‘Hotel Mumbai’ Earns Solid Opening at Indie Box Office

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While Jordan Peele’s “Us” had the new release slat mostly to itself this weekend, the limited release front did see the release of Bleecker Street’s “Hotel Mumbai,” the true story thriller about the 2008 attack on the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel in Mumbai.

Released on four screens in New York and Los Angeles, the film grossed $86,492 for a solid per screen average of $21,623, the best average for any release this weekend. Directed by Anthony Armas and starring Dev Patel and Armie Hammer, the movie was filmed two years ago and was originally set to be released by The Weinstein Company, but was picked up by Bleecker Street after TWC declared bankruptcy. It has a 73 percent score on Rotten Tomatoes.

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Also releasing this weekend was “Sunset,” László Nemes’ follow-up to his 2016 Best Foreign Language Oscar winner “Son of Saul.” Released on three screens by Sony Pictures Classics, the film grossed $15,000. Reviews were far more mixed for “Sunset” than “Son of Saul,” receiving a 54 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

Among holdovers, the film with last weekend’s top per screen average, Focus Features’ “The Mustang,” expanded to 38 screens and grossed $228,000, bringing its total to $322,000 with a weekend PSA.

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Fox Searchlight’s “The Aftermath,” which had a muted opening last weekend, expanded to 26 screens in its second weekend and grossed $123,000 for an average of $4,731 and a total of $203,254.

Finally, A24’s “Gloria Bell” is showing strong word-of-mouth among female audiences, as it expanded nationwide to 654 screens. The Sebastian Lelio/Julianne Moore film grossed $1.8 million, bringing its total to just under $2.5 million.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Breaks Original Horror Film Record With $70 Million Opening

Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Breaks Original Horror Film Record With $70 Million Opening

Read on: TheWrapTheWrap.

Universal/Monkeypaw’s “Us” has set a new opening weekend record for original horror films, earning a $70.2 million launch from 3,741 screens. This total for Jordan Peele’s latest film blows by the original horror movie opening record of $50.2 million set by “A Quiet Place” last year.

“Us” has also more than doubled the opening weekend earned by Peele’s previous film, “Get Out,” which opened to $33.3 million in February 2017. When ranked among all horror films, including franchise titles and remakes, “Us” sits third on the genre’s opening weekend charts, sitting behind the $123 million opening for 2017’s “It” remake and the $76 million opening for last year’s “Halloween.”

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Peele and “Us” were able to successfully ride the critical acclaim from its SXSW premiere two weeks ago and its 94 percent Rotten Tomatoes score to one of the biggest openings for any horror film, adding $16.7 million from 47 overseas markets to earn an $86.9 million worldwide launch against a $20 million budget.

According to CinemaScore audience data, African-American moviegoers overindexed and comprised of 30 percent of the entire audience. By comparison, Caucasians sat at 36 percent, with Hispanic/Latinos at 21 percent and Asians at 7 percent. While “Get Out” was a hit with audiences with an A- on CinemaScore, “Us” was more consistent with most horror titles with a B.

Taking second is “Captain Marvel,” which dropped 50 percent for a $35 million total in its third weekend. It also grossed $52 million overseas for an $87 million global weekend total. That pushes the latest Marvel film past the domestic total of “Thor: Ragnarok” with $320 million, and past the global total of “Wonder Woman,” “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” and “Batman v Superman” with $910 million after 19 days in theaters around the world.

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Taking third is Paramount’s “Wonder Park” with $8.8 million, a 44 percent drop that brings its 10-day total to $29.2 million and $39.7 million worldwide, with $5 million grossed this weekend from 24 markets overseas.

CBS Films/Lionsgate’s “Five Feet Apart” sits just behind it with $8.5 million for a 35 percent drop and a $26.2 million 10-day domestic total and a $32.8 million total against a $7 million budget. Universal’s “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” completes the top five with $6.5 million for a domestic total of $145 million and a global total of $488 million after five weekends.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ on Pace for $67 Million Opening, Double ‘Get Out’ Debut

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Universal/Monkeypaw’s “Us” is blowing by all analysts’ expectations. On the back of strong pre-release buzz and an opening day total of $29 million, Jordan Peele’s second film is estimated to gross $67 million from 3,741 screens this weekend.

If that estimate holds, not only will “Us” have doubled the opening weekend of Peele’s debut film “Get Out” ($33.3 million), it will set a new opening weekend record for original horror films, beating the $50.2 million of last year’s “A Quiet Place.” It’s also a record for any original film released in March.

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The one somewhat bad note for “Us” is that while critics have been raving about the film with a Rotten Tomatoes score of 95 percent, audiences aren’t quite as enthused as they were for “Get Out.” While that film earned an A on CinemaScore, “Us,” with its more opaque theming and twist ending, has received a B from opening night audiences, which is typical for what horror films tend to receive from the audience poll.

Postrak demographic data shows that Friday night’s audience was 31 percent African-American, compared to 34 percent Caucasians, 22 percent Hispanic/Latino, and 13 percent Asian/Other.

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“Captain Marvel” will settle for the No. 2 spot in its third weekend, though it is still continuing its torrid pace, as it will pass the $315 million domestic total for “Thor: Ragnarok” by Sunday’s end. The Marvel movie is set to make $34.6 million in its third weekend, bringing its domestic total to $321 million and, depending on overseas results, possibly push its global total past the $1 billion mark.

CBS Films/Lionsgate’s “Five Feet Apart” takes third place with an estimated $8.6 million, dropping 34 percent from its $13.1 million opening. Paramount’s “Wonder Park” is fourth, dropping 50 percent for a $7.8 million opening. “How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” completes the top five with $6.7 million in its fifth weekend.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Scares Up $7.4 Million at Thursday Box Office

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“Us,” the horror follow-up to “Get Out” from director Jordan Peele and released by Universal, earned a massive $7.4 million in its Thursday box office previews from 3,150 screens. It opens on 3,741 screens this weekend.

Independent trackers have “Us” expected to earn between $45-50 million, though Universal is saying that the opening would be considered a success if it was within the range of “Get Out.” Peele’s previous film earned $33.3 million in its first weekend in 2017 following a Thursday preview total of just $1.8 million.

A $50 million opening for “Us” would also put it within the range of the opening for John Krasinski’s horror film “A Quiet Place,” which earned $4.3 million during its Thursday previews. It also eclipsed the total of last year’s horror prequel “The Nun,” which made an impressive $5.4 million on Thursday ahead of a $53.8 million opening.

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“Get Out” was made on a trim $4.5 million budget, while “Us” cost a still modest $20 million. But behind killer word of mouth and a Rotten Tomatoes score that currently sits at 94 percent with 183 reviews counted, “Us” is expected to leg out well beyond its opening and could reach a domestic run of over $200 million.

“Us” stars Lupita Nyong’o as Adelaide Wilson, a woman returning to her beachside childhood home with her husband, Gabe (Winston Duke), and their two children (Shahadi Wright Joseph, Evan Alex) for an idyllic summer getaway. After spending a tense day at the beach with their friends (Elisabeth Moss, Tim Heidecker), Adelaide and her family return to their vacation home to discover the silhouettes of four figures standing in their driveway. “Us” pits an ordinary American family against a terrifying and uncanny opponent: doppelgängers of themselves.

Peele wrote and directed “Us,” his second feature, for his Monkeypaw Productions alongside Ian Cooper. The film is the company’s first solo production venture. Sean McKittrick and Jason Blum also produced.

“Us” could top what would be the third weekend for Marvel’s “Captain Marvel.” It also opens opposite the true-story thriller “Hotel Mumbai” and the foreign film “Sunset,” and Julianne Moore’s “Gloria Bell” going wider.

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Global Entertainment Industry Raked In Near $97B In 2018; Home Sector Alive With $55B+, But U.S. Digital Spend Crushed Moviegoing – MPAA Annual Report

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A week and a half prior to the exhibitor-distributor love-in CinemaCon, the Motion Picture Association of America has released their annual entertainment industry report, showing that the theatrical and home ancillary sectors were vibrant at a record $…

Worldwide Box Office Hit Record $41.1 Billion in 2018, MPAA Reports

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The global box office reached a record $41.1 billion last year, the Motion Picture Association of America announced Thursday in its annual report.

The growth was primarily driven by the $11.9 billion earned in domestic theaters from hits like “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War” and critical favorites like “A Star Is Born.”

Home entertainment, meanwhile, saw an even bigger growth of 16 percent year-over-year to $55.7 billion, bringing the total global entertainment market to $96.8 billion.

That surge for home entertainment is thanks in large part to a 27 percent increase in streaming/online video service subscriptions, which passed cable subscriptions for the first time ever with 613 million worldwide. The MPAA also found that Americans now spend 52 percent of their media time on a digital platform.

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“In today’s dynamic marketplace, stories come to life for audiences in theaters, at home, and on the go,” said Charles Rivkin, Chairman and CEO of the MPAA in a statement. “Our companies continue to deliver content where, when, and how audiences want it – and the numbers released today speak volumes.”

The one category where there is continued decline is in 3D movie ticket sales. 3D sales reached $6.7 billion in 2018, accounting for only 16 percent of the total global gross and down 20 percent from 2017’s $8.4 billion global gross. Even in Asia, where 3D was still a relatively novel experience for many Chinese moviegoers, 3D decreased 14 percent year-over-year.

Back in the U.S., theaters continue to rely on frequent moviegoers, which the MPAA classifies as those who see at least one movie per month. These moviegoers account for 12 percent of the U.S./Canada population, yet account for 49 percent of all tickets sold.

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But teenage and young adult audiences are showing strong turnouts, holding the highest per capita attendance amongst all age groups as both the 12-17 and 18-24 age groups were both found to have bought an average of 5.1 tickets last year. Audiences are also becoming more diverse. In a year that brought films like “Black Panther” and “Crazy Rich Asians,” ticket purchasing increased among Latinos and Asians with moviegoers compared to last year.

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Jordan Peele’s ‘Us’ Headed Toward an Even Bigger Opening Than ‘Get Out’

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Two years ago, Jordan Peele became the box office’s biggest surprise as “Get Out” became one of the year’s biggest cultural and financial hits. Now, with an Oscar and multiple producer attachments to his name, Peele is ready to make a big splash at the box office again as Universal releases his second film, “Us,” nationwide this weekend.

While there were 14 other films that had a higher domestic gross than in 2017, “Get Out” had by far the biggest return on investment. Produced by Blumhouse with its usual thrifty approach, the film grossed $176 million domestic and $255 million worldwide against a mere $4.5 million production budget. The film also legged out far better than most horror or R-rated movies, as it opened to $33.3 million in February 2017 and more than quintupled that amount by the end of its domestic theatrical run.

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Universal says that any opening higher than what “Get Out” made would be considered a success, but trackers are very optimistic as they project a $45-50 million opening. An opening on the higher end of that range would match the $50.2 million opening of last year’s horror hit “A Quiet Place,” which “Us” is currently outperforming in advance ticket sales on Fandango. The film is also expected to leg out as well as “Get Out,” which could mean a domestic run of more than $200 million against a $20 million production budget.

Even compared to other upcoming horror films like “Pet Sematary,” “Us” is a fiercely unique film that is enjoying immense social buzz and critical acclaim. Since its premiere on the opening night of SXSW, “Us” has earned a 98 percent Rotten Tomatoes score, with 68 reviews logged. And along with lead stars Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, both of whom are still riding high off of their “Black Panther” fame, “Us” also has something that was once common decades ago but which is now rare: a director with box office draw.

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“In horror, there is a brand recognition with Blumhouse, but there isn’t a single director that has become so popular with audiences as Jordan Peele has,” said Exhibitor Relations analyst Jeff Bock. “The closest person I can think of is Eli Roth, but even he didn’t get nearly as big off of just one film the way Peele has with ‘Get Out.’”

Written, directed, and co-produced by Peele, “Us” stars Nyong’o and Duke as an upper-middle class African-American couple on vacation with their two kids. But their vacation is interrupted when they are attacked by clones of themselves known as The Tethered, who have come to claim the family’s lives for themselves. Tim Heidecker and Elisabeth Moss also star in the film, which was produced by Blumhouse’s Jason Blum, QC Productions’ Sean McKittrick and Ian Cooper, who is producing alongside Peele through Monkeypaw Productions

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‘The Mustang’ and Matthias Schoenaerts Ride Into Indie Box Office

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A slew of new releases hit the indie box office this weekend, with the top per screen average going to Focus Features’ “The Mustang,” which stars Matthias Schoenaerts as a violent prison inmate who undergoes a personal transformation when he is entered into a mustang taming program.

Released on five screens in Los Angeles and New York, the film grossed $94,750 for an average of $18,950. Critics have hailed the performances of Schoenaerts and co-star Bruce Dern, as well as the direction of Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre, giving the film a 95 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

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Less impressive was Fox Searchlight’s “The Aftermath,” which also released this weekend on five screens in L.A. and New York and grossed $57,000 for a per screen average of $11,500. Set after the end of World War II, the film stars Keira Knightley and Jason Clarke as a British couple who move into a home in Hamburg that has been recommissioned by the British but is still inhabited by a German widower (Alexander Skarsgard) and his troubled daughter. Circumstances lead to a secret tryst between the woman and the widower, as tensions between Britain and Germany remain high.

Directed by James Kent, the film will expand to 28 theaters next weekend but faces poor critical reviews, as it earned a 27 percent Rotten Tomatoes score.

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Among holdovers, A24’s “Gloria Bell” expanded to 39 screens in its second weekend and grossed $378,000 for a total of $568,000, while NEON/CNN Films’ “Apollo 11” expanded to 588 screens and added $1.22 million for a total of $5.5 million after three weekends.

Finally, Magnolia and Shorts.TV’s annual screening of the Oscar short film nominees is reaching the end of its theatrical run, adding $14,500 this weekend to bring its total to $3.5 million, a record for the Oscar screening series.

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