‘A Dog’s Journey’ Begins With Dennis Quaid & Josh Gad; Betty Gilpin Joins Sequel

Amblin Partners has begun principal photography on A Dog’s Purpose sequel, A Dog’s Journey with Dennis Quaid and Josh Gad returning to reprise their roles from the original. Co-financed and co-produced by Walden Media and Alibaba Pictures, A Dog’s Jour…

Amblin Partners has begun principal photography on A Dog's Purpose sequel, A Dog's Journey with Dennis Quaid and Josh Gad returning to reprise their roles from the original. Co-financed and co-produced by Walden Media and Alibaba Pictures, A Dog's Journey is set for domestic release via Universal on May 17, 2019. The studio will also handle select offshore markets while Alibaba will provide marketing support in China as it did on the last film which did $196M worldwide…

‘GLOW’ Renewed for Season 3 by Netflix (Video)

Ding, ding, ding: Netflix has renewed pro-wrestling comedy “GLOW” for a 10-episode third season.

Inspired by the short-lived but beloved show from the ’80s, “GLOW” tells the fictional story of Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), an out-of-work, struggling actress in 1980s Los Angeles who finds one last chance for stardom when she’s thrust into the glitter and spandex world of women’s wrestling. In addition to working with 12 Hollywood misfits, Ruth also has to compete with Debbie Eagan (Betty Gilpin) a former soap actress who left the business to have a baby, only to be sucked back into work when her picture-perfect life is not what it seems. And at the wheel is Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron), a washed-up, B-movie director who now must lead this group of women on the journey to wrestling stardom.

Yeah, they’re a rag-tag bunch.

Also Read: ‘GLOW’ Stars on the State of Female Wrestling, WWE’s First All-Women Pay-Per-View ‘Evolution’

Watch a teaser for Season 3 via the video above, which is pretty much just a supercut of every time a cast member said “three” over the first few seasons.

“GLOW” is created by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch. “Orange Is the New Black” creator Jenji Kohan, Tara Herrmann and Mark Burley are executive producers alongside Flahive and Mensch, who serve as showrunners.

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on How Wrestling Is Like Hollywood (Exclusive Video)

No, Alison Brie’s ‘GLOW’ Character Wasn’t Based on Nikolai Volkoff

‘Glow’: 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix Comedy (Photos)

Ding, ding, ding: Netflix has renewed pro-wrestling comedy “GLOW” for a 10-episode third season.

Inspired by the short-lived but beloved show from the ’80s, “GLOW” tells the fictional story of Ruth Wilder (Alison Brie), an out-of-work, struggling actress in 1980s Los Angeles who finds one last chance for stardom when she’s thrust into the glitter and spandex world of women’s wrestling. In addition to working with 12 Hollywood misfits, Ruth also has to compete with Debbie Eagan (Betty Gilpin) a former soap actress who left the business to have a baby, only to be sucked back into work when her picture-perfect life is not what it seems. And at the wheel is Sam Sylvia (Marc Maron), a washed-up, B-movie director who now must lead this group of women on the journey to wrestling stardom.

Yeah, they’re a rag-tag bunch.

Watch a teaser for Season 3 via the video above, which is pretty much just a supercut of every time a cast member said “three” over the first few seasons.

“GLOW” is created by Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch. “Orange Is the New Black” creator Jenji Kohan, Tara Herrmann and Mark Burley are executive producers alongside Flahive and Mensch, who serve as showrunners.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin on How Wrestling Is Like Hollywood (Exclusive Video)

No, Alison Brie's 'GLOW' Character Wasn't Based on Nikolai Volkoff

'Glow': 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix Comedy (Photos)

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on How Wrestling Is Like Hollywood (Exclusive Video)

A version of this story about Betty Gilpin first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“I think ladies are used to being asked to do 5 percent of what they can do, so I just feel so insanely lucky to have a very rare job that demands all of what I can do,” said Betty Gilpin, one of the stars of Netflix’s female-centric and fabulously executed ’80s wrestling drama “GLOW.”

And she does a lot, playing Debbie Eagen, a former soap actress turned red-blooded American wrestler Liberty Belle, who’s also raising a kid after finding out her best friend had an affair with her husband.

Also Read: ‘Glow’: 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix Comedy (Photos)

“I relate to what the ladies of ‘GLOW’ go through in terms of [Hollywood] wanting to put you into a certain box,” said Gilpin, the only actor to be included among the series’ 10 nominations. “And it made me realize how many times I stood in my own way creatively.

“I’ve wasted a lot of time auditioning for the job I already had and wasting the first three takes apologizing for being there, proving that I could do it the way I knew they wanted me to, which was choiceless and small,” she said. But with the acclaimed Netflix series, she said, “I start with my weirdest idea and get weirder from there. Liberty Belle is a result of that weirdness.”

Fans can see a big change in Debbie throughout Season 1 — one that offers a lesson to other women, the actress said.

Also Read: No, Alison Brie’s ‘GLOW’ Character Wasn’t Based on Nikolai Volkoff

“Debbie’s life imploded before her eyes and she realized, ‘Oh, there were things about my life that I didn’t like and things about the way I was treating myself that I didn’t like.’ So maybe she uses this life explosion to be like, ‘OK, when the smoke clears, I’m going to build a different, stronger person who likes themselves more and is a little braver,’” the actress said.

“Wrestling sort of lends itself to that in a lot of ways,” she said. “You have to be brave. It’s very chest-pounding, and it’s sort of the opposite of male-gaze posing with your body as an actress. It’s grunting and cave-dancing, which is fun.”

And Gilpin thinks her “GLOW” role will stay with her long after the show is done.

“I’m sure when I’m playing a, like, quiet minimalist detective on ‘Alaska Cop Pig in the City,’” she said, with a laugh, “I’ll be like, ‘Man, I really wish I was slamming my bones into the ground.’”

Watch the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

No, Alison Brie’s ‘GLOW’ Character Wasn’t Based on Nikolai Volkoff

‘GLOW’ Season 2 Trailer: Newfound Fame Brings Out the Weirdos, Coke and Cancellation (Video)

Watch ‘GLOW’ Ladies Take ‘Flashdance’-‘Maniac’ Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

A version of this story about Betty Gilpin first appeared in the Down to the Wire issue of TheWrap’s Emmy magazine.

“I think ladies are used to being asked to do 5 percent of what they can do, so I just feel so insanely lucky to have a very rare job that demands all of what I can do,” said Betty Gilpin, one of the stars of Netflix’s female-centric and fabulously executed ’80s wrestling drama “GLOW.”

And she does a lot, playing Debbie Eagen, a former soap actress turned red-blooded American wrestler Liberty Belle, who’s also raising a kid after finding out her best friend had an affair with her husband.

“I relate to what the ladies of ‘GLOW’ go through in terms of [Hollywood] wanting to put you into a certain box,” said Gilpin, the only actor to be included among the series’ 10 nominations. “And it made me realize how many times I stood in my own way creatively.

“I’ve wasted a lot of time auditioning for the job I already had and wasting the first three takes apologizing for being there, proving that I could do it the way I knew they wanted me to, which was choiceless and small,” she said. But with the acclaimed Netflix series, she said, “I start with my weirdest idea and get weirder from there. Liberty Belle is a result of that weirdness.”

Fans can see a big change in Debbie throughout Season 1 — one that offers a lesson to other women, the actress said.

“Debbie’s life imploded before her eyes and she realized, ‘Oh, there were things about my life that I didn’t like and things about the way I was treating myself that I didn’t like.’ So maybe she uses this life explosion to be like, ‘OK, when the smoke clears, I’m going to build a different, stronger person who likes themselves more and is a little braver,'” the actress said.

“Wrestling sort of lends itself to that in a lot of ways,” she said. “You have to be brave. It’s very chest-pounding, and it’s sort of the opposite of male-gaze posing with your body as an actress. It’s grunting and cave-dancing, which is fun.”

And Gilpin thinks her “GLOW” role will stay with her long after the show is done.

“I’m sure when I’m playing a, like, quiet minimalist detective on ‘Alaska Cop Pig in the City,'” she said, with a laugh, “I’ll be like, ‘Man, I really wish I was slamming my bones into the ground.'”

Watch the video below.

Related stories from TheWrap:

No, Alison Brie's 'GLOW' Character Wasn't Based on Nikolai Volkoff

'GLOW' Season 2 Trailer: Newfound Fame Brings Out the Weirdos, Coke and Cancellation (Video)

Watch 'GLOW' Ladies Take 'Flashdance'-'Maniac' Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

Emmy Nominations: Here Are All 36 First Time Performer Nominees

Welcome to the club, new Emmy nominees! Among the first time performer nominees this year are Kenan Thompson, Jessica Biel, John Legend, James Corden, Darren Criss, Penelope Cruz, and Tiffany Haddish.
There’s also Sara Bareilles, Aidy Bryant, Nik…

Welcome to the club, new Emmy nominees! Among the first time performer nominees this year are Kenan Thompson, Jessica Biel, John Legend, James Corden, Darren Criss, Penelope Cruz, and Tiffany Haddish.

There’s also Sara Bareilles, Aidy Bryant, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Betty Gilpin and Ricky Martin, to single out a few more.

But let’s not play favorites any longer — the full first-timers list is below.

Megan Amram, “An Emmy for Megan”
Sara Bareilles, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
Zazie Beetz, “Atlanta”
Jessica Biel, “The Sinner”
Cameron Britton, “Mindhunter”
Aidy Bryant, “SNL”
James Corden, “James Corden’s Next James Corden”
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, “Game of Thrones”
Darren Criss, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Penelope Cruz, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Alexis Denisof, “I Love Bekka & Lucy”
Brandon Victor Dixon, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
Joseph Fiennes, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Lee Garlington, “Broken”
Betty Gilpin, “GLOW”
Matthew Goode, “The Crown”
Naomi Grossman, “Ctrl Alt Delete”
Tiffany Haddish, “SNL”
Melvin Jackson Jr., “This Eddie Murphy Role Is Mine, Not Yours”
Kelly Jenrette, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Diarra Kilpatrick, “American Koko”
Vanessa Kirby, “The Crown”
John Legend, “Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert”
Ricky Martin, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”
Kelli O’Hara, “The Accidental Wolf”
Adina Porter, “AHS: Cult”
Destorm Power, “Caught The Series”
Issa Rae, “Insecure”
Jimmi Simpson, “Westworld”
Matt Smith, “The Crown”
Yvonne Strahovski, “The Handmaid’s Tale”
Michael Stuhlbarg, “The Looming Tower”
Miles Tagtmeyer, “Broken”
Kenan Thompson, “SNL”
Katt Williams, “Atlanta”
Letitia Wright, “Black Museum” (“Black Mirror”)

And here is the complete list of Emmy nominees, whether Thursday marked their first time or 15th time being bestowed with the honor.

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'Game of Thrones' Just Became the Emmys' Most Nominated Primetime Series Ever

‘Glow’: 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix Comedy (Photos)

The cast of “GLOW” throw punches, kicks and each other around in the wrestling ring. But the colorful characters are also excellent at delivering the perfect one-liner sure to put anyone back in their place. Here’s a round up of our f…

The cast of “GLOW” throw punches, kicks and each other around in the wrestling ring. But the colorful characters are also excellent at delivering the perfect one-liner sure to put anyone back in their place. Here’s a round up of our favorite one-liners from Season 1. Season 2 premieres Friday, June 29 on Netflix.

“I can’t leave Randy with my mom all day. She’ll feed him Funyuns and Fresca and government conspiracies.” – Debbie (Betty Gilpin)

“Ruth… That is not a great name.” – Sam (Marc Maron)

“I am the Cezanne of bulls–t artists.” – Melrose (Jackie Tohn)

“I mean… You’re like Grace Kelly on steroids.” – Sam

“15 minutes, Confucius. And only because it’s rush hour.” – Debbie

“If you’re so into sisterhood maybe you shouldn’t have f—ed your friend’s husband.” – Sam

“Right. Cause you only listen to women if you’re f—ing them.” – Justine (Britt Baron)

“What if Bill Cosby gets mad at us?” – Dawn (Rebekka Johnson)

“What are you doing?”

“My hair.”

“For who?”

“For me. Hello, self esteem.” – Melrose and Jenny (Ellen Wong)

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Netflix Names Julie Fontaine Head of Film Publicity

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‘GLOW’ Season 2 Trailer: Newfound Fame Brings Out the Weirdos, Coke and Cancellation (Video)

The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling are back in the Season 2 trailer for Netflix’s “GLOW,” when the stakes — and hair — are bigger.

Season 2 sees the female wrestlers in the show-within-a-show become local celebrities, which brings out the weirdo fans. That newfound fame might not last for long, however, as cancellation looms in favor of a men’s wrestling show. While it looks like the group might suffer due to Ruth’s (Allison Brie) refusal to sleep with a man in the biz, they aren’t going down without a fight. “I say we do whatever the hell we want to do,” says Sam (Marc Maron), when the show is threatened. “Set the weirdos free and see what happens.”

Watch the trailer above.

Also Read: Celebrity ‘Undercover Boss’: Yes, That’s Really WWE’s Stephanie McMahon (Exclusive Video)

“GLOW” stars Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin , Marc Maron, Sydelle Noel, Britney Young, Britt Baron, Kate Nash, Jackie Tohn, Gayle Rankin and Kia Stevens.

Inspired by the short-lived but beloved show from the ’80s, “GLOW” tells the fictional story of Ruth Wilder (Brie), an out-of-work, struggling actress in 1980s Los Angeles who finds one last chance for stardom when she’s thrust into the glitter and spandex world of women’s wrestling, per Netflix’s official description. In addition to working with 12 Hollywood misfits, Ruth also has to compete with Debbie Eagan (Gilpin) a former soap actress who left the business to have a baby, only to be sucked back into work when her picture perfect life is not what it seems.

And at the wheel is Sam Sylvia (Maron), a washed-up, B-movie director who now must lead this group of women on the journey to wrestling stardom.

Also Read: Betty Gilpin on How ‘GLOW’ Breaks Mold With Female Stories Beyond Just ‘Brunch and Betrayal’ (Video)

Season 2 of “GLOW” premieres June 29 on Netflix.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch ‘GLOW’ Ladies Take ‘Flashdance’-‘Maniac’ Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

The Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling are back in the Season 2 trailer for Netflix’s “GLOW,” when the stakes — and hair — are bigger.

Season 2 sees the female wrestlers in the show-within-a-show become local celebrities, which brings out the weirdo fans. That newfound fame might not last for long, however, as cancellation looms in favor of a men’s wrestling show. While it looks like the group might suffer due to Ruth’s (Allison Brie) refusal to sleep with a man in the biz, they aren’t going down without a fight. “I say we do whatever the hell we want to do,” says Sam (Marc Maron), when the show is threatened. “Set the weirdos free and see what happens.”

Watch the trailer above.

“GLOW” stars Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin , Marc Maron, Sydelle Noel, Britney Young, Britt Baron, Kate Nash, Jackie Tohn, Gayle Rankin and Kia Stevens.

Inspired by the short-lived but beloved show from the ’80s, “GLOW” tells the fictional story of Ruth Wilder (Brie), an out-of-work, struggling actress in 1980s Los Angeles who finds one last chance for stardom when she’s thrust into the glitter and spandex world of women’s wrestling, per Netflix’s official description. In addition to working with 12 Hollywood misfits, Ruth also has to compete with Debbie Eagan (Gilpin) a former soap actress who left the business to have a baby, only to be sucked back into work when her picture perfect life is not what it seems.

And at the wheel is Sam Sylvia (Maron), a washed-up, B-movie director who now must lead this group of women on the journey to wrestling stardom.

Season 2 of “GLOW” premieres June 29 on Netflix.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch 'GLOW' Ladies Take 'Flashdance'-'Maniac' Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin on Her 'Stripped Down' First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Betty Gilpin on How ‘GLOW’ Breaks Mold With Female Stories Beyond Just ‘Brunch and Betrayal’ (Video)

A version of this story about Betty Gilpin and “Glow” Season 2 appeared in The Race Begins issue of TheWrap Emmy magazine.

Betty Gilpin is proud of how her hit Netflix show “GLOW” is helping to blow up sterotypes about women on TV by presenting professional female wrestlers in 1980s Los Angeles in all their body-slamming glory.

“So much of what is exciting about TV and film right now is that we’re kind of exploding this myth that female characters kind of go a foot deep, and that female friendships are about brunch and betrayal,” the actress told TheWrap, noting that her Netflix show is just the tip of the iceberg.

The “American Gods” alum said that many TV series right now are “going deeper, and realizing that in every one woman’s brain is the cast of ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ and the cast of ‘GLOW.’”

Also Read: Here’s Everything Coming to and Leaving Netflix in June

“GLOW,” specifically, takes a deeper dive in Season 2 into how female friendships are portrayed on screen.

Gilpin plays housewife-turned-wrestler Debbie “Liberty Belle” Eagan, who had been the best friend of Alison Brie’s Ruth Wilder until Ruth slept with Debbie’s husband.

“I think Ruth and Debbie’s friendship goes so gut-and-soul deep that it’s not easily cast away,” she said. “If it were a different friendship, they would be able to be like, ‘OK, I’m never speaking to you again.’ But because they are each others’ soul mates sort of, it’s not that easy.”

Gilpin added that although you might recognize some of the storylines in Season 2 as particularly topical, the whole season was written before the birth of Time’s Up and before the Harvey Weinstein scandal inspired the #MeToo movement.

Also Read: ‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

“You’ll see there are themes throughout Season 2 where it looks like it’s lifted straight from the headlines,” she said.

“But what I think so much of what us ladies have been feeling is, you know, when people are shocked by things that have existed for decades and decades. While it feels very current, it’s all written before this happened — but of course it’s been happening for centuries of the patriarchy.”

Read more of TheWrap Emmy magazine’s The Race Begins issue here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch ‘GLOW’ Ladies Take ‘Flashdance’-‘Maniac’ Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Netflix Glows With Blowout Q3 Earnings, Adds 5.3 Million Subscribers

A version of this story about Betty Gilpin and “Glow” Season 2 appeared in The Race Begins issue of TheWrap Emmy magazine.

Betty Gilpin is proud of how her hit Netflix show “GLOW” is helping to blow up sterotypes about women on TV by presenting professional female wrestlers in 1980s Los Angeles in all their body-slamming glory.

“So much of what is exciting about TV and film right now is that we’re kind of exploding this myth that female characters kind of go a foot deep, and that female friendships are about brunch and betrayal,” the actress told TheWrap, noting that her Netflix show is just the tip of the iceberg.

The “American Gods” alum said that many TV series right now are “going deeper, and realizing that in every one woman’s brain is the cast of ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ and the cast of ‘GLOW.'”

“GLOW,” specifically, takes a deeper dive in Season 2 into how female friendships are portrayed on screen.

Gilpin plays housewife-turned-wrestler Debbie “Liberty Belle” Eagan, who had been the best friend of Alison Brie’s Ruth Wilder until Ruth slept with Debbie’s husband.

“I think Ruth and Debbie’s friendship goes so gut-and-soul deep that it’s not easily cast away,” she said. “If it were a different friendship, they would be able to be like, ‘OK, I’m never speaking to you again.’ But because they are each others’ soul mates sort of, it’s not that easy.”

Gilpin added that although you might recognize some of the storylines in Season 2 as particularly topical, the whole season was written before the birth of Time’s Up and before the Harvey Weinstein scandal inspired the #MeToo movement.

“You’ll see there are themes throughout Season 2 where it looks like it’s lifted straight from the headlines,” she said.

“But what I think so much of what us ladies have been feeling is, you know, when people are shocked by things that have existed for decades and decades. While it feels very current, it’s all written before this happened — but of course it’s been happening for centuries of the patriarchy.”

Read more of TheWrap Emmy magazine’s The Race Begins issue here.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Watch 'GLOW' Ladies Take 'Flashdance'-'Maniac' Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin StudioWrap Portraits (Exclusive Photos)

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin on Her 'Stripped Down' First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Netflix Glows With Blowout Q3 Earnings, Adds 5.3 Million Subscribers

2018 Emmy Contender Portraits, From Krysten Ritter to Maggie Gyllenhaal (Photos)

TheWrap Emmy magazine: A dozen of this year’s Emmys contenders, from Laura Linney to Krysten Ritter to Maggie Gyllenhaal, pose for TheWrap.
Krysten Ritter, “Jessica Jones”
Photographed by Elisabeth Caren for TheWrap
(Hair: Pamela Neal…

TheWrap Emmy magazine: A dozen of this year’s Emmys contenders, from Laura Linney to Krysten Ritter to Maggie Gyllenhaal, pose for TheWrap.

Krysten Ritter, “Jessica Jones”

Photographed by Elisabeth Caren for TheWrap

(Hair: Pamela Neal for Exclusive Artists using Dyson Supersonic Hair Dryer)

Laura Linney, “Ozark”

Photographed by Megan Mack for TheWrap

Maggie Gyllenhaal, “The Deuce”

Photographed by Samantha Annis for TheWrap

Christine Baranski, “The Good Fight”

Photographed by Megan Mack for TheWrap

 

 

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‘Grudge’: Jacki Weaver, Betty Gilpin, William Sadler & Frankie Faison Join Sony’s Reimagining

EXCLUSIVE: Sony is firming up the cast for its remake of The Grudge with the addition of two-time Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver, Betty Gilpin, star of the Netflix series GLOW, William Sadler, and Frankie Faison. The group joins previously announced cast A…

EXCLUSIVE: Sony is firming up the cast for its remake of The Grudge with the addition of two-time Oscar nominee Jacki Weaver, Betty Gilpin, star of the Netflix series GLOW, William Sadler, and Frankie Faison. The group joins previously announced cast Andrea Riseborough, Demian Bichir, John Cho and Lin Shaye as filming is scheduled to start in May. Nicolas Pesce is attached to helm the piece, a reimagining to 2004 version (based on the 2002 Japanese original Ju-on) that…

Teasing ‘GLOW’ Season 2, Betty Gilpin Unleashes Her Inner Gravitas Clown — Tribeca Studio

With a June 29 Season 2 release date announced for Netflix’s GLOW just days ago out of Rome—where star Alison Brie was on hand for the See What’s Next event—actress Betty Gilpin was on hand in Tribeca yesterday to hype the coming seas…

With a June 29 Season 2 release date announced for Netflix’s GLOW just days ago out of Rome—where star Alison Brie was on hand for the See What's Next event—actress Betty Gilpin was on hand in Tribeca yesterday to hype the coming season of her Netflix series, teasing a bit of what’s to come. “Debbie dies in the first episode of Season 2—I'm just kidding,” the actress said. “We pick up a couple weeks after Season 1 ended, and they've been picked up to series, and now it's…

Watch ‘GLOW’ Ladies Take ‘Flashdance’-‘Maniac’ Sequence to the Next Level (Video)

The girls are back in town.

Season 2 of Netflix’s ladies wrestling comedy “GLOW” returns on June 29, the streaming service announced Wednesday.

In the second season’s first promo video, Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin and the other Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling “Flashdance” as they prepare for a performance in the locker room by lip-syncing to Michael Sembello’s 1980s hit “Maniac.”

Also Read: ‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Here’s the famed “Flashdance” sequence:



Season 2 will follow the ladies as they become local celebrities and are forced to deal with the ins and outs of fame. Ruth (Brie) and Debbie (Gilpin) must confront issues in their friendship as they make a season of TV together, and Sam (Marc Maron) now has a teenage daughter living with him as he needs to produce 20 episodes. As the logline says: “The wrestling is harder, the stakes are higher, and the hair is even bigger.”

In the promo video, Maron barges into the locker room in typical grumpy fashion.

“Hey, what’s going on here?” he asks. “We got a show to do. What is this? Come on, let’s go.”

Also Read: How Betty Gilpin Found Her Power on ‘GLOW’ Set: ‘I Took Up Space’

The ladies shrug it off and finish out the song in epic ’80s style.

“GLOW” Season 1 received plenty of critical success. The half-hour comedy was nominated for four Screen Actors Guild Awards, and Alison Brie was nominated for a Golden Globe for her leading role.

Watch the full promo video above.

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‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

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‘America’s Got Talent’ Ukrainian Dance Crew Will Make You Feel the Glow (Video)

‘GLOW’ Gets Second Season on Netflix

The girls are back in town.

Season 2 of Netflix’s ladies wrestling comedy “GLOW” returns on June 29, the streaming service announced Wednesday.

In the second season’s first promo video, Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin and the other Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling “Flashdance” as they prepare for a performance in the locker room by lip-syncing to Michael Sembello’s 1980s hit “Maniac.”

Here’s the famed “Flashdance” sequence:

Season 2 will follow the ladies as they become local celebrities and are forced to deal with the ins and outs of fame. Ruth (Brie) and Debbie (Gilpin) must confront issues in their friendship as they make a season of TV together, and Sam (Marc Maron) now has a teenage daughter living with him as he needs to produce 20 episodes. As the logline says: “The wrestling is harder, the stakes are higher, and the hair is even bigger.”

In the promo video, Maron barges into the locker room in typical grumpy fashion.

“Hey, what’s going on here?” he asks. “We got a show to do. What is this? Come on, let’s go.”

The ladies shrug it off and finish out the song in epic ’80s style.

“GLOW” Season 1 received plenty of critical success. The half-hour comedy was nominated for four Screen Actors Guild Awards, and Alison Brie was nominated for a Golden Globe for her leading role.

Watch the full promo video above.

Related stories from TheWrap:

'GLOW' Star Betty Gilpin on Her 'Stripped Down' First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Netflix Glows With Blowout Q3 Earnings, Adds 5.3 Million Subscribers

'America's Got Talent' Ukrainian Dance Crew Will Make You Feel the Glow (Video)

'GLOW' Gets Second Season on Netflix

‘GLOW’ Star Betty Gilpin on Her ‘Stripped Down’ First Encounter With Alison Brie, Season 2 (Video)

Getting in shape to play a professional wrestler in the ’80s Netflix series “GLOW” required a ton of practice, but star Betty Gilpin said that came with the added benefit of bringing the cast closer together.

“Wrestling really fostered a real primal connection between us. We wrestled together before we acted together,” Gilpin said of her relationship to co-star Alison Brie in an interview with TheWrap. “We were in our pajamas learning how to wrestle.”

“It couldn’t have been more stripped down and vulnerable, and it was the best foundation to lay for a creative relationship together,” she said. Now, the two actresses are “very much in love,” she joked, adding that she and Brie recently spent Thanksgiving weekend together.

Also Read: ‘GLOW’ Gets Second Season on Netflix

That’s a far cry from the relationship their characters share on-screen — a soured friendship turned successful professional collaboration.

Though Gilpin says the characters’ “impressive” ability to compartmentalize won’t last long come Season 2. Sooner or later, their in-the-ring partnership will have to reckon with the unresolved feelings of anger and betrayal.

“I think it’s sort of coming to bite them in the ass this season. When you don’t have open dialogue about extreme pain, repression turns into — in Debbie’s case, rage,” she said. “I think we’re going to see Debbie’s rage.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

‘GLOW’ Gets Second Season on Netflix

How Betty Gilpin Found Her Power on ‘GLOW’ Set: ‘I Took Up Space’

Betty Gilpin Says Shows Like ‘GLOW’ Are a ‘Step In The Right Direction’ For Women On Screen

Getting in shape to play a professional wrestler in the ’80s Netflix series “GLOW” required a ton of practice, but star Betty Gilpin said that came with the added benefit of bringing the cast closer together.

“Wrestling really fostered a real primal connection between us. We wrestled together before we acted together,” Gilpin said of her relationship to co-star Alison Brie in an interview with TheWrap. “We were in our pajamas learning how to wrestle.”

“It couldn’t have been more stripped down and vulnerable, and it was the best foundation to lay for a creative relationship together,” she said. Now, the two actresses are “very much in love,” she joked, adding that she and Brie recently spent Thanksgiving weekend together.

That’s a far cry from the relationship their characters share on-screen — a soured friendship turned successful professional collaboration.

Though Gilpin says the characters’ “impressive” ability to compartmentalize won’t last long come Season 2. Sooner or later, their in-the-ring partnership will have to reckon with the unresolved feelings of anger and betrayal.

“I think it’s sort of coming to bite them in the ass this season. When you don’t have open dialogue about extreme pain, repression turns into — in Debbie’s case, rage,” she said. “I think we’re going to see Debbie’s rage.”

Related stories from TheWrap:

'GLOW' Gets Second Season on Netflix

How Betty Gilpin Found Her Power on 'GLOW' Set: 'I Took Up Space'

Betty Gilpin Says Shows Like 'GLOW' Are a 'Step In The Right Direction' For Women On Screen

How Betty Gilpin Found Her Power on ‘GLOW’ Set: ‘I Took Up Space’

Betty Gilpin, known for “American Gods” and “Nurse Jackie,” has written an essay for Glamour magazine about growing up with no self-esteem and finding body confidence on the set of her latest project, Netflix’s “GLOW,” which stands for the “Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling.”

Also Read: Betty Gilpin Says Shows Like ‘GLOW’ Are a ‘Step In The Right Direction’ For Women On Screen

In the essay, Gilpin describes what it was like going through puberty seemingly over night: “Physically, I went from Justin Bieber to Jessica Rabbit. I gained 30 pounds of thigh, booty, and certified American jugs,” she wrote.

“And I quickly learned big boobs have the effect of announcing your presence in a room as if you’re cradling Gilbert Godfrey singing the opening to the ‘Circle of Life.’ Pretty hard to disappear into the wall, which is what I’d taught myself to do before my tits grew to the size of pudding-filled manatee pups,” Gilpin said.

Before working on “GLOW,” in which the ensemble cast of 14 women really learned how to wrestle before filming, the actress worked hard to keep her body from being a focal point. “Having to use this gross ghost in a functional way was not something I had ever thought about,” she wrote.

Also Read: Alison Brie on the ‘GLOW’ Audition Joke That Helped Her Land the Role

Gilpin said she found power in the female-driven project. “Creators Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch commanded our set with a greater authority than any of the bro-gargoyles of yore, but with open arms, back rubs, and eye contact,” she wrote.

“This created the constant sense of: You are loved and celebrated-and now that you’re comfortable, please give us your goddamn guts and soul so we can make the best thing possible. Also, have this Philly cheese steak for God’s sake.”

Near the end of filming, Gilpin realized that she no longer felt uncomfortable in her own skin, despite the skimpy wrestling costumes. “I hadn’t winced at the mirror in months. I stood taller. I took up space.”

“GLOW” is now streaming on Netflix.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Betty Gilpin Says Shows Like ‘GLOW’ Are a ‘Step In The Right Direction’ For Women On Screen

15 Totally Tubular ’80s Moments in Netflix’s ‘GLOW’ (Photos)

‘Glow’: 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix’s Women Wrestlers Series (Photos)

Marc Maron on What It Was Like to Play a Sexist in ‘GLOW’: ‘It Felt Pretty Natural’

Betty Gilpin, known for “American Gods” and “Nurse Jackie,” has written an essay for Glamour magazine about growing up with no self-esteem and finding body confidence on the set of her latest project, Netflix’s “GLOW,” which stands for the “Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling.”

In the essay, Gilpin describes what it was like going through puberty seemingly over night: “Physically, I went from Justin Bieber to Jessica Rabbit. I gained 30 pounds of thigh, booty, and certified American jugs,” she wrote.

“And I quickly learned big boobs have the effect of announcing your presence in a room as if you’re cradling Gilbert Godfrey singing the opening to the ‘Circle of Life.’ Pretty hard to disappear into the wall, which is what I’d taught myself to do before my tits grew to the size of pudding-filled manatee pups,” Gilpin said.

Before working on “GLOW,” in which the ensemble cast of 14 women really learned how to wrestle before filming, the actress worked hard to keep her body from being a focal point. “Having to use this gross ghost in a functional way was not something I had ever thought about,” she wrote.

Gilpin said she found power in the female-driven project. “Creators Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch commanded our set with a greater authority than any of the bro-gargoyles of yore, but with open arms, back rubs, and eye contact,” she wrote.

“This created the constant sense of: You are loved and celebrated-and now that you’re comfortable, please give us your goddamn guts and soul so we can make the best thing possible. Also, have this Philly cheese steak for God’s sake.”

Near the end of filming, Gilpin realized that she no longer felt uncomfortable in her own skin, despite the skimpy wrestling costumes. “I hadn’t winced at the mirror in months. I stood taller. I took up space.”

“GLOW” is now streaming on Netflix.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Betty Gilpin Says Shows Like 'GLOW' Are a 'Step In The Right Direction' For Women On Screen

15 Totally Tubular '80s Moments in Netflix's 'GLOW' (Photos)

'Glow': 10 Most Relatable One-Liners in Netflix's Women Wrestlers Series (Photos)

Marc Maron on What It Was Like to Play a Sexist in 'GLOW': 'It Felt Pretty Natural'

‘GLOW’ Breakout Betty Gilpin Still Doesn’t Feel Like She’s Made It, and That’s a Hollywood Problem

Between “American Gods” and “GLOW,” Betty Gilpin is an undeniable breakout of 2017 TV — but she doesn’t feel that way.

The term breakout is a tad misleading.

While implying that someone has broken free from the pack — a standout among standouts; that they’ve “made it” — there’s no guarantee of permanence. Many so-called breakouts have an expiration date on their spotlight, and plenty of these actors who’ve proven themselves in one way or another still fade away over time. Then they’re asked to do it all over again, sometimes for their entire career.

READ MORE: ‘GLOW’ Producers Didn’t Want to Cast Alison Brie — Here’s How She Fought to Change Their Minds

Betty Gilpin, the electrifying spark of both “American Gods” and “GLOW” in their debut seasons, is absolutely a summer breakout. She might even be a 2017 breakout, if buzz holds and fans continue to discover both shows (now available in full on Starz and Netflix, respectively). Her talent is undeniable and is being vouched for by big names all over the internet.

But she’s not feeling it yet.

“Absolutely not, no,” Gilpin said during a recent interview, when asked if she felt like she’d broken through.”I don’t!”

Considering the ever-shortening public attention span, the highly competitive nature of the business, and the patriarchal nature of Hollywood, can you blame her? Gilpin’s description of auditioning for certain roles because that’s all that’s out there is the kind of thing we’ve heard before, but keep expecting to go away as minority- and women-driven projects prove profitable.

GLOW Season 1 Alison Brie Betty Gilpin

“I’ve been in this sort of strange sweet spot of making my living as an actor but not doing crazy big shows like this,” Gilpin said. “I’ve died on a lot of ‘Law & Orders,’ I’ve worked on ‘Nurse Jackie,’ but I’ve auditioned for a lot of what’s out there, which is like squinty cops in tight outfits who aren’t taking any shit in the first scene and in the second scene they’re naked and blowing the captain of the police force.”

“And I tried really hard to get those parts because I want my future children to go to school,” she said. “I tried really hard. Last year, I tested for a pilot called ‘Y’all in the Family,’ and I tried really hard to get it and just didn’t get it.”

READ MORE: ‘GLOW’ Review: The Series of the Summer is Netflix’s ’80s Wrestling Comedy

Working actors don’t have the option to pick and choose their parts, and Gilpin had been living on that level long enough for it to affect how she views the profession. Despite working in the theater to “feed her passion” for acting, Gilpin saw the aforementioned auditions as a necessity.

“To get health insurance, you give up your dignity — that’s what I thought being an actor was,” Gilpin said. “So when ‘GLOW’ came along, I was shaking reading it because I hadn’t really allowed myself to dream of a show like this.”

GLOW Season 1 Betty Gilpin

What’s more surprising than the stark reminder of what working actors go through on a day-to-day basis is that “GLOW” was a project Gilpin landed after she’d already booked “American Gods.” So after nabbing a juicy part on Bryan Fuller’s buzzy Starz series, Gilpin was still eager to travel to Los Angeles and audition with Alison Brie five days before her wedding.

“So I auditioned for ‘American Gods’  way before ‘GLOW,'” Gilpin said. “I auditioned for the main part of Laura [Moon]. Emily Browning is so amazing in that part [playing] this quiet, minimalist quality — this quiet power that’s like a laser — and I come in.. not like a quiet laser. I’m like Elaine Stritch everywhere. So they were like, ‘You could be the drunk friend.'”

And what an amazing drunk friend she makes. As Audrey, Gilpin all but steals Laura’s solo episode from Browning, turning a two-dimensional grieving widow and scorned wife into a woman with biting wit and incredible empathy. She does something similar in “GLOW,” as the two characters she fought so hard to play prove to have more in common than we’ll spoil here.

“Reading this and thinking I could be on something where I could use the full expression of myself as an actor, in a feminist and powerful way, especially in this crazy time, was an opportunity that I almost didn’t allow myself to fully take in,” Gilpin said.

It’s safe to say the world is glad she did. Now Hollywood needs to make sure Ms. Gilpin’s breakout never breaks down.

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Every ‘American Gods’ Character, Ranked by How Weirdly Intriguing They Are (Photos)

“American Gods” is full of characters who only show up for a brief time to do something delightfully weird and godlike. Here’s every single one, ranked by how intriguing, mysterious, flawed and strange they are. Spoilers beyond this point!

Robbie (Dane Cook)
Audrey’s husband and Shadow’s best friend got mixed up with Laura and, seemingly, fell in love with her. Unfortunately, he failed to realize that Laura’s been working through some stuff — like latent depression. Overall, though, he’s just a typical human dude, and one who can’t seem to avoid ruining his relationships.

Low Key Lyesmith (Jonathan Tucker)
Shadow’s bud from his days in prison has some good advice — like how you shouldn’t yell at airline officials. There’s no metaphor there, even though it seems like he might be building toward one. What we’ve seen of Low Key is pretty thin and doesn’t suggest a whole lot of death.

Technical Boy (Bruce Langley)
The impetuous kid new god that represents the Internet seems a lot like its worst parts. He employs a faceless mob and he seems to take offense to tiny slights and overreact. Oh, and after having his minions hang Shadow from a tree, he seems pretty racist in addition to violent. So yeah, a lot like a big chunk of the Internet, but not a lot of depth there.

Audrey (Betty Gilpin)
Laura and Shadow’s best friend gets introduced under the worst circumstances. But she quickly turns into one of the funniest characters in “American Gods,” especially after Laura’s return. Audrey surprises everyone — including maybe her self — when her justified bitterness combines with a reluctant willingness to help her former friend in her weird predicament.

Salim (Omid Abtahi)
Salim’s moment with the Jinn is almost a short story in the world of “American Gods,” one that goes through an arc viewers probably don’t expect. His struggles with finding his way in America, his time with a low-level deity, his literally magical sex scene and his new lease on life at its conclusion stand out in a show that’s usually about a fair amount of bad news for its characters.

Mad Sweeney (Pablo Schreiber)
Fighting, drinking, and flipping gold coins. Sweeney isn’t really anything but angry, especially at Shadow for some reason. His lack of luck is creating some suitably horrific scenarios, which are at least visually arresting. But we need to see Mad Sweeney doing more than just giving Shadow a hard time.

Mr. Ibis (Demore Barnes)
The best thing about Mr. Ibis so far is genuine zeal for helping preserve Laura’s undead body, “Death Becomes Her”-style. Hopefully he’ll have more zombies to treat in the future.

Zorya Polunochnaya (Erika Kaar)
One of the three sisters living with Czernobog, Zorya Polunochnaya hasn’t been around much in the series, but her dream moment with Shadow, and the whole “grab the moon out of the sky” thing, is definitely intriguing.

Mr. Jacquel (Chris Obi)
The god of the afterlife has had a couple of solid moments weighing the hearts of those moving on to the next life. His screen time has been a bit low so far, though, so while his careful ferrying of souls to the next life is compelling, he could definitely stand to have more to do.

Bilquis (Yetide Badaki)
A god that straight up absorbs her worshipers in the middle of sex is easily the creepiest thing “American Gods” has yet thrown us, and that includes a zombie wife who loses an arm and gets it stapled back on. What the deal is with Bilquis, though, remains to be seen.

Mr. Nancy (Orlando Jones)
We’ve only seen a bit of Mr. Nancy. But Orlando Jones absolutely crushed his harrowing speech inspiring a slave uprising. His impeccable style is pretty awesome, but we’re waiting for Mr. Nancy to really bear his spider fangs.

Czernobog (Peter Storemare)
The dark Slavic god with a big hammer and a taste for artfully (and mercifully) dealing death, Czernobog is both a spooky badass and a god whose own nature is in doubt. He doesn’t even know if he’s a bad guy or not — after all, he might kill cows and people, but he tries to do it in one shot. That internal conflict might not go any further, but he’s cool to have around in any case.

Media (Gillian Anderson)
Showing up in the guise of Lucille Ball on a set of department store TVs was very cool touch for the godly personification of television, but we haven’t seen Media actually do much yet. Still, she’s the most stylish of gods, and her Bowie look will probably be high in the running for coolest touch even by the end of the season.

The Jinn (Mousa Kraish)
Though the wish-granting might be a little roundabout in this case, the Jinn still manages to create a compelling look at the idea of adaptation and assimilation to the changing time and place of “American Gods.” The intensity of the connection between the Jinn and Salim makes their moment together one of the most compelling side stories the series has shown.

Zorya Vechernyaya (Cloris Leachman)
The Evening Star sister, Vechernyaya doesn’t even like Mr. Wednesday. It’s clear he isn’t interested in dealing with his BS, unlike just about everyone else. That alone sets her apart from most of the other characters, to say nothing of her unwillingness to abandon the rules of being a good host even for a guy she doesn’t want around.

Laura Moon (Emily Browning)
With her own dedicated episode, Laura became one of the most complicated characters on “American Gods.” It was easy to blame her for betraying Shadow, but there’s a whole lot more going on with her than was first apparent. Now back from the dead, she’s got even more weird issues to contend with.

Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle)
Shadow seems to be everyman walking through the world of gods with basically no idea what’s going on. Then again, there has to be a reason every god seems to be very interested in him. He’s apparently a formidable checkers opponent under the right circumstances, and he keeps managing to find solutions to ever-more-weirdo problems — suggesting there’s more to Shadow than even he knows.

Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane)
Ian McShane always brings a certain well-spoken straightforwardness to his characters. Mr. Wednesday has an air of McShane’s character Al Swearengen from “Deadwood,” but with a little more class and a lot more mystery. He’s pretty great at holding his cards close to the vest and we’re still waiting to see what his endgame is.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Gillian Anderson Channels David Bowie in ‘American Gods’ Clip (Video)

‘American Gods’ Showrunners on How Trump Presidency Reshaped Neil Gaiman Series

‘American Gods’: Why Neil Gaiman Was ‘Deeply Concerned’ First Time He Watched Starz Series

‘American Gods’: 14 Historical and Cultural Stories Behind the Old Gods (Photos)

‘American Gods’ Wows With Bold, Trippy Opening Credits (Video)

“American Gods” is full of characters who only show up for a brief time to do something delightfully weird and godlike. Here’s every single one, ranked by how intriguing, mysterious, flawed and strange they are. Spoilers beyond this point!

Robbie (Dane Cook)
Audrey’s husband and Shadow’s best friend got mixed up with Laura and, seemingly, fell in love with her. Unfortunately, he failed to realize that Laura’s been working through some stuff — like latent depression. Overall, though, he’s just a typical human dude, and one who can’t seem to avoid ruining his relationships.

Low Key Lyesmith (Jonathan Tucker)
Shadow’s bud from his days in prison has some good advice — like how you shouldn’t yell at airline officials. There’s no metaphor there, even though it seems like he might be building toward one. What we’ve seen of Low Key is pretty thin and doesn’t suggest a whole lot of death.

Technical Boy (Bruce Langley)
The impetuous kid new god that represents the Internet seems a lot like its worst parts. He employs a faceless mob and he seems to take offense to tiny slights and overreact. Oh, and after having his minions hang Shadow from a tree, he seems pretty racist in addition to violent. So yeah, a lot like a big chunk of the Internet, but not a lot of depth there.

Audrey (Betty Gilpin)
Laura and Shadow’s best friend gets introduced under the worst circumstances. But she quickly turns into one of the funniest characters in “American Gods,” especially after Laura’s return. Audrey surprises everyone — including maybe her self — when her justified bitterness combines with a reluctant willingness to help her former friend in her weird predicament.

Salim (Omid Abtahi)
Salim’s moment with the Jinn is almost a short story in the world of “American Gods,” one that goes through an arc viewers probably don’t expect. His struggles with finding his way in America, his time with a low-level deity, his literally magical sex scene and his new lease on life at its conclusion stand out in a show that’s usually about a fair amount of bad news for its characters.

Mad Sweeney (Pablo Schreiber)
Fighting, drinking, and flipping gold coins. Sweeney isn’t really anything but angry, especially at Shadow for some reason. His lack of luck is creating some suitably horrific scenarios, which are at least visually arresting. But we need to see Mad Sweeney doing more than just giving Shadow a hard time.

Mr. Ibis (Demore Barnes)
The best thing about Mr. Ibis so far is genuine zeal for helping preserve Laura’s undead body, “Death Becomes Her”-style. Hopefully he’ll have more zombies to treat in the future.

Zorya Polunochnaya (Erika Kaar)
One of the three sisters living with Czernobog, Zorya Polunochnaya hasn’t been around much in the series, but her dream moment with Shadow, and the whole “grab the moon out of the sky” thing, is definitely intriguing.

Mr. Jacquel (Chris Obi)
The god of the afterlife has had a couple of solid moments weighing the hearts of those moving on to the next life. His screen time has been a bit low so far, though, so while his careful ferrying of souls to the next life is compelling, he could definitely stand to have more to do.

Bilquis (Yetide Badaki)
A god that straight up absorbs her worshipers in the middle of sex is easily the creepiest thing “American Gods” has yet thrown us, and that includes a zombie wife who loses an arm and gets it stapled back on. What the deal is with Bilquis, though, remains to be seen.

Mr. Nancy (Orlando Jones)
We’ve only seen a bit of Mr. Nancy. But Orlando Jones absolutely crushed his harrowing speech inspiring a slave uprising. His impeccable style is pretty awesome, but we’re waiting for Mr. Nancy to really bear his spider fangs.

Czernobog (Peter Storemare)
The dark Slavic god with a big hammer and a taste for artfully (and mercifully) dealing death, Czernobog is both a spooky badass and a god whose own nature is in doubt. He doesn’t even know if he’s a bad guy or not — after all, he might kill cows and people, but he tries to do it in one shot. That internal conflict might not go any further, but he’s cool to have around in any case.

Media (Gillian Anderson)
Showing up in the guise of Lucille Ball on a set of department store TVs was very cool touch for the godly personification of television, but we haven’t seen Media actually do much yet. Still, she’s the most stylish of gods, and her Bowie look will probably be high in the running for coolest touch even by the end of the season.

The Jinn (Mousa Kraish)
Though the wish-granting might be a little roundabout in this case, the Jinn still manages to create a compelling look at the idea of adaptation and assimilation to the changing time and place of “American Gods.” The intensity of the connection between the Jinn and Salim makes their moment together one of the most compelling side stories the series has shown.

Zorya Vechernyaya (Cloris Leachman)
The Evening Star sister, Vechernyaya doesn’t even like Mr. Wednesday. It’s clear he isn’t interested in dealing with his BS, unlike just about everyone else. That alone sets her apart from most of the other characters, to say nothing of her unwillingness to abandon the rules of being a good host even for a guy she doesn’t want around.

Laura Moon (Emily Browning)
With her own dedicated episode, Laura became one of the most complicated characters on “American Gods.” It was easy to blame her for betraying Shadow, but there’s a whole lot more going on with her than was first apparent. Now back from the dead, she’s got even more weird issues to contend with.

Shadow Moon (Ricky Whittle)
Shadow seems to be everyman walking through the world of gods with basically no idea what’s going on. Then again, there has to be a reason every god seems to be very interested in him. He’s apparently a formidable checkers opponent under the right circumstances, and he keeps managing to find solutions to ever-more-weirdo problems — suggesting there’s more to Shadow than even he knows.

Mr. Wednesday (Ian McShane)
Ian McShane always brings a certain well-spoken straightforwardness to his characters. Mr. Wednesday has an air of McShane’s character Al Swearengen from “Deadwood,” but with a little more class and a lot more mystery. He’s pretty great at holding his cards close to the vest and we’re still waiting to see what his endgame is.

Related stories from TheWrap:

Gillian Anderson Channels David Bowie in 'American Gods' Clip (Video)

'American Gods' Showrunners on How Trump Presidency Reshaped Neil Gaiman Series

'American Gods': Why Neil Gaiman Was 'Deeply Concerned' First Time He Watched Starz Series

'American Gods': 14 Historical and Cultural Stories Behind the Old Gods (Photos)

'American Gods' Wows With Bold, Trippy Opening Credits (Video)