‘Blade Runner 2049’ Production Diary Reveals Alternative Title and 9 More Things You Didn’t Know About the Sequel

Producer Cynthia Yorkin kept a running diary during the production of “Blade Runner 2049,” and it’s packed with nuggets of amazing info.

Blade Runner 2049” didn’t set the box office on fire when it was released in October 2017, but the film has earned a devoted following over the last year. Denis Villeneuve’s epic sequel takes place three decades after the events of Ridley Scott’s original and centers around Ryan Gosling’s K, an LAPD blade runner who discovers that a replicant may have given birth to a child.

Read More:  Denis Villeneuve’s Editor Looks Back at That Four-Hour ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cut, Teases How He’s Approaching ‘Dune’

When Villeneuve kicked off production on “2049” in July 2016, producer Cynthia Yorkin began her own side project by deciding to keep a running diary of milestones, setbacks, and overall observations from the set. Collider has exclusively published Yorkin’s production diary, which offers a fascinating in-depth look at the making of “2049” on a month-by-month basis. IndieWire has rounded up some exciting tidbits from Yorkin’s production diary below. Head to Collider to read the diary in its entirety.

An Alternative Title

The film’s official title wasn’t finalized until months into production. Yorkin came up with one title she loved, “Blade Runner: Time to Live,” a play on words that is a call back to Roy Batty’s “time to die” line from the original film. “‘Time to Live’ foreshadows what our film is about,” Yorkin wrote July 28. “The replicants in the first film were never given the chance to live. It’s an homage with many layers, and it’s poetic.” Sony apparently loved the title but ultimately shifted to “Blade Runner 2051” or “Blade Runner 2049.” The film used the latter when it was decided the sequel would be set 30 years after the original.

“Blade Runner”

Warner Bros.

K’s Rooftop Easter Egg

Production designer Dennis Gassner came up with the idea to put a giant “Moebius” sign on K’s apartment rooftop as an homage to graphic artist Jean Moebius Gerraud, whose work greatly inspired Ridley Scott on the original “Blade Runner.” The rooftop setting is used during a romantic encounter between K and Joi, a hologram played by Ana de Armas. “It’s a beautiful scene that perfectly captures a yearning to be more human,” Yorkin wrote August 30. “And the rain makes Joi look more human – it gives her form until she shorts out.”

How the Production Saved $1 Million

Yorkin explained the production was able to shave $1 million off its budget by deciding to build a giant water tank in Budapest and not in Malta. Most of the production was already taking place in Budapest, so building the set there meant not having to pay to transport the 230 crew members to Malta to work on this section of the film. The water tank was built for the climactic fight scene between K and the assassin Luv, played by Sylvia Hoeks. “It’s also really cool to think that such a huge piece of the set will get to stay on in Budapest and be a part of many more films for years to come,” Yorkin noted in July.

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Bros.

Ridley Scott Didn’t Like One of the Film’s Technology

VFX Supervisor John Nelson gave Ridley Scott a special effects demonstration in September 2016. According to Yorkin, “Ridley wanted to know more about the plates, models, and prices, and told us about the challenges he and Douglas Trumbull faced with the smoke level consistency in the first film.” The producer revealed that Scott did not like the ceiling mechanism in K’s apartment that projected Joi and allowed her to walk around the space freely. Scott felt the piece of technology should be more of a remote that uses the internet, something that is used later in the film to make Joi more mobile.

Harrison Ford Spoke Up When He Didn’t Love the Script

The middle of September 2016 was spent filming a scene where Harrison Ford’s Rick Deckard is being transported by Luv. Yorkin revealed that Ford spoke to producers Andrew A. Kosove and Broderick Johnson about some of the writing he felt could be tweaked in the scene. As a result, the team “made the transport conversation simpler so Deckard now says, ‘Where are you taking me?’ and Luv says, ‘Home.'”

The Meaning Behind Deckard’s Frank Sinatra Hologram

“One of my favorite things in Harrison’s penthouse apartment is the Sinatra hologram which sets such a mood for Deckard,” Yorkin wrote September 28. The production was able to license Sinatra’s music from his estate. Yorkin said producer Andrew A. Kosove wanted to get Sinatra into “2049” as an homage to Yorkin’s late husband, Bud Yorkin, who directed Sinatra in his first film, “Come Blow Your Horn.”

“Bud used to tell a story of how Sinatra told him they would work well together as long as Bud understood that they would need to stop filming every day at 5pm for cocktails,” Yorkin wrote. “Bud agreed and the two remained friends for a very long time.”

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Bros.

Production Couldn’t Clash With ‘La La Land’ Press

Yorkin explains throughout her production diary the importance of breaking for Thanksgiving, a priority that was constantly up in the air since shooting kept falling behind schedule. Gosling had to be off set by Thanksgiving because of a commitment in New York City to complete press for “La La Land.” Yorkin said she had hoped Gosling could leave even earlier so he could spend time in Los Angeles with his family before his New York press tour. The production ultimately got Gosling off set by November 22, which allowed him to see his family.

What Scenes Were Shot First

Yorkin wrote on July 25 that production was beginning its third week of filming and that she had seen dailies for some of the scenes already shot. Within the first month, Villeneuve had shot Luv crashing the LAPD office to retrieve the replicant bones and kill office worker Coco (David Dastmalchian), K taking a shower after the opening scenes in which he fights and kills Sapper (Dave Bautista), and K and Joi talking in his apartment following his shower. Two days before principal photography started on July 12, Villeneuve was filming inserts with Robin Wright and Sylvia Hoeks, who the director told Yorkin is one of “the finest actresses he’s ever worked with.”

Wood Harris Was Added to Existing Scenes

Actor Wood Harris appears in a brief role as LAPD officer Nandez. The character appears in a scene at the LAPD office with K, Coco, and Robin Wright’s Joshi, but Yorkin revealed the actor shot his scenes in the film separate from his co-stars. Wood arrived in November 2016 and met with Villeneuve, who explained Wood would be “inserted into existing scenes and will not actually be working with Robin.” Wood “acted and reacted from studying the scene playback on the monitor.” Wood appeared with Gosling on camera on two scenes.

Ford’s Last Day Was Deckard’s Last Shot

Movies don’t always shoot chronologically, but Ford’s last day on set happened to be for the scene that is Deckard’s final appearance in “2049.” Ford wrapped production on Tuesday, November 8 after filming a scene in which Deckard and K walk through the snow toward Dr. Ana Stelline’s lab. “This will be the last scene of movie,” Yorkin wrote. “Just finished Harrison’s last shot as Deckard. It was very emotional, and everyone was crying and clapping for him. I said goodbye to Harrison. He’s so happy with Denis, Ryan, Roger and the entire experience.”

The 4-hour cut of Blade Runner 2049 had much longer “baseline test” scenes

Just about a year ago, Blade Runner 2049 editor Joe Walker revealed that director Denis Villeneuve’s original cut of the film was four hours long and split into two parts, with the first half focusing on Ryan Gosling’s K learning about who he is (or wh…

Just about a year ago, Blade Runner 2049 editor Joe Walker revealed that director Denis Villeneuve’s original cut of the film was four hours long and split into two parts, with the first half focusing on Ryan Gosling’s K learning about who he is (or who he thinks he is) and the second half starting after the high-tech…

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Denis Villeneuve’s Editor Looks Back at That Four-Hour ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cut, Teases How He’s Approaching ‘Dune’

Joe Walker is at the center of two of the best director-editor teams in Hollywood thanks to his work with Denis Villeneuve and Steve McQueen.

Denis Villeneuve piqued the interest of “Blade Runner 2049” fans when he revealed in December that the first cut of his science-fiction sequel was four hours long. The director admitted his four-hour version was “pretty strong,” but he said the 163-minute theatrical version was an overall better movie and less self-indulgant. For editor Joe Walker, a regular collaborator of Villeneuve’s after “Sicario” and “Arrival,” cutting down that four-hour cut proved challenging. Walker recently spoke to Collider about what he left in and took out, and the reasons why for each.

One thing Walker knew he couldn’t touch in the editing room were some of Roger Deakins’ most stunning shots. Walker explained that in conventional films an editor would leave a shot of a character walking into a room on screen for an average of three to four seconds, but taking that approach on “Blade Runner 2049” was impossible given the beauty of Deakins’ work. One shot Walker couldn’t trim was that of Jared Leto’s introduction.

“On ‘Blade Runner,’ I’ve got a world class shot of this amazing caustic light effect following Sylvia Hoeks, who’s amazing to look at, climbing up the steps,” Walker said. “The first person you see in the office is a man in the shadows, a blind man, with artificial sunlight crawling into a huge water set. So, I mean, to make that three to five seconds long is killing a major world class shot.”

Walker wouldn’t dare touch Deakins’ imagery, which is part of the reason the film got released with a still hefty 163 minute runtime (something original “Blade Runner” director Ridley Scott criticized). So what exactly was left on the cutting room floor? Walker said that “experimental things” like scene length were reduced in post-production. Several scenes depicting K (Ryan Gosling) undergoing a baseline test went on for much longer in the four-cut than in the theatrical release.

“In my first assembly I put a lot of [the baseline tests] in because it was really good,” Walker said. “We all knew we would pepper it with a tiny like fraction of it since you probably could have gone out and brewed a cup of tea while that was playing. It was a long first assembly.”

“Blade Runner”

Walker is not sure whether or not Warner Bros. was interested in releasing a two-part film, but he confirmed the first assembly cut was so long that they naturally split it into two halves just to make editing the movie more manageable. Villeneuve and Walker decided to split the film just after K has sex with Mariette (Mackenzie Davis).

“The beginning of part two was her waking up in bed,” Walker said. “It struck us that it drew attention to the fact that [this is a film] unusually in two halves. It starts with an eye opening and the second half starts with an eye opening; it’s a very different K in the first half where he’s coming to terms with his past and him being a real boy in the second half. That was just the way we viewed it.”

Next for Villeneuve in his two-part “Dune” adaptation, which Walker won’t confirm or deny he’s working on. Considering Walker has been Villeneuve’s go-to editor since “Sicario,” all signs point to him editing “Dune,” set to star Timothee Chalamet and Rebecca Ferguson. For now, Walker is taking the anti-approach to the source material.

“I’ve kept away from Dune discussions. I want to be fresh. It’s good for me to come in from the outside a little bit and read the script when they’re ready for it and when it comes my way, and that’s not a certainty. I don’t want to overload it to much with the older film and reading the book. I Just want to see see what his vision is.”

Walker’s next release is “Widows,” his fourth collaboration with Steve McQueen. The movie opens November 16 from 20th Century Fox.

‘Black Panther’ Tops 44th Saturn Awards With Five; ‘Blade Runner 2049’ , ‘Shape Of Water’, ‘Get Out’ Also Score

It may not be the Oscars, but if tonight’s results of the 44th Annual Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films is any indication of influence on that other Academy (which it usually isn’t) then get prepared for a Black Panther …

It may not be the Oscars, but if tonight’s results of the 44th Annual Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror Films is any indication of influence on that other Academy (which it usually isn’t) then get prepared for a Black Panther wave at the Dolby Theatre next February. After virtually sweeping last week’s MTV Movie Awards, Panther took  five Saturns including Best Comic-to-Film Motion Picture and Best Director for  Ryan Coogler. However the Panther himself lost…

Rachel Matchett Will Lead Technicolor Visual Effects

Technicolor announced it has hired Rachel Matchett to head the group’s new brand, Technicolor Visual Effects. A creative visual effects house with local studios in Los Angeles Toronto, and London, Technicolor Visual Effects’ recent credits includes fea…

Technicolor announced it has hired Rachel Matchett to head the group’s new brand, Technicolor Visual Effects. A creative visual effects house with local studios in Los Angeles Toronto, and London, Technicolor Visual Effects’ recent credits includes feature films “Avengers: Infinity Wars,” “Black Panther,” “Paddington 2,” and episodic shows “This is Us,” “Anne with an E” […]

19 4K and HDR Movies That Are Worth the Upgrade

Now that we’re a couple years into the 4K and HDR era, the format has really started to come into its own as movie studios have firmly committed to taking full advantage of everything that Ultra High Definition and High Dynamic Range colors have …

Now that we’re a couple years into the 4K and HDR era, the format has really started to come into its own as movie studios have firmly committed to taking full advantage of everything that Ultra High Definition and High Dynamic Range colors have to offer — and a little assist from Apple, Netflix, Amazon and Vudu for making 4K content readily available and affordable. So if you’re taking the plunge into this beautiful new world of colors you’ve never seen on a TV before, these movies are absolute must-haves. NOTE: I’m not saying all these movies are good — your tastes are probably different from mine — but I am saying they look spectacular in 4K.

“Alien: Covenant” — Fox doesn’t make use of Dolby Vision at all on any of its releases, opting instead for the less dynamic HDR10 format exclusively, so its 4K releases tend to stand out less than those of other studios. Nonetheless, “Alien: Covenant” is a hell of a looker in 4K. I guess I shouldn’t have expected anything less from Ridley Scott, one of the greatest visual directors of all time.

“Black Panther” — The first time I watched this disc it was in the HDR10 format and I wasn’t overly impressed. But then I watched it with Dolby Vision and it was like night and day. This disc really pops.

“Blade Runner 2049” — The first film shot by Roger Deakins in the 4K era is exactly as incredible as you’d hope. I wasn’t a huge fan of Denis Villaneuve’s sequel, but the HDR version of the film is so incredible to look at it made me like it more.

“The Fate of the Furious” — I adore the warmth of the Dolby Vision version of the film, and in particular the way the reds pop spectacularly. Letty’s ’66 Corvette that she drives in the New York chase might be the most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen when captured this way.

“Game of Thrones” — I wasn’t expecting much from HBO’s 4K release of season 1, but I was blown away with this overhaul. They’ve taken what had been the least visually interesting season of “Game of Thrones” and, through the power of Dolby Vision HDR, turned it into an absolutely striking visual experience. After seeing what HBO did here, I can’t wait to revisit the rest of the series in 4K. Hopefully they won’t wait to long to start rolling out the other seasons.

“The Hitman’s Bodyguard” — As much as I enjoy great implementation of HDR, it’s rare for me to watch a movie in the format and think that this is what the director really wanted it to look like and he was hamstrung by the normal limitations of color in movies. But with “Hitman’s Bodyguard” I can’t help but come to that conclusion. It’s just so gorgeous and the difference from the SDR version is so pronounced.

“Interstellar” — The Dolby Vision version of “Interstellar” is a bit controversial because it’s an example of the use of HDR to fundamentally alter what a movie looks like. But I love it. This DV transfer effectively gives Christopher Nolan’s film an old school Technicolor look, and I think it works perfectly.

“John Wick Chapter 2” — With 4K and HDR still being young formats, the first year or so of releases tended to be relatively underwhelming. But the second “John Wick” film, which still feels like a reference quality release to me a year later, was where the potential of 4K HDR really clicked for me. This is the way to watch this movie.

“Justice League” — I dislike almost everything about this movie, including its visual style, so when I say that “Justice League” includes an absolutely stellar implementation of HDR you know I’m not messing around. It’s tough to image how Warner Home Video could have possibly made it look any better than this.

“The Purge: Anarchy” and “The Purge: Election Year” — The power of HDR becomes very evident in movies that spend a lot of time in high-contrast environments like city streets at night, and the two “Purge” sequels definitely benefit from that fact. These things are just so beautiful.

“The Matrix” — This 4K release is billed as a return to what the film looked like before it was run through thick green and blue color filters to match the palettes of the sequels when it was first released on Blu-ray. While the new Dolby Vision transfer, overseen by DP Bill Pope, certainly does look more like it originally did, there are still a few new bells and whistles — the whole thing certainly is a bit brighter than it ever was before. That said, this is easily the best “The Matrix” has ever looked and after a decade of only having that tinted Blu-ray it was an absolute delight to watch this 4K disc.

“Starship Troopers” — When a CGI-heavy movie gets a resolution upgrade, there’s always a risk that its effects won’t hold up under such scrutiny. When the original “Star Wars” trilogy was released on blu-ray, for example, its 1997 Special Edition CGI additions were an absolute horror to look at, and even movies like the recent “Planet of the Apes” movies when faced with this sort of high resolution scrutiny. But Sony did a wonderful job with its new “Starship Troopers” transfer — it might be the best 4K edition of a catalog title out there.

Steven Spielberg’s back catalog – The new 4K discs for “Jurassic Park” and “The Lost World” are perfectly fine upgrades, but his three other catalog titles that have been given the 4K treatment are all reference quality for to do right by older films. “E.T.,” “Close Encounters” and “Saving Private Ryan” are all stunning and are must-haves.

The fourth and fifth “Transformers” films — If you’re looking for movies that will instantly blow you away with how sick they look in 4K, Michael Bay has exactly what you need. “Age of Extinction,” the fourth one, has probably the greatest immediate wow factor of any 4K release so far. The first three also got excellent 4K upgrades — they just aren’t as spectacularly mindblowing as the other two.

“Wonder Woman” — Already a visually striking movie, the HDR in this release feels like it fills a hole in the look of the film you didn’t know was there.

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Finds Second Life on DVD and Blu-Ray With Over $21 Million in 2018 Sales

Box office hits “It” and “Wonder” are also doing huge business on home video this year.

Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049” was an unfortunate flop for Paramount Pictures during its theatrical release last year. Despite earning critical acclaim (IndieWire gave the film an A- review), the long-awaited sequel just couldn’t catch on in theaters. “2049” tapped out with just $92 million in the U.S. and $259 million worldwide, well below the estimated $300 million the studio spent on production and marketing. But it turns out the sequel is still making money.

According to the industry data and research outlet The Numbers, “2049” has pulled in an impressive $21 million and counting from home video sales just in 2018. The movie was released December 26, 2017 on DVD, followed by a Blu-ra release January 16, 2018. The home video gross is inching “2049” closer to matching its $300 budget. The total 2018 gross is split between $3.8 million worth of DVDs sold and nearly $18 million worth of Blu-ray copies.

With $21 million earned as of April 2018, “2049” is the third highest-grossing home video release of 2018, trailing only the horror blockbuster “It” and the family box office surprise “Wonder.” Villeneuve’s movie pulls ahead of “Wonder” on the Blu-ray chart and sits in the #2 position behind “It.” Overall, “2049” has sold just under one million DVD and Blu-rays in 2018.

The film’s huge home video sales are surprising given its disappointing theatrical run and the fact”2049″ opened all the way back in October. Positive reviews and the film’s five Oscar nominations and two wins in January and February seem to have kept the title in rotation. IndieWire has reached out to Paramount for comment.

Check out this year’s home video rankings as of April 11 below. The Numbers‘ gross estimates are based on weekly retail surveys.

Top-Selling Blu-rays in 2018
1. “It” ($19.9 million)
2. “Blade Runner 2049” ($17.9 million)
3. “Wonder” ($8.2 million)
4. “Dunkirk” ($4.5 million)
5. “Daddy’s Home 2” ($4.1 million)

Top-Selling DVDs in 2018
1. “Wonder” ($8.7 million)
2. “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” ($6.5 million)
3. “Blade Runner 2049” ($3.8 million)
4. “A Bad Mom’s Christmas” ($3.7 million)
5. “Daddy’s Home 2” ($3.2 million)

Top-Selling Video Titles in 2018
1. “It ($30.9 million)
2. “Wonder” ($16.9 million)
3. “Blade Runner 2049” ($21.7 million)
4. “Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” ($8.8 million)
5. “A Bad Mom’s Christmas” ($8.3 million)

Denis Villeneuve Is Planning At Least Two ‘Dune’ Films, If Not More: ‘It Will Probably Take Two Years to Make’

Villeneuve is moving on from “Blade Runner 2049” and gearing up for what sounds like a massive adaptation of “Dune.”

With “Blade Runner 2049” behind him, Denis Villeneuve is gearing up for “Dune” and he isn’t hiding the fact he has some big plans in store for his adaptation of Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel. The director appeared at the Rendez-Vous du Cinema Quebecois this week (via The Playlist) where he revealed to the audience that “Dune” is going to be more than just a one-off tentpole.

“’Dune’ will probably take two years to make,” Villeneuve said. “The goal is to make two films, maybe more.”

The franchise plans are all Villeneuve is willing to tease right now, but multiple films sounds fitting considering Herbert’s novel is over 400 pages and incredibly dense. David Lynch’s infamous 1984 adaptation struggled to tell the entire story in just over two hours. As The Playlist notes, there’s a significant time jump in the middle of “Dune,” which would more or less be the ideal place to split the film adaptation into two parts. Warner Bros. did something similar with their “It” movie adaptation.

Villeneuve flirted with a similar plan on “Blade Runner 2049” when the assembly cut came in over the four-hour mark. Instead of releasing “2049” in two parts, Villeneuve and Warner Bros. decided to cut down the film into a single theatrical release. The director has referred to “Dune” as the movie he’s been wanting to make since he was a child. He previously warned that his take would greatly differ from Lynch’s version.

“David Lynch did an adaptation in the ’80s that has some very strong qualities. I mean, David Lynch is one of the best filmmakers alive, I have massive respect for him,” Villeneuve said in November 2016. “But when I saw his adaptation, I was impressed, but it was not what I had dreamed of, so I’m trying to make the adaptation of my dreams. It will not have any link with the David Lynch movie. I’m going back to the book, and going to the images that came out when I read it.”

No casting or release info has been set for “Dune.” The film will keep Villeneuve in the science-fiction drama after “Arrival” and “2049.”

Roger Deakins Responds to (Finally) Winning His First Oscar for ‘Blade Runner 2049’

After being nominated 14 times and finally snagging his first Oscar, the awards-averse cinematographer still doesn’t seem that hung up on accolades.

The drought is over. After (finally) breaking his own 14-nomination streak without a win Sunday night, lauded cinematographer Roger Deakins earned his first Academy Award for his work on Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049.”

Deakins has never seemed especially tethered to the notion that awards are essential to his work, telling IndieWire just last month, “Sure, it’s nice of people to see your work and appreciate [it] – I don’t know really. I just move on and I like shooting films.”

He added, “I mean, okay, it’s such a weird, weird thing when a film gets ignored or a film gets talked about. It doesn’t make any sense to me. Some of what I consider my best work and some of the best films that I’ve ever worked on, kind of disappear without a trace. There’s no accounting for it. Something connects or something doesn’t.”

Backstage after his win, Deakins remained similarly relaxed about his statuette. “I mean, a big part of me was saying, ‘Please, please no,'” he said when asked what it felt like to finally take the stage for his big win.

“It’s great,” Deakins continued. “I think it’s great because, I’ve worked with a lot of the same people, my crew, for years and years, and I feel it’s recognition for their work. I really do. And I know they’re all kind of watching in New York and London and Budapest, and I’d like to mention every one of them, because that’s just great for them, I think.”

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Oscars: How Roger Deakins Finally Won For Best Cinematography — and Why ‘Planet of the Apes’ Lost Again

Cinematographer Roger Deakins finally won his elusive Oscar for “Blade Runner 2049,” while “Dunkirk” scored three crafts awards.

The biggest craft stories of the 90th Academy Awards: Cinematographer Roger Deakins finally winning the Oscar (after 14 nominations) for “Blade Runner 2049,” and the Denis Villeneuve-directed “Blade Runner” sequel upsetting “War for the Planet of the Apes” for VFX.

Deakins, the greatest cinematographer of his generation, was honored at long last for his naturalistic brilliance, making the “Blade Runner” universe adapt to his aesthetic, and putting his unmistakable imprint on every visual aspect, including VFX. And “Blade Runner 2049” honored the legacy of Ridley Scott’s iconic original by limiting green screen, keeping sets close to camera, and making it look photographic. Yet the sequel also offered a major step in digital human animation with the recreation of Sean Young’s Rachael replicant.

However, with a third consecutive VFX loss for “Apes,” the Academy once again denied Weta Digital the Oscar for its remarkable Caesar (Andy Serkis) and Bad Ape (Steve Zahn). It was a unique experience particularly for Serkis to play the sentient simian from birth to death in the trilogy, and Weta rose to the challenge of capturing and animating his performance with greater nuance in “War.”

Yet despite a campaign to convince voters that an emotional performance is Oscar worthy regardless of whether it’s digital or live-action, there was still enough resistance to put “Blade Runner” over the top. In addition to the respect he commands, Deakins also was aided by the high-profile nature of the “Blade Runner” sequel. From Villeneuve on down, everyone acknowledged the auteur-like status of his lighting. And it ultimately became a stealth campaign to help him win the Oscar.

Director Denis Villeneuve and DP Roger Deakins on the set of "Blade Runner 2049"

Director Denis Villeneuve and DP Roger Deakins on the set of “Blade Runner 2049”

Stephen Vaughan

The project began with Villeneuve’s directive that it look like a harsh February winter in Montreal, and that the color yellow embody innocence and creation. But the execution was left up to Deakins. And what he achieved was a visual balance between brutalism and beauty.

Three images helped seal the deal: The artificial sunlight effect in the office of Jared Leto’s Wallace, with the pool of water projecting caustic patterns on the walls, the romantic warmth between K (Ryan Gosling) and the holographic Joi (Ana de Armas), and the surreal red landscape of Vegas, where K travels on the road to destiny with Deckard (Harrison Ford).

In a race marked by noteworthy CG character animation, “Blade Runner” (John Nelson, Gerd Nefzer, Paul Lambert and Richard R. Hoover) not only delivered Rachael but also Joi. The two-minute Rachael sequence brought an emotionally conflicted reunion with Deckard that required technical virtuosity and subtle performance by Oscar-winning MPC (“The Jungle Book”). After drilling in all of Young’s mannerisms into the youthful CG model, they honed in on the performance, creating a three-beat arc consisting of confidence, longing, and rejection.

“Blade Runner 2049”

Joi, by contrast, was more of an advanced analog creation, alternating between looking realistic and artificial. The key was having her character help humanize replicant K. Production VFX supervisor Nelson and Double Negative’s Lambert came up with a 360-degree transparency effect for her. But the highlight was the three-way sex scene between K, Joi, and replicant prostitute Mariette (Mackenzie Davis). For that, DNeg shot the women separately (with lighting assistance from Deakins), merged them with the CG models, and inventively created a third face that upped the emotional experience.

Best Picture winner “The Shape of Water” earned Oscars for production design (Paul Austerberry) and original score (Alexandre Desplat). Their work instilled the Cold War-era fable from Oscar winner Guillermo del Toro with watery metaphors that enhanced the romance between the mute custodian (Sally Hawkins) and the Amphibian Man (Doug Jones). Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Phantom Thread,” about the world of London haute couture in the 1950s, took home the costume design award for Mark Bridges. These marked the second Oscars for both Desplat (“The Grand Budapest Hotel”) and Bridges (“The Artist”).

Tom Hardy, “Dunkirk

Additionally, Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” captured three Oscars for editing (Lee Smith), sound editing (Richard King), and sound mixing (Gregg Landaker, Gary Rizzo, Mark Weingarten). The immersive World War II survival thriller was an experimental tour de force, playing with time with clockwork precision and putting us in the center of the action on land, sea, and air. For King, his fourth Oscar represents a record for sound editing. The other three were for “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World,” “The Dark Knight,” and “Inception.” Landaker, too, has earned four Oscars (“Speed,” “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” and “Star Wars: Episode V — The Empire Strikes Back”) and Rizzo previously won for “Inception.”

“Darkest Hour” won for makeup/hairstyling (Kazuhiro Tsuji, David Malinowski, and Lucy Sibbick). Tsuji, a master of special makeup effects, was lured out of retirement by Best Actor winner Gary Oldman to transform him into Winston Churchill, and he became the first Asian from his category to win the Oscar.

Coco

Pixar’s “Coco” claimed Oscars for animated feature (the studio’s ninth) and the original song, “Remember Me” (Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez). Director Lee Unkrich (who previously won for “Toy Story 3”) and co-director Adrian Molina made a stirring and colorful love letter to Mexico and Día de los Muertos. “Remember Me,” which underscored the theme of family, marked the second Oscar for the husband and wife Lopez team (“Frozen’s” “Let It Go”).

“Dear Basketball” took animated short honors, riding the star power of Lakers legend Kobe Bryant, who teamed with Disney legend Glen Keane (“Beauty and the Beast,” “The Little Mermaid”). Despite its slightness, “Dear Basketball” nonetheless displayed Keane’s hand-drawn prowess in depicting Bryant’s aspirational dream and balletic flights of fancy.

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Oscars: Roger Deakins Finally Wins, Snapping the Longest-Ever Losing Streak

Roger Deakins might be the greatest living cinematographer, and he’s finally – finally! – getting the credit he deserves. Deakins won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, snapping the longest losing streak in Oscar history.

Deakins’s nomination for “Blade Runner 2049” marked his 14th nomination dating back to 1995, but this is his first win.

“I really love my job. I’ve been doing it a long time as you can see,” Deakins said upon winning his Oscar. “It’s for us, because it was a team, a real team effort.”

Deakins has been nominated for his work with the Coen Brothers, Sam Mendes and his director on “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve. Some of his notable, yet Oscar-losing work, included other Best Picture nominees “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and “No Country for Old Men,” which went on to win Best Picture. This win follows Deakins earning top honors from the American Society of Cinematographers.

Also Read: Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

In speaking with TheWrap for the Down to the Wire Oscars magazine, Deakins didn’t think he was overdue for the award. “Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years,” he said.

“Blade Runner 2049” is the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic, shot by Jordan Cronenweth, who never won an Oscar either. The special effects heavy “Blade Runner 2049” is dazzling, but Deakins told TheWrap you’d be surprised how much was actually captured in-camera without the aid of CGI.

“I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is,” Deakins said.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

‘Sicario’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

Roger Deakins, Janusz Kaminski Nominated by American Society of Cinematographers, Again

Roger Deakins might be the greatest living cinematographer, and he’s finally – finally! – getting the credit he deserves. Deakins won the Oscar for Best Cinematography, snapping the longest losing streak in Oscar history.

Deakins’s nomination for “Blade Runner 2049” marked his 14th nomination dating back to 1995, but this is his first win.

“I really love my job. I’ve been doing it a long time as you can see,” Deakins said upon winning his Oscar. “It’s for us, because it was a team, a real team effort.”

Deakins has been nominated for his work with the Coen Brothers, Sam Mendes and his director on “Blade Runner 2049,” Denis Villeneuve. Some of his notable, yet Oscar-losing work, included other Best Picture nominees “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and “No Country for Old Men,” which went on to win Best Picture. This win follows Deakins earning top honors from the American Society of Cinematographers.

In speaking with TheWrap for the Down to the Wire Oscars magazine, Deakins didn’t think he was overdue for the award. “Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years,” he said.

“Blade Runner 2049” is the follow-up to Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic, shot by Jordan Cronenweth, who never won an Oscar either. The special effects heavy “Blade Runner 2049” is dazzling, but Deakins told TheWrap you’d be surprised how much was actually captured in-camera without the aid of CGI.

“I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is,” Deakins said.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Roger Deakins Doesn't Think He's Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

'Sicario' Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

Roger Deakins, Janusz Kaminski Nominated by American Society of Cinematographers, Again

All the Oscar-Nominated Movies You Can Watch at Home Right Now

Oscars 2018: Here Are the Best Shots From This Year’s Nominees

From “The Shape of Water” to “Get Out,” these images are a big reason why the 2018 Oscar nominees are so memorable.

Editor’s Note: Presented by iTunes. Watch this year’s contenders here.

Oscar season often finds us talking about movies in terms of characters, actors and plots; the actual images that make movies such a distinctive medium can get lost in the fray. Nevertheless, movies are nothing without the indelible images that make them so memorable. Here are some of the ones from this year’s nominees that really stand out.

Blade Runner 2049” – Orange Desert

“Blade Runner 2049” spends much of its first hour establishing the icy, mechanical dystopia with the same template as Ridley Scott’s 1982 movie. Then Ryan Gosling’s K ventures deep into the desert of a ruined Las Vegas, and as the movie prepares to reveal Harrison Ford’s Rick Deckard’s hideaway, the movie quiets down and enters the eerie landscape of a forgotten world. Cinematographer Roger Deakins turns up the orange hues of this dusty landscape to such a high contrast that K may as well be walking on Mars, gazing at a citrus horizon of nothingness in his open-ended quest for answers that may or may not exist.

“Blade Runner”

The shot epitomizes director Denis Villeneuve’s ambition with this unconventional blockbuster, which draws from one of the most famous sci-fi reference points in modern history even as it dares to push it forward in new creative directions. K’s journey is at once familiar and alien, mimicking his paradoxical mindset, and the movie’s visual textures mark the rare case of a blockbuster reaching for high art. —EK

“Get Out” – The Sunken Place

In its first act, Jordan Peele’s first feature is already a fascinating tonal juggling act, one that melds racial satire with genuine chills in a brilliant combination of “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” and more sinister horror tropes. Then, in the dead of night, it catapults into a far more remarkable abstract place, one with haunting reverberations on many levels at once. As Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) visits the country home of the parents of the white woman he’s dating, he encounters her eerie psychotherapist mother Missy (Catherine Keener) after dark and she hypnotizes him.

The resulting sequence is a mesmerizing immersion into “The Sunken Place”: Chris collapses into another plane of awareness, drifting away into a black void within his own mind, where Missy can keep him locked away as long as she wants. The scene is a masterstroke of editing, performance, and sound design that apes Chris’ sense of disorientation and become a pivotal moment for the movie’s tonal shift into scarier territory. Peele has referred to The Sunken Place “this symbol for the marginalization of black people,” which would be an extraordinary concept even if it weren’t so brilliantly executed. But The Sunken Place is indeed horrifying — a menacing empty world where escape is impossible, and the observer can only watch the privileged outside world in frozen terror from afar. No matter its surreal dimension, the scene is also a shocking reality check for the age. -EK

The Shape of Water” – Underwater Embrace

Guillermo del Toro’s dark fairy tale is a pure, unbridled dose of the filmmaker’s otherworldly aesthetic, a melding of gothic horror and magical realism that demonstrates an understanding of both traditions. They’re embodied by the movie’s two central characters, Elisa (Sally Hawkins), and the unnamed elemental river god (Doug Jones) with whom she falls in love. The essence of that unlikely pairing is epitomized by the movie’s climactic image, which has been the single biggest selling point for the movie after months of marketing.

“The Shape of Water”

In reality, the couple dangle beneath the waves after a violent showdown, and their fates remain unclear. But the image has a lot more going on beyond the most literal, plot-based aspects. Elisa and her lover dangle in a deep blue void as it careening through time and space, finding catharsis in companionship even as they feel ostracized by the rest of the world. It’s a rich, painterly image at once haunting and life-affirming, and it gets at the essence of del Toro’s work as a whole. —EK

“Call Me by Your Name” – Final Shot

The final shot of Luca Guadagnino’s “Call Me by Your Name” is a gut-punch in every sense of the term. The director and cinematographer Sayombhu Mukdeeprom hold the camera on a medium close-up of Elio (Timothée Chalamet) for an uninterrupted take that lasts over four minutes. Elio stares directly into a fire and is reduced to tears, having just gotten off the phone with first love Oliver and learning that he’s getting married. The shot alone justifies Chalamet’s Oscar nomination for Best Actor. By utilizing a one take, Guadagnino allows Chalamet to react in real time to his heartbreak and the results are simply devastating. You can feel the pain inside him unfolding by the second.

"Call Me By Your Name"

“Call Me By Your Name”

Sony Pictures Classics

But the power of the show is also in its composition. Mukdeeprom expertly captures the burning flames reflecting off Elio’s face. He’s at once staring down the past as it burns down and looking into a warmer future, one where he’s already gone through the confusion of self-discovery. The shot keeps Elio in focus, but the out-of-focus background is just as important to its impact. Elio’s mother and their maid can be seen setting the table for dinner. As Elio hits his emotional breakthrough, the world simply moves as as normal behind him. The final shot might just be the best of this year’s Oscar nominees. —ZS

“The Florida Project” – Magic Kingdom

The great magic trick of “The Florida Project” is how Sean Baker and cinematographer Alexis Zabe envision their budget motel through the eyes of their six-year-old protagonist, Moonee. Other filmmakers tackling the same subject matter might have shot the motel to capture the grim reality of its destitution, but Baker directs “The Florida Project” as if you were actually seeing the world through Moonee’s rose-colored glasses. The motel is the only world Moonee knows, so for her it’s not a rundown place of squalor but a massive playhouse bursting with endless possibilities. No wonder Baker and Zabe turn the setting into a vibrant and massive landscape.

"The Florida Project"

“The Florida Project”

A24

In this shot, Moonee and her friend are overcome by the beauty of their surroundings. The motel is a neon pink palace and Moonee is its rascal of a princess. The added bonus of the rainbow almost feels like Moonee’s imagination in full force, and it very well could be. Lots of movies are about childhood, but “The Florida Project” is one of the rare ones that actually see the world as one. —ZS

“Dunkirk” – The Beach

The strength of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk” lies in its immersive storytelling. The director doubled downed on his love for practical effects and worked closely with cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema to create shots overflowing with palpable danger. One of the earliest examples in the film takes place when Tommy (Fionn Whitehead) first arrives on Dunkirk beach. Nolan and Hoytema shoot Tommy’s introduction to the setting mostly in wide screen establishing shots, making it very clear the young solider has now become one of many hopeless bodies awaiting certain death. When German airplanes attack the coast line and drop bombs on the beach, Tommy drops to the floor and covers his head.

“Dunkirk”

Nolan switches to a close up of Tommy’s head but keeps the wide screen format so the viewer can see one explosion after the next drawing closer and closer to him. Shots like these have a claustrophobic horror to them that really make “Dunkirk” such grueling experiential cinema; there is no where to run, quite literally in the shot, and the only thing to do is wait and hope you survive. —ZS

“Lady Bird” – Hotel Room

So much of Greta Gerwig’s Best Picture nominee is about the push-pull between the eponymous Lady Bird (Saoirse Ronan) and her equally complicated mother Marion (Laurie Metcalf), and while that’s a fraught relationship explored in a number of the film’s other, showier scenes — Lady Bird jumping out of the car for one, or their epic shouting match much later in the coming-of-age tale — Gerwig indicates early on just how complex their bond is within the confines of a single hotel room.

“Lady Bird”

A24

The pair are returning from a long-planned road trip to visit various colleges that Lady Bird may (or most decidedly may not) attend, all just a quickie drive from her hated Sacramento home, and Gerwig uses their final stay in a grubby hotel to show the pair as they literally grow apart while sleeping. First stuck to each other, Lady Bird and Marion naturally move apart as they slumber, eventually ending up as far from each other as possible.

That’s where we start in “Lady Bird,” a clever introduction to all the emotion that’s to come, delivered with the maximum of grace. —KE

“I, Tonya” – Makeup Before Olympics

Margot Robbie’s performance in Craig Gillespie’s flinty, funny, and often exceedingly foul-mouthed Tonya Harding biopic is one of the most riveting pieces of an already-riveting feature. It’s not just that Robbie was cast as Harding in a variety of ages — from teenagehood all the way up to present day — a challenge she gamely accepted (and accentuated with some smart choices in terms of both her hair and her speaking voice), but that the actress also adeptly handles a wide array of emotions and situations while staying laser-eyed on the heart of a complex character. As brash and brusque as Robbie’s Tonya can be (and, man, is she ever), “I, Tonya” also finds the space for a seeming inevitable breakdown that leads into a bravura turn from Robbie.

“I, Tonya”

And it’s still, somehow, pure big-talking Tonya, even as Robbie stares into the camera and angrily, tearfully freshens her makeup before what will end up being one of her final skates. She’s as vulnerable as she ever was, but she’s also fixated on her own pain, her own other-ness, and as the blush gets pinker and the bangs get higher, Tonya (and Robbie) become something else entirely. It’s the kind of “oh, yes, there, that’s the Oscar moment” scene that any other film would have played for the trauma and the drama, but which “I, Tonya” fits inside its unique spin on a truth that’s stranger than fiction. —KE

“Baby Driver” – Baby and the Toy Car

“Baby Driver”

A combination of codependence and coercion keeps Baby (Ansel Elgort) caught up in the criminal enterprises of Doc (Kevin Spacey) in Edgar Wright’s unabashedly fun car chase caper, but when the young getaway driver is behind the wheel, he suddenly becomes master of his own domain. While the actual chase scenes in Wright’s film are the most clearly thrilling — hell, the filmmaker and his star even make a well-timed walking chase scene feel fresh and fun — seeing Baby in a lower key helps the audience get to know him even better, while also making it clear that maybe he really is ready to bust out on his own. As Baby looms large over a toy model car — one being used to help plot another daring heist, of which he will assuredly excel — his driving dominance solidified in one image. —KE

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How ‘Blade Runner 2049’ VFX Supervisor John Nelson Brought Rachael & Pic’s Holograms To Life

A self-described science-fiction fan, visual effects supervisor John Nelson saw a “dream gig” and rare opportunity in Denis Villeneuve‘s Blade Runner 2049. Getting the chance to work on a sequel to a revered sci-fi film—one of the pillars of the genre—Nelson would construct surreal cityscape shots out of real aerial footage shot across the globe, while exploring holograms in all their various visual representations.
Specifically, in 2049, Nelson would create holograms of…

A self-described science-fiction fan, visual effects supervisor John Nelson saw a "dream gig" and rare opportunity in Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049. Getting the chance to work on a sequel to a revered sci-fi film—one of the pillars of the genre—Nelson would construct surreal cityscape shots out of real aerial footage shot across the globe, while exploring holograms in all their various visual representations. Specifically, in 2049, Nelson would create holograms of…

Production Designer Dennis Gassner Gets His “All-In,” ‘Lawrence Of Arabia’ Moment With ‘Blade Runner 2049’

An Oscar nominee for Blade Runner 2049—a sequel to Ridley Scott’s ’80s sci-fi classic—production designer Dennis Gassner saw challenges everywhere when he first signed on to the project.
“It was going to be particularly demanding in lots of ways. You think about trying to remake a film 35 years later. What is that going to be like?” the designer reflects. “We shot it in Budapest, Hungary, and that was a challenge in itself.”
A steward of design for the last several Bond

An Oscar nominee for Blade Runner 2049—a sequel to Ridley Scott's '80s sci-fi classic—production designer Dennis Gassner saw challenges everywhere when he first signed on to the project. "It was going to be particularly demanding in lots of ways. You think about trying to remake a film 35 years later. What is that going to be like?" the designer reflects. "We shot it in Budapest, Hungary, and that was a challenge in itself." A steward of design for the last several Bond

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Made Light “Feel Alive” With Computer-Controlled Rigs

Teaming with Denis Villeneuve on Blade Runner 2049—a well-received sequel to Ridley Scott’s 1982 sci-fi classic—cinematographer Roger Deakins took on what the director has called “the most expensive art house movie in cinema history,” seamlessly recreating the aesthetic of the original film while building out its world. Back in the running at the Oscars this year with his 14th nomination—and looking for his first win—Deakins was compelled to take on the ambitious project…

Teaming with Denis Villeneuve on Blade Runner 2049—a well-received sequel to Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi classic—cinematographer Roger Deakins took on what the director has called "the most expensive art house movie in cinema history," seamlessly recreating the aesthetic of the original film while building out its world. Back in the running at the Oscars this year with his 14th nomination—and looking for his first win—Deakins was compelled to take on the ambitious project…

Roger Deakins’ Legacy is Bigger Than an Oscar: A Frank Conversation With the Cinematography Legend

After 14 nominations will the biggest name in cinematography really lose again? It’s a question everyone, except Deakins, is asking.

The Roger talk started in July, when the “Blade Runner 2049” trailer dropped three months before the film’s release. From just two minutes of footage, it was clear that Denis Villeneuve’s reimagining of the Ridley Scott’s visionary world 32 years into the future could finally provide a sufficiently stunning showcase for the“naturalistic” cinematographer.

But during the long awards season, another narrative came into play. Deakins’ recognition may be long overdue after 14 nominations, but there was also an entire gender that had been previously overlooked. This was the year that Rachel Morrison’s stunning work on “Mudbound” received the first-ever Oscar nomination for a female cinematographer.

The result is a front-page level of attention for a below-the-line category. Deakins like to preach that DPs should go unnoticed, but that’s not to be this year. “I’m really happy working on this film ‘The Goldfinch’ right now,” joked Deakins in an interview with IndieWire last Saturday morning following a late-night shoot on director John Crowley’s adaptation of Donna Tartt’s novel for Warner Brothers and Amazon. “That’s my focus.

“Sure, it’s nice of people to see your work and appreciate [it] – I don’t know really,” said Deakins, pausing to collect his thoughts. “I just move on and I like shooting films. I mean, okay, it’s such a weird, weird thing when a film gets ignored or a film gets talked about. It doesn’t make any sense to me. Some of what I consider my best work and some of the best films that I’ve ever worked on, kind of disappear without a trace. There’s no accounting for it. Something connects or something doesn’t.”

“Blade Runner 2049”

Stephen Vaughan

While he reportedly has an aversion for the awards circuit, Deakins is more than happy to talk shop. Unlike other great DPs like Emmanuel Lubezki or Mark Lee Ping-bing – who have difficulty putting their visual craft into words –  Deakins is happy to break down, in great technical detail, how he achieved virtually any shot. Maintaining his own website, rogerdeakins.com, he logs on – even after a long day in production – to answer young filmmakers’ questions with concrete specifics and a clear description of his lighting and camera philosophies. While he is careful to constantly repeat “there are no rules,” his demystification of creating amazing imagery carries the underlying message that good cinematography isn’t magic; it’s a skill and a discipline.

Deakins has been recognized with multiple awards from his peers in the ASC; his lack of Oscars ultimately says more about the Academy than it does his legacy. Traditionally, the Best Cinematography Oscar is tied to Best Picture. Since 1989 (when the British Deakins began working in America), only four Best Cinematography Oscar winners did not also receive a Best Picture nomination; more often than not, the two awards go to the same film. Of Deakins’ 14 nominations, only five of those films also received a Best Picture nomination. Part of Deakins’ awards problem (if you want to call it that) is he is often drawn to character- and director-driven scripts that often receive critical acclaim, but remain on the periphery of Best Picture consideration.

In 2008, the one year a film he shot won Best Picture (“No Country For Old Men”), Deakins was a double nominee: His work on “No Country” was in direct competition with what many consider his masterpiece, “The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford.” Robert Elswit, who won both the Oscar and ASC Award for “There Will Be Blood” that year, was likely only half joking when he suggested a special category: “Films shot by Roger Deakins.”

"Stalker"

“Stalker”

As for the visual playground of science fiction, Deakins loves the genre. Andrei Tarkovsky’s films are some his favorite films of all-time, while shooting Orwell’s “1984” put him on the map. However, he avoided sprawling fantasy films after a bad experience on his first big Hollywood film, “Air America,” in 1990. With three discrete production units, the film never lived up to its original conception. “The scale and the amorphic nature of working on it was something I didn’t care for, and it was so disappointing in terms of not living up to the expectation I had. The script was smart and subversive, I thought.”

Over 25 years later, as one collaborator recently told IndieWire, Deakins requires a level of control that would place the cinematographer in an “absolute personal hell” if he were ever to shoot a tudio superhero movie. With Villeneuve, a collaborator who is every bit as visually specific as Deakins, “Blade Runner” was an opportunity he couldn’t pass up. For Deakins, who admits he “absolutely obsesses” about creating unified look for a film, “Blade Runner 2049” would be an enormous challenge with its incredible diversity of visual worlds and multiple layers.

Luckily, it was a world he could conceive from the ground up. Villeneuve was pressed for time, and would need to start conceiving the visual world while he was still editing “Arrival,” so he brought Deakins up to Montreal. “My way to put my foot on the gas to make things happen faster was to create a dialogue with Roger very early on,” said Villeneuve. “I would be in dialogue rather than dreaming alone, which can take a very long time in my case.”

Adds Deakins, “A film that’s of that scale, it was kind of an open book. You have to have some starting point. You got an army of people waiting for you to move forward with all the things that they have to do and it’s like, ‘Where are we gonna even shoot?”

Deakins and Villeneuve travelled, walking around cities and landscapes, and quickly got on the same page about wanting to ground their 2049 dystopia in a recognizable reality. Drawing inspiration from the brutalist architecture of London, the smog of the Beijing, the shipyards of Bangladesh, and the red dust storms of the Sahara, Deakins describes their concept as, “what would feel possible based on what is already happening today.”

"Blade Runner 2049"

“Blade Runner 2049”

Stephen Vaughan

There’s a misconception that, because Deakins favors lighting that looks naturalistic, he is a cinematographer who works with natural light. Rather, he plans, tests, and sketches pages of hyper-specific and complicated lighting setups, which his gaffer follows like a blueprint. Working closely with production designer Dennis Gassner, Deakins built his lighting schemes into the sets to make them look like they are lit by practicals.

Deakins had an element of control over almost everything that appeared on screen . “There’s some things that you might not think were effect shots that are actually in camera,” said Deakins. “Everything was done first unit, and most of the film was shot single camera.” The black landscape seen flying into Sapper Morton’s farm was based on plates Deakins shot of the landscape in Iceland. The aerial shots of the cityscapes were done in Mexico City in exactly the right light.

There’s also the Deakins misconception that he created the bold colors of “Blade Runner 2049” in post. That rumor likely stems from becoming the first DP to fully digitally color-correct a film; on “O Brother, Where Art Thou?”,  he spent two months pulling the greens from the film. However, his switch to digital cinematography only made him more determined to everything in camera, without manipulating the image. For example, to create the now-famous red of Villeneuve’s Las Vegas, Deakins actually mixed different colored lights to perfect the scene.

“It’s not just red, it’s got two sets of colors – higher up in the interior, there’s a kind of yellower light percolating through and down where it’s more dusty and there’s less light, it’s more red,” said Deakins. “The way those lights combine, and the way the light flares through those windows and that gel, you can’t do it in post. It looks artificial. You might not be able to point to it and say, ‘Well, that’s what’s wrong about it,’ but there’s just something about it. It doesn’t feel right. It’s the same as any effects shot against something that’s been done in camera. It’s those little things reality has that you can’t create in a computer. I’m sorry, you just can’t. It’s as simple as that.”

For Deakins, the biggest change  with digital cinematography has been his reliance on the monitor and his DIT to see precisely what he is getting. From there, he tweaks his lights to get the color right. “With Denis especially, he’s so specific,” he said. “The reference photo for the silver winter light was his backyard in Montreal – it’s more fun to show the director and say, ‘Well, this is what I’m thinking,’ and work from there.’”

Deakins, who is known to spend Saturdays with his crew pre-lighting for Monday, relies on preparation to allow himself to be creative on set as the camera operator. With Deakins, who cut his teeth in documentary, the one piece of magic he can’t break down is his incredible sense of composition and ability to make every frame more dynamic. Even if his style changes to some degree from film to film, his eye for arresting images is distinctive.

Villeneuve and Deakins check the monitor on the "Blade Runner" set

Villeneuve and Deakins check the monitor on the “Blade Runner” set

Stephen Vaughan

Deakins has admitted before that, back in the 1990s, while he was still building his reputation, an Academy Award would have meant something to his career. Now, at age 68, his ability to consistently work on his own terms — the same tight-knit crew, operating the camera himself, and picking scripts from the few director-driven films with a mid-size budget — is its own reward. It’s a niche he’s well aware is practically extinct.

He also has perspective that while the industry puts a great deal of attention on Academy Awards, film history is another matter. Pointing to cinematographer Jordan Cronenweth’s groundbreaking work on the original “Blade Runner,” Deakins calls attention to how what he considers some of the greatest cinematography never even got nominated. “Well, you think Jordan deserved one?” Deakins asks rhetorically.

“It’s such a sort of particular [film that gets focused on],” said Deakins. “There’s so many films from around the world, I emphasize, that are so beautifully photographed, but they don’t get the recognition. Kazuo Miyagawa, who used to shoot for [director Akira] Kurosawa – I mean, hey, just go and look at any of the films he shot.”

And of course, over 50-60 years later, the films Miyagawa shot for Kurosawa (“Yojimbo,” “Rashomon”), along with his collaborations with Kenji Mizoguchi (“Ugetsu”), areheld in the pantheon of the greatest films ever made, regardless of awards. It’s a humbling group of filmmakers to think about, even for the great Deakins, but it keeps other’s preoccupation with his lack of Oscars in perspective.

Anonymous Oscar Ballot: VFX Supervisor Wants ‘The Shape of Water’ to Win, ‘Get Out’ Not Best Picture Material

The omission of “The Shape of Water” from the visual effects race was most disappointing.

Here’s another in our series of interviews with a swath of Academy voters from different branches for their candid thoughts on what got picked, overlooked, and overvalued this year.

Best Picture of the Year

The Shape of Water” has broad appeal, is a beautifully done film, and feels like a completed thought and singular vision from all categories and disciplines working together. “Get Out” is a very good and fun movie but not necessarily best picture material.

As far as omissions, “Victoria & Abdul,” came and went without the usual fanfare for Oscar nominations. I’m not sure why it was left out of most categories, including Judi Dench and Stephen Frears. Also, “Detroit” seemed like an early frontrunner and was mysteriously left out.

“Get Out”

Also, in terms of the preferential system, I’m not sure of its effectiveness, it’s so hard to say one way or the other. And I have no problem with the Academy trying to be more inclusive of women and people of color: Artistic merit and raw talent wins out over all and is always color and gender blind.

Best Visual Effects

What I liked about “War for the Planet of the Apes” was the finesses and the aspiration to emotionally tell the story with the subtlety of performance. The greater the subtlety, the greater the amount of difficulty and cinematic art that needs to be generated to produce such an effect.

“War for the Planet of the Apes”

Courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox

The same holds true for “The Shape of Water”; I was disappointed it was overlooked. “Kong: Skull Island” was not as impressive as “The Shape of Water,” hence it should not have arguably been on the list in place of it. It was also marred by less impressive water-splashing simulations that covered up more impressive action. Also, the film did not try to transcend the characters beyond the sensational aspect of their size and battles. It was fine and good work, but it did not try as hard as “Apes” and “The Shape of Water” to emotionally move the audience beyond the quality of the effect itself.

Blade Runner 2049” also had an impressive combination of art and execution at its core. The scene that tipped the scales involved a relationship with an artificially intelligent hologram trying to fulfill a physical relationship with Ryan Gosling’s character K. A very fine execution of a purely sci-fi idea that transcends the genre for an ordinary non sci-fi audience. Possibly “Blade Runner” will win, as more members will most likely see that movie over “Apes” and the visual component might be rewarded, like cinematography and production design.

Best Cinematography

The cinematography race is a tough one: very impressive films are competing. My favorites are “Blade Runner,” “Mudbound,” and “The Shape of Water,” in that order.

“Blade Runner 2049”

I think Roger Deakins’ imprint is on every frame where the photography creates the entire mood and atmosphere. As beautifully done as can be imagined that also transcends the medium into high art. “Mudbound” is also beautifully rendered with its cinematographer Rachel Morrison emerging as a huge talent.

“The Shape of Water” is perhaps the most complete film in every department, contributing to the whole experience. The camera, lighting, costume, directing, acting, and production design dovetails beautifully, creating the mood and tone of the fable.

“Dunkirk” is good and workmanlike but didn’t aspire to much greater than using 70mm to create the epic-like quality. I think the slavish dedication to photochemical limitations hurt its consistency in achieving what the other films were able to seamlessly create.

“Darkest Hour” was also beautifully done, but I felt the cinematography shone more than the seamless blend of “Mudbound” and some of the other films.

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Roger Deakins Doesn’t Think He’s Overdue for an Oscar – Even After 14 Nominations

A version of this story on Roger Deakins first ran in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine. 

Roger Deakins now has more cinematography nominations without a win than anyone in Oscar history. “Blade Runner 2049” marks his 14th nod. And it’s not as though the movies he’s lost for, including “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and the Best Picture-winning “No Country for Old Men,” have been completely snubbed by the Academy. It would seem he’s long overdue.

“You say that, but I don’t really agree,” said Deakins. “I don’t subscribe to that ‘overdue.’ Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years.”

For one, Jordan Cronenweth never got an Oscar (he was nominated once), and he shot the original “Blade Runner.” Deakins admires that film’s memorable noir look, but he and director Denis Villeneuve aimed to have 2049 stand on its own.

Also Read: ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

“I think the only way I paid respect to Jordan’s work is I didn’t try to mimic it in any way,” Deakins said. “I did not light like Jordan lit. I’m not Jordan Cronenweth. I talked to Denis about it, but he said it was a film to stand by itself.”

The new film is a visual marvel. Deakins staged a fight scene to the neon-lit backdrop of a holographic Elvis Presley stage show that recalls his work on “Skyfall.” He turned the Vegas strip into a burnt orange hellscape. And he bounced rippling waves of light from a reflecting pond onto the walls of the villain’s lair to make a dreamily ominous fortress.

Asked how many of the effects were captured in-camera without the aid of CGI, Deakins said, “You’d be surprised both ways, really. I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is.”

Also Read: ‘Mudbound’ Gives American Society of Cinematographers Its First-Ever Female Film Nominee

And though he worked on a far smaller budget and with more technical limitations back on one of his earliest films, an adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” Deakins said the challenge of finding ways to visualize these moments in-camera is the same.

“It’s just a matter of scale,” Deakins said. “I was just talking with someone else about the night time storm sequence on the sea wall at the end. I certainly hadn’t shot anything quite like that, such an extended scene with actors in the water and crashing waves at night. But you just figure it out.”

Deakins used this blend of in-camera visuals with the artificial to poignant effect during a “threesome” scene among two real characters and a holographic one. Deakins explained you would’ve never been able to replicate the exact lighting on an actresses face if one of them was filmed in front of a green screen. So his team filmed two actresses in the same light without a green screen, then rotoscoped one actress out and laid her image on top of the other to a beautifully imperfect effect.

“It’s the simplicity of doing it that way that makes it successful and believable,” Deakins said. “You have a picture of what you want, and it’s work, work, work to try and create it.”

Go here for more from the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap Oscar Magazine.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘Sicario’ Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

‘Blade Runner 2049’ Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

‘Blade Runner’ and ‘Planet of the Apes’ Lead Visual Effects Nominations

A version of this story on Roger Deakins first ran in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Oscar magazine. 

Roger Deakins now has more cinematography nominations without a win than anyone in Oscar history. “Blade Runner 2049” marks his 14th nod. And it’s not as though the movies he’s lost for, including “Fargo,” “The Shawshank Redemption” and the Best Picture-winning “No Country for Old Men,” have been completely snubbed by the Academy. It would seem he’s long overdue.

“You say that, but I don’t really agree,” said Deakins. “I don’t subscribe to that ‘overdue.’ Some of the greatest work is never appreciated, so from my point, it’s wonderful to be appreciated over the years.”

For one, Jordan Cronenweth never got an Oscar (he was nominated once), and he shot the original “Blade Runner.” Deakins admires that film’s memorable noir look, but he and director Denis Villeneuve aimed to have 2049 stand on its own.

“I think the only way I paid respect to Jordan’s work is I didn’t try to mimic it in any way,” Deakins said. “I did not light like Jordan lit. I’m not Jordan Cronenweth. I talked to Denis about it, but he said it was a film to stand by itself.”

The new film is a visual marvel. Deakins staged a fight scene to the neon-lit backdrop of a holographic Elvis Presley stage show that recalls his work on “Skyfall.” He turned the Vegas strip into a burnt orange hellscape. And he bounced rippling waves of light from a reflecting pond onto the walls of the villain’s lair to make a dreamily ominous fortress.

Asked how many of the effects were captured in-camera without the aid of CGI, Deakins said, “You’d be surprised both ways, really. I think that’s a lot of the fun of my job. And there’s something about doing it in camera that’s a reality you don’t get with a computer, no matter how good the work is.”

And though he worked on a far smaller budget and with more technical limitations back on one of his earliest films, an adaptation of George Orwell’s “1984,” Deakins said the challenge of finding ways to visualize these moments in-camera is the same.

“It’s just a matter of scale,” Deakins said. “I was just talking with someone else about the night time storm sequence on the sea wall at the end. I certainly hadn’t shot anything quite like that, such an extended scene with actors in the water and crashing waves at night. But you just figure it out.”

Deakins used this blend of in-camera visuals with the artificial to poignant effect during a “threesome” scene among two real characters and a holographic one. Deakins explained you would’ve never been able to replicate the exact lighting on an actresses face if one of them was filmed in front of a green screen. So his team filmed two actresses in the same light without a green screen, then rotoscoped one actress out and laid her image on top of the other to a beautifully imperfect effect.

“It’s the simplicity of doing it that way that makes it successful and believable,” Deakins said. “You have a picture of what you want, and it’s work, work, work to try and create it.”

Go here for more from the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap Oscar Magazine.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'Sicario' Cinematographer Roger Deakins Hunts for One Perfect Angle

'Blade Runner 2049' Wins Top Prize From American Society of Cinematographers

'Blade Runner' and 'Planet of the Apes' Lead Visual Effects Nominations

Anonymous Oscar Ballot: Executive Loves ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Three Billboards’ Is ‘Less Than the Sum of Its Parts’

Yet another Academy member disapproves of the preferential ballot.

Here’s another in our series of interviews with a swath of Academy voters from different branches for their candid thoughts on what got picked, overlooked, and overvalued this year. 

Best Motion Picture of the Year

I haven’t decided. “Get Out,” over time, it stood up. “Get Out” is so spectacular. But the end makes no sense. It’s such a brilliant joke that it makes you not care that it makes no sense. There’s nothing in the algebra of the movie that makes that ending possible — no clues, no hints.  In the end, it’s a deus ex machina, but the joke is so good I don’t care. They had a different ending: too dark, everyone hated it. It’s so brilliant to take a movie like that–like Frank Capra chopped off the first reel of “Lost Horizon.” I’m talking myself into voting for it now.

I thought “Lady Bird” was a perfect movie, not the biggest genre, not something you haven’t seen before. But [the movie] is exquisite in terms of its characterization and scene construction. People say it’s a little TV coming-of-age movie. It’s like a haiku, like the scene where they have the fight and then go shopping, it’s so mother-daughter, you get these amazing relationships between people. I fell in love with all of it, really.

I can’t figure out the preferential thing, my biggest concern is I don’t know what I’m voting for. I’m voting for the five in whatever order, then cast it to the winds. I don’t game it. I get into a reductive mode, I will pick the five in the order I like them: the rest is out of my hands. You don’t remember what wins in any given year anyway.

One thing bothers me. I raised the issue, which went nowhere into the maw of the mother Academy. There should be the same number of directors nominated as there are movies. By creating a different number, you create a snub. They don’t have to be the same. Why are there only five with nine movies? It should be the equal number.

I don’t mind having more than five movies nominated, but I’m not sure it worked out the way they thought it would. The theory was that more studio movies would be nominated? Where’s “Wonder Woman?” Or “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” which I thought was great but realize no one else did.

Jordan PeeleThe Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon, Los Angeles, USA - 05 Feb 2018

Jordan Peele

Chelsea Lauren/REX/Shutterstock

Best Director

These guys are all so amazing, so different, not a bad choice among them. Very tough choice, if any one of them won I would feel fine, I’m in for the count. They’re so different. How do you compare “Lady Bird” and “Dunkirk?” They’re on such different planes of existence.

The whole notion of inclusiveness doesn’t [weigh with me]. Everybody votes for their friends anyway. I don’t believe in affirmative action per se for awards. That said my favorite movies are “Get Out” and “Lady Bird.”

If it’s not the best picture why is it best director? I would have trouble picking a movie for best director if I didn’t love the movie enough that it would be in my final selection for Best Picture. If you like two movies you try to find a way to give them both some action.

I’m pretty much settled on director. It could change. Not settled on picture. There’s two movies. I also like “Dunkirk.” If “The Shape of Water” won it wouldn’t bother me. I could change my mind and vote for it. I may watch them again.

Gary OldmanThe Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon, Los Angeles, USA - 05 Feb 2018

Gary Oldman at The Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon

Matt Baron/REX/Shutterstock

Best Actor 

I’m probably going with Gary Oldman, because God knows he’s earned it, it’s a totally amazing performance, you don’t know how he did that. To some degree it’s a combination of gravitational pull, the weight of the performance, and seeing other people brilliantly play him and have him come in and do it totally differently. It’s Sid Vicious, Churchill, that whole thing.

What do you with Daniel Day-Lewis? He’s from a another planet. That performance stays with you, stays with you, stays with you. I like the kid, the young man [Timothee Chalamet]: in all three movies he’s in, he’s extraordinary.

Sally HawkinsThe Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon, Los Angeles, USA - 05 Feb 2018

Sally Hawkins at The Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon

Chelsea Lauren/REX/Shutterstock

Best Actress

Streep was great. She’s always great. “The Post” was fine. I’m happy it’s doing business: its an important movie and they’re all doing a great job, although Tom Hanks is miscast: he’s Jimmy Stewart, he’s not Spencer Tracy. He had energy, but he was forced to do a wonderful job of impersonation, which made it tougher for her, she’s always wonderful. I’m not sure she carries the move enough to get that far, whereas Sally Hawkins did [in “The Shape of Water”]. The most valuable player on the movie takes the movie to a place you can’t imagine it going without her.

Margot RobbieThe Academy Awards Nominees Luncheon, Los Angeles, USA - 05 Feb 2018

Margot Robbie

Chelsea Lauren/REX/Shutterstock

The other person I can’t imagine the movie without is Margot Robbie. “I Tonya” is a movie nobody in the world ever wanted to see –as an idea, from a marketing standpoint: “Tonya Harding, I already know that story.” She carried it off in an amazing way. There’s a woman with a brilliant career, as a producer, what a talent!

I’m not the biggest fan of “Three Billboards,” but it’s fun. To me it’s less than the sum of its parts, which tells me it’s a directing issue. I liked the ending, that was a real moment. To me the movie started going downhill when Woody [Harrelson] left the movie, as much as [Sam] Rockwell’s great, and if he wins that’s fine. Frances McDormand is wonderful, but I feel she’s played that part before. I agreed with her SAG Awards speech: “Some of these kids need a doorstop too.”

Best Supporting Actor

Between Harrelson and Rockwell, I’d probably go with Woody, just because I felt it when he left the movie. I thought Michael Stuhlbarg was the weakest thing in [“Call Me By Your Name”], a stagey contrived character and an Oscar speech. I didn’t hate the movie, I liked it.

Christopher Plummer is the only thing worth watching [“All the Money in the World”] for, but I wasn’t knocked out. I didn’t see any reason to make the movie. As it was he was perfect for the part, 87 years old, unbelievable! Willem Dafoe was very good and I liked “The Florida Project” too, he was the early favorite. I’m edging toward Woody.

Saoirse Ronan and Laurie Metcalf in “Lady Bird”

A24

Best Supporting Actress

Here’s where campaigning works, because I totally fell in love with Allison Janney as a person. Allison and I had the best time together, we see the world the same way. There’s more depth to Metcalf’s character than Janney, who said she just hits the accelerator and goes the whole way. There’s more dimension to the character Laurie plays, more maneuvers and change of gears. Despite my admiration for Allison, who I never met before– I want her to be my best friend –I will vote for Metcalf.

I take that ballot seriously, even if I forget it when I turn it in. I don’t enter any Oscar pools anymore. It’s too confusing: do I vote for who I voted for, who I want to win, or who I think will win? So I don’t do it.

Director Denis Villeneuve and DP Roger Deakins on the set of "Blade Runner 2049"

Director Denis Villeneuve and DP Roger Deakins on the set of “Blade Runner 2049

Stephen Vaughan

Best Cinematography

No question about that one, Roger Deakins. “Blade Runner 2049” was the biggest robbery job, it got dismissed because it didn’t do well. It was one of my two or three favorites.

“Phantom Thread”

Photo Courtesy of Focus Features

Best Costumes

I thought “Marshall” had the best costumes. I’ll vote for “Phantom Thread.”

Best Editing

I don’t know how they did “I, Tonya.” [Margot Robbie] did a lot of the skating. I have a sweet spot for that movie; it’s such a surprise, in an interesting, smart fun way that captured those characters. It was a little “Star 80” with the husband, and the goofball friend–the whole story so improbable. The editing was so magnificent. I want that movie to win something.

Hans Zimmer

Hans Zimmer

Erik Pendzich/REX/Shutterstock

Best Score

“Dunkirk”: Hans Zimmer. It’s all one cue! And “Phantom Thread” had a great score.

Best Song

I liked the Common/Diane Warren song in “Marshall” [“Stand Up for Something”].

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MPSE Awards 2018: ‘War for the Planet of the Apes’ and ‘Blade Runner 2049’ Take Top Sound Editing Awards

The “Apes” origin story finale was the surprise winner at the Golden Reel Awards Sunday, splitting with the “Blade Runner” sequel.

It was a clear victory for sci-fi sound editing Sunday night at the 65th annual MPSE Golden Reel Awards at the Westin Bonaventure. “War for the Planet of the Apes” was the surprise winner for Dialogue/ADR, splitting honors with “Blade Runner 2049,” which grabbed the Effects/Foley prize. The big loser was “Dunkirk” (which won the BAFTA sound award earlier Sunday). However, Christopher Nolan’s World War II survival epic took home the Music Score award and remains the sound editing Oscar favorite.

"Blade Runner 2049"

“Blade Runner 2049”

In addition, “The Greatest Showman,” “Coco,” “Loveless,” and “Jane” earned sound editing awards for Musical, Animation, Foreign Language, and Documentary. The big TV winner was “Game of Thrones” (“The Spoils of War”) for Dialogue/ADR and Effects/Foley. Other TV honorees included “Black Mirror” (“USS Callister”) for Episodic Long Form Dialogue/ADR; “Godless” (“Homecoming”) and “Ozark” (“The Toll”) for Episodic Long Form Effects/Foley; “The Get Down” (“Only from Exile Can We Come Home”) for Episodic Long Form Music/Musical; and “Stranger Things” (“Chapter Eight: The Mind Flayer” for Episodic Short Form Music/Musical.

Director Kathryn Bigelow (“Detroit”) won the Filmmaker Award and sound effects recording mixer John P. Fasal (“Dunkirk,” “Coco”) earned the Career Achievement Award.

Progression Image 3 of 3: Final Frame..ASPIRING MUSICIAN — In Disney•Pixar’s “Coco,” Miguel (voice of newcomer Anthony Gonzalez) dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like the celebrated Ernesto de la Cruz (voice of Benjamin Bratt). But when he strums his idol’s guitar, he sets off a mysterious chain of events. Directed by Lee Unkrich, co-directed by Adrian Molina and produced by Darla K. Anderson, “Coco” opens in theaters Nov. 22, 2017.

“Coco”

Pixar

65th MPSE Golden Reel Award Highlights:

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Dialogue / ADR

“War for the Planet of the Apes”

20th Century Fox

Supervising Sound Editors: Douglas Murray, MPSE, Will Files

Supervising Dialogue Editor: R.J. Kizer

Vocal Editors: Kim Foscato, P.K. Hooker, Doug Jackson, Lindsay Alvarez

ADR Editors: Laura Graham, Jim Brookshire

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Effects / Foley

“Blade Runner 2049”

Warner Brothers

Supervising Sound Editor: Mark Mangini, MPSE

Sound Designer: Theo Green

Sound Effects Editors: Chris Aud, MPSE, Lee Gilmore, MPSE, Greg ten Bosch, MPSE,

Charlie Campagna, MPSE, Dave Whitehead, Eliot Connors, MPSE

Foley Editor: Ezra Dweck

Foley Artists: Goro Koyama, Andy Malcolm

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Musical

“The Greatest Showman”

20th Century Fox

Supervising Music Editor: Jen Monnar

Music Editors: Jim Harrison, Jeff Carson, Peter Myles, Sheri Ozeki, Ted Caplan

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Music Score

“Dunkirk”

Warner Brothers

Supervising Music Editor: Alex Gibson

Music Editor: Ryan Rubin

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Foreign Language Feature

“Loveless”

Sony Pictures Classics

Supervising Sound Editor: Andrey Dergachev

Dialogue Editor: Alexey Kuznetsov

Sound Effects Editors: Alexey Kobzar, Sofia Matrosova

Foley Editors: Elena Starikova, Ruslan Khuseyn, Dmitriy Zuev

Foley Artist: Natalia Zueva

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Documentary

“Jane”

National Geographic

Supervising Sound Editors: Warren Shaw, Joshua Paul Johnson

Sound Designers: Peter Staubli, MPSE, Odin Benitez, MPSE

Dialogue Editor: Will Digby

Foley Artist: Tara Blume

Music Editor: Suzana Peric

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Feature Animation

“Coco”

Disney

Supervising Sound Editors: J.R. Grubbs, Chris Boyes

Dialogue Editors: Marshall Winn, Michael Silvers

Sound Effects Editors: Michael Silvers, Justin Doyle, Jack Whittaker, Teresa Eckton,

Foley Editors: Jim Likowski, Dee Selby

Foley Artists: Jana Vance, Dennie Thorpe, Geoff Vaughan

Supervising Music Editor: Stephen Davis, MPSE

Music Editor: Warren Brown, MPSE, Barney Jones

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Effects / Foley

“Game of Thrones”

“The Spoils of War”

HBO

Supervising Sound Editor: Tim Kimmel, MPSE

Sound Designer: Paula Fairfield, MPSE

Sound Effects Editor: Bradley Katona, MPSE

Foley Editors: Brett Voss, MPSE, John Matter

Foley Artists: Jeff Wilhoit, MPSE, Dylan Tuomy-Wilhoit

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Dialogue/ADR

“Game of Thrones”

“The Spoils of War”

HBO

Supervising Sound Editor: Tim Kimmel, MPSE

Supervising Dialogue Editor: Paul Bercovitch

Supervising ADR Editor: Tim Hands, MPSE

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Dialogue/ADR

“Black Mirror”

“USS Callister”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editor: Kenny Clark

Dialogue Editors: Michael Maroussas, Matt Skelding

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Music / Musical

“The Get Down”

“Only from Exile Can We Come Home”

Netflix

Supervising Music Editor: Jamieson Shaw

Music Editors: Jordan Ross, Dave Robertson

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Short Form – Music / Musical

“Stranger Things”

“Chapter Eight: The Mind Flayer”

Netflix

Music Editor: David Klotz

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Episodic Long Form – Effects / Foley (Tie)

“Godless”

“Homecoming”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Wylie Stateman, MPSE, Eric Hoehn

Sound Effects Editors: Harry Cohen, MPSE, Hector Gika, MPSE, Sylvain Lasseur, Leo Marcil, Jackie Zhou

Ozark”

“The Toll”

Netflix

Supervising Sound Editors: Nick Forshager, Stephen Grubbs

Sound Effects Editor: Matt Temple

Foley Editors: Jeff Cranford, Daniel Raphael

Foley Artists: Tim Chilton, Jerry Trent, Jill Sanders, Ginger Geary

Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing – Special Venue

“Carne Y Arena”

Legendary Entertainment

Supervising Sound Editors: Randy Thom, MPSE, Martín Hernández, MPSE, Leff Lefferts

Technical Audio Designers: Bill Rudolph, Kevin Bolen, Damian Kastbauer

Sound Effects Editor: Leff Lefferts

Dialogue Editor: Gwendolyn Yates Whittle, MPSE

Audio Artists: Doc Kane, Geoff Vaughan, Dusty Jermier

Audio Director: Steve Morris

ADR Editor: Brian Chumney

Foley Editors: Luke Dunn Gielmuda, Malcolm Fife

Foley Artists: Sean England, Shelley Roden, MPSE, John Roesch, MPSE, Geoff Vaughan

The complete list of winners can be found on the MPSE website.

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