UnCabaret at 25: Celebrating Alt-Comedy’s Misogyny-Busting Breakthrough

Among the things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving week is that comedy, of the standup and other varieties, is in a very different place than it was 25 years ago. And for some of that, we have to thank the influence of UnCabaret, the alternative sho…

Among the things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving week is that comedy, of the standup and other varieties, is in a very different place than it was 25 years ago. And for some of that, we have to thank the influence of UnCabaret, the alternative showcase that celebrated its 25thanniversary at the Theatre at […]

‘Better Call Saul’: For Jimmy McGill, the Most Important Death in Season 4 Happened Off-Screen

No bullets helped trigger Jimmy’s continued descent into darkness.

[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Better Call Saul” Season 4.]

“Better Call Saul” Season 4 was more focused than ever on answering the question at the show’s core: By the time “Breaking Bad” Season 2 begins, how did attorney Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) become criminal lawyer Saul Goodman? The season ably answered that inquiry, but required a pretty significant body count.

It has always made sense for “Better Call Saul” to be a less-violent series than its sister show, at least in the early seasons, as that’s when many of these characters are still on the verge of becoming part of the brutal Albuquerque drug scene that consumed Walter White and his many associates. However, that also meant escalation was always a part of the show’s future. Season 4 brought the increased presence of the Salamanca cousins, Lalo and Nacho, whose actions made the drug business even more brutal. Mike committed his first on-screen murder since the flashbacks in “Five-O.” And of course, the season began by confirming what was implied by the Season 3 finale: the death of Chuck McGill.

However, the most important death of the season might have been another that took place off-screen. That would be the loss of Jimmy’s one-time client, Geraldine Strauss, collector of Hummel figurines and star of Jimmy’s first major TV commercial, who died at some point in the lead-up to Season 4, Episode 6, “Piñata.” Up until that point in the season, Jimmy’s reaction to his brother’s death skipped a whole lot of steps in the grieving process, and that denial factored into his sadness over Mrs. Strauss’s unexpected passing.

In an inversion of the classic trope, building his relationship with Kim into a real partnership didn’t make Jimmy a better person. (It may have dragged him further down into the grey zone, in fact.) The truth is, Jimmy was at his very best as a person when he was practicing elder law, a legal speciality that is not one of the more glamorous ways to use a law license. But running bingo games, remembering the names of grandchildren, and offering comfort utilized Jimmy’s skills as a con man to help a demographic that is often overlooked.

Jimmy’s engagement with this side of the legal world was far from purely altruistic — the Sandpiper class-action case, which stood to earn him a lot of money, was a major factor in his interest. And to date, the very worst thing that Jimmy McGill (not Saul Goodman) has done on this show may have been manipulating Irene (Jean Effron) into accepting the Sandpiper settlement. However, it’s an act he makes up for in the Season 3 finale by publicly exposing his scheme in front of the entire retirement home community, while ensuring he’ll never regain the trust of Albuquerque’s elderly.

Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

With 13 months passing between seasons, it might be easy to forget this aspect of his career. However, the Hummel caper he executes with Ira (Franc Ross) proves a brilliant reminder of Jimmy’s visits to Mrs. Strauss (while making sure that her death is no less a gut punch). Chuck’s death is a complicated stew of emotions for Jimmy, toying with both his better angels and darkest impulses. Mrs. Strauss dying serves as a formal farewell to his former life.

News of Mrs. Strauss’s death immediately precedes Kim telling Jimmy that she’s joining another law firm instead of waiting for them to restart Wexler-McGill. Not only is elder law no longer a real possibility for him, but Wexler-McGill is also gone, and those factors push him to jeopardize the reinstatement of his license by revving up his burner-phone side hustle.

If all of those events didn’t conflate, would Jimmy have descended as far as he did down this path? Would he have decided, at the end of Season 4, to keep practicing law under the McGill name? The what-ifs are many, but the reveal in Mrs. Strauss’ death isn’t what it told the audience about Jimmy; it’s what her death opened up in him. By the end of the episode, he’s proven himself capable of terrifying acts. The same Jimmy who remembered the Alpine Shepherd Boy isn’t the same Jimmy who hired Ira and Huell to turn punk kids into piñatas.

For the rest of the season, Jimmy keeps up the appearance of wanting to reinstate his law license, but “Piñata,” and Mrs. Strauss represent the season’s key turning point. Much changed this year, for all of these characters, but the biggest change was within Jimmy himself.

Bob Odenkirk Hadn’t Gotten Drunk in Over 30 Years, but That All Changed Because of ‘Drunk History’

The “Better Call Saul” actor filmed his episode after drinking “two-and-a-half double gin and tonics and four shots of tequila.”

Bob Odenkirk just wrapped another masterful season of AMC’s “Better Call Saul,” but before he returns to the Emmy-nominated series next year he’ll appear in an episode on the upcoming sixth season of Comedy Central’s “Drunk History.” The actor revealed during an appearance at PaleyFest NY (via AV Club) that filming the episode got him drunk for the first time in three decades.

“It was scary for me to get drunk,” Odenkirk said. “[Creator Derek Waters] knows. We had a lot of conversations about it. I almost backed out because I haven’t been drunk in a long, long time. Probably over 30 years.”

Odenkirk’s “Drunk History” episode recounts radio host Steve Dahl’s disco demolition in 1979. The event took place at Comiskey Park in Chicago during a doubleheader between the Chicago White Sox and the Detroit Tigers. Dahl blew up a crate filled with disco records in between games, which ended with fans storming the field. The White Sox ended up forfeiting the second game because the playing field was so damaged from the event.

In order to get ready for filming, Odenkirk drank “two-and-a-half double gin and tonics and four shots of tequila.” The actor said he was nervous to film the episode because he has family.

“I have kids who are teenagers, both in college now,” Odenkirk said. “I was a little worried about them seeing me on TV really drunk — like — vomiting drunk.”

Comedy Central has not announced a premiere date for the sixth season of “Drunk History.” Waters teased additional episodes will take on the stories of Sam Cooke and the Little Rock Nine. The show wrapped up its fifth season over the summer.

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Talks AMC Show’s Future: ‘We’re Closer to the End’

Now that Jimmy McGill has completed his professional transition into Saul Goodman, “Better Call Saul” finally paid off on its long-awaited premise.

Since that is settled, fans of the series are now left wondering how much of the “Breaking Bad” prequel’s story is left to tell? After all, not only did viewers finally meet Saul, the fourth season also featured the show’s biggest time jump, inching closer to the day when he crosses paths with Bryan Cranston’s Walter White.

“I couldn’t tell you exactly how many episodes there are [left], but I think we’re closer to the end than we are to the beginning,” “Better Call Saul” co-showrunner Peter Gould told TheWrap.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Co-Showrunner Breaks Down That Long-Awaited Moment in the Season Finale

“Breaking Bad” ran officially for five seasons, though that final season was as an expanded 16 episodes spread over two years. With the exception of the WGA-strike shortened first season, “Breaking Bad” seasons were longer episode counts vs “Saul.” AMC has already renewed the “Breaking Bad” spinoff for a fifth season, which Gould said is just now starting to be put together.

Gould admits that he and co-showrunner (and “Breaking Bad” creator) Vince Gilligan are working on the show’s endgame. “I don’t know that I can claim to have a nailed-down plan, or that Vince and I have a nailed-down plan for how it ends, but I can tell you we’ve talked about it an awful lot,” says Gould. “This is a story that has a beginning, middle and an end.”

Part of that will include the fate of Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn), last seen stunned and horrified as she witnessed first hand the “birth” of the monster that is Saul Goodman. With Kim among the handful of “Better Call Saul’s” main players not seen on “Breaking Bad,” it begs the question of whether her and Jimmy’s relationship, already on choppy waters, makes it out alive.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim’s Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

“The thing I’m most interested and worried about is where Jimmy and Kim are going together,” says Gould. “What is Kim’s fate going to be? She seems to be, at the end of this season, at a decision point about her relationship with Jimmy.” Gould argues that while Jimmy knew he was playing the Bar Association with his story about Chuck, he was unaware that Kim wasn’t fully in on the ruse. “He was expecting that Kim would see through it. She didn’t. She took it at face value.”

With “Better Call Saul” running closer to the “Breaking Bad” timeline, does that mean we’ll see more “Bad” vets show up? Gould is still holding out hope he’ll get everyone of consequence to make a return in some form or fashion. While he didn’t specifically name them, that would presumably include Cranston himself and Aaron Paul’s Jesse Pinkman.

“[We] would love to see all of the key folks from ‘Breaking Bad,’” said Gould. “It’s really a matter of whether the story leads us there.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Co-Showrunner Breaks Down That Long-Awaited Moment in the Season Finale

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould: ‘Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks’ (Podcast)

Now that Jimmy McGill has completed his professional transition into Saul Goodman, “Better Call Saul” finally paid off on its long-awaited premise.

Since that is settled, fans of the series are now left wondering how much of the “Breaking Bad” prequel’s story is left to tell? After all, not only did viewers finally meet Saul, the fourth season also featured the show’s biggest time jump, inching closer to the day when he crosses paths with Bryan Cranston’s Walter White.

“I couldn’t tell you exactly how many episodes there are [left], but I think we’re closer to the end than we are to the beginning,” “Better Call Saul” co-showrunner Peter Gould told TheWrap.

“Breaking Bad” ran officially for five seasons, though that final season was as an expanded 16 episodes spread over two years. With the exception of the WGA-strike shortened first season, “Breaking Bad” seasons were longer episode counts vs “Saul.” AMC has already renewed the “Breaking Bad” spinoff for a fifth season, which Gould said is just now starting to be put together.

Gould admits that he and co-showrunner (and “Breaking Bad” creator) Vince Gilligan are working on the show’s endgame. “I don’t know that I can claim to have a nailed-down plan, or that Vince and I have a nailed-down plan for how it ends, but I can tell you we’ve talked about it an awful lot,” says Gould. “This is a story that has a beginning, middle and an end.”

Part of that will include the fate of Kim Wexler (Rhea Seehorn), last seen stunned and horrified as she witnessed first hand the “birth” of the monster that is Saul Goodman. With Kim among the handful of “Better Call Saul’s” main players not seen on “Breaking Bad,” it begs the question of whether her and Jimmy’s relationship, already on choppy waters, makes it out alive.

“The thing I’m most interested and worried about is where Jimmy and Kim are going together,” says Gould. “What is Kim’s fate going to be? She seems to be, at the end of this season, at a decision point about her relationship with Jimmy.” Gould argues that while Jimmy knew he was playing the Bar Association with his story about Chuck, he was unaware that Kim wasn’t fully in on the ruse. “He was expecting that Kim would see through it. She didn’t. She took it at face value.”

With “Better Call Saul” running closer to the “Breaking Bad” timeline, does that mean we’ll see more “Bad” vets show up? Gould is still holding out hope he’ll get everyone of consequence to make a return in some form or fashion. While he didn’t specifically name them, that would presumably include Cranston himself and Aaron Paul’s Jesse Pinkman.

“[We] would love to see all of the key folks from ‘Breaking Bad,'” said Gould. “It’s really a matter of whether the story leads us there.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Co-Showrunner Breaks Down That Long-Awaited Moment in the Season Finale

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould: 'Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks' (Podcast)

‘Better Call Saul’ Team on the Season Finale: ‘It’s Either a Break or a Breakthrough’ (SPOILERS)

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched the final episode of season four of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Winner.” “It’s all good, man.” With those four words, the transformation of Jimmy McGill (Bo…

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched the final episode of season four of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Winner.” “It’s all good, man.” With those four words, the transformation of Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) into Saul Goodman was finally complete. Jubilant over getting his law license back, Jimmy celebrated by asking the clerk for […]

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Finale Gives Birth To A Brand New Jimmy

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul.
There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 final…

SPOILER ALERT: This article contains details of the season 4 finale of Better Call Saul. There are many moving parts to Better Call Saul, with the main lingering question being: “How did Jimmy McGill become Saul Goodman?” The season 4 finale addresses this and continues to clear the path for the inevitable intersection with the Breaking Bad timeline — although we’ll probably have to wait a little longer to see Walter White or Jesse Pinkman make an appearance in Saul. Even…

‘Better Call Saul’ Co-Showrunner Breaks Down That Long-Awaited Moment in the Season Finale

(Warning: This story contains spoilers from the season finale of AMC’s “Better Call Saul”)

Exit Jimmy McGill. And finally, after four seasons, enter Saul Goodman.

The “Breaking Bad” spinoff wrapped its fourth season on Monday with a moment that viewers had been anticipating ever since we first met Bob Odenkirk’s lovable-but-flawed Jimmy McGill.

“I’m so thankful that everyone stuck with us this long,” Peter Gould, “Better Call Saul’s” co-showrunner tells TheWrap.

After delivering a heartfelt, tearful story about his late brother Chuck (Michael McKean) and winning his appeal to the New Mexico State Bar committee to be reinstated as a lawyer, as they walk out Jimmy does an about-face to Kim (Rhea Seehorn): He was faking the whole thing in an attempt to get a sympathy vote.

Also Read: AMC Renews Paul Giamatti-Produced ‘Lodge 49’ for Season 2

“Did you see those suckers? That one a—— was crying,” he excitedly tells Kim, who looks on horror as she is unwittingly witnessing the “birth” of his “Breaking Bad” alter-ego. Upon being reinstated, he asks for a DBA, or “Doing Business As,” form so he can practice law under a different name. And if there was still any doubt what that name would be, the final words of the season made it crystal clear: He’s finally Saul Goodman, Attorney at Law.

“It’s one of those things that emerged, sort of organically, as we broke the season,” Gould said of the four-years-in-the-making moment.

The introduction (or re-introduction) of Saul Goodman was something that took far longer than Gould had anticipated, as it’s well known that he and co-creator Vince Gilligan had originally planned to have Jimmy become Saul at the end of the first season. But the tragic descent of Jimmy into the sleazy lawyer from “Breaking Bad” ending up being too interesting to speed through.

But all throughout the fourth season, it felt like the clock was counting down to midnight on Jimmy. He was already using the “Saul Goodman” moniker when he was selling his cell phones to criminals and in the penultimate episode he laments to Kim that, while he sees those same criminals as potential new business (after all, criminals tend to need lawyers), they only know him under his pseudonym.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

“Jimmy has this very specific problem, which is that his former business of doing wills for the elders is closed off to him,” says Gould. “Even when he’s a lawyer again, he’s ruined his reputation, so what kind of law is he going to practice next?”

Gould said that around midseason they figured out how they were going to get Jimmy to that point where he decides it’s more advantageous to him to practice law under a different name. “All season long we’ve been kind of teasing out and going step by step to try and figure out how he comes to the conclusion that he comes to.” And as Gould explains, to Jimmy, it makes perfect sense. “This crazy decision of calling himself Saul Goodman is, in his eyes, logical.”

But Gould teases, is it also a way for Jimmy to put on a mask and shut himself off to anybody that still cares for him?

All throughout “Better Call Saul” the writers have presented Jimmy McGill as this down-on-his-luck screw up, always looking to cut corners, and always failing to earn the respect of Chuck. Despite Jimmy’s insistence to Kim at the end that his statement about his late brother in front of the committee was an act, Gould argues there was probably some truth to those words, where Jimmy talks about his desire to make his big brother proud.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

“He uses the death of his brother to evoke an emotional reaction from the panel to win the day. But, it feels very real,” said Gould. “Has he just become a much better actor? There’s a lot of ways to interpret that [scene].”

Gould said the writers are just starting to plan out the fifth season, which will see Odenkirk have to essentially play two characters.

“The big question for us is what does it mean to be Saul?” he asks. “It’s the Bruce Wayne/Batman question. Which one is the real guy?”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould: ‘Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks’ (Podcast)

‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim’s Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

(Warning: This story contains spoilers from the season finale of AMC’s “Better Call Saul”)

Exit Jimmy McGill. And finally, after four seasons, enter Saul Goodman.

The “Breaking Bad” spinoff wrapped its fourth season on Monday with a moment that viewers had been anticipating ever since we first met Bob Odenkirk’s lovable-but-flawed Jimmy McGill.

“I’m so thankful that everyone stuck with us this long,” Peter Gould, “Better Call Saul’s” co-showrunner tells TheWrap.

After delivering a heartfelt, tearful story about his late brother Chuck (Michael McKean) and winning his appeal to the New Mexico State Bar committee to be reinstated as a lawyer, as they walk out Jimmy does an about-face to Kim (Rhea Seehorn): He was faking the whole thing in an attempt to get a sympathy vote.

“Did you see those suckers? That one a—— was crying,” he excitedly tells Kim, who looks on horror as she is unwittingly witnessing the “birth” of his “Breaking Bad” alter-ego. Upon being reinstated, he asks for a DBA, or “Doing Business As,” form so he can practice law under a different name. And if there was still any doubt what that name would be, the final words of the season made it crystal clear: He’s finally Saul Goodman, Attorney at Law.

“It’s one of those things that emerged, sort of organically, as we broke the season,” Gould said of the four-years-in-the-making moment.

The introduction (or re-introduction) of Saul Goodman was something that took far longer than Gould had anticipated, as it’s well known that he and co-creator Vince Gilligan had originally planned to have Jimmy become Saul at the end of the first season. But the tragic descent of Jimmy into the sleazy lawyer from “Breaking Bad” ending up being too interesting to speed through.

But all throughout the fourth season, it felt like the clock was counting down to midnight on Jimmy. He was already using the “Saul Goodman” moniker when he was selling his cell phones to criminals and in the penultimate episode he laments to Kim that, while he sees those same criminals as potential new business (after all, criminals tend to need lawyers), they only know him under his pseudonym.

“Jimmy has this very specific problem, which is that his former business of doing wills for the elders is closed off to him,” says Gould. “Even when he’s a lawyer again, he’s ruined his reputation, so what kind of law is he going to practice next?”

Gould said that around midseason they figured out how they were going to get Jimmy to that point where he decides it’s more advantageous to him to practice law under a different name. “All season long we’ve been kind of teasing out and going step by step to try and figure out how he comes to the conclusion that he comes to.” And as Gould explains, to Jimmy, it makes perfect sense. “This crazy decision of calling himself Saul Goodman is, in his eyes, logical.”

But Gould teases, is it also a way for Jimmy to put on a mask and shut himself off to anybody that still cares for him?

All throughout “Better Call Saul” the writers have presented Jimmy McGill as this down-on-his-luck screw up, always looking to cut corners, and always failing to earn the respect of Chuck. Despite Jimmy’s insistence to Kim at the end that his statement about his late brother in front of the committee was an act, Gould argues there was probably some truth to those words, where Jimmy talks about his desire to make his big brother proud.

“He uses the death of his brother to evoke an emotional reaction from the panel to win the day. But, it feels very real,” said Gould. “Has he just become a much better actor? There’s a lot of ways to interpret that [scene].”

Gould said the writers are just starting to plan out the fifth season, which will see Odenkirk have to essentially play two characters.

“The big question for us is what does it mean to be Saul?” he asks. “It’s the Bruce Wayne/Batman question. Which one is the real guy?”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould: 'Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks' (Podcast)

'Better Call Saul': Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim's Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

'Better Call Saul': Nacho Is a 'Samurai Without a Master' Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

Bob Odenkirk is in Greta Gerwig’s Little Women 

At this point, the cast of Greta Gerwig’s Little Women adaptation is looking so good that it actually makes her look a little greedy. The Ladybird writer/director has already landed Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Meryl Streep, Laura Dern, Florence P…

At this point, the cast of Greta Gerwig’s Little Women adaptation is looking so good that it actually makes her look a little greedy. The Ladybird writer/director has already landed Saoirse Ronan, Timothée Chalamet, Meryl Streep, Laura Dern, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlon, and Emma Watson (replacing Emma Stone in a…

Read more...

‘Better Call Saul’s Bob Odenkirk Joins Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’ Remake

EXCLUSIVE: Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Better Call Saul star Bob Odenkirk is set for Sony Pictures’ Little Women, the remake which is being written and directed by Greta Gerwig. The previously announced cast includes Meryl Streep, Timothee Ch…

EXCLUSIVE: Emmy and Golden Globe-nominated Better Call Saul star Bob Odenkirk is set for Sony Pictures’ Little Women, the remake which is being written and directed by Greta Gerwig. The previously announced cast includes Meryl Streep, Timothee Chalamet, Saoirse Ronan, Laura Dern, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Eliza Scanlon, James Norton, and Louis Garrel. The pic will reunite Odenkirk and Streep, both of whom starred in the Oscar-nominated feature, The Post. Odenkirk’s…

‘Better Call Saul’: How Bob Odenkirk and the Cast Develop Their Characters, One Tiny Bit of Backstory At a Time

Odenkirk and fellow stars Jonathan Banks, Rhea Seehorn, and Patrick Fabian tell IndieWire how the nuanced writing, costumes, and their own intuitions drive their work on the series.

In the latest episode of “Better Call Saul,” viewers get an intense peek into the psyche of Gus (Giancarlo Esposito), as the character sat beside the bedside of nemesis Hector Salamanca and told a little story about the fruit tree he loved as a child, and the coati who tried to rob young Gus of its fruit. While it doesn’t offer up any specific biographic details, it’s a feast of a monologue which reveals quite a bit about who Gus is, and why we should be afraid of him.

It’s just yet another exciting insight into the life of one of “Saul’s” characters. That sort of moment, co-star Rhea Seehorn told IndieWire, is why “these shows stand out. There’s never spoon-feeding to the audience, and that includes us not having to reiterate plot-wise over and over. Sometimes you watch TV and they let you know how they feel to make sure you’re keeping up. But on this show, they just completely trust the audience. That they’ll get it, and when something’s meant to be mysterious, they take it with open arms.”

That sense of mystery doesn’t just affect the audience, but the cast. They’ve learned a lot about their characters since the show’s premiere in 2015, but are still piecing it together through the details.

When Bob Odenkirk first started playing the man who would eventually be known as Saul Goodman, “I hadn’t painted a very complete picture of that guy,” he told IndieWire. “I figured he went to strip clubs at night, and then went home as drunk as he could safely drive, and then played a little golf on the weekends, and tried to not think about being alone too much. So I didn’t have much of a guy there beyond a guy who’s like a shark, moving as fast as he could through life.”

Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Bob Odenkirk in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

In fact, he said, it’s only now in the fourth season that he feels like “we have now gotten to know these guys, so it’s only now that I feel like this season has been the season where both Rhea and I have said, ‘Oh, I don’t think my character would do that’ a few times. Not too often. Because we know them now. And we didn’t know them before.”

Odenkirk doesn’t see that as a bad thing, though. “I think it’s been all to the good. It doesn’t stop production, or stop the show. It just means we have to have a conversation with the producers about who they’ve been. I feel like, at this point for him to do something he has never done is a little… Like, I have to question that. Because we’ve seen him in wildly different modes, and we’ve seen him do vastly different things, and those are all part of who he is. So if he goes out of that world that we’ve already established, I have to ask the question,” he said. “But we always work it out. Whether it’s a logic that has to be explained to us, or different choices that they make with the writing to help us justify a choice by the character — we always figure it out.”

In the earliest days of the show, wardrobe played a big role in helping them figure those things out. “Our costumer designer, Jennifer Bryan, is just brilliant,” Seehorn said. “My very first costume fitting with her, she said, ‘There’s just something about Kim that feels like she’s still buying separates from Marshalls and Ross and stuff. And they’re not matching suits, but she hopes everyone in the office [thinks they do].”

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 6 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Rhea Seehorn in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

It was an observation that literally inspired tears in Seehorn, because “that’s not in this business. Women don’t always get to have those kinds of conversations in a fitting — it could be much more superficial stuff. This was deep character, and I’m just like, ‘That’s exactly what I think. There’s something about her that’s trying to fit in, and she’s the most herself in front of Jimmy.'”

And Fabian also found himself leaning on the impeccable suits that he was asked to wear for “Saul” for character insight. “I’d love to say that going to school and being an actor for 20 years has given me a head start in a lot of things, and I’ll take credit for some talent, but I tell you what, I put on that suit because that woman has designed Howard’s suit of armor,” he said. “When I throw that on, my work is 70 percent there. It makes me feel like, when I walk into a scene, that I am wearing more money than anybody else has in the room. And it just gives me an attitude and a sense of superiority that I think lends itself to Howard’s character pretty well.”

(Of course, as the audience has already begun to see in Season 4, those suits are starting to get rumpled. “I think everybody pretty much thinks they know Howard and they think they know how in control and how buttoned up he is and I think they’re in for a bit of a surprise this season, what Howard can and cannot be.”)

Patrick Fabian as Howard Hamlin - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Patrick Fabian in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

As the series progressed, when it came to how Kim’s actual backstory matched with her own ideas, Seehorn said that “more of it’s matched up than I would’ve thought possible. Sometimes I like to pretend that that’s because I am just as smart as them, but that’s not usually what it is.”

Instead, she said, “I took from what they had in the very beginning, of someone who has great economy of language and uses as few words as possible to get her point across, and very ambitious. And I started building the backstory facts from that, including the relationship with Jimmy. And you sort of take the puzzle pieces you give them, and you try to figure out, what notches would fit in those? And it keeps getting built out. So by the time they started adding other pieces, they were always wonderfully surprising in the way that they added a layer, but they also fit. Because I feel like together, it’s this constant matrix.”

The details about her life that have emerged over the years, such as coming from a small town in the midwest, seemed to extend naturally from what had been established previously. “There was something from the very beginning that felt outsider-looking-in to me from the beginning about her,” she said. “And also, immediately I was like, well that matches with the relationship with Jimmy, even prior to dating this history that goes back to the mailroom. There’s something about being on the outside and trying to fit in that I think they share.”

Also important was the question of Kim’s age. “I did the backwards math there and said, so if you’re in a law firm coming out of a mailroom, at a time when usually it’s intern-high school age or college age, and she was older than that. And she’s trying to move up, so if that’s what you’re clinging to, then let’s make where you came from as far from that as you can.”

While Banks is also learning more about Mike as the series progresses, he told IndieWire that he never gets surprised by what the writers choose to add to the character. “They write this full dimensional, wonderful rich character for me. And what that does [for me] as an actor — I’ll do Mike’s backstory forever. Because they’ve given me so much to work with.”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Jonathan Banks in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Even when the writers take Mike in a new direction that doesn’t necessarily make sense to him, it eventually comes together. “When I disagree with something, I’ll say so. I mean, when they had him in the group therapy session, with the daughter in that depressing room, where you would have slit your wrists if you had to go into that group therapy, I went, ‘What are you doing, you’re putting Mike in a group therapy session, oh no, no.’ Well, they said, ‘It’s for the daughter-in-law.’ I went, ‘Okay, yeah.’ But then they extricate me from that because I lay into those people eventually.”

Added Banks, “My version of Mike … Mike’s been dark a long, long, long, time. They gave us the Vietnam veteran sniper and who was he before that, even as a kid. You think about the things you did as a kid that you regret or the hurt that you may have inflicted on someone. And we all have sometimes much greater degrees of that. So how dark? I haven’t even decided yet but I promise you, he’d been dark a long, long time.”

As Season 4 progresses, we’ve seen Mike fully commit to helping set up Gus’s enterprises, and as Banks says, “to hook up with Gus, it’s a decision, yes. But is it any darker than other places that he’s been? No, it’s not…Playing that character and that precision, I like that. I like that because again, I go back to dimensions, look what else I’ve given him. Look what else they’ve given this character.”

Banks’s instincts when it comes to the character, it’s worth noting, weren’t just backed up by the direction the writers took Mike — Banks (as he told IndieWire) actually had an impact on key backstory elements. “Years ago in one of the ‘Breaking Bad’ episodes, I let my granddaughter out of the car and I had balloons, mylar balloons and I gave her a few of them. And then I send her up and say, ‘Your mom’s waiting for you, go on.'”

Jonathan Banks as Mike Ehrmantraut - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Jonathan Banks in “Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures

As he continued, “I said to Vince, who was directing that episode, when I sent my daughter up and it was from a distance … I turned to him afterwards and I said, ‘That’s my granddaughter, but that is not my daughter.’ I said, ‘Whatever has happened to Mike, happened because of his son.’ So three, four years later, Peter said to me, “Remember when you said that about …’ And here came the episode [Season 1’s “Five-O”].”

Until Season 3, Fabian hadn’t even known that the other Hamlin in the firm name Hamlin Hamlin & McGill referred to the father of his character, though he had assumed that it was the case. “I had a line [in a scene with Kim] talking about my father wanted me to hang another H on the wall. That’s such a loaded line of so many things. Of father and son issues, wanting to be your own. All that sort of thing. Familial obligations,” he said. “And since we don’t see Howard release that very often, that’s a moment where it also tells me if he’s willing to even say that line, that shows how much affection he has for Kim, how much he looks at her as either a protégé, or a daughter, or a mentee, and all those sort of things. That’s the kind of economy in the writing that I think I’m able to use and find that really tells me a lot about Howard.”

Fabian noted that when they first began shooting the series, creators Peter Gould and Vince Gilligan “were still sort of finding out what they thought. They knew kind of what he was, but the great thing about being on a show for a long run is that the writers start writing to some of your strengths.”

So at the beginning there was some uncertainty as to how Fabian felt he should play Howard. “We were doing something in the very beginning of the very first episode and I think I was sort of leaning into it. And when I say leaning into it, it’s a gentle way of saying I was completely overacting. I was playing this sort of Snidely Whiplash, twirling my mustache sort of thing,” he said.

“And then Vince came over to me because he was directing that particular episode and he said, ‘You know what? I’m not sure if Howard is a bad guy. And I don’t think you should be either.’ It was a great note to drop in, I think, for any actor, at least for me, to not make assumptions and not run to the end of something that you don’t know is there yet. To really take it one step at a time.”

New episodes of “Better Call Saul” Season 4 air Mondays at 9 p.m. on AMC.

Constance Wu, Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey Among 70th Emmy Awards Presenters

The presenters for the 70th Emmy Awards were announced on Thursday, with some new faces set to take the stage to hand out the iconic statuettes on Sept. 17.

Constance Wu, Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey, Rachel Brosnahan, Bob Odenkirk, Taraji P. Henson, Millie Bobby Brown, Sandra Oh, and Kit Harington are among the stars named as presenters for TV’s biggest night.

Many of them are also nominees themselves, including Brosnahan for her breakout role on “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and Oh for British crime drama “Killing Eve.”

Also Read: Inside Netflix’s Historic Upset of HBO for Most Emmy Nominations

As for the shows they will be handing over golden ladies too, “Game of Thrones” took the TV Iron Throne with 22 nominations for the 2018 Emmy Awards, the most for any show — edging out NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” and fellow HBO drama “Westworld,” grabbing 21 nominations apiece. Following behind was Hulu’s “Handmaid’s Tale,” which leaped from 13 nods in 2017 to 20 nominations for this year’s show.

For the first time, Netflix has surpassed HBO to earn 112 nominations and break the cabler’s 17-year streak of being the most nominated network.

“Saturday Night Live’s” Colin Jost and Michael Che will serve as co-hosts for the evening, and the show is executive produced by Lorne Michaels.

Also Read: Watch Rachel Bloom’s ‘Super Chill’ Reaction to ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’s’ Emmys Snub (Video)

See the full list of presenters below (with more names expected to be announced closer to showtime).

The 70th Emmy Awards will air live from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles on Monday, Sept. 17 at 8/7c on NBC.

Alec Baldwin​ (“Saturday Night Live,” “Match Game”) – Outstanding Supporting
Actor in a Comedy Series
Rachel Brosnahan ​(“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”) – Outstanding Lead Actress
in a Comedy Series
Millie Bobby Brown ​(“Stranger Things”) – Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Michael Douglas ​(“The Kominsky Method”)
Tina Fey ​(“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”)
Kit Harington ​(“Game of Thrones”)
Taraji P. Henson ​(“Empire”)
Kate McKinnon ​(“Saturday Night Live”) – Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Tracy Morgan ​(“The Last O.G.”)
Bob Odenkirk ​(“Better Call Saul”)
Sandra Oh​ (“Killing Eve”) – Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Constance Wu ​(“Fresh Off the Boat”)

Related stories from TheWrap:

Carl Reiner Is the Oldest Emmy Nominee Ever at 96, but He’s Still Got Work to Do (Video)

4 Female Emmy-Nominated Directors on Being Outnumbered by Men 10-to-1: ‘What the Hell?’ (Video)

Don’t Tell Allison Janney She Could Make Emmy History: ‘Should I Change My Name?’

The presenters for the 70th Emmy Awards were announced on Thursday, with some new faces set to take the stage to hand out the iconic statuettes on Sept. 17.

Constance Wu, Alec Baldwin, Tina Fey, Rachel Brosnahan, Bob Odenkirk, Taraji P. Henson, Millie Bobby Brown, Sandra Oh, and Kit Harington are among the stars named as presenters for TV’s biggest night.

Many of them are also nominees themselves, including Brosnahan for her breakout role on “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and Oh for British crime drama “Killing Eve.”

As for the shows they will be handing over golden ladies too, “Game of Thrones” took the TV Iron Throne with 22 nominations for the 2018 Emmy Awards, the most for any show — edging out NBC’s “Saturday Night Live” and fellow HBO drama “Westworld,” grabbing 21 nominations apiece. Following behind was Hulu’s “Handmaid’s Tale,” which leaped from 13 nods in 2017 to 20 nominations for this year’s show.

For the first time, Netflix has surpassed HBO to earn 112 nominations and break the cabler’s 17-year streak of being the most nominated network.

“Saturday Night Live’s” Colin Jost and Michael Che will serve as co-hosts for the evening, and the show is executive produced by Lorne Michaels.

See the full list of presenters below (with more names expected to be announced closer to showtime).

The 70th Emmy Awards will air live from the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles on Monday, Sept. 17 at 8/7c on NBC.

Alec Baldwin​ (“Saturday Night Live,” “Match Game”) – Outstanding Supporting
Actor in a Comedy Series
Rachel Brosnahan ​(“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”) – Outstanding Lead Actress
in a Comedy Series
Millie Bobby Brown ​(“Stranger Things”) – Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Michael Douglas ​(“The Kominsky Method”)
Tina Fey ​(“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”)
Kit Harington ​(“Game of Thrones”)
Taraji P. Henson ​(“Empire”)
Kate McKinnon ​(“Saturday Night Live”) – Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Tracy Morgan ​(“The Last O.G.”)
Bob Odenkirk ​(“Better Call Saul”)
Sandra Oh​ (“Killing Eve”) – Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Constance Wu ​(“Fresh Off the Boat”)

Related stories from TheWrap:

Carl Reiner Is the Oldest Emmy Nominee Ever at 96, but He's Still Got Work to Do (Video)

4 Female Emmy-Nominated Directors on Being Outnumbered by Men 10-to-1: 'What the Hell?' (Video)

Don't Tell Allison Janney She Could Make Emmy History: 'Should I Change My Name?'

Bob Odenkirk on ‘Better Call Saul’s’ Latest ‘Breaking Bad’ Twists

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched episode 5 of Season 4 of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Quite a Ride.” The episode title says it all: Quite a ride, indeed. Halfway through Season 4 of “Better Call Saul,&…

Spoiler alert: Do not read until you’ve watched episode 5 of Season 4 of “Better Call Saul,” titled “Quite a Ride.” The episode title says it all: Quite a ride, indeed. Halfway through Season 4 of “Better Call Saul,” one thing is clear: Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) is plummeting even faster into his eventual, inevitable […]

‘Better Call Saul’ Boss Peter Gould Wrote a Clinton-Lewinsky Movie – With Shadow Puppets (Podcast)

“Better Call Saul” co-creator and “Breaking Bad” veteran Peter Gould is one of the most successful writers in Hollywood, but it wasn’t always so. In the early 2000s, he tried unsuccessfully to get HBO to make his project a…

“Better Call Saul” co-creator and “Breaking Bad” veteran Peter Gould is one of the most successful writers in Hollywood, but it wasn’t always so. In the early 2000s, he tried unsuccessfully to get HBO to make his project about the Clinton-Lewinsky saga — with shadow puppets.

Listen to Gould explain the project — and offer some excellent writing advice — in our new “Shoot This Now” podcast. You can listen on Apple or right here.

Gould told us that before he was hired on “Breaking Bad” — where he created criminal lawyer Saul Goodman, aka Jimmy McGill, the antihero of “Breaking Bad” spinoff “Better Call Saul” — he spent years writing projects that never got made. One of them was a Pam Grier story he also describes on the podcast. Another was the Clinton-Lewinsky story, which Gould wrote in both movie and miniseries form in the hopes that HBO would air it. The network unfortunately passed.

The scandal was still all-too-fresh in people’s minds in the early 2000s, and Gould was looking for a way to illustrate certain graphic details. That’s when he hit on the idea of shadow puppets — figures placed between a light and a screen to act out the drama.

Ever make a dog with your hands when your teacher turned on a film projector? Congratulations: You understand the basics of shadow puppets. Masters of the art form cut figures from paper and other materials to create characters who can walk, dance, and… do other stuff, as Gould explains.

Could the Clinton-Lewinsky story still work today? We think so. Earlier this year, Ryan Murphy abandoned plans for a season of “American Crime Story” that would have focused on the star-crossed relationship between President Bill Clinton’s relationship and White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

But interest in the case remains high: Donald Trump tried to make it an issue during the 2016 presidential campaign, when he ran against Clinton’s wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. And the scandal is the new subject of the captivating “Slow Burn” podcast.

Gould also tells us about his interesting job interview for “Breaking Bad,” how he beats writer’s block, and what’s in store for “Better Call Saul” leads Jimmy (Bob Odenkirk) and Kim (Rhea Seehorn). Things are about to get shadowy.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Boss Peter Gould: 'Not Every Story Has to Have a Baby Tied to the Railroad Tracks' (Podcast)

'Better Call Saul': Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim's Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

'Better Call Saul' Writers: Walter White May Still Be Alive During Gene's Omaha Cinnabon Scenes

‘Better Call Saul’: Rhea Seehorn Is Terrified of Kim’s Fate, Checks Every Script to See If She Dies (Video)

Rhea Seehorn says the fact that her “Better Call Saul” character Kim Wexler didn’t appear on “Breaking Bad” has her terrified about her eventual fate. So terrified, in fact, that she flips through every script immediately to check if she makes it through the episode intact.

“Patrick Fabian [who plays Howard Hamlin] and I, every time we get the scripts, we flip through them as fast as possible and then we call each other: ‘I’m not dead! You’re not dead!,’” Seehorn told Seth Meyers on his “Late Night” show on Tuesday. “And then we get back to doing the work. But yea, you always have to check.”

Set prior to the events of “Breaking Bad,” “Better Call Saul” focuses on the transformation of Bob Odenkirk’s Jimmy McGill into the criminal lawyer Saul Goodman that advises Bryan Cranston’s Walter White. A popular theory for any “Better Call Saul” character that didn’t first show up in “Breaking Bad” is that they’re living on borrowed time. We already saw that with one character: Michael McKean’s Charles McGill.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’: Nacho Is a ‘Samurai Without a Master’ Stuck Between Fring and the Salamancas (Video)

As Meyers so aptly put it: “It’s a universe where people die a lot.”

Since Kim is arguably the last character that’s keeping Jimmy from turning fully into the smarmy lawyer we meet in “Breaking Bad,” it would appear that something tragic is going to happen.

“In the end if it’s better to kill Kim, [showrunners Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould] would kill Kim, but at this point I’m not even sure that’s the most tragic end for her,” Seehorn said.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Writers: Walter White May Still Be Alive During Gene’s Omaha Cinnabon Scenes

However, Seehorn said she’s been pitching Gilligan and Gould on a future that includes Kim, referencing the black-and-white flash-forwards of Jimmy/Saul’s life after the events of “Breaking Bad,” where he’s essentially in witness protection as a Cinnabon manager named “Gene.”

“We do the Gene-Cinnabon scenes that are black and white, but you just slowly pull back and Kim works next door at Claire’s accessories… with her own comb-over,” she said. “She could be selling ponytail holders.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of ‘Better Call Saul’ (Video)

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New ‘Better Call Saul’ Ass Tattoo (Photo)

Rhea Seehorn says the fact that her “Better Call Saul” character Kim Wexler didn’t appear on “Breaking Bad” has her terrified about her eventual fate. So terrified, in fact, that she flips through every script immediately to check if she makes it through the episode intact.

“Patrick Fabian [who plays Howard Hamlin] and I, every time we get the scripts, we flip through them as fast as possible and then we call each other: ‘I’m not dead! You’re not dead!,'” Seehorn told Seth Meyers on his “Late Night” show on Tuesday. “And then we get back to doing the work. But yea, you always have to check.”

Set prior to the events of “Breaking Bad,” “Better Call Saul” focuses on the transformation of Bob Odenkirk’s Jimmy McGill into the criminal lawyer Saul Goodman that advises Bryan Cranston’s Walter White. A popular theory for any “Better Call Saul” character that didn’t first show up in “Breaking Bad” is that they’re living on borrowed time. We already saw that with one character: Michael McKean’s Charles McGill.

As Meyers so aptly put it: “It’s a universe where people die a lot.”

Since Kim is arguably the last character that’s keeping Jimmy from turning fully into the smarmy lawyer we meet in “Breaking Bad,” it would appear that something tragic is going to happen.

“In the end if it’s better to kill Kim, [showrunners Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould] would kill Kim, but at this point I’m not even sure that’s the most tragic end for her,” Seehorn said.

However, Seehorn said she’s been pitching Gilligan and Gould on a future that includes Kim, referencing the black-and-white flash-forwards of Jimmy/Saul’s life after the events of “Breaking Bad,” where he’s essentially in witness protection as a Cinnabon manager named “Gene.”

“We do the Gene-Cinnabon scenes that are black and white, but you just slowly pull back and Kim works next door at Claire’s accessories… with her own comb-over,” she said. “She could be selling ponytail holders.”

Watch the video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of 'Better Call Saul' (Video)

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New 'Better Call Saul' Ass Tattoo (Photo)

‘Better Call Saul’: The Cast of One of TV’s Best Written Shows Has a Lot to Say About Silence

Bob Odenkirk, Rhea Seehorn, Michael Mando, and Patrick Fabian explain how the lack of words in the scripts inspire them to create their best performances.

Better Call Saul” is a show that doesn’t lack for dramatic confrontations. But the reason those scenes are so memorable is that on balance, the AMC drama is a show driven by silence. In fact, the quiet reserve of so many of its characters has become a trademark of the series that Rhea Seehorn couldn’t help but laugh when asked what would happen if the show’s most stalwart characters came together.

Seehorn is more than capable of exploding with rage, as viewers saw in “Breathe,” the second episode of Season 4. But typically, tough and smart lawyer Kim (Seehorn) is more reserved than normal folks, perhaps only matched for silence by reluctant drug dealer Nacho (Michael Mando).

On set earlier this year, IndieWire simply asked, “what if Nacho and Kim had a scene together?”

But Seehorn found the idea amusing. “If you stick Jonathan Banks in there, it’ll just be three people staring at each other, right? For an entire season. Just a staring contest. That’d be great.”

Watching Nacho, Kim, and Mike stare at each other for a season does sound like a lot of fun. And the reason for that speaks to how well this show deploys the moments when characters do speak their minds — or, more often than not, the moments when they don’t.

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

For Seehorn, her reaction to getting a largely dialogue-free scene is appreciation, because “as an actor, you look at it and first of all, you feel trusted. By your writers and your directors, and then one of the coolest things about the show is how much they trust the audience. And I do think that it has, from the beginning of ‘Breaking Bad,’ made these shows stand out in a way.”

As she continued, “There’s never spoon-feeding to the audience, and that includes us not having to reiterate plot-wise over and over. If a character is not very articulate about their emotions, or like Kim who sometimes is suppressing, avoiding and not totally in touch with some things, then they don’t say them. Sometimes you watch TV and they let you know how they feel to make sure you’re keeping up, and on this show, they just completely trust the audience.”

For Mando, Nacho’s silence spoke to an aspect of his character that he learned from doing his research for the part. “When I spoke to a lot of people who were in this business, in order to prepare for the character, they would tell you the most dangerous guys are those who don’t speak, because a dog that barks doesn’t bite,” he said. “Nacho, I think inherently, because of his father’s upbringing, has always been moral. And he was always surrounded by predators. And the way that a person like that survives is by observing and calculating.”

Added Mando, “What’s so interesting this season is there’s a new saying that applies to Nacho, which is, ‘If you make yourself a sheep, you will be eaten by the wolves.’ And Nacho has to make himself a wolf.”

One scene from Season 3 that demanded a great deal of Mando was what we might simply call the “training montage.” The sequence showcased Nacho practicing the simple yet crucial maneuver that would allow the character to sabotage Hector Salamanca’s medication.

Michael Mando as Nacho Varga, Vincent Fuertes as Arturo - Better Call Saul _ Season 3, Episode 9 - Photo Credit: Michele K. Short/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Michele K.Short/AMC/Sony Picture

“The pill sequence is a really interesting sequence,” Mando said, “because to an outsider it sounds like a banal thing to do, but when you understand what it means for that particular character… In that given moment, that pill situation for Nacho is the equivalent of flying a fighter plane and being able to go after the Death Star in ‘Star Wars.’ That’s what that meant to him, and if he had failed that moment, he’s dead. There’s no alternative.”

When it came to filming the scene, Mando said that “It was extremely grueling. When I was switching those pills, my hands were sweaty and the pressure was there and it was draining… Even though it’s just entertainment, I really take it to heart. I really care. So whenever they give me tasks like that, I really invest in it. I really, really care.” And when it came time to shoot the moment, Mando said that he did successful drop the pill bottle in the jacket pocket on the first take.

(But here is a promise that just Episode 2 of Season 4 has already delivered on: “As draining as that was,” Mando said, “that pales in comparison to what [Nacho] goes through this season.”)

One of the show’s most talkative characters may be Howard Hamlin, played by Patrick Fabian, who admitted to being conscious of how much he might get to say in any given episode. “My ego as an actor says, ‘Yes, give Patrick more dialogue, because the more Patrick says … ‘ — I don’t know if you’ve noticed — ‘he likes to talk. And that would be so much more interesting,'” he said.

That said, he admitted, “In this show, the two scenes that I constantly get told how good I am in are the two scenes where I say nothing. The first scene is a silent dumb show where Jimmy’s having a birthday cake to celebrate passing the bar, and I do a silent dumb show where I let him know that he’s not gonna become a lawyer at HHM, and all you hear is the sound of a copy machine. And in the other one, is me and Kim walking down the hall and we are dead silent as she’s trying to say things. And I say nothing. And then all of a sudden we hit the HHM room and I smile and say, ‘Hey, welcome.'”

As he said, “I get singled out for those scenes all the time, which just goes to show you, at least for this actor, I don’t know when I’m being really good or when I’m not being really good. And I don’t necessarily need a mouthful of dialogue in order to convey what’s going on.”

Fabian did follow that up with a joke: “If you want to call the writers and tell them to give me more words, you may do so. You have my permission.”

Patrick Fabian as Howard Hamlin - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Meanwhile, Seehorn said she loves playing the quiet scenes, noting that when it comes to “Saul’s” writing, “the entire script, no matter who’s talking, there’s such a great art of the economy of language. [Executive producer] Gennifer Hutchison even said on Twitter — she writes a lot of great writing advice on Twitter — she was talking about that at some point her final drafts involve, how little can you say and how well can you tell this in the fewest amount of words? And that pairing down, I think lends itself to a lot more reality, certainly for the relationship with Kim and Jimmy. They are often much more about what’s not said than what is said.”

That matters a lot to Odenkirk on both sides, because for him the quiet scenes do matter, but “the dynamics of this show are pretty vast.” And that’s most especially true when it comes to the interplay we can expect between Kim and Jimmy going forward.

“There have been a number of scenes between Kim and Jimmy that were very mature and not people hiding inside of their characters, but two people who are genuinely trying to stretch themselves as people and doing things that you almost wouldn’t think they’re capable of,” he said.

Still, their central dynamic is rooted in what’s said and not said, as Seehorn noted. “You’ve got a character like Kim who’s really far on that spectrum, as far as she’s quite withholding. And it sometimes very much has a position of power I think, in certain situations to just not participate and engage,” she said. “And then it becomes also a source of comedy I think at times, and heartache, with a character like Jimmy because he’s actually so verbose, and deals with the emotions and his reactions to things by talking and talking and talking, and Kim gets quieter and quieter and quieter. It makes for a very interesting relationship that I find very believable.”

Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 2 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

“Better Call Saul.”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Odenkirk did feel that in Season 4, the dynamic between Kim and Jimmy had evolved to some degree. “Much of what we play are people hiding inside their self-delusion or their natural reactive behaviors… there has been more than one scene where the character doesn’t resort to their limited almost caricature version of themselves, but kind of reaches out in a human way to the other characters. Boy, that’s something to play. That just feels like you’re playing a living person.”

As Odenkirk continued, “these two characters give each other forgiveness and leeway. That is just not something you’re used to playing or seeing, even in movies.”

“Better Call Saul” Season 4 is currently airing Mondays at 9 p.m. on AMC.

‘Better Call Saul’ Writers: Walter White May Still Be Alive During Gene’s Omaha Cinnabon Scenes

“Better Call Saul” star Bob Odenkirk and masterminds Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould just changed everything we thought we knew about Jimmy McGill/Saul Goodman’s life in Omaha: It turns out the black-and-white sequences on “Saul” may take place when Walter White is still alive.

Wait, we hear you saying. What? We had the same reaction. The Omaha sequences on “Saul” — brief segments that hint at Saul’s sad life after he fled Albuquerque to live undercover — suggest Gene is still living in fear because of his life as Saul. (The Season 4 premiere spelled this out more explicitly than any episode before.) On the “Better Call Saul Insider” podcast released this week, Odenkirk, Gilligan and Gould raised the possibility that Saul might be living in fear of Walter.

Remember that in the penultimate episode of “Breaking Bad,” titled “Granite State,” Saul was eager to part ways with Walt. Walt wanted Saul to stay with him, and help him get revenge on the neo-Nazis who robbed him of barrels of money. Saul went off to Nebraska, and we never saw him again on “Breaking Bad.” Walter spent months in New Hampshire, before finally returning to Albuquerque to make his last stand.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

When we met Saul again in “Better Call Saul,” in Omaha, no one told us how much time had passed since his split with Walt. Yes, we saw Walt die in the finale of “Breaking Bad” — but we don’t know when the Omaha scenes take place in relation to “Breaking Bad.” They might occur during the stretch of “Granite State” when Walt is hiding out in Nebraska.

Odenkirk pondered on the podcast whether Walt’s death could free Jimmy/Saul/Gill from his monk-like existence in Omaha.

“Speaking as a fan, if Walter White dies… and that’s on the news in some capacity, I don’t know. Does that make him think, ‘I can come out from hiding?’”

Also Read: Bob Odenkirk on Why Saul Goodman Would Represent Donald Trump (Video)

Odenkirk, Gould and Gilligan then speculated about whether Gene/Saul/Jimmy would be in less trouble if Walter White died, or more trouble if he died. Gilligan noted that prosecutors might come down even harder on Gene/Saul/Jimmy for being Walter White’s lawyer if they couldn’t capture White. But Odenkirk noted that Saul/Jimmy is a shrewd negotiator who might be able to strike a deal.

“Do we even know in our Omaha sequences, our Gene sequences, Do we know… I mean, has it happened yet?” Gilligan said, referring to Walt’s demise.

“Oh s—!” declared podcast host Kelly Dixon, speaking for everyone listening.

“We haven’t defined that. We haven’t said how long Gene has been… in Omaha,” Gould responded.

Also Read: Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New ‘Better Call Saul’ Ass Tattoo (Photo)

“It’s a good question,” added Gilligan. “We don’t know yet. It’s a good question. Has it happened yet, has it not? As you say, Peter, we have not defined it.”

“It’s an open question,” Gould replied.

“And a good question,” Gilligan said. “It’s one that will have to be answered at some point, like a lot of these things.”

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline, Co-Creator Says

Gilligan has said he is “desperate” to find a way to get Walter White and Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) onto “Better Call Saul.” Maybe this gives him a window.

Look at a map of the United States. If Walter White decided to stop in Omaha on his drive from New Hampshire to Albuquerque, he wouldn’t have to take too much of a detour to stop in Omaha for a Cinnabon.

How would he know where Saul was? Well. As “Granite State” showed us, he spent several days rooming with Saul before they parted ways — but after Saul took a photo for his fake Nebraska driver’s license. And Saul told Walt, right before they parted, “If I’m lucky, a month from now, best case scenario, I’m managing a Cinnabon in Omaha.”

Saul and Walt’s last moments together in “Granite State”

Also Read: Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of ‘Better Call Saul’ (Video)

It seems likely that Saul didn’t pull this possibility out of thin air — and extremely unlikely that if he did, his random possibility would come true precisely.

It seems more likely that at some point, Ed the disappearer (Robert Forster) tipped off Saul about the identity he would take on undercover. Perhaps Saul discussed his Nebraska plans with Walter more specifically off-screen.

Whatever happened, the interview with Gould, Gilligan and Odenkirk opens up a lot of possibilities. We can imagine worse endings for “Better Call Saul” than Walter White showing up unexpectedly in an Omaha sequence to resolve some old business with Saul/Gene.

Everyone involved in “Better Call Saul” has said it will eventually overlap with “Breaking Bad.” But if Walt is still alive when Saul is in Omaha, it already has.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline, Co-Creator Says

Bob Odenkirk Dreads Jimmy’s ‘Better Call Saul’ Transformation

“Better Call Saul” star Bob Odenkirk and masterminds Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould just changed everything we thought we knew about Jimmy McGill/Saul Goodman’s life in Omaha: It turns out the black-and-white sequences on “Saul” may take place when Walter White is still alive.

Wait, we hear you saying. What? We had the same reaction. The Omaha sequences on “Saul” — brief segments that hint at Saul’s sad life after he fled Albuquerque to live undercover — suggest Gene is still living in fear because of his life as Saul. (The Season 4 premiere spelled this out more explicitly than any episode before.) On the “Better Call Saul Insider” podcast released this week, Odenkirk, Gilligan and Gould raised the possibility that Saul might be living in fear of Walter.

Remember that in the penultimate episode of “Breaking Bad,” titled “Granite State,” Saul was eager to part ways with Walt. Walt wanted Saul to stay with him, and help him get revenge on the neo-Nazis who robbed him of barrels of money. Saul went off to Nebraska, and we never saw him again on “Breaking Bad.” Walter spent months in New Hampshire, before finally returning to Albuquerque to make his last stand.

When we met Saul again in “Better Call Saul,” in Omaha, no one told us how much time had passed since his split with Walt. Yes, we saw Walt die in the finale of “Breaking Bad” — but we don’t know when the Omaha scenes take place in relation to “Breaking Bad.” They might occur during the stretch of “Granite State” when Walt is hiding out in Nebraska.

Odenkirk pondered on the podcast whether Walt’s death could free Jimmy/Saul/Gill from his monk-like existence in Omaha.

“Speaking as a fan, if Walter White dies… and that’s on the news in some capacity, I don’t know. Does that make him think, ‘I can come out from hiding?'”

Odenkirk, Gould and Gilligan then speculated about whether Gene/Saul/Jimmy would be in less trouble if Walter White died, or more trouble if he died. Gilligan noted that prosecutors might come down even harder on Gene/Saul/Jimmy for being Walter White’s lawyer if they couldn’t capture White. But Odenkirk noted that Saul/Jimmy is a shrewd negotiator who might be able to strike a deal.

“Do we even know in our Omaha sequences, our Gene sequences, Do we know… I mean, has it happened yet?” Gilligan said, referring to Walt’s demise.

“Oh s—!” declared podcast host Kelly Dixon, speaking for everyone listening.

“We haven’t defined that. We haven’t said how long Gene has been… in Omaha,” Gould responded.

“It’s a good question,” added Gilligan. “We don’t know yet. It’s a good question. Has it happened yet, has it not? As you say, Peter, we have not defined it.”

“It’s an open question,” Gould replied.

“And a good question,” Gilligan said. “It’s one that will have to be answered at some point, like a lot of these things.”

Gilligan has said he is “desperate” to find a way to get Walter White and Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul) onto “Better Call Saul.” Maybe this gives him a window.

Look at a map of the United States. If Walter White decided to stop in Omaha on his drive from New Hampshire to Albuquerque, he wouldn’t have to take too much of a detour to stop in Omaha for a Cinnabon.

How would he know where Saul was? Well. As “Granite State” showed us, he spent several days rooming with Saul before they parted ways — but after Saul took a photo for his fake Nebraska driver’s license. And Saul told Walt, right before they parted, “If I’m lucky, a month from now, best case scenario, I’m managing a Cinnabon in Omaha.”

Saul and Walt’s last moments together in “Granite State”

It seems likely that Saul didn’t pull this possibility out of thin air — and extremely unlikely that if he did, his random possibility would come true precisely.

It seems more likely that at some point, Ed the disappearer (Robert Forster) tipped off Saul about the identity he would take on undercover. Perhaps Saul discussed his Nebraska plans with Walter more specifically off-screen.

Whatever happened, the interview with Gould, Gilligan and Odenkirk opens up a lot of possibilities. We can imagine worse endings for “Better Call Saul” than Walter White showing up unexpectedly in an Omaha sequence to resolve some old business with Saul/Gene.

Everyone involved in “Better Call Saul” has said it will eventually overlap with “Breaking Bad.” But if Walt is still alive when Saul is in Omaha, it already has.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Asked If Bruce Lee Could Beat Muhammad Ali. We Asked Their Biographers

'Better Call Saul' Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During 'Breaking Bad' Timeline, Co-Creator Says

Bob Odenkirk Dreads Jimmy's 'Better Call Saul' Transformation

Bob Odenkirk and Vince Gilligan on ‘Better Call Saul’ Beyond the ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline — Turn It On Podcast

Also: Although Gilligan admits his worldview is a bit “bleak,” he shares his love for “Spongebob Squarepants.”

As “Better Call Saul” gets closer to the events of “Breaking Bad,” does that mean the series is getting close to its endgame? Star Bob Odenkirk certainly doesn’t hope so, and he’s even got an idea for how the show might continue.

“I don’t want the end game to be Saul Goodman, I wanna know what happens to Gene,” Odenkirk told IndieWire’s TURN IT ON podcast. “As a fan of the story, and playing this guy, I want that guy to figure out something better that he can be. I don’t see ‘Breaking Bad’ as the closure of this story.”

Indeed, “Better Call Saul” has started each season with a black-and-white look at what Jimmy McGill, a.k.a. Saul Goodman, is up to after he escapes Albuquerque. Now going by the name of Gene and working as the manager of a Cinnabon store in an Omaha, Neb., mall, Jimmy/Saul/Gene is constantly looking over his shoulder.

“Weirdly enough, in this story you think you know where it’s all going,” said co-creator Vince Gilligan. “Because you know that this guy, as Saul Goodman, if you’ve watched ‘Breaking Bad,’ you know it’s not a big secret that this guy goes off on the run at a certain point, from the police. But in Omaha, there is the possibility for redemption.”

Gilligan can’t promise that’s where the show will end up, particularly now that co-creator Peter Gould is handling the show’s day-to-day operations. But, he added, “as an audience, people want to see characters that they love be redeemed. So I don’t wanna promise, but there is a possibility.”

IndieWire sat down with Gilligan and Odenkirk at the Austin ATX TV Festival this June. Listen below!

Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill - Better Call Saul _ Season 4, Episode 1 - Photo Credit: Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Bob Odenkirk, “Better Call Saul”

Nicole Wilder/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

It’s been a long wait for the return of “Better Call Saul,” which last aired in June 2017 with a rather fiery finale. Now, Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) is back, and the death of his brother (Michael McKean) — after their final clash — will continue to haunt him. And across town, the rise of Gus Fring’s power will bring “Better Call Saul” closer to the dawn of “Breaking Bad.”

As Season 4, premieres August 6 on AMC, a quick refresher about the Season 3 finale: Kim (Rhea Seehorn) had just exited the hospital in a cast, after the overworked lawyer had fallen asleep behind the wheel. Jimmy felt he was to blame, and decided to try and patch things up with Chuck — who instead railed against his brother. Chuck, who had just been forcibly bought out of his legal firm partnership, later destroys his house (setting it on fire) while looking for a hidden power source. Meanwhile, across town Hector (whose pills had been replaced by Nacho) has a heart attack during a meeting with Gus.

“I can’t wait for me, Bob Odenkirk, to see Season 4,” Odenkirk said. “Because I read it, and I didn’t read the parts I wasn’t in very thoroughly, because I want to see those just like a fan.”

Odenkirk also turned the tables and asked Gilligan a question: Given the darkness of his series, what is his own worldview?

Gilligan answered: It’s bleak.

“I think it’s harder to write an upbeat, uplifting story. I also think it is more worthwhile,” he said. “I don’t know I’m wired to tell those kinds of stories, but I respect them greatly. I think they are ultimately more worth-while because I think our storytelling, if it can inspire us, if it can uplift us, that’s to the good. I wish I felt more able to tell those kinds of stories.

“I am not particularly optimistic by nature, but I’m not as negative as probably, I would come across with “Breaking Bad” on my resume,” he added. “But you know, I love “Spongebob Squarepants” I’m not even joking. That is a character who’s very positive, very, loves life, he’s a good person. I wouldn’t know how to write it.”

This conversation was recorded live at the ATX Television Festival in Austin, TX. For information on how to attend next year’s festival (June 6-9, 2019), please visit atxfestival.com. 
To hear bonus content from the festival, subscribe to THE TV CAMPFIRE wherever you get your podcasts, or visit ATVXP.com to hear/watch more panels, Q&As, and conversations from ATX.

IndieWire’s “TURN IT ON with Michael Schneider” is a weekly dive into what’s new and what’s now on TV — no matter what you’re watching or where you’re watching it. With an enormous amount of choices overwhelming even the most sophisticated viewer, “TURN IT ON” is a must-listen for TV fans looking to make sense of what to watch and where to watch it.

Be sure to subscribe to “TURN IT ON” on iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud or anywhere you download podcasts. New episodes post every week. This week’s music by HookSounds.

Special thanks to KROQ’s DJ Omar Khan for the new theme song!

Should You Call Saul? A Lawyer Explains the Legal Accuracy of ‘Better Call Saul’ (Video)

“Better Call Saul” was not created by lawyers, but it’s about lawyers and therefore a huge amount of the plot revolves around the intricacies of the legal profession and how Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) navigates his path toward becoming the crooked Saul Goodman. So how realistic is the jargon used and the plot points crafted by co-creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould?

Actually, it’s pretty spot on, according to Los Angeles-based entertainment lawyer Rick Zou, who sat down with TheWrap to pick apart the AMC series ahead of its Season 4 premiere. The two topics we focused on were illegal recording and extortion, showing Zou clips from the series in which Jimmy confesses to a crime to his brother Chuck (Michael McKean), only to find out he’s being taped, and one where Jimmy uses some big, fancy legal words to try to persuade his community service supervisor into letting him out early.

Zou explained why what happens in both instances is pretty by the book and why the show overall checks out. (Hey, “Breaking Bad” was about meth lords but wasn’t written by meth lords, so.)

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Teaser: Jimmy McGill Starts to Become a Truly Criminal Lawyer (Exclusive Video)

“I think the show actually takes great pains to be accurate, to not just the individual legal issues, but life as a lawyer as a whole,” Zou said. “There’s definitely glamorous aspects, but this definitely balances both issues and shows, ‘Hey, it’s not just a glorified party all the time. There’s paperwork, there’s stress, and depression with aspects of the profession that you don’t necessarily see on other TV shows.”

If you were wondering what legal issues Jimmy will be facing soon, here is the official description for the upcoming fourth season of “Better Call Saul,” per AMC:

In “Better Call Saul”s fourth season, Chuck’s death catalyzes Jimmy McGill’s transformation into Saul Goodman. In the wake of his loss, Jimmy takes steps into the criminal world that will put his future as a lawyer – and his relationship with Kim (Rhea Seehorn) – in jeopardy. Chuck’s death deeply affects former colleagues Howard (Patrick Fabian) and Kim as well, putting the two of them once again on opposite sides of a battle sparked by the Brothers McGill.

Also Read: ‘Breaking Bad’ Creator Is ‘Desperately’ Trying to Figure Out How to Get Walt and Jesse on ‘Better Call Saul’

Meanwhile, Mike Ehrmantraut takes a more active role as Madrigal Electromotive’s newest (and most thorough) security consultant. It’s a volatile time to be in Gus Fring’s employ, as Hector’s collapse sends shock waves throughout the Albuquerque underworld and throws the cartel into chaos — tearing apart both Gus and Nacho’s (Michael Mando) well-laid plans. While Gus changes course, Nacho finds himself in the crosshairs of deadly forces.

“Better Call Saul”  is executive produced by Peter Gould, Vince Gilligan, Mark Johnson, Melissa Bernstein, Thomas Schnauz and Gennifer Hutchison and hails from Sony Television.

Watch the video above.

Also Read: ‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline, Co-Creator Says

“Better Call Saul” Season 4 premieres Monday, Aug. 6 at 9/8 c on AMC.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline, Co-Creator Says

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Teaser: Jimmy McGill Starts to Become a Truly Criminal Lawyer (Exclusive Video)

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Preview (Exclusive Photos)

‘Breaking Bad’ Creator Is ‘Desperately’ Trying to Figure Out How to Get Walt and Jesse on ‘Better Call Saul’

“Better Call Saul” was not created by lawyers, but it’s about lawyers and therefore a huge amount of the plot revolves around the intricacies of the legal profession and how Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) navigates his path toward becoming the crooked Saul Goodman. So how realistic is the jargon used and the plot points crafted by co-creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould?

Actually, it’s pretty spot on, according to Los Angeles-based entertainment lawyer Rick Zou, who sat down with TheWrap to pick apart the AMC series ahead of its Season 4 premiere. The two topics we focused on were illegal recording and extortion, showing Zou clips from the series in which Jimmy confesses to a crime to his brother Chuck (Michael McKean), only to find out he’s being taped, and one where Jimmy uses some big, fancy legal words to try to persuade his community service supervisor into letting him out early.

Zou explained why what happens in both instances is pretty by the book and why the show overall checks out. (Hey, “Breaking Bad” was about meth lords but wasn’t written by meth lords, so.)

“I think the show actually takes great pains to be accurate, to not just the individual legal issues, but life as a lawyer as a whole,” Zou said. “There’s definitely glamorous aspects, but this definitely balances both issues and shows, ‘Hey, it’s not just a glorified party all the time. There’s paperwork, there’s stress, and depression with aspects of the profession that you don’t necessarily see on other TV shows.”

If you were wondering what legal issues Jimmy will be facing soon, here is the official description for the upcoming fourth season of “Better Call Saul,” per AMC:

In “Better Call Saul”s fourth season, Chuck’s death catalyzes Jimmy McGill’s transformation into Saul Goodman. In the wake of his loss, Jimmy takes steps into the criminal world that will put his future as a lawyer – and his relationship with Kim (Rhea Seehorn) – in jeopardy. Chuck’s death deeply affects former colleagues Howard (Patrick Fabian) and Kim as well, putting the two of them once again on opposite sides of a battle sparked by the Brothers McGill.

Meanwhile, Mike Ehrmantraut takes a more active role as Madrigal Electromotive’s newest (and most thorough) security consultant. It’s a volatile time to be in Gus Fring’s employ, as Hector’s collapse sends shock waves throughout the Albuquerque underworld and throws the cartel into chaos — tearing apart both Gus and Nacho’s (Michael Mando) well-laid plans. While Gus changes course, Nacho finds himself in the crosshairs of deadly forces.

“Better Call Saul”  is executive produced by Peter Gould, Vince Gilligan, Mark Johnson, Melissa Bernstein, Thomas Schnauz and Gennifer Hutchison and hails from Sony Television.

Watch the video above.

“Better Call Saul” Season 4 premieres Monday, Aug. 6 at 9/8 c on AMC.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Better Call Saul' Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During 'Breaking Bad' Timeline, Co-Creator Says

'Better Call Saul' Season 4 Teaser: Jimmy McGill Starts to Become a Truly Criminal Lawyer (Exclusive Video)

'Better Call Saul' Season 4 Preview (Exclusive Photos)

'Breaking Bad' Creator Is 'Desperately' Trying to Figure Out How to Get Walt and Jesse on 'Better Call Saul'

Bob Odenkirk on Why Saul Goodman Would Represent Donald Trump (Video)

Sounds like Donald Trump could snag a certain prominent TV lawyer sometime soon — as long as he can pony up.

“Better Call Saul” star Bob Odenkirk said that his titular lawyer would definitely represent Trump, saying that the two would “have a bit of a mind meld” when it came to solving problems. But, Saul Goodman wouldn’t put up with any talk about free work.

“Saul is like a really good guy, comparatively to the real world,” Odenkirk said before Meyers asked is Saul would represent Trump.

“I do think he would. I do think he would love the limelight,” he said. “I think they’d have a bit of a mind meld, with how to handle things. He might have an issue with getting paid. The whole ‘I don’t pay people, it should be an honor just to work for me,’ I think he’d say no.”

Also Read: Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New ‘Better Call Saul’ Ass Tattoo (Photo)

Odenkirk said he created an entire backstory for his character back in the “Breaking Bad” days that included having Michael Avenatti and Michael Cohen as frat brothers. “And get this — his professor, his favorite professor, was a guy named Rudy Giuliani,” Odenkirk told Seth Meyers on his talk show Wednesday night.

“That all makes sense now,” Meyers said, pointing out that Saul/Jimmy McGill has always been willing to cut corners — and now real-life lawyers are even worse than the fictional “Breaking Bad”/”Saul” attorney.

Watch the clip above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New ‘Better Call Saul’ Ass Tattoo (Photo)

‘Better Call Saul,’ ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ and ‘McMafia’ Renewed by AMC

Will ‘Better Call Saul’ Go Full ‘Rosencrantz and Guildenstern’? Maybe, Showrunners say

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During ‘Breaking Bad’ Timeline, Co-Creator Says

Sounds like Donald Trump could snag a certain prominent TV lawyer sometime soon — as long as he can pony up.

“Better Call Saul” star Bob Odenkirk said that his titular lawyer would definitely represent Trump, saying that the two would “have a bit of a mind meld” when it came to solving problems. But, Saul Goodman wouldn’t put up with any talk about free work.

“Saul is like a really good guy, comparatively to the real world,” Odenkirk said before Meyers asked is Saul would represent Trump.

“I do think he would. I do think he would love the limelight,” he said. “I think they’d have a bit of a mind meld, with how to handle things. He might have an issue with getting paid. The whole ‘I don’t pay people, it should be an honor just to work for me,’ I think he’d say no.”

Odenkirk said he created an entire backstory for his character back in the “Breaking Bad” days that included having Michael Avenatti and Michael Cohen as frat brothers. “And get this — his professor, his favorite professor, was a guy named Rudy Giuliani,” Odenkirk told Seth Meyers on his talk show Wednesday night.

“That all makes sense now,” Meyers said, pointing out that Saul/Jimmy McGill has always been willing to cut corners — and now real-life lawyers are even worse than the fictional “Breaking Bad”/”Saul” attorney.

Watch the clip above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His New 'Better Call Saul' Ass Tattoo (Photo)

'Better Call Saul,' 'Fear the Walking Dead' and 'McMafia' Renewed by AMC

Will 'Better Call Saul' Go Full 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern'? Maybe, Showrunners say

'Better Call Saul' Season 4 to Have Scenes Set During 'Breaking Bad' Timeline, Co-Creator Says

‘Better Call Saul’ Season 4 Exclusive Preview: Gene’s Number Might Be Up in the Premiere — Watch

The future is an uncertain thing for the man once known as Jimmy McGill.

As the successor to “Breaking Bad,” “Better Call Saul” has always had a complicated relationship with timelines, as it rolls out not just in the years before Walter White, but also the years after the end of the original series.

Attentive “Saul” viewers know that black-and-white means we’re in a post-“Breaking Bad” future, where Jimmy McGill has shed the persona of Saul Goodman for a new and far more subdued identity. But while “Gene” may lack Jimmy’s enthusiasm or Saul’s bombast, it’s for the very good reason that his only goal is to survive under the radar.

So the clip below, which features Gene being asked for his driver’s license and social security number, might seem relatively mundane on the surface. But thanks to Bob Odenkirk’s nuanced performance, the man’s terror over such a simple moment is palpable.

“Better Call Saul,” created by Peter Gould and Vince Gilligan, also stars Jonathan Banks, Giancarlo Esposito, Rhea Seehorn, Michael Mando, and Patrick Fabien. For more on the fourth season, here’s the official synopsis provided by AMC:

In “Better Call Saul’s” fourth season, Chuck’s death catalyzes Jimmy McGill’s (Odenkirk) transformation into Saul Goodman. In the wake of his loss, Jimmy takes steps into the criminal world that will put his future as a lawyer – and his relationship with Kim (Rhea Seehorn) – in jeopardy. Chuck’s (Michael McKean) death deeply affects former colleagues Howard (Patrick Fabian) and Kim as well, putting the two of them once again on opposite sides of a battle sparked by the Brothers McGill.

Saturday, AMC announced in a very cheeky way that “Saul” has been renewed for a fifth season. Season 4 premieres Monday, August 6 at 9 p.m. ET on AMC. Check out the exclusive clip below.

Bob Odenkirk Shows Off His Bare Ass to Reporters as AMC’s ‘Better Call Saul’ Is Renewed

TCA: Crack is wack.

Bob Odenkirk made the Television Critics Association press tour highlight reel on Saturday afternoon by showing a little skin. Making a surprise appearance at the event, Odenkirk joked that he was so excited about the upcoming season of “Better Call Saul” that he had decided to get a tattoo, announcing the show’s Season 4 return date.

Odenkirk then pulled down his pants to show the “tattoo” (really, a temporary tattoo, like the ones that were also passed out to reporters in attendance at the tour). But Odenkirk pulled his pants down awfully far, causing most in the room to crack a smile and a laugh.

“I wanted to show you guys something,” he said. This is exciting for me. I’m sorry. I got a tattoo… All my life, I’m trying to think, like, what do I care about enough to get it, like, eternally marked on my ass. And so, I finally had something.”

Bob OdenkirkAMC 'Better Call Saul' TV show, TCA Summer Press Tour, Los Angeles, USA - 28 Jul 2018

Bob Odenkirk’s ass

David Buchan/Variety/REX/Shutterstock

“I’m a real company man, and I was just thinking, I want everyone to know it’s coming back. It was such a long wait. Where can I put the information that a lot of people will see it? So, there you go.”

AMC announced that “Better Call Saul” had been picked up for a fifth season, while “Fear The Walking Dead” was also renewed for Season 5, and “McMafia” would return for its second season.

“Better Call Saul’s” pick-up comes just ahead of its Season 4 premiere on Monday, August 6, at 9 p.m. ET.

“I really do think it might be our best season ever,” Odenkirk said. “And I haven’t watched it all. Of course, I read it all, and we did it, but I’ve heard from people who’ve been watching the cuts. They’re very excited about it, and it’s like I think we just know our show now, and we can move faster, and it’s got more comedy, and more violence, and more drama coming at you faster.”