ‘Look, look, ladies, I know you don’t like me, but here’s why you’re wrong — shhh, I’m talking. I gave you safety and security. For instance, I put Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court. Now he’s too busy to whip it out at parties.’ “

Colbert then continued with another example of something Trump tweeted this week that almost definitely did not help his cause with women.

Also Read: Omarosa Calls Trump and Ivanka Relationship ‘Awkward,’ ‘Disgusting’ on ‘Real Time’

“There could be another reason women are upset with the President of the United States — it seems like he’s constantly insulting them,” Colbert said. “For instance, earlier this week, when he took to Twitter to call Stormy Daniels ‘horseface.’ Horseface? Sir, sticks and stones may break your bones, but words can never un-spank you.

“Shockingly, the president actually put some thought into his thoughtless insult. The Daily Beast is reporting that the president thought it was strategically smart to go after Stormy Daniels in such a visceral way, and he even workshopped the insult prior to tweeting it. He workshopped it! What were the ones that were rejected? ‘Okay, guys, okay, guys, North Korea can wait. Listen up. Okay, what do you think of donkey neck? Chicken torso? Hold on. Armadillo butt?’ “

You can watch this portion of Colbert’s monologue on Friday’s episode of “The Late Show” in the video embedded at the top of this post.

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‘SNL’: Alec Baldwin’s Trump Returns to Have Lunch With Kanye – ‘He’s Black Me!’ (Video)

Stephen Colbert began his monologue on “The Late Show” Friday night by reminding viewers that the show will be doing a rare live broadcast on the night of the midterm elections on Nov. 6, before sliding into a look at what exactly might be the downfall of Republicans in the House of Representatives.

“Everybody is excited the midterms are 18 days away. Eighteen days away right now. I am giddy with deep concern, because this is America’s first real chance to wash the taste of Trump’s victory out of our mouths,” Colbert joked, grimly. “It’s dark. It’s a dark, earthy taste. It’s mushroom-y, even. It’s really not a great taste. Rinse twice.”

Colbert then noted why things look optimistic for the Democrats.

“If the Republicans do lose the House of Representatives, it could be because of their continued, passionate support for men credibly accused of sexual assault,” Colbert said. “Surprise: that’s driving away women voters. Polls show, women prefer Democrats 63 percent to 33 percent. 63 to 33, 30 points.

“And, remember, women make up over half of the country. A little tip to Republicans: if you’re going to pick on a minority, make sure they’re not the majority.”

That current major disadvantage, of course, did not stop Trump from being as condescending as possible about which way women will go in upcoming elections.

“Trump’s trying to win back suburban, college-educated women,” Colbert said, “tweeting, ‘College- educated women want safety, security, and healthcare protections — very much along with financial and economic health for themselves and our Country. I supply all of this far better than any Democrat (for decades, actually). That’s why they will be voting for me!’

“Did Trump just try to mansplain the midterms to women? ‘Look, look, ladies, I know you don’t like me, but here’s why you’re wrong — shhh, I’m talking. I gave you safety and security. For instance, I put Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court. Now he’s too busy to whip it out at parties.’ “

Colbert then continued with another example of something Trump tweeted this week that almost definitely did not help his cause with women.

“There could be another reason women are upset with the President of the United States — it seems like he’s constantly insulting them,” Colbert said. “For instance, earlier this week, when he took to Twitter to call Stormy Daniels ‘horseface.’ Horseface? Sir, sticks and stones may break your bones, but words can never un-spank you.

“Shockingly, the president actually put some thought into his thoughtless insult. The Daily Beast is reporting that the president thought it was strategically smart to go after Stormy Daniels in such a visceral way, and he even workshopped the insult prior to tweeting it. He workshopped it! What were the ones that were rejected? ‘Okay, guys, okay, guys, North Korea can wait. Listen up. Okay, what do you think of donkey neck? Chicken torso? Hold on. Armadillo butt?’ “

You can watch this portion of Colbert’s monologue on Friday’s episode of “The Late Show” in the video embedded at the top of this post.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Wilson Fisk Gives a Very Trump-esque Speech in 'Daredevil' Season 3

Michael Rapaport Tramples Trump Over 'Horseface' Insult: 'Have You Not Looked at Your Kids Lately?' (Video)

Seth Meyers Returns to 'SNL' Weekend Update, Colin Jost Blames Him for Trump Presidency (Video)

'SNL': Alec Baldwin's Trump Returns to Have Lunch With Kanye – 'He's Black Me!' (Video)

A Kavanaugh Book Is Already On The Way So We Can Relive The Confirmation Drama All Over Again

Mere weeks after the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, a book documenting his excruciating nomination process is already in the works.

“I have some news,” said Washington Post columnist and deputy editorial page editor Ruth Marcus earlier this week. “Washington Post deputy editorial page editor, is writing a book about Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation. The book is being published by Simon & Schuster.”

I have some news:
Good Thursday afternoon. BOOK ALERT: RUTH MARCUS, Washington Post deputy editorial page editor, is writing a book about Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation. The book is being published by Simon & Schuster.

— Ruth Marcus (@RuthMarcus) October 11, 2018

Also Read: Protestors Interrupt Final Kavanaugh Vote With Shouts

It’s unclear when the tome may hit bookshelves. A rep for Simon & Schuster did not immediately respond to request for comment on the matter.

For anyone in need of a refresher, Judge Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed as Justice Kavanaugh on October 6 in a contentious 50-48 vote. Senators voted mostly party line with the exceptions of West Virginia Democratic Joe Manchin who voted to confirm and Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski, who voted “present” at the final roll.

For weeks the final vote lay in the balance as Kavanaugh faced a wall of Democratic opposition and several wavering Republicans. In September, Kavanaugh was hit with allegations from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford that he has sexually assaulted her while drunk at a party in the early 1980.

“Brett groped me and tried to take off my clothes. He had a hard time because he was so drunk,” Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee in a dramatic statement. “I believed he was going to rape me. I tried to yell for help. When I did, Brett put his hand over my mouth to stop me from screaming. This was what terrified me the most.”

Kavanaugh offered a strenuous denial to the same committee the very same day, and continues to deny the accusation.

As more women came forward — including one person represented by Michael Avenatti who accused Kavanaugh of participating in “gang rape,” an accusation Kavanaugh also firmly denies — Senators launched an FBI investigation into the matter. After initially applauding the decision, Democrats later accused Republicans of circumscribing the probe and cutting off the bureau from investigating key witnesses.

The final vote was not sealed until the day before his confirmation when Sen. Susan Collins of Maine announced that she believed Brett Kavanaugh and she would join her Republicans colleagues and vote for him.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘South Park’ Goes After Brett Kavanaugh Hearing in Episode With Mr Hankey on Trial (Video)

Kavanaugh Confirmation Lifts Fox News to Most-Watched Saturday Primetime Since 2003 Iraq War

John Oliver Calls Kavanaugh Appointment a ‘Shameless Commitment to Bad Faith Arguments’ (Video)

‘Late Show’ Writer Regrets Saying She Was ‘Glad We Ruined Brett Kavanaugh’s Life’

Mere weeks after the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, a book documenting his excruciating nomination process is already in the works.

“I have some news,” said Washington Post columnist and deputy editorial page editor Ruth Marcus earlier this week. “Washington Post deputy editorial page editor, is writing a book about Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court confirmation. The book is being published by Simon & Schuster.”

It’s unclear when the tome may hit bookshelves. A rep for Simon & Schuster did not immediately respond to request for comment on the matter.

For anyone in need of a refresher, Judge Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed as Justice Kavanaugh on October 6 in a contentious 50-48 vote. Senators voted mostly party line with the exceptions of West Virginia Democratic Joe Manchin who voted to confirm and Alaska Republican Lisa Murkowski, who voted “present” at the final roll.

For weeks the final vote lay in the balance as Kavanaugh faced a wall of Democratic opposition and several wavering Republicans. In September, Kavanaugh was hit with allegations from Dr. Christine Blasey Ford that he has sexually assaulted her while drunk at a party in the early 1980.

“Brett groped me and tried to take off my clothes. He had a hard time because he was so drunk,” Ford told the Senate Judiciary Committee in a dramatic statement. “I believed he was going to rape me. I tried to yell for help. When I did, Brett put his hand over my mouth to stop me from screaming. This was what terrified me the most.”

Kavanaugh offered a strenuous denial to the same committee the very same day, and continues to deny the accusation.

As more women came forward — including one person represented by Michael Avenatti who accused Kavanaugh of participating in “gang rape,” an accusation Kavanaugh also firmly denies — Senators launched an FBI investigation into the matter. After initially applauding the decision, Democrats later accused Republicans of circumscribing the probe and cutting off the bureau from investigating key witnesses.

The final vote was not sealed until the day before his confirmation when Sen. Susan Collins of Maine announced that she believed Brett Kavanaugh and she would join her Republicans colleagues and vote for him.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'South Park' Goes After Brett Kavanaugh Hearing in Episode With Mr Hankey on Trial (Video)

Kavanaugh Confirmation Lifts Fox News to Most-Watched Saturday Primetime Since 2003 Iraq War

John Oliver Calls Kavanaugh Appointment a 'Shameless Commitment to Bad Faith Arguments' (Video)

'Late Show' Writer Regrets Saying She Was 'Glad We Ruined Brett Kavanaugh's Life'

‘South Park’ Trolls ‘The Simpsons’ in ‘The Problem With a Poo’ Episode Twist Ending (Video)

It may not come as a surprise that a “South Park” episode titled “The Problem With a Poo” included a shot at “The Simpsons,” which has been criticized lately for it’s long-running Indian caricature-character Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, most notably in documentary “The Problem With Apu.” But how Wednesday’s Comedy Central half-hour actually ended might jolt your system a bit.

“The Problem With a Poo” centered on Mr. Hankey the Christmas Poo, who is a talking piece of poo in a Santa Claus hat that’s been in and out of “South Park” since the very beginning. In a hearing meant to mock Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination testimony, Mr. Hankey defended offensive tweets he posted.

The whole circus really turned into a Kavanugh-Roseanne Barr hybrid joke when the literal piece of crap blamed Ambien for his unkind social media posts. Yeah, the cast-off “Roseanne” star did that in real life.

Also Read: Catholic League President Calls ‘South Park’ Creators ‘Cowards’ Over ‘A Boy and a Priest’ Episode

At the end of last night’s episode, Mr. Hankey was sent packing from the lovely little town of South Park, where nothing offensive ever happens.

“Where will he go?” Stan Marsh asks.

“He’ll have to find a place that accepts racist, awful beings like him,” dad Randy replies. “There are still places out there who don’t care about bigotry and hate.”

Also Read: ‘South Park’ Season 22 Premiere: ‘Dead Kids’ Bags 1.5 Million Viewers on Wednesday

Cut to: A relative facsimile of “The Simpsons” opening music and its classic scroll-down from the clouds.

Apu welcomes Mr. Hankey in the Springfield Square, and the the whole thing closes with a #cancelthesimpsons hashtag. That’s a play on the #cancelsouthpark hashtag that Comedy Central has used in its promotion of this current season.

Watch the ending of “The Problem With a Poo” below.

Also Read: ‘Simpsons’ Showrunner Jokes That 17 People Were Fired Over This Huge Mistake From 23 Years Ago

South Park just went there on @TheSimpsons and Apu #cancelthesimpsons pic.twitter.com/djT8eTRgfn

— Matt Wilstein (@mattwilstein) October 11, 2018

Also Read: Matt Groening Finally Explains That Michael Jackson ‘Simpsons’ Cameo (Video)

“Simpsons” home Fox did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment on the “South Park” swipe, nor did it’s studio, 20th Century Fox. Comedy Central did not immediately elaborate on it either.

Here’s what “Simpsons” showrunner Al Jean had to say about the episode:

.@TheSimpsons Please don’t cancel @SouthPark

— Al Jean (@AlJean) October 11, 2018

Also Read: Hank Azaria Says He’s ‘Happy and Willing to Step Aside’ as Voice of Apu on ‘The Simpsons’ (Video)

This isn’t the first time the two popular animated shows have commented on one other. “South Park” Episode 607 was titled “Simpsons Already Did It,” and the whole plot basically revolved around the fact that the Fox comedy has been on TV for so long there are no original plot devices left for a younger show. Fast-forward to now, and “South Park” is in its 22nd year of existence.

“The Simpsons” have mostly relied on Bart to fire off a few rounds at its cable rival.

Below are video compilations of both shows getting their licks in.

Also Read: ‘The Simpsons’ Unkillable ‘Steamed Hams’ Meme Explained by Its Creator



Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Problem With Apu’ Trailer: Doc Shreds ‘Simpsons’ Most Stereotypical Character (Video)

‘Simpsons’ Showrunner Promises to Seek ‘Popular’ and ‘Right’ Solution to Apu Problem

‘Simpsons’ Producers ‘Haven’t Talked About’ Retiring Apu

It may not come as a surprise that a “South Park” episode titled “The Problem With a Poo” included a shot at “The Simpsons,” which has been criticized lately for it’s long-running Indian caricature-character Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, most notably in documentary “The Problem With Apu.” But how Wednesday’s Comedy Central half-hour actually ended might jolt your system a bit.

“The Problem With a Poo” centered on Mr. Hankey the Christmas Poo, who is a talking piece of poo in a Santa Claus hat that’s been in and out of “South Park” since the very beginning. In a hearing meant to mock Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination testimony, Mr. Hankey defended offensive tweets he posted.

The whole circus really turned into a Kavanugh-Roseanne Barr hybrid joke when the literal piece of crap blamed Ambien for his unkind social media posts. Yeah, the cast-off “Roseanne” star did that in real life.

At the end of last night’s episode, Mr. Hankey was sent packing from the lovely little town of South Park, where nothing offensive ever happens.

“Where will he go?” Stan Marsh asks.

“He’ll have to find a place that accepts racist, awful beings like him,” dad Randy replies. “There are still places out there who don’t care about bigotry and hate.”

Cut to: A relative facsimile of “The Simpsons” opening music and its classic scroll-down from the clouds.

Apu welcomes Mr. Hankey in the Springfield Square, and the the whole thing closes with a #cancelthesimpsons hashtag. That’s a play on the #cancelsouthpark hashtag that Comedy Central has used in its promotion of this current season.

Watch the ending of “The Problem With a Poo” below.

“Simpsons” home Fox did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment on the “South Park” swipe, nor did it’s studio, 20th Century Fox. Comedy Central did not immediately elaborate on it either.

Here’s what “Simpsons” showrunner Al Jean had to say about the episode:

This isn’t the first time the two popular animated shows have commented on one other. “South Park” Episode 607 was titled “Simpsons Already Did It,” and the whole plot basically revolved around the fact that the Fox comedy has been on TV for so long there are no original plot devices left for a younger show. Fast-forward to now, and “South Park” is in its 22nd year of existence.

“The Simpsons” have mostly relied on Bart to fire off a few rounds at its cable rival.

Below are video compilations of both shows getting their licks in.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Problem With Apu' Trailer: Doc Shreds 'Simpsons' Most Stereotypical Character (Video)

'Simpsons' Showrunner Promises to Seek 'Popular' and 'Right' Solution to Apu Problem

'Simpsons' Producers 'Haven't Talked About' Retiring Apu

‘South Park’ Takes Jabs At Roseanne Barr, Brett Kavanaugh And ‘The Simpsons’

Always a show to be relevant with their skewering, this week’s episode of South Park not only threw shade at Brett Kavanaugh but took some jabs at Roseanne Barr and The Simpsons.
The turd — er, I mean third — episode of the 22nd seaso…

Always a show to be relevant with their skewering, this week’s episode of South Park not only threw shade at Brett Kavanaugh but took some jabs at Roseanne Barr and The Simpsons. The turd — er, I mean third — episode of the 22nd season, titled “The Problem With Poo”, features the iconic South Park character Mr. Hankey the Christmas Poo. After he posts offensive tweets, he is fired from directing the annual holiday pageant. But with the help of Kyle, he tries to do some…

Rally-Bound Donald Trump Tweets Show Must Go On As Historic Hurricane Slams South

Heading out for yet another rally, this one in Erie, Pennsylvania, President Donald Trump acknowledged the possibly bad optics of staging another base-baiting performance on same day Hurricane Michael hit land with record-breaking force.
“I can&#…

Heading out for yet another rally, this one in Erie, Pennsylvania, President Donald Trump acknowledged the possibly bad optics of staging another base-baiting performance on same day Hurricane Michael hit land with record-breaking force. “I can’t disappoint thousands of people that are there – and the thousands that are going,” Trump tweeted. “I look forward to seeing everyone this evening.” Trump got asked about those optics in the afternoon at a White House ceremony. "I…

Melania Trump: #MeToo Accusers Must Show “Hard Evidence” To Be Believed

First Lady Melania Trump says she stands in support of the women of the #MeToo movement. But, she tells ABC News in an interview to be broadcast Friday, the women must produce “hard evidence” of the alleged assault/rape/sexual misconduct.
I…

First Lady Melania Trump says she stands in support of the women of the #MeToo movement. But, she tells ABC News in an interview to be broadcast Friday, the women must produce “hard evidence” of the alleged assault/rape/sexual misconduct. In a clip released this morning, ABC News’ Chief National Affairs Correspondent Tom Llamas was not shown asking the First Lady to specify what she mean by “hard evidence.” Melania Trump, who sat down with Llamas in Kenya as she toured…

Jimmy Kimmel Blasts Donald Trump’s Claim George Soros Stiffed Brett Kavanaugh Protesters

Jimmy Kimmel explained President Donald Trump’s new conspiracy theory to keep his base hotted up before the midterm elections.
After opening his monologue with a look at Nikki Haley’s resignation as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations hou…

Jimmy Kimmel explained President Donald Trump’s new conspiracy theory to keep his base hotted up before the midterm elections. After opening his monologue with a look at Nikki Haley’s resignation as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations hours earlier, Kimmel detailed how Trump continues to fuel base outrage over Brett Kavanaugh, even after Trump and his Senate soldiers nabbed the judge a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court. Kimmel said, generously, that Trump…

Steven Seagal Rules Out Running for Governor of Siberia: ‘Fake News’

Steven Seagal says he will not be running for governor of Siberia.
The actor, who became a Russian citizen in 2016, said media reports that he would seek higher office in the snowy region of his adopted homeland were “fake news.”
“Thi…

Steven Seagal says he will not be running for governor of Siberia.

The actor, who became a Russian citizen in 2016, said media reports that he would seek higher office in the snowy region of his adopted homeland were “fake news.”

“This is one of the millions of fake news sort of stories,” said Seagal on “Tucker Carlson Tonight”. “I was at a film festival in Vladivostok… and somebody in the audience said ‘hey man we don’t have a governor here, you want to become the governor’ and I said ‘sure’ and there it went.”

“At the same time we said 30 times, guys we were joking, Vladivostok had a friend of mine become governor there the next day.  It was just a joke that the press enjoyed doing bad things to certain people with,” he added.

Carlson, smirking through the segment, offered broad agreement.

Seagal then offered his belief that the Russia collusion story “was all a fantasy” and Vladimir Putin was a “brilliant strategist” which elicited no pushback from the famously combative Carlson.

Seagal’s comments were also gleefully picked up by Russian state controlled media including RT and TASS.

The actor also told Tucker that Russians he talked to were inclined to believe Brett Kavanaugh — and his denials of sexual misconduct when he was a young man.

“They’re just completely bemused. Some of them are laughing and some of them are crying but the basic consensus is that they’re finding it astounding and hard to believe that so much is being made of this and a lot of these accusations against people like Kavanaugh, they just are finding it … incredulous,” he said.

Unmentioned throughout were the allegations of rape against Seagal — which you can read more about here.  Carlson decided not to broach the subject.

The last time Seagal was pressed on his own past, during a BBC interview last week, he wordlessly stormed off set. The story was widely reported — including by Carlson’s own network, Fox News.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Steven Seagal Walks Out Mid-Interview After Question About Sexual Assault Accusations (Video)

Steven Seagal Accuser Faviola Dadis Says She Was Doubted on Live TV: 'That Killed Me'

LA Prosecutor Declines to Charge Steven Seagal With Sexual Assault; Another Case Still Pending

Steven Seagal Sexual Assault Case Under Review by DA's Office

‘The Purge’ Is at Its Scariest, and Most Poignant, Addressing #MeToo

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Oct. 9 episode of “The Purge.”)

The concept behind “The Purge,” a night each year when all crime, including murder, is legal, is pretty ridiculous when you apply any logic to it. Of course, the point isn’t that the Purge makes sense — it’s a state-sponsored terror campaign designed to keep the lower classes in line.

The four films have used that theme mainly to examine American racism and classism with blantant candidness. And for much of its first season, USA’s TV addition to the series, “The Purge,” has been content to do the same.

But in its latest episode, “The Forgotten,” the show diverged from that with a chilling look at how an event like the Purge would disproportionately affect women. A year into the #MeToo era, and following the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, “The Purge” franchise suddenly feels as relevant as it’s ever been.

Also Read: ‘The Purge’: ‘Halloween’ Easter Egg Teases What’s Up With the Masked Man

The series has mentioned before that violence against women is a huge part of each annual Purge night. As we saw in the fourth episode of the season, “The Urge to Purge,” the problem is so bad in Los Angeles that a group of vigilante women go out each Purge night with the express purpose of saving other women who are in danger. With the lack of any sort of institutional protections, they take matters into their own hands, physically branding the faces of the men who hurt women during the Purge to mark them for the rest of the year.

Things escalate even further in “The Forgotten.” After spending two episodes trying to reach her boss to save him from the hit woman she hired, Jane (Amanda Warren) finally gets to him and explains the situation. David (Billy Baldwin), the boss Jane believes has passed her over for promotion, possibly because she rejected his passes at her, seems understanding at first — but then reveals the he’s running a secret Purge sexual assault party, and he’s going to force Jane to be a part of it.

Also Read: ‘The First Purge’ Star Lex Scott Davis Says That ‘P— Grabbing Motherf—‘ Line Was Added in Post

David explains the nature of his “party”: the women are forced to participate, but there are some rules. There’s no nudity or penetration, and everything happens over clothes. There’s no murder, because “we are not animals,” he says. He notes that another woman who was promoted over Jane has excelled because she was willing to go along with David’s desires, and in fact, she’s the only woman at the party who isn’t tied up.

As with everything in “The Purge,” the scene is a take on viewpoints and people that really exist in America today, but this is easily the most pointed the show has been since it started. David could easily be a Harvey Weinstein.

David also brings up how “PC” the nation has become, creating a situation in which, if he tells a woman, “I can’t stop thinking about you,” he could lose his company. Those are of course things men have actually said about the #MeToo movement in real life.

Also Read: Everything We’ve Learned About the Purge from the Movies

Of course, for women, the discussion is extremely different. As “The Handmaid’s Tale” paraphrased the author of the book on which it’s based, Margaret Atwood, “Men are afraid women will laugh at them. Women are afraid men will kill them.”

“The Purge” at its best feels like an awful, too-close version of our own world. Its characters get a once-a-year outlet to drop their social niceties — what David would call “PC” but so often is just the idea of treating other people with respect — and act how they really believe. The night of the Purge gives people like David an opportunity to make their subtext into text.

Also Read: ‘The Purge’: What is the NFFA, or New Founding Fathers of America?

That’s the real horror “The Purge.” It imagines a world that’s the same as ours, except that one night a year, the worst of us get to drop their masks, say what they mean, and do what they fantasize about. The scary part is that we can imagine knowing the people in the show. In the current moment, in which at least some powerful abusers are finally being held accountable, the look “The Purge” takes at some of those men is all the more frightening because it feels all too real.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘The Purge’: ‘Halloween’ Easter Egg Teases What’s Up With the Masked Man

‘The Purge’: What is the NFFA, or New Founding Fathers of America?

Everything We’ve Learned About the Purge from the Movies

‘The First Purge’ Star Lex Scott Davis Says That ‘P—- Grabbing Motherf—–’ Line Was Added in Post

All the Ways ‘The First Purge’ Skewers America and Donald Trump

(Note: This post contains spoilers for the Oct. 9 episode of “The Purge.”)

The concept behind “The Purge,” a night each year when all crime, including murder, is legal, is pretty ridiculous when you apply any logic to it. Of course, the point isn’t that the Purge makes sense — it’s a state-sponsored terror campaign designed to keep the lower classes in line.

The four films have used that theme mainly to examine American racism and classism with blantant candidness. And for much of its first season, USA’s TV addition to the series, “The Purge,” has been content to do the same.

But in its latest episode, “The Forgotten,” the show diverged from that with a chilling look at how an event like the Purge would disproportionately affect women. A year into the #MeToo era, and following the appointment of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, “The Purge” franchise suddenly feels as relevant as it’s ever been.

The series has mentioned before that violence against women is a huge part of each annual Purge night. As we saw in the fourth episode of the season, “The Urge to Purge,” the problem is so bad in Los Angeles that a group of vigilante women go out each Purge night with the express purpose of saving other women who are in danger. With the lack of any sort of institutional protections, they take matters into their own hands, physically branding the faces of the men who hurt women during the Purge to mark them for the rest of the year.

Things escalate even further in “The Forgotten.” After spending two episodes trying to reach her boss to save him from the hit woman she hired, Jane (Amanda Warren) finally gets to him and explains the situation. David (Billy Baldwin), the boss Jane believes has passed her over for promotion, possibly because she rejected his passes at her, seems understanding at first — but then reveals the he’s running a secret Purge sexual assault party, and he’s going to force Jane to be a part of it.

David explains the nature of his “party”: the women are forced to participate, but there are some rules. There’s no nudity or penetration, and everything happens over clothes. There’s no murder, because “we are not animals,” he says. He notes that another woman who was promoted over Jane has excelled because she was willing to go along with David’s desires, and in fact, she’s the only woman at the party who isn’t tied up.

As with everything in “The Purge,” the scene is a take on viewpoints and people that really exist in America today, but this is easily the most pointed the show has been since it started. David could easily be a Harvey Weinstein.

David also brings up how “PC” the nation has become, creating a situation in which, if he tells a woman, “I can’t stop thinking about you,” he could lose his company. Those are of course things men have actually said about the #MeToo movement in real life.

Of course, for women, the discussion is extremely different. As “The Handmaid’s Tale” paraphrased the author of the book on which it’s based, Margaret Atwood, “Men are afraid women will laugh at them. Women are afraid men will kill them.”

“The Purge” at its best feels like an awful, too-close version of our own world. Its characters get a once-a-year outlet to drop their social niceties — what David would call “PC” but so often is just the idea of treating other people with respect — and act how they really believe. The night of the Purge gives people like David an opportunity to make their subtext into text.

That’s the real horror “The Purge.” It imagines a world that’s the same as ours, except that one night a year, the worst of us get to drop their masks, say what they mean, and do what they fantasize about. The scary part is that we can imagine knowing the people in the show. In the current moment, in which at least some powerful abusers are finally being held accountable, the look “The Purge” takes at some of those men is all the more frightening because it feels all too real.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'The Purge': 'Halloween' Easter Egg Teases What's Up With the Masked Man

'The Purge': What is the NFFA, or New Founding Fathers of America?

Everything We've Learned About the Purge from the Movies

'The First Purge' Star Lex Scott Davis Says That 'P—- Grabbing Motherf—–' Line Was Added in Post

All the Ways 'The First Purge' Skewers America and Donald Trump

MSNBC’s Steve Schmidt: Brett Kavanaugh Should Have Withdrawn His Nomination

Even after Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in as the newest Supreme Court justice, political pundits continue to evaluate the fall-out from a confirmation process that underscored the nation’s deep divisions.
MSNBC political analyst Steve Schmidt said …

Even after Brett Kavanaugh was sworn in as the newest Supreme Court justice, political pundits continue to evaluate the fall-out from a confirmation process that underscored the nation’s deep divisions. MSNBC political analyst Steve Schmidt said Kavanaugh should have withdrawn his nomination to preserve the integrity of the U.S. Supreme Court. For the duration of tenure on the nation’s high court, he warned, half of the country will view the appointment as illegitimate…

Trevor Noah Savages Senate Vote That Made Brett Kavanaugh Donald Trump’s New Supreme Court Justice

“Kavanugh,” Trevor Noah began tonight’s The Daily Show.
Much booing from his studio audience.
“Don’t boo – vote!” Noah shot back, channeling President Obama’s line at the Democratic National Convention in summer of ’…

“Kavanugh,” Trevor Noah began tonight’s The Daily Show. Much booing from his studio audience. “Don't boo – vote!" Noah shot back, channeling President Obama's line at the Democratic National Convention in summer of ’16 in Philadelphia, when Obama’s mention of Donald Trump during his speech elicited similar booing.  Now, as then, the “vote” line went over big. “Until recently, Brett was just some guy without an inside voice,” Noah joked of Kavanaugh. “But over the weekend…

Tucker Carlson Shouts ‘Your Body Is a Wonderland’ Lyrics at Female Guest in ‘Toxic Masculinity’ Debate

Tucker Carlson engaged in a heated debate over “toxic masculinity” on Monday, and accused a female guest on his Fox News program of hypocrisy over her refusal to specifically condemn John Mayer’s “Your Body Is a Wonderland” for being harmful to women.

“I want to restate that John Mayer is a really talented guy,” said Carlson. “But I remember his song, ‘Your Body Is a Wonderland’ and in it he’s got this line ‘one pair of candy lips in your bubblegum tongue’ … and I could go on,” Carlson said. “But I’m just wondering. Is that an examples of toxic masculinity right there?”

Carlson’s guest, described as “feminist” Anushay Hossain told him no, it was not.

Also Read: Colbert: Tucker Carlson ‘Has Degraded His Reputation by Saying Disgusting Things’ for Money (Video)

“No. It isn’t,” she said. “Toxic masculinity isn’t about saying your body is a wonderland. It’s actually about men being violent towards women and that song was written for his girlfriend at the time.”

The broader point of the segment was Carlson’s desire to highlight what he said was a double standard in the way artists like John Mayer were treated as opposed to Brett Kavanaugh.

“If Brett Kavanaugh’s calendar from 1982 had basketball with squee and then your body is a wonderland and your bubblegum tongue, you would have called for his arrest,” Carlson said.

Also Read: John Oliver Calls Kavanaugh Appointment a ‘Shameless Commitment to Bad Faith Arguments’ (Video)

The conversation then largely broke down, with Carlson calling “toxic masculinity” “some dumb made-up feminist term” and demanded to know about whether “toxic femininity” and “toxic homosexuality” were real as well.

The video ended with Carlson laughing in her face, and then laughing more for the camera. “Hilarious,” he concluded.

A representative for John Mayer did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

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Tucker Carlson Labels Michael Avenatti ‘Creepy Porn Lawyer’ While Insisting No Interest in ‘Name-Calling’ (Video)

Tucker Carlson engaged in a heated debate over “toxic masculinity” on Monday, and accused a female guest on his Fox News program of hypocrisy over her refusal to specifically condemn John Mayer’s “Your Body Is a Wonderland” for being harmful to women.

“I want to restate that John Mayer is a really talented guy,” said Carlson. “But I remember his song, ‘Your Body Is a Wonderland’ and in it he’s got this line ‘one pair of candy lips in your bubblegum tongue’ … and I could go on,” Carlson said. “But I’m just wondering. Is that an examples of toxic masculinity right there?”

Carlson’s guest, described as “feminist” Anushay Hossain told him no, it was not.

“No. It isn’t,” she said. “Toxic masculinity isn’t about saying your body is a wonderland. It’s actually about men being violent towards women and that song was written for his girlfriend at the time.”

The broader point of the segment was Carlson’s desire to highlight what he said was a double standard in the way artists like John Mayer were treated as opposed to Brett Kavanaugh.

“If Brett Kavanaugh’s calendar from 1982 had basketball with squee and then your body is a wonderland and your bubblegum tongue, you would have called for his arrest,” Carlson said.

The conversation then largely broke down, with Carlson calling “toxic masculinity” “some dumb made-up feminist term” and demanded to know about whether “toxic femininity” and “toxic homosexuality” were real as well.

The video ended with Carlson laughing in her face, and then laughing more for the camera. “Hilarious,” he concluded.

A representative for John Mayer did not immediately respond to TheWrap’s request for comment.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Tucker Carlson Warns of White 'Genocide' After Georgetown Professor Calls for Castration

Tucker Carlson Mocks Kavanaugh Accusers With Footage From 'The Crucible'

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Tucker Carlson Labels Michael Avenatti 'Creepy Porn Lawyer' While Insisting No Interest in 'Name-Calling' (Video)

Jimmy Kimmel Mocks Donald Trump’s Brett Kavanaugh Swearing-In Ceremony

“President Donald Trump is “flying extra high today after the confirmation of beer-battered Brett Kavanaugh, who is now on the United States Supreme Court despite all of the stuff you know about,” ABC late-night star Jimmy Kimmel said…

“President Donald Trump is “flying extra high today after the confirmation of beer-battered Brett Kavanaugh, who is now on the United States Supreme Court despite all of the stuff you know about,” ABC late-night star Jimmy Kimmel said before launching into talk about Trump’s do-over swearing in of Kavanaugh at the White House tonight. Kavanaugh, Kimmel noted, was approved by the smallest margin of any Supreme Court Justice since 1881. And there were massive protests about…

Donald Trump Apologizes To Brett Kavanaugh “On Behalf Of Country” At White House Ceremony

President Donald Trump apologized on national TV to Brett Kavanaugh for the “pain and suffering” to which he was subjected during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing, declaring on national TV that Kavanaugh had been “found innocent…

President Donald Trump apologized on national TV to Brett Kavanaugh for the “pain and suffering” to which he was subjected during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing, declaring on national TV that Kavanaugh had been “found innocent.” “I would like to begin tonight proceeding differently than perhaps any other event of such magnitude,” Trump had begun Kavanaugh’s second swearing-in ceremony, signaling some big reality TV-esque reveal was about to happen. “On behalf of…

‘South Park’ Goes After Brett Kavanaugh Hearing in Episode With Mr Hankey on Trial (Video)

“South Park” will spoof the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation and other congressional hearings in Wednesday’s episode.

The episode, titled “The Problem With a Poo” — a riff off the title of Hari Kondabolu’s “The Problem With Apu,” a documentary criticizing “The Simpsons” for its portrayal of Indian Americans — will see Mr. Hankey, the show’s anthropomorphized feces/Christmas mascot character, having to testify in defense of his past misbehavior.

In a clip from Wednesday’s episode, Mr. Hankey faces questions from Mr. Waithouse, ostentatiously sniffling and claiming that his previous statements are misinterpreted jokes, both jabs at the newest Supreme Court justice.

Also Read: Catholic League President Calls ‘South Park’ Creators ‘Cowards’ Over ‘A Boy and a Priest’ Episode

According to Comedy Central’s description of the episode, “Mr. Hankey’s offensive behavior puts him in jeopardy of being fired as the Director of the Annual Christmas Pageant. Meanwhile, at South Park Elementary, Strong Woman and PC Principal face a whole new set of challenges in their relationship.”

“South Park” has also taken the topical approach with the first two episodes of the current 22nd season, previously tackling the prevalence of school shootings in the U.S. and the Catholic Church’s ongoing abuse scandal.

“South Park” airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on Comedy Central.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Catholic League President Calls ‘South Park’ Creators ‘Cowards’ Over ‘A Boy and a Priest’ Episode

‘South Park’ Will Take on Catholic Church Abuse Scandal in Next Episode (Video)

‘South Park’ Season Premiere ‘Dead Kids’ Is a Big Middle Finger at Apathy Over School Shootings

“South Park” will spoof the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation and other congressional hearings in Wednesday’s episode.

The episode, titled “The Problem With a Poo” — a riff off the title of Hari Kondabolu’s “The Problem With Apu,” a documentary criticizing “The Simpsons” for its portrayal of Indian Americans — will see Mr. Hankey, the show’s anthropomorphized feces/Christmas mascot character, having to testify in defense of his past misbehavior.

In a clip from Wednesday’s episode, Mr. Hankey faces questions from Mr. Waithouse, ostentatiously sniffling and claiming that his previous statements are misinterpreted jokes, both jabs at the newest Supreme Court justice.

According to Comedy Central’s description of the episode, “Mr. Hankey’s offensive behavior puts him in jeopardy of being fired as the Director of the Annual Christmas Pageant. Meanwhile, at South Park Elementary, Strong Woman and PC Principal face a whole new set of challenges in their relationship.”

“South Park” has also taken the topical approach with the first two episodes of the current 22nd season, previously tackling the prevalence of school shootings in the U.S. and the Catholic Church’s ongoing abuse scandal.

“South Park” airs Wednesdays at 10/9c on Comedy Central.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Catholic League President Calls 'South Park' Creators 'Cowards' Over 'A Boy and a Priest' Episode

'South Park' Will Take on Catholic Church Abuse Scandal in Next Episode (Video)

'South Park' Season Premiere 'Dead Kids' Is a Big Middle Finger at Apathy Over School Shootings

The Hill Mocked for Confusing Susan Rice With Condoleezza Rice

The Hill came in for some mockery on Monday for a piece about former National Security adviser Susan Rice, which — briefly — used an image of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

The post was swiftly corrected with the right image, but not before eagle-eyed Twitter users could record it for posterity.

Er… @thehill. That’s not Susan Rice. That’s Condoleezza. pic.twitter.com/I1yNjlLx8n

— Peter Jukes (@peterjukes) October 7, 2018

Also Read: USA Today Drops Columnist Cheri Jacobus After Tweet About Convicted Pedophile Jeffrey Epstein (Exclusive)

The piece, by Emily Birnbaum, was an otherwise ordinary post documenting how Rice had been “moved” by enthusiasm about a possible Senate run in Maine. The prospect took on renewed life last week after the Republican incumbent Susan Collins cast a pivotal vote in favor of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for confirmation to the United States Supreme Court.

“We mistakenly posted an incorrect photograph and had it taken down quickly,” a rep for The Hill told TheWrap in a terse statement. Comment was also provided from Twitter users who used the snafu to liven up a slow news day.

All Black People Look The Same. https://t.co/AbGvlZ0QwK

— Soledad O’Brien (@soledadobrien) October 8, 2018

Wrong Rice. https://t.co/LA6UN26XAQ

— Molly JongFast (@MollyJongFast) October 8, 2018

my goodness. https://t.co/2lIDsxE2yC

— Michael McFaul (@McFaul) October 8, 2018

Confusing black people, part 9,243 https://t.co/7uYFhpVasj

— Dartunorro D. Clark (@DartDClark) October 8, 2018

Oh dear. Well, at least it wasn’t a photo of Patti LaBelle. https://t.co/p2abq2Jcd0

— Daniel W. Drezner (@dandrezner) October 8, 2018

Seriously?? https://t.co/WEkRVs5t5w

— Robbin Simmons (@RobbinSimmons7) October 7, 2018

Damn, y’all. For real?? @thehill pic.twitter.com/lnyFdApAf0

— Michael Eaves (@michaeleaves) October 8, 2018

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The Hill came in for some mockery on Monday for a piece about former National Security adviser Susan Rice, which — briefly — used an image of former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.

The post was swiftly corrected with the right image, but not before eagle-eyed Twitter users could record it for posterity.

The piece, by Emily Birnbaum, was an otherwise ordinary post documenting how Rice had been “moved” by enthusiasm about a possible Senate run in Maine. The prospect took on renewed life last week after the Republican incumbent Susan Collins cast a pivotal vote in favor of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for confirmation to the United States Supreme Court.

“We mistakenly posted an incorrect photograph and had it taken down quickly,” a rep for The Hill told TheWrap in a terse statement. Comment was also provided from Twitter users who used the snafu to liven up a slow news day.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Mischa Barton Joins MTV's 'The Hills' Reboot

'The Hills' Cast Reunites at VMAs to Announce Reboot of MTV Reality Series

The Hill Drops Pro-Trump Contributor Caught on Video Lamenting That Nazis 'Didn't Keep F–ing Going'

The Hill Pulls out of Future White House Correspondents' Dinners After Michelle Wolf Routine